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Weight Loss And Hba1c Levels

Linear Association For Weight Loss, Hba1c Reduction In T2dm

Linear Association For Weight Loss, Hba1c Reduction In T2dm

Linear association for weight loss, HbA1c reduction in T2DM (HealthDay)For overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D), weight loss is associated with a reduction in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in a dose-dependent manner, according to a review published online April 18 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism. Anders Gummesson, M.D., from Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg, Sweden, and colleagues conducted a systematic review of the literature to identify prospective trials of energy-reduced diets, obesity drugs, or bariatric surgery in adult overweight and obese patients with type 2 diabetes. The authors developed a linear model to describe the effect of weight reduction on HbA1c based on data from three to 24 months of follow-up. Data were included for 58 articles with 124 treatment groups and 17,204 adults. The researchers identified a linear relationship between weight loss and HbA1c reduction; for each 1 kg of reduced body weight there was an estimated mean reduction of 0.1 percent in HbA1c for the overall population. Baseline HbA1c significantly affected the correlation between weight loss and HbA1c: for the same degree of weight loss, high HbA1c at baseline correlated with a greater reduction in HbA1c. There were also weight-loss-dependent reductions in diabetes medication. "This summary of data from previous trials regarding the effect of weight reduction on HbA1c may be used to support the design and interpretation of future studies that aim to demonstrate the efficacy of weight loss interventions for T2D treatment," the authors write. Several authors disclosed financial ties to AstraZeneca. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion bests injections in T2DM (HealthDay)For patients with type 2 diabetes and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) >8 percent following Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Weight Loss On The A1c

The Effects Of Weight Loss On The A1c

An A1C test is commonly used to diagnose diabetes. It measures your blood sugar levels over a 3-month period by showing the amount of glucose that is attached to your red blood cells. The glucose sticks to the cells until they die which is typically two to three months, reports Utah.gov. Having too much blood sugar can cause an excess amount of glucose to attach to the cells which will give you a higher A1C and increase your risk of diabetes. Lower your A1C and your risk of diabetes by losing weight. Video of the Day Lower A1C Losing weight is the first step to lowering your A1C. Your A1C should be below 120 mg/dL, or between 4 to 6 percent. Having two separate tests showing an A1C 120 mg/dL to 140 mg/dL, or 6 to 6.5 percent, may determine that you have pre-diabetes, reports MayoClinic.com. If your A1C is above 150 mg/dL, or 7 percent, your doctor may diagnose you with diabetes. In some cases, your doctor may also suggest medications to help lower your A1C if weight loss is not enough. Reduced Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Your doctor will use the A1C results to diagnose or treat your diabetes. The more fatty tissue you have in your body, the more resiliant you become to insulin. Your body uses insulin to regulate the movement of sugar into cells. The higher your A1C, the greater your risk of developing type 2 diabetes and having diabetes complications, according to MayoClinic.com. There is no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you can reduce your risk and lessen the complications. Eat a healthy diet full of whole grains, vegetables, fruits and lean meats. Also, increase your physical activity to lose weight and help lower your A1C. Having a high A1C puts a tremendous strain on your body. Losing weight and lowering your A1C can reduce your risk of a heart attack and other cardiova Continue reading >>

6 Ways To Lower Your A1c Level

6 Ways To Lower Your A1c Level

Diabetes is a serious, chronic disease that can lead to many complications. When managed properly, diabetes does not have to control your life or ruin your health. Getting tested, especially if you are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes, is a proactive measure you can take for yourself and your future. In the early stages of diabetes, there are no symptoms. An early diagnosis helps you get treatment before complications occur. The A1C test is a blood test that checks for type 2 diabetes. It is also used to see how well you are managing your diabetes if you have already been diagnosed. The test provides information about a person’s average levels of blood sugar over a two- to three-month period. The number is reported in the form of a percentage. The higher the percentage, the higher your average blood glucose levels are, and the higher your risk for either diabetes or related complications. A1C is one of the primary tests used for diabetes diagnosis and management. It can test for type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but it can’t test for gestational diabetes. It can also be used to predict the likelihood that someone will get diabetes. The A1C test measures how much glucose, or sugar, is attached to hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells. The more glucose attached, the higher the A1C. This test is groundbreaking, as it 1) doesn’t require fasting, 2) gives a picture of blood sugar levels over a period of days and weeks instead of at just one point in time like fasting sugars, and 3) can be done at any time of day. This makes it easier to administer and easier to make accurate diagnoses. According to the National Institutes of Health, a normal A1C is below 5.7 percent. If your score is between 5.7 and 6.4 percent, the diagnosis is prediabetes. Having prediabetes put Continue reading >>

