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What A Diabetic Should And Should Not Eat?

Here's Five Things To Eat Or Avoid To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Here's Five Things To Eat Or Avoid To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Pre-diabetes is diagnosed when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as having type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is an early alert that your diabetes risk is now very high. It is ten to 20 times greater compared to the risk for those with normal blood sugars. What you choose to eat, or avoid, influences this risk. Studies around the world, including Finland, China and the US have shown diabetes prevention programs prevent or delay progression to type 2 diabetes. When people eat more healthily, drop their body weight by 5-10 percent and walk for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, they lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by about 58 percent over two years. We recently gave 101 men with pre-diabetes a self-directed diabetes prevention program over six months. We found they were able to reduce their portion size of potato and meat and improve their variety of health foods.They were able to reduce the proportion of energy coming from junk food by 7.6 percent more than the group who didn't change their diet and got a four-point increase in their scores from the Healthy Eating Quiz. These improved eating patterns were associated with an average weight loss of 5.5 kg (12 lbs) and better blood sugar regulation. This is great news for the 318 million adults around the world, including two million Australians, who have pre-diabetes. The original diabetes prevention studies started in the 1980s. Back then the advice was to reduce your total kilojoule intake by eating less fat, especially from take-away, processed and fried foods and to eat more foods rich in carbohydrate, such as vegetables, fruit and wholegrains. That advice worked because the world did not have the huge numbers of ultra-processed foods and drinks, many of which Continue reading >>

Foods To Avoid For People With Diabetes

Foods To Avoid For People With Diabetes

Taking control of what foods they eat not only helps people manage their diabetes but also influences how well they feel and how much energy they have every day. We take a look at what foods people with diabetes should avoid and outline what they should eat instead. Foods to avoid with diabetes Having diabetes does not have to stop people from eating the foods they enjoy. However, it does mean that they should eat smaller portions, less often. The Institute of Medicine recommend that carbohydrate intake for most people should be between 45-65 percent of total calories. This higher carbohydrate intake is consistent with plant-based diets, which have shown benefit for diabetes management in well-designed, long-term studies. However, some research has shown that people can improve their blood sugar levels when their carbohydrate intake is between 5-35 percent of calories. Much of the research comes from short-term studies for higher-fat diets, such as the ketogenic diet and Mediterranean diets. Experts are just beginning to understand the influence that the gut bacteria have on health. What is known is that high-fiber carbohydrates feed gut bacteria while a high-fat, low-carb diet often results in gut bacteria death. This is far from ideal as people with diabetes already have lower levels of gut bacteria. Populations around the world that live the longest, known as Blue Zones, all eat a plant-based diet, rich in whole foods and carbohydrates. The key to eating well with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthful foods from each of the food groups. Foods to avoid within the major food groups and suggested replacements are listed below. Grains All grains are starches. Avoiding refined grains is a smart choice for people with diabetes, regardless of chosen diet, as they affect Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Fruits Diabetics Should Avoid To Keep Their Blood Sugar Levels In Check

Diabetes Diet: Fruits Diabetics Should Avoid To Keep Their Blood Sugar Levels In Check

One of the leading global health concerns, Diabetes Mellitus is a disorder which involves a range of metabolic diseases that causes a spike in blood sugar levels. It may trigger due to genetic disposition, or your dietary and lifestyle habits. According the official figures from the World Health Organisation, India has an estimated 31,705,000 diabetics in the millennium year which is predicted to grow to 79,441,000 by 2030! The root cause of diabetes is an erratic and inadequate production of insulin by the pancreas (Type 1 diabetes), or when the body is not able to respond properly to the insulin produced (Type 2 diabetes). Diabetics often need to take extra care of their diet and it is an important aspect of managing the ailment. They are often asked to avoid food items that might spike their blood sugar levels. Sugary desserts, beverages, high carb and fatty foods are some of such food items that diabetics are often asked to steer clear of. The same is the case with fruits that are high in natural sugar. While some fruits like guavas and jamun are known to be good for diabetics, others that are very sweet should be avoided. Fruits Diabetics Should Avoid Bangalore-based nutritionist Dr. Anju Sood says, "It is always a good idea to avoid fruits that have a high sugar content. All fruits have natural sugar that can pose to be a problem for diabetics. Mangoes aren't quite recommended. Opt for fruits that are high in fibre and low on the Glycemic Index like apples, pears, oranges, peaches and plums." According to Macrobiotic Nutritionist and Health Practitioner Shilpa Arora " When it comes to diabetics eating fruits, there is a lot of confusion and the information is very misleading. Just remember that moderation is the key here. Too many mangoes and chickoo (Sapota) coul Continue reading >>

