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What Age Group Is Most Affected By Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 2 Diabetes: What Is The Average Age Of Onset?

Type 2 Diabetes: What Is The Average Age Of Onset?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes. The variations between individual diagnoses are too great for there to be an exact age of onset for type 2 diabetes. There is evidence, however, that the likelihood of developing the condition increases drastically after the age of 45. Average age of onset for type 2 diabetes The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommend annual diabetes screening tests after the age of 45. But the age at which someone develops the condition depends on too many differing factors to accurately predict. A wide mix of individual health and lifestyle factors can influence the progression of the condition. Many people have diabetes for years before being diagnosed, causing a large variation between the age of onset and age of diagnosis. Meanwhile, some estimates claim that nearly one-third of those with diabetes do not know they have it, which further complicates estimates. And many national surveys and studies do not distinguish between rates of type 1 and 2 diabetes in adults. According to the CDC, from 1997 through to 2011, the average age at which a person was diagnosed with diabetes in the United States was largely the same, at around 54 years of age. While there might not be a set age for onset for type 2 diabetes, age greatly increases the chances of developing the condition. In 2014, an estimated 4.3 percent of Americans over 20 years of age had diabetes, while 13.4 percent of those aged 45-64, and 11.2 percent of those aged 65 or older, had the condition. A 2016 study found that the rates of type 2 diabetes were up to seven times higher in Chinese adults, aged 55-74, than they were in those aged 20-34 years. The ADA report that rates of diabetes remain high i Continue reading >>

Age Of People Affected By Type 2 Diabetes

Age Of People Affected By Type 2 Diabetes

Age of People Affected by Type 2 Diabetes Janet Renee is a clinical dietitian with a special interest in weight management, sports dietetics, medical nutrition therapy and diet trends. She earned her Master of Science in nutrition from the University of Chicago and has contributed to health and wellness magazines, including Prevention, Self, Shape and Cooking Light. A doctor explaining to a patient how to use a blood glucose meter.Photo Credit: BernardaSv/iStock/Getty Images Type 2 diabetes was once -- by definition -- an adult disease, but this is no longer the case. While the average age of onset is 46, according to 1999 to 2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey results, type 2 diabetes in young adults and even in teens is becoming more common. In addition, a significant portion of the population over the age of 65 has type 2 diabetes. Anyone considered high risk for developing diabetes, and every adult age 45 and older, should be screened regularly for this condition. Type 2 diabetes is becoming more common America's younger generation. A 2008 to 2009 multicenter study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health confirmed this trend, finding that during the study period, 5,089 people under the age of 20 were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. While this is significantly fewer compared to the 18,436 youth under 20 who were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in the same year, study data published in the May 2014 issue of "JAMA" show a 30.5 percent increase in the number of youth diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2009 compared to 2001. Researchers believe that in children, this increase can be largely attributed to the rise in childhood obesity. According to the CDC, one in six American children is considere Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine. Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable. Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus. Slow-healing sores o Continue reading >>

Characterization Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Burden By Age And Ethnic Groups Based On A Nationwide Survey - Sciencedirect

Characterization Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Burden By Age And Ethnic Groups Based On A Nationwide Survey - Sciencedirect

Volume 36, Issue 4 , 1 April 2014, Pages 494-506 Characterization of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Burden by Age and Ethnic Groups Based on a Nationwide Survey Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is the most common form of diabetes. Risk factors for its development include older age, obesity, family history of diabetes, history of gestational diabetes, impaired glucose metabolism, physical inactivity, and race/ethnicity. The purpose of this study was to characterize T2DM burden, from a patient perspective, with respect to age and race/ethnicity. Adults aged 18 years with T2DM from a large, Internet-based, nationwide survey were retrospectively analyzed. Demographic and clinical characteristics (glycemic control, body mass index [BMI], comorbidities, and diabetes-related complications), hypoglycemic episodes, and medication adherence were used to assess diabetes burden. Degree of burden was compared across age (1864, 6574, and 75 years) and racial/ethnic (white, African American, Hispanic, Asian, and American Indian) groups. An apparent association was found between glycemic control and medication adherence. Hispanics had the lowest percentage of participants with a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level <7.0% (24.4%) and the highest percentage of those not knowing their HbA1c levels (55.4%) but also had the poorest medication adherence among racial/ethnic groups. Conversely, American Indians and whites had the best glycemic control, HbA1c knowledge, and medication adherence. The 18- to 64-year age group had the poorest glycemic control (28.8%), the most with unknown HbA1c levels (46.3%), and the poorest medication adherence of the age groups. Mean BMIs were high (>30 mg/kg2) for all racial/ethnic groups other than the Asian group (28.9 mg/kg2). Approximately 71% of Asians were obese or o Continue reading >>