Can You Lower Your A1c With Diet And Exercise?

Can You Lower Your A1c With Diet And Exercise?

This post may contain affiliate links. Purchasing through them helps support this website. This post may also contain items sent to A Girl's Gotta Spa! for consideration. Can You Lower Your A1C with Diet and Exercise? If you just received test results back from your doctor and he/she has indicated that you have an elevated HbA1C (or A1c for short), you may be wondering what that means and just what you can do to lower it to within normal range. Back in December I decided I wanted to be a Living Kidney Donor . Im at a point in my life where Im no longer satisfied with just living a basic life. I want to do more, see more and touch more lives before my time is up. To become a candidate for living kidney donation you have to go through a battery of tests over the course of several months. The very first round of bloodwork includes testing your HbA1C level to determine if you have diabetes or are considered pre-diabetic. Obviously you dont have to be looking to donate a kidney to have this test done, as its something your doctor will do when you have blood sugar issues. Mine was in the pre-diabetic range (5.8%) and it left me trying to figure it out what I needed to do to lower it. Dr. Manisha Ghei of Praana Integrative Medicine & Holistic Health Center, PLLC told me that, HbA1C is a test of hemoglobin glycation and hemoglobin is present inside our Red Blood Cells (RBCs). Our RBCs regenerate every 120 days so it will take A1C approximately 3 months to change. A1c is a test of average long-term blood sugar control over the three months prior to the date of the blood test. Think about what you eat over the course of 3 months. Do you have a few bad days where you emotionally eat or go on a chocolate and fried food binge? No? Just me? Well for those of you not in the big fat l Continue reading >>

Real-world Evaluation Of Hba1c, Blood Pressure, And Weight Loss Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Treated With Canagliflozin: An Analysis Of Electronic Medical Records From A Network Of Hospitals In Florida

Real-world Evaluation Of Hba1c, Blood Pressure, And Weight Loss Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Treated With Canagliflozin: An Analysis Of Electronic Medical Records From A Network Of Hospitals In Florida

Get access/doi/full/10.1080/03007995.2018.1444591?needAccess=true Objective: Clinical trials and real-world studies reported that canagliflozin (CANA) improved HbA1c, blood pressure (BP), and weight in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This study examines if previous results hold regionally and within specific patient sub-groups. Methods: Adults with T2DM and 12 months of clinical activity before the first CANA prescription (index) were identified in electronic medical records (January 1, 2012February 15, 2017) from a network of hospitals in Florida. Quality measures were described at baseline and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post-index. Selected thresholds were HbA1c < 7%, BP < 140/90 mmHg, and weight loss 5%. Sub-groups included patients 65 years old, with African American race, with CANA dose increase, initiating CANA in an endocrinology setting, and initiating CANA in a primary care setting. Results: Overall, 1,259 patients (mean age = 56.7 years; 51.2% female, 70.4% White) were identified. Among patients with a baseline HbA1c 7%, 16.1% had an HbA1c < 7% 3 months following CANA initiation, and the mean HbA1c decreased from 8.8% to 8.1%. Among patients with a baseline systolic BP 140 mmHg or diastolic BP 90 mmHg, 59.3% attained a systolic BP < 140 mmHg and 77.3% a diastolic BP < 90 mmHg after 3 months. HbA1c and BP responses were sustained through 12 months. The proportion of patients with a weight loss from baseline 5% increased from 17.0% at 3 months to 31.1% at 12 months. Consistent trends were observed for all sub-groups. Conclusions: In CANA-treated patients and patient sub-groups from a network of Florida hospitals, improvements in quality measures and response durability were similar to clinical trials and other real-world studies. Continue reading >>