Pre Diabetes Diet Plan

Pre Diabetes Diet Plan

It’s estimated that almost 50% of the American population has diabetes or prediabetes – a condition where blood sugar is higher than normal levels. It is accompanied by insulin resistance, a risk factor for full-blown diabetes, and other health complications. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data estimates the recent prevalence of total diabetes, diagnosed diabetes and undiagnosed diabetes’ US trends to be 12-14% among US adults. So, neither should you shrug off your doctor’s advice, nor should you be taking your elevated blood sugar levels lightly. Generally, the power of a pre-diabetes diet plan, for getting those numbers back on track, is underestimated. Prediabetes is diagnosed when fasting blood sugar levels range from 100 to 125 mg/dl, or hemoglobin A1C levels range from 5.7 to 6.4%. One needs to undergo regular prediabetes tests to be sure. But, with the right pre-diabetes diet plan, one starts to feel the difference in their energy levels soon enough. MORE: Take the Prediabetes Risk Test This is a chance to take control. Simple and daily lifestyle changes, like a balanced diet and regular exercise, that help you lose weight go a long way towards warding off the risk of progressing to full-blown type 2 diabetes. Pre-Diabetes Diet Plan: Changes You Need To Make Today If you already have pre-diabetes, you are likely to develop type 2 diabetes (T2D) within the next 10 years unless you make some changes, starting from today. It’s time to adopt a new pre-diabetes diet plan built on some basic principles: Don’t Skip Breakfast You may barely make it to office on time, but that doesn’t mean you skip breakfast. That means you wake up earlier! A healthy breakfast starts your day on the right note. It gives your metabolism the kick-sta Continue reading >>

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that has reached epidemic proportions among adults and children worldwide (1). Uncontrolled diabetes has many serious consequences, including heart disease, kidney disease, blindness and other complications. Prediabetes has also been linked to these conditions (2). Importantly, eating the wrong foods can raise your blood sugar and insulin levels and promote inflammation, which may increase your risk of disease. This article lists 11 foods that people with diabetes or prediabetes should avoid. Carbs, protein and fat are the macronutrients that provide your body with energy. Of thesen three, carbs have the greatest effect on your blood sugar by far. This is because they are broken down into sugar, or glucose, and absorbed into your bloodstream. Carbs include starches, sugar and fiber. However, fiber isn't digested and absorbed by your body in the same way other carbs are, so it doesn't raise your blood sugar. Subtracting fiber from the total carbs in a food will give you its digestible or "net" carb content. For instance, if a cup of mixed vegetables contains 10 grams of carbs and 4 grams of fiber, its net carb count is 6 grams. When people with diabetes consume too many carbs at a time, their blood sugar levels can rise to dangerously high levels. Over time, high levels can damage your body's nerves and blood vessels, which may set the stage for heart disease, kidney disease and other serious health conditions. Maintaining a low carb intake can help prevent blood sugar spikes and greatly reduce the risk of diabetes complications. Therefore, it's important to avoid the foods listed below. Sugary beverages are the worst drink choice for someone with diabetes. To begin with, they are very high in carbs, with a 12-ounce (354-ml) can of soda prov Continue reading >>