Age Of Onset For Type 2 Diabetes: Know Your Risk

Age Of Onset For Type 2 Diabetes: Know Your Risk

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 21 million people were diagnosed with diabetes in 2012. The CDC also notes that 90 to 95 percent of cases in adults involve type 2 diabetes. In the past, type 2 diabetes was most prevalent in older adults. But due to widespread poor lifestyle habits, it’s more common in younger people than ever before. Type 2 diabetes is often preventable. Learn what you can do to prevent or delay its onset, no matter your age. Middle-aged and older adults are still at the highest risk for developing type 2 diabetes. According to the CDC, there were a total of 1.7 million new total diabetes cases in 2012. In 2012, adults aged 45 to 64 were the most diagnosed age group for diabetes. New cases of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in people aged 20 years and older were distributed as follows: ages 20 to 44: 371,000 new cases ages 45 to 64: 892,000 new cases age 65 and older: 400,000 new cases People aged 45 to 64 were also developing diabetes at a faster rate, edging out adults aged 65 and older. Type 2 diabetes used to be only prevalent in adults. It was once called “adult-onset” diabetes. Now, because it is becoming more common in children, it’s simply called “type 2" diabetes. While type 1 diabetes, which is believed to be due to an autoimmune reaction, is more common in children and young adults, type 2 diabetes is rising in incidence, attributed in part to poor lifestyle habits. According to the American Diabetes Association, about 5,090 people under the age of 20 are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes every year. A 2012 study published in Diabetes Care considered the potential future number of diabetes cases in people under the age of 20. The study found that, at current rates, the number of people under the age o Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is much less common than type 2 diabetes and typically affects younger individuals. Type 1 diabetes usually begins before age 40, although there have been people diagnosed at an older age. In the United States, the peak age at diagnosis is around 14. Type 1 diabetes is associated with deficiency (or lack) of insulin. It is not known why, but the pancreatic islet cells quit producing insulin in the quantities needed to maintain a normal blood glucose level. Without sufficient insulin, the blood glucose rises to levels which can cause some of the common symptoms of hyperglycemia. These individuals seek medical help when these symptoms arise, but they often will experience weight loss developing over several days associated with the onset of their diabetes. The onset of these first symptoms may be fairly abrupt or more gradual. To learn more about type 1 diabetes basics, see our type 1 diabetes slideshow. It has been estimated that the yearly incidence of type 1 diabetes developing is 3.7 to 20 per 100,000. More than 700,000 Americans have this type of diabetes. This is about 10% of all Americans diagnosed with diabetes; the other 90% have type 2 diabetes. What You Need to Know about Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes Causes Type 1 diabetes usually develops due to an autoimmune disorder. This is when the body's immune system behaves inappropriately and starts seeing one of its own tissues as foreign. In the case of type 1 diabetes, the islet cells of the pancreas that produce insulin are seen as the "enemy" by mistake. The body then creates antibodies to fight the "foreign" tissue and destroys the islet cells' ability to produce insulin. The lack of sufficient insulin thereby results in diabetes. It is unknown why this autoimmune diabetes develops. Most often Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease caused by inherited and/or acquired deficiency in production of insulin by the pancreas, or by the ineffectiveness of the insulin produced. Such a deficiency results in increased concentrations of glucose in the blood, which in turn damage many of the body's systems, in particular the blood vessels and nerves. There are two principle forms of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes (formerly known as insulin-dependent) in which the pancreas fails to produce the insulin which is essential for survival. This form develops most frequently in children and adolescents, but is being increasingly noted later in life. Type 2 diabetes (formerly named non-insulin-dependent) which results from the body's inability to respond properly to the action of insulin produced by the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes is much more common and accounts for around 90% of all diabetes cases worldwide. It occurs most frequently in adults, but is being noted increasingly in adolescents as well. Certain genetic markers have been shown to increase the risk of developing Type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is strongly familial, but it is only recently that some genes have been consistently associated with increased risk for Type 2 diabetes in certain populations. Both types of diabetes are complex diseases caused by mutations in more than one gene, as well as by environmental factors. Diabetes in pregnancy may give rise to several adverse outcomes, including congenital malformations, increased birth weight and an elevated risk of perinatal mortality. Strict metabolic control may reduce these risks to the level of those of non-diabetic expectant mothers. Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glycaemia (IFG) refer to levels of blood glucose concentration above the normal r Continue reading >>

Many Racial And Ethnic Minority Groups Are Less Likely To Develop Type 1 Diabetes, But Are Deeply Affected By Type 2 Diabetes. According To The U.s. Office Of Minority Health:

Many Racial And Ethnic Minority Groups Are Less Likely To Develop Type 1 Diabetes, But Are Deeply Affected By Type 2 Diabetes. According To The U.s. Office Of Minority Health:

While the medical community is still learning about the causes of diabetes, we do know that the illness is caused by more than just poor dieting, especially in the case of type 1 diabetes. Obesity and an unhealthy lifestyle do increase a person’s susceptibility to type 2 diabetes, but there are many factors that can affect a person’s chances of developing either type of the disease, including family medical history, race and ethnicity, gender and age. Many racial and ethnic minority groups are less likely to develop type 1 diabetes, but are deeply affected by type 2 diabetes. According to the U.S. Office of Minority Health: American Indians (and Alaska Natives) are the minority group most affected by diabetes, with 14.2 percent of the adult population (aged 20 or older) diagnosed with the disease as of 2011. This number only reflects Native Americans being treated by Indian Health Services. Some statistics place prevalence among Native Americans as high as 16.1 percent. African Americans are twice as likely as white Americans to develop diabetes. The elderly African American community (65 and older), as well as African American women, are particularly affected. According to statistics from 2009, 12.6 percent of non-Hispanic blacks have been diagnosed with diabetes. Like African Americans, elderly Hispanic populations are also more susceptible to developing diabetes. Within the adult population – people 18 years of age and older –13.2 percent were diagnosed with diabetes. While the rate of diabetes among Hispanics is not as high as African American and indigenous communities, the Hispanic population sees an increased risk of death from the disease; numbers from 2008 place Hispanics as 50 percent more likely to die of diabetes than non-Hispanic white Americans. Wh Continue reading >>

General Diabetes Facts And Information

General Diabetes Facts And Information

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease in which the body is unable to properly use and store glucose (a form of sugar). Glucose backs up in the bloodstream — causing one’s blood glucose (sometimes referred to as blood sugar) to rise too high. There are two major types of diabetes. In type 1 (fomerly called juvenile-onset or insulin-dependent) diabetes, the body completely stops producing any insulin, a hormone that enables the body to use glucose found in foods for energy. People with type 1 diabetes must take daily insulin injections to survive. This form of diabetes usually develops in children or young adults, but can occur at any age. Type 2 (formerly called adult-onset or non insulin-dependent) diabetes results when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin and/or is unable to use insulin properly (insulin resistance). This form of diabetes usually occurs in people who are over 40, overweight, and have a family history of diabetes, although today it is increasingly occurring in younger people, particularly adolescents. How do people know if they have diabetes? People with diabetes frequently experience certain symptoms. These include: being very thirsty frequent urination weight loss increased hunger blurry vision irritability tingling or numbness in the hands or feet frequent skin, bladder or gum infections wounds that don't heal extreme unexplained fatigue In some cases, there are no symptoms — this happens at times with type 2 diabetes. In this case, people can live for months, even years without knowing they have the disease. This form of diabetes comes on so gradually that symptoms may not even be recognized. Who gets diabetes? Diabetes can occur in anyone. However, people who have close relatives with the disease are somewhat more likely to develop it. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication. Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40. However, type 2 diabetes is now becoming more common in young adults, teens and children and accounts for roughly 90% of all diabetes cases worldwide. How serious is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is a serious medical condition that often requires the use of anti-diabetic medication, or insulin to keep blood sugar levels under control. However, the development of type 2 diabetes and its side effects (complications) can be prevented if detected and treated at an early stage. In recent years, it has become apparent that many people with type 2 diabetes are able to reverse diabetes through methods including low-carb diets, very-low-calorie diets and exercise. For guidance on healthy eating to improve blood glucose levels and weight and to fight back against ins Continue reading >>

Diabetes Risk Factors

Diabetes Risk Factors

You're also more at risk if: you’ve ever had a heart attack or a stroke you have schizophrenia, bipolar illness or depression, or if you are receiving treatment with antipsychotic medication you’re a woman who’s had polycystic ovaries, gestational diabetes, or a baby weighing over 10 pounds. You can find out your risk of Type 2 diabetes now. It only takes a few minutes. It could be the most important thing you do today. Before you use the tool to find out your risk, you need to take a few measurements: your waist size, your height and your weight. Find out more about how to get an accurate waist measurement. It's not your belt size. Are you eligible for an NHS Health Check? Whether you have any other risk factors or not, if you’re over 40 your risk of Type 2 diabetes and other conditions is higher. If you're aged 40 to 74 and living in England you may be eligible for a free NHS Health Check. It's a great way to check your health and get personalised advice on keeping yourself healthy and active. Find out more about the health check on the NHS website, or talk to your GP for more information. Terry's story Continue reading >>