Losing Weight

Losing Weight

There has been a lot of progress in the causes of type 2 diabetes. However, being overweight is harmful. First, it makes your body 'resistant' to insulin, so you need more insulin that you would if you were an ideal weight. As insulin shortage is the main cause of diabetes, this becomes a real problem; you become even more short of insulin. Losing weight can make diabetes easier to control, as well as help lowering blood pressure and helping arthritis. Secondly, some fat is deposited in the pancreatic cells that make the insulin, the beta type of islet cells. Some researchers have found that this fat damages these cells, which stop making as much insulin. Third, weight increases the risk of retinopathy significantly, even in type 1 diabetes . So there are many reasons to lose weight, but like many things in life, losing weight is often a very hard battle. However, if you avoid all the food that is very fattening, like cakes, chocolate and full fat dairy food, and have small portions of fattening food like meat and fish, and combine this with an hours walking a day (perhaps 2 x half hour walks), most people will make good progress. Below is more specific advice that everyone, even if they do not have diabetes, needs to follow to keep healthy. "Obesity is perpetuated by a series of vicious circles, which...accelerate weight gain." BMJ ....the "runaway weight gain train".  The wait gain is usually very slow, by 100 gm a day, equivalent to a large bowl of cereal of 1/2 a mars bar every day. How does being overweight cause or contribute to your diabetes? fat & too little exercise causes resistance to insulin enlarge In type 2 diabetes muscles need more insulin than normal: this is due to resistance to insulin caused by large amounts of fat and lack of exercise. Details. Fo Continue reading >>

Just Diagnosed With An A1c Of 7.4. Weight Loss Question.

Just Diagnosed With An A1c Of 7.4. Weight Loss Question.

Just diagnosed with an A1c of 7.4. Weight loss question. Just diagnosed with an A1c of 7.4. Weight loss question. Hi everyone. I was just diagnosed last week with type 2. My Ac1 was 7.4, I didn't know my blood was being tested for Diabetes, thought it was a blood test for cholesterol. Anyway, after the initial diagnosis shock, my PCP wanted to start me on meds, I refused. She has given me two months to lose 20lbs and get my Ac1 down to an acceptable level, what that level is I do not know. I pretty much stopped eating, have gone to under 1000 calories a day, eating very clean, very low carb, probably under 40 a day. I have already dropped about 10 lbs (I'm sure a lot of it's water). My question is this, my wife is freaking out because she doesn't think i'm eating enough, I'm trying to eat even less because I would like to be at least 30lbs lighter by my next appointment. My wife aside, the main issue I am having right now is pain in my left lower rib cage that radiates to the back. This has been a recurrent issue prior to the diagnosis, this new diet seems to have triggered it again. I am "spacy", shaky and having difficulty thinking clearly or finding the right "words" but I don't know if it's calorie restriction causing it or my blood sugar. Any suggestion? D.D. Family Type 2 since June 2014, levemir & metformin Every diabetic is different and if you have an a1c of 7.4, that well puts you into the diabetic category. For many of us diabetics, any kind of fasting needs to be much more methodical. Your liver will dump glycogen into your blood stream if you are not careful so the reduction in eating can often times make things worse, not better (i.e. nutrition issues compiled with high blood sugar from your liver). There are many successful methods of fasting for diabeti Continue reading >>