The 11 Worst Foods For Diabetics

The 11 Worst Foods For Diabetics

Diabetes, put simply, is the presence of too much glucose in your blood. Glucose is an important source of energy for cells and the brain’s main source of fuel, but too much of it can lead to major health problems. A hormone called insulin is responsible for allowing glucose into the cells, but with type 1 diabetes the immune system attacks the insulin; with type 2 diabetes the cells become resistant to insulin. In both cases, sugar is left to build up in the bloodstream. To control diabetes, it’s best to avoid foods that can raise your blood sugar too much or too fast. Obviously, foods that are high in sugar—both processed and natural—can cause blood sugar to spike, but plenty of foods that aren’t sweet, like those high in refined carbohydrates, can still have a high glycemic index and add too much sugar too quickly to your bloodstream (refined starches act a lot like sugar once they’re digested). The glycemic index is a measurement of how fast a carbohydrate raises your blood sugar; it’s suggested that when a diabetic eats one of the foods on our list (which have high glycemic indexes), it be balanced out with a low-glycemic index food, like steel-cut oatmeal or non-starchy vegetables. The Mayo Clinic suggests that diabetics center their diet on fruits, vegetables, and whole grains instead of simple carbs, animal products, and sweets. There’s no specific diabetes diet, but some foods should certainly be avoided, or at least consumed in strict moderation. Foods that are high in cholesterol, fat, sodium, carbohydrates, and calories are unhealthy in general, but are even more dangerous for diabetics because their health is already compromised, and their body is working overtime to keep them healthy. Each case of diabetes is unique, so diabetics should wor Continue reading >>

Shopping List For Diabetics

Shopping List For Diabetics

Control Type 2 Diabetes, Shed Fat Our Shopping List for Diabetics is based on the Pritikin Eating Plan, regarded worldwide as among the healthiest diets on earth. The Pritikin Program has been documented in more than 100 studies in peer-reviewed medical journals to prevent and control many of our nation’s leading killers – heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, metabolic syndrome, and obesity as well as type 2 diabetes. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, pay special attention. Research on newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics coming to the Pritikin Longevity Center illustrate how profoundly beneficial early intervention can be. Scientists from UCLA followed 243 people in the early stages of diabetes (not yet on medications). Within three weeks of coming to Pritikin, their fasting blood sugar (glucose) plummeted on average from 160 to 124. Research has also found that the Pritikin Program reduces fasting insulin by 25 to 40%. Shopping List for Diabetics – More Features Here’s another big plus to our Shopping List for Diabetics. In addition to icons that are diabetes-focused like “sugar free,” this list uses icons like “low cholesterol” and “low sodium” because many people with diabetes are working to control not just diabetes but related conditions like high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure. This list can help you identify those foods most advantageous in helping you reach your personal health goals. Diabetic Food Taboos? Not Anymore! Have you been told you have to give up juicy watermelon or sweet grapes? What if we told you those foods really aren’t taboo? Watch the Video Our Healthy Shopping List for Diabetics also lists the top 10 things to put back on the shelf if you’re trying to: Lose Weight Lower Blood Pres Continue reading >>

'diabetics Should Avoid Certain Fruits'

'diabetics Should Avoid Certain Fruits'

If you have diabetes, there is no reason you should have to avoid certain fruits. In fact, there is no such thing as a “bad” fruit. Fruits are an important component of a healthy, balanced diet as they are loaded with powerful nutrients and antioxidants that promote health. Many fruits are also high in fibre which is not only good for digestion, but also helps to keep blood sugar levels steady and keeps you full for longer. They are also low in kilojoules, which is excellent news if you need to lose weight. However, it is important to understand that all the different kinds of fruits in Nature's basket can have different effects on your blood sugar levels. This effect on blood sugar levels is measured by the glycaemic index. Fruits that are absorbed quickly and release a quick burst of energy are categorised as high-GI foods, whereas fruits that are digested slower and therefore provide a more sustained energy release, are categorised as low-GI foods. As it is so important for diabetics to regulate their blood sugar levels at all times, it is important to learn the GI value of fruits. Fruits with a low glycaemic index (GI value of 55 or less) are always the recommended safe choice for diabetics as they contain mainly slow-release carbs which help to regulate blood sugar levels better. Good examples of low-GI fruit are apples, pears, oranges, peaches, plums and strawberries. Yes, the good news is that all berries are low-GI, even though they are very sweet, making them the perfect substitute for unhealthier snacks such as chocolates and sweets to satisfy your sweet tooth. Though low-GI fruits are a safer choice for diabetics, you can still eat medium to high-GI fruits (such as banana, pineapple, watermelon, sweet melon and papaya), as long as you do it after exercisi Continue reading >>