Changes In Age At Diagnosis Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In The United States, 1988 To 2000

Changes In Age At Diagnosis Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In The United States, 1988 To 2000

Changes in Age at Diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in the United States, 1988 to 2000 We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Changes in Age at Diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in the United States, 1988 to 2000 Richelle J. Koopman, MD, MS, Arch G. Mainous, III, PhD, [...], and Mark E. Geesey, MS PURPOSE The prevalence of diabetes in the United States is increasing. There is also concern that diabetes may be occurring at a greater frequency in youth and in young adults. We describe US population trends in self-reported age at diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS We undertook a secondary analysis of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 19992000 and NHANES III (19881994). Both surveys are stratified, multistage probability samples targeting the civilian, noninstitutionalized US population, which allow calculation of population estimates. We included adults aged 20 years and older. We compared self-reported age at diagnosis of type 2 diabetes between the 2 survey periods. RESULTS The mean age at diagnosis decreased from 52.0 to 46.0 years (P <.05). Racial and ethnic differences in age at diagnosis found in 1988 to 1994 are no longer found in 1999 to 2000. CONCLUSIONS The age at diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus has decreased with time. This finding likely represents a combination of changing diagnostic criteria, improved physician recognition of diabetes, and increa Continue reading >>

Percentage Of Adults With Diagnosed Diabetes By Age Group

Percentage Of Adults With Diagnosed Diabetes By Age Group

Tools: State data based upon the BRFSS, an ongoing, state-based, random-digit-dialed telephone survey of noninstitutionalized civilian adults aged 18 years and older. Women who indicated that they had diabetes only during pregnancy were not included in these data. Total adults diagnosed with diabetes by state have been age-adjusted to the U.S. population in 2000. Continue reading >>

Mortality In People Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes At An Older Age: A Systematic Review

Mortality In People Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes At An Older Age: A Systematic Review

Objectives: to review all published observational studies reporting on all-cause mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes to determine the degree of increased mortality when diagnosed at an older age. Design: systematic literature search. Setting: the review included studies carried out in populations from Germany, United Kingdom, United States, Japan, Italy, Western Australia, Netherlands and Sweden. Measurements: Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, National Research Register and Cochrane Reviews were systematically searched from 1975 to 2004. We identified observational studies that reported overall mortality for people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes when they were over the age of 60, compared with a non-diabetic population. Outcome measures were expressed as risk ratios or relative risks. Results: among 14 eligible studies, one study reported reduced mortality for patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes over the age of 60, whereas another found virtually no increased risk of mortality. However, 7 of the 14 studies reported increased mortality in all patients diagnosed when older, and 5 studies for certain subgroups only. A meta-analysis showed the combined relative risks (with 95% CI) of increased mortality for men diagnosed between the ages of 60 and 70 to be 1.38 (1.08–1.76) and 1.13 (0.88–1.45) for men diagnosed aged 70 years or older. A similar pattern was found for the same age groups for women, with combined relative risks of 1.40 (1.10–1.79) and 1.19 (0.93–1.52) respectively. Conclusion: increased mortality associated with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes at an older age is lower than that reported for the general older diabetic population. Objective: to investigate variations in the use of specialist palliative care (SPC) services for adult cancer patients, in r Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In Children & Adolescents

Type 2 Diabetes In Children & Adolescents

Type 2 diabetes was previously seen only in middle age or older adults. However, with the rise of obesity in children, it is now being increasingly diagnosed in young people, particularly Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth and children with non- European backgrounds. Type 2 diabetes is serious and can cause long-term complications such as heart and kidney disease, which, with more young people developing type 2 diabetes, are likely to occur at a younger age. Proper treatment is therefore essential to preventing these long-term health problems. Sometimes a young person with type 2 diabetes will be initially mistaken as having type 1 diabetes, until a complete assessment can be done. Type 2 Although there is a stronger inherited tendency to developing type 2 diabetes compared to type 1, type 2 diabetes in young people is largely due to lifestyle habits. Type 1 The development of type 1 diabetes is not usually related to lifestyle habits, obesity or insulin resistance, but to a problem with immunity. Children and adolescents most at risk of developing type 2 diabetes are those who are: overweight or obese AND have any two of the following: blood relatives with type 2 diabetes an Aboriginal or Pacific Islander background or other high risk ethnic groups signs of insulin resistance diagnosed by the doctor. Type 2 diabetes in young people is thought to result from insulin resistance, which means insulin does not work properly. The hormone insulin is made in our bodies by an organ called the pancreas and has an important role in regulating blood glucose levels. Young people with insulin resistance need to make more insulin than is ‘normally’ required to regulate their blood glucose levels. Overweight and obese young people are most likely to have insulin resistanc Continue reading >>

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