David’s Guide To Getting Our A1c Under 6.0

David’s Guide To Getting Our A1c Under 6.0

The A1C test is our best scorecard to show how well we are controlling our diabetes. It measures how much glucose has been sticking to our red blood cells for the previous two or three months. Since our bodies replace each red blood cell with a new one every four months, this test tells us the average of how high our glucose levels have been during the life of the cells. The experts recommend that we should get our A1C level tested at least twice a year. People who take insulin need to get it about four times a year. If the test shows that our blood glucose level is high, it means that we have a greater risk of having diabetes problems. Think of the A1C as an early warning system for the insidious complications that we can get down the road when we don’t control our condition. But what do we mean by a “high” A1C level? Here the experts disagree. The American Diabetes Association says that we need to keep our A1C results below 7.0 percent. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists sets the target at 6.5 percent. The International Diabetes Federation, or IDF, also recommends that most people with diabetes keep their levels below 6.5 percent. The more our A1C level is higher than normal, the greater the likelihood that we will suffer from one or more of the complications of diabetes. And here too the experts disagree with how they define “normal.” People who don’t have diabetes have A1C levels below 6.0 percent. That’s the gist of what I wrote here recently in “The Normal A1C Level.” The IDF agrees. But more aggressive endocrinologists say that a truly normal A1C ranges from 4.2 percent to 4.6 percent. That’s what Dr. Richard K. Bernstein wrote in Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution. No matter what our level is, we can be sure that lower is Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Diet & Exercise On Hba1c Levels In Diabetic Patients

The Effects Of Diet & Exercise On Hba1c Levels In Diabetic Patients

The Effects of Diet & Exercise on HbA1C Levels in Diabetic Patients A registered nurse with more than 25 years of experience in oncology, labor/delivery, neonatal intensive care, infertility and ophthalmology, Sharon Perkins has also coauthored and edited numerous health books for the Wiley "Dummies" series. Perkins also has extensive experience working in home health with medically fragile pediatric patients. Lowering A1C levels through diet and exercise helps reduce complications of diabetes. Diabetes, a disease that affected 23.6 million Americans in 2007, according to the American Diabetes Association, requires close monitoring of blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels change frequently depending on what a person eats but are normally measured only a few times a day. A test called a hemoglobin A1C, or just A1C, can give more accurate measurements of long-term blood sugar control, because the test determines the average blood sugar levels over two to three months. Diabetics should aim to keep their A1C levels close to 6 percent in most cases. Diet and exercise can have significant effects on A1C levels. Following a calorie-restricted diet results in weight loss over time. Weight loss is an important part of diabetes management because body fat contributes to insulin resistance, which in turn raises blood sugar levels. The higher the blood sugar, the more damage that occurs to organs and tissues, raising the risks of heart disease, infection and immune problems. Even losing as little as 5 percent of body weight helps reduce A1C levels, the University of Utah reports. Controlling intake of carbohydrates, especially empty carbohydrates, or those with no nutritional value, such as soda, candy and other sweets, helps decrease both weight and blood sugar levels. Exercise Continue reading >>

Jay: 15kg Weight Loss And Hba1c Of 5.1%

Jay: 15kg Weight Loss And Hba1c Of 5.1%

Blood Glucose , Exercise , Nutrition , Stories We are proud to share some words from Jay (age 46), who was one of our early GlycoLeap users. After 6 months on GlycoLeap, Jay has successfully reduced his weight by 16kg (14% of his initial weight), and has reduced his HbA1c from 8.9% to 5.1%. I am a Type 2 Diabetic and have been diagnosed for more than a decade. I have never followed through on the treatments and the fact that I felt that I was still young and will not affect me until I am older, I was so wrong here. A couple of months ago, after an eye examination, I was told that the nerves around my eyes have been damaged by my diabetes. It was caused because of uncontrolled sugar levels although I have been on medication for a few years. At this point, I realized that if I do not take control of by diabetes, I might never see my children grow up. I finally woke up and decided I needed to do something about it. I was searching online when I stumbled onto their website, a Singapore company called GlycoLeap , and was actually surprise that there is a local company providing these services. Their approach is about behavioural change where they provide support and education on what diabetes is and what one can do to face diabetes. So I decided togive it a try and it was the best decision I have ever made for my health. GlycoLeap has helped me to understand and deal with my diabetes with confidence now that I know how to live with it. In fact, without their support, I could not have done this alone. The personalized approach from their great team of dietitians, psychologist and medical officer has help me to understand how our local cuisines affect my sugar levels. In fact, I am still enjoying my favourite unhealthy dishes but of course now I have to balance it out. I eat Continue reading >>