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Diabetes diagnosed during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in about 7 percent of all pregnancies. It usually arises in the second half of pregnancy and goes away as soon as the baby is born. However, if gestational diabetes is not treated, you may experience complications. The first step in treating gestational diabetes is to modify your diet to help keep your blood sugar level in the normal range, while still eating a healthy diet. Most women with well-controlled blood sugar deliver healthy babies without any complications. One way of keeping your blood sugar levels in normal range is by monitoring the amount of carbohydrates in your diet. Carbohydrate foods digest and turn into blood glucose (a type of sugar). Glucose in the blood is necessary because it is the fuel for your body and nourishment your baby receives from you. However, it's important that glucose levels stay within target. Carbohydrates in Food Carbohydrates are found in the following foods: Milk and yogurt Fruits and juices Rice, grains, cereals and pasta Breads, tortillas, crackers, bagels and rolls Dried beans, split peas and lentils Potatoes, corn, yams, peas and winter squash Sweets and desserts, such as sugar, honey, syrups, pastries, cookies, soda and candy also typically have large amounts of carbohydrate. Carbohydrates in foods are measured in units called grams. You can count how many carbohydrates are in foods by reading food labels and learning the exchange lists. The two most important pieces of information on food labels for a carbohydrate-controlled diet is the serving size and grams of total carbohydrate in each serving. Dietary Recommendations It is important to be meet with a registered dietitian to have your diet assessed. The dietitian will calcula Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Following a type 2 diabetes diet doesn’t mean you have to give up all the things you love — you can still enjoy a wide range of foods and, in some cases, even help reverse type 2 diabetes. Indeed, creating a diet for diabetes is a balancing act: It includes a variety of healthy carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. The trick is ultimately choosing the right combination of foods that will help keep your blood sugar level in your target range and avoid big swings that can cause diabetes symptoms — from the frequent urination and thirst of high blood sugar to the fatigue, dizziness, headaches, and mood changes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). The Basics of the Type 2 Diabetes Diet: What Should You Eat? To follow a healthy diet for type 2 diabetes, you must first understand how different foods affect your blood sugar. Carbohydrates, which are found to the largest degree in grains, bread, pasta, milk, sweets, fruit, and starchy vegetables, are broken down into glucose in the blood faster than other types of food, which raises blood sugar, potentially leading to hyperglycemia. Protein and fats do not directly impact blood sugar, but both should be consumed in moderation to keep calories down and weight in a healthy range. To hit your blood sugar level target, eat a variety of foods but monitor portions for foods with a high carbohydrate content, says Alison Massey, RD, CDE, the director of diabetes education at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. “[Foods high in carbohydrates] have the most impact on blood sugar level. This is why some people with diabetes count their carbohydrates at meals and snacks,” she says. How Many Carbs Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), you can calculate Continue reading >>

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the four healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up our Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taking in less of both Continue reading >>

20 Foods To Avoid If You Have Diabetes

20 Foods To Avoid If You Have Diabetes

A large part of keeping your diabetes in control is about making the right food choices. If you have diabetes, a general rule to follow is to stay off foods that are high in sugar. However, some foods and drinks may appear to be healthy options but might contain hidden sugar and fats. And it’s not just sugar you need to watch out for as increased carbs and fats in your diet may also contribute to higher blood sugar levels. Too confusing? Here’s a list of 20 foods that you need to avoid if you have diabetes. 20 Foods To Stay Away From 1. Dried Fruit The high fiber content and nutrients might make dried fruit look like a healthy option but you might want to reconsider if your have Type 2 diabetes. Dried fruit undergoes dehydration which causes it’s natural sugars to get very concentrated. Though it’s a better snacking option when compared to cookies, it will still send your blood sugar soaring. Just have some fresh fruit like strawberries or grapefruit instead. 2. White Rice, Bread, And Flour While most diabetics are wary of sugar, they usually don’t keep a tab on eating carbs. Low quality carbs like rice and foods made with white flour, like bread and pasta, act similar to sugar once the digestive process begins. This means that they with interfere with body’s glucose levels. Switching to whole grains such as oatmeal, barley, and brown rice will help in keeping the bad carbs in check. 3. Full-Fat Dairy Most people know that full-fat dairy products contain saturated fat that can increase your bad cholesterol (LDL) and increase the risk of heart disease. As a diabetic, you should also avoid dairy products like cream, full-fat yogurt, ice-cream, and cream cheese that’s made with whole milk. The reason being saturated fats have also been found to increase insul Continue reading >>

9 Foods To Avoid When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

9 Foods To Avoid When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 10 Know What to Avoid Diabetes requires daily maintenance, including monitoring your blood sugar, eating a healthy diet, exercising, and of course staying on top of any complications with your heart, eyes, and other organs. Controlling your weight is another key aspect of managing type 2 diabetes. If you’re overweight, losing some weight — even just 10 to 15 pounds — can help improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control, reduce triglycerides and LDL cholesterol, and lower your blood pressure. A healthy diet for diabetes will help you manage your weight and lead you toward foods that have a positive effect on your glucose levels, while guiding you away from those foods that are likely to cause dangerous spikes in your blood sugar. Learn which nine foods you should steer clear of if you have type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Foods Diabetics Should Never Eat

Foods Diabetics Should Never Eat

Foods Diabetics Should Never Eat: “Diabetes is all about carbs,” Deborah Malkoff-Cohen, registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, says. No medical prescription can fix a bad diet. The condition requires daily maintenance – monitoring blood sugar levels, eating healthy and exercising are crucial. Managing your weight is a lot more serious than simply looking and feeling good. Watching your diet can be a matter of life and death. Continue reading >>

I Have Type 2 Diabetes – What Can I Eat?

I Have Type 2 Diabetes – What Can I Eat?

From the moment you are diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes you are likely to be faced with what seems like an endless list of new tasks... medical appointments, taking medication, stopping smoking, being more active and eating a healthy, balanced diet. No wonder it can all seem so daunting and overwhelming. One of your first questions is likely to be “what can I eat?” But, with so much to take in, you could still come away from appointments feeling unsure about the answer. And then there are lots of myths about diabetes and food that you will need to navigate, too. If you’ve just been diagnosed and aren’t sure about what you can and can’t eat, here’s what you need to know. I've just been diagnosed with Type 2 – what can I eat? In one word... anything. Or how about another? Everything. It may come as a surprise, but all kinds of food are OK for people with Type 2 diabetes to eat. In the past, people were sent away after their diagnosis with a list of foods they weren't allowed to eat, or often told to simply cut out sugar. Long gone are those days of “do's and don'ts”. The way to go nowadays is to eat a healthy, balanced diet. Try and make changes to your food choices that are realistic and achievable in the long term; this will be different for each person diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes depending on your current diet and the goals you want to achieve. Many people with Type 2 diabetes make changes to their diet in order to achieve: good blood glucose control good blood fat levels good blood pressure There's a lot of evidence to say that your diet can affect all of these, so see a registered dietitian for specific advice and an eating plan that is tailored to your needs. Is there anything I should avoid? Before your diabetes was diagnosed, you may have been Continue reading >>

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