Hba1c Levels Under Control With Redicare

Hba1c Levels Under Control With Redicare

December 9, 2015 Case Study , Diabetes , Weight Loss , Women's Health No comments Mary is a Type 1 Diabetic and so has traditionally had to inject herself with insulin 6 times per day. Mary started out at 15 stone 9 lbs with a bmi of 34.3 (obese 1). At the time her HbA1c (test for control of diabetes) measurement level was 6.7%. At RediCare she has followed the RediCare diabetes intervention program which is based on the clinically validated Diabetes Prevention Program developed at the CDC. To date Mary has lost 30lbs weight and currently weighs 13 stone 7 pounds. This represents a very significant reduction of -14% in her body weight. In conjunction with this weight loss her HbA1c levels have reduced dramatically to 5.3%, representing a -21% improvement. On a recent trip to the diabetes clinic her doctor commented that her HbA1c levels have reduced to that of a non diabetic. As a result of this improvement the doctor told Mary she no longer needs to attend the clinic every 3 months and he is happy to see her once each year as she has the condition so well under control. The following is a testimonial Mary submitted to us in August 2015. In the intervening period Mary has continued to reduce her weight and keep her type 1 diabetes condition well under control. How RediCare have helped me take control of my Diabetes? Before coming to RediCare I had been under the false impression that my diet and lifestyle was pretty good. I knew I was carrying some extra weight but had put that down to having a slow metabolism. Shortly after joining the program I had learned enough about my diet to know that it wasnt as good as I had first thought. Logging my foods made me so much more aware of what I was eating and made me see that I wasnt being fully honest with myself. In my time on Continue reading >>

Hba1c And Weight Loss

Hba1c And Weight Loss

It’s long been established — based on both research studies and real-world clinical experience — that in many people with Type 2 diabetes, losing weight can help control blood glucose levels. In fact, one of the very first posts here at Diabetes Flashpoints was a personal account of losing weight and reaching a lower HbA1c level (a measure of long-term blood glucose control) on a low-carb diet. But different studies over the years have focused on different populations of people with Type 2 diabetes, some of whom had higher HbA1c levels or were more overweight or obese than others. So in a study published last month in the journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, researchers sought to combine the results of several studies to find out whether there’s an overall pattern to how much HbA1c levels can be reduced by losing weight. They found 58 studies that met their criteria, conducted between 1990 and 2012, in which overweight or obese people with Type 2 diabetes lost weight through reduced-calorie diets, weight-loss drugs, or bariatric surgery. In these studies, a total of 17,204 people were followed for between 3 and 24 months after beginning their weight-loss intervention. As noted in an article on the study at Physician’s Briefing, the researchers found that overall, there was a linear relationship between weight loss and HbA1c reduction. Specifically, the average person saw their HbA1c drop by 0.1% for each kilogram (about 2.2 pounds) of body weight lost — regardless of whether it was the first or last kilogram of weight loss over the course of the study. But that’s doesn’t mean this average applied to everyone — in fact, people with a higher starting HbA1c level saw a bigger drop in HbA1c for each kilogram of body weight lost, compared with those wh Continue reading >>

Effect Of Weight Reduction On Glycated Haemoglobin In Weight Loss Trials In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

Effect Of Weight Reduction On Glycated Haemoglobin In Weight Loss Trials In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

Generate a file for use with external citation management software. Diabetes Obes Metab. 2017 Sep;19(9):1295-1305. doi: 10.1111/dom.12971. Epub 2017 May 22. Effect of weight reduction on glycated haemoglobin in weight loss trials in patients with type 2 diabetes. Department of Clinical Pathology and Genetics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. AstraZeneca Research and Development, Gothenburg, Sweden. To quantify the effect of weight loss on glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) at group level, based on data from published weight loss trials in overweight and obese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). A systematic literature search in MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane CENTRAL (January 1990 through December 2012) was conducted to identify prospective trials of energy-reduced diets, obesity drugs or bariatric surgery in adult, overweight and obese patients with T2D. Based on clinical data with follow-up from 3 to 24 months, a linear model was developed to describe the effect of weight reduction on HbA1c. The literature search identified 58 eligible articles consisting of 124 treatment groups and 17 204 subjects, yielding a total of 250 data points with concurrent mean changes from baseline in weight and HbA1c. The model-based analyses indicated a linear relationship between weight loss and HbA1c reduction, with an estimated mean HbA1c reduction of 0.1 percentage points for each 1 kg of reduced body weight for the overall population. Baseline HbA1c was a significant covariate for the relationship between weight loss and HbA1c: high HbA1c at baseline was associated with a greater reduction in HbA1c for the same degree of weight loss. The collected trial data also indicated weight-loss-dependent reductions in antidiabetic medication. At group level, weight loss in obese Continue reading >>

5 Reasons Why A Small 5 Or 10% Weight Loss Is A Big Win.

5 Reasons Why A Small 5 Or 10% Weight Loss Is A Big Win.

There are so many promises that we’ll lose a bazillion pounds in 14, 20, or 30 days that when we lose only a fraction of that number, like when we achieve a 5 or 10 percent weight loss, we can’t help but feel disappointed. Yes we recognize that many of the “4 Weeks, 20 Pounds, Lose it Faster” claims are unrealistic; yes we know those detox diet claims were suspicious; at the same time though, it’s difficult to not feel like we’ve achieved nothing when a month into weight loss we’ve lost like a pound or two. We were supposed to have lost 20 by now, or 10 at least, one or two pounds per month is nothing! At this pace it’ll almost take a year to lose 10-20 pounds. And when you have, say, 50 pounds to lose… That’s 3 years. 3 years of weight loss. I sense the overwhelment here. But some of us don’t even get started in the first place. If you weigh 200 pounds and want to lose 50, losing, e.g.,10 doesn’t sound like a big deal; you’ll still have 40 to go. So you don’t get started anyway. So for those of you who feel frustrated with weight loss, for those of you who’ve achieved 10 percent of weight loss already but feel like failures, for those of you who don’t even want to get started because this effort seems like it’s gonna be huge, I have good news: even a modest amount of weight loss can have a tremendous effect on your health, science says. But can losing just 5, 10, or 15 pounds really have significant effects on health that justify it as a worthwhile goal and not something to be disappointed about? Absolutely! Read below. How can a small 5 or 10 percent weight loss improve health? We all know that obesity can have some detrimental effects on our body, even if you’re fat and fit. Excess weight forces the heart to work harder, boosts the Continue reading >>

The Role Of Weight Loss In Improving Metabolic Outcomes

The Role Of Weight Loss In Improving Metabolic Outcomes

The Role of Weight Loss in Improving Metabolic Outcomes Authors: Author: F. Xavier Pi-Sunyer, MD, MPH This clinical update is intended for physicians and allied health professionals who provide care to people at risk for developing type 2 diabetes and those who already have the disease. This goal of this activity is to review how obesity affects glucose metabolism, specifically as it relates to the development of impaired glucose tolerance and risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The metabolic effects of exercise and weight loss on those at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes and on people who already have the disease will be discussed. After completing this program, participants should be able to: Recognize the epidemiologic link between the rising prevalence of obesity and the increase in type 2 diabetes. Discuss the metabolic consequences of obesity. Summarize results of the latest research on type 2 diabetes prevention. Review the beneficial effects of weight loss on metabolic outcomes. Identify current nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic strategies for promoting weight loss. Professor of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY; Chief, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Nutrition, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY. Disclosure: F. Xavier Pi-Sunyer, MD, MPH, has served as an advisor or consultant for Abbott Laboratories, Roche, Aventis, and Johnson & Johnson. This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and Policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the sponsorship of the University of Michigan Medical School. The University of Michigan Medical School is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continue reading >>

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