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Water Retention Tablets For Diabetics

How To Avoid Insulin-related Weight Gain

How To Avoid Insulin-related Weight Gain

Managing diabetes sometimes requires insulin treatment, which may lead to weight gain. Find out why and learn how to manage your weight while using insulin. When diet, exercise, and oral diabetes medications aren't enough to control diabetes, adding insulin can help get your blood sugar under control. Although insulin is an important part of diabetes treatment, some people may have an issue with weight gain after starting on it. If insulin has been prescribed as part of your treatment plan, you may need to pay extra attention to your weight management efforts in addition to blood sugar management. "Insulin weight gain is a well-known problem and concern for people with type 2 diabetes," says Amber L. Taylor, MD, an endocrinologist who directs the Diabetes Center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. "This is problematic because weight gain can make managing diabetes more difficult." Why Is Weight Gain an Insulin Side Effect? A study published in the journal Clinical Medicine Insights: Endocrinology and Diabetes focused on 102 people with type 2 diabetes who had recently started taking insulin. After the first year of insulin therapy, both men and women in the study had increased their body weight by about 2.5 percent. The science behind why this happens is clear. When you’re not managing diabetes well, your body can't use the glucose (sugar) from your food for energy. That means the sugar builds up in your blood, which can lead to diabetes complications. You may feel hungry because you’re not getting enough energy, and thirsty because your body is trying to flush all that sugar out of your bloodstream. Here’s what happens when you add insulin: Insulin helps the sugar in your blood to be absorbed by your cells, where it's used and stored for energy. Because you’r Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Kidney Failure

Diabetes And Kidney Failure

One of the causes of kidney failure is diabetes mellitus, a condition characterised by high blood glucose (sugar) levels. Over time, the high levels of sugar in the blood damage the millions of tiny filtering units within each kidney. There is no cure, and treatment must become ever more aggressive as the kidneys deteriorate towards failure. Treatment options include medications, dialysis and kidney transplant. On this page: The main job of the kidneys is to remove waste from the blood and return the cleaned blood back to the body. Kidney failure means the kidneys are no longer able to remove waste and maintain the level of fluid and salts that the body needs. One cause of kidney failure is diabetes mellitus, a condition characterised by high blood glucose (sugar) levels. Over time, the high levels of sugar in the blood damage the millions of tiny filtering units within each kidney. This eventually leads to kidney failure. Around 20 to 30 per cent of people with diabetes develop kidney disease (diabetic nephropathy), although not all of these will progress to kidney failure. A person with diabetes is susceptible to nephropathy whether they use insulin or not. The risk is related to the length of time the person has diabetes. There is no cure for diabetic nephropathy, and treatment is lifelong. Another name for the condition is diabetic glomerulosclerosis. People with diabetes are also at risk of other kidney problems, including narrowing of the arteries to the kidneys, called renal artery stenosis or renovascular disease. Symptoms of kidney failure For people with diabetes, kidney problems are usually picked up during a check-up by their doctor. Occasionally, a person can have type 2 diabetes without knowing it. This means their unchecked high blood sugar levels may be Continue reading >>

Can I Take Water Pills?

Can I Take Water Pills?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Has anyone taken water pills? I can't find anything definate on whether they will have an adverse effect or not. I wondered if anyone had any practical experience taking them with diabetes? I take two 40mg of Furosemide (substituted for Lasix) daily, along with potassium tablets. If it is causing problems, I don't know what they would be. When I don't take them, I sure notice a difference, feet and hands swell and I have trouble urinating. Has someone told you that you need the water pills? I took water pills for awhile, because I was retaining fluid. It immediately took about 4 lbs. of water off. I had to stop taking them because of the HORRIBLE cramping in my legs! I put up with it for awhile, until the morning that about 5 different muscles in my calf were cramping at the same time and my hubby had to go in to work late so that he could massage them out....which took more than an HOUR!!! After that, I decided I would rather retain a little water! What I am doing now is REALLY watching the sodium.....that helps. My mom takes them and also has cramps, but not as bad. Just keep an eye out for that....otherwise they help with the water retention and also blood pressure, plus they are CHEAP! I took water pills for awhile, because I was retaining fluid. It immediately took about 4 lbs. of water off. I had to stop taking them because of the HORRIBLE cramping in my legs! I put up with it for awhile I also get cramps, but not near as bad since the doctor increased the amount of potassium I take. Also, I found if I keep my feet warm, wearing socks helps, I do not get cramps. Don't know why it works, Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Water Retention: How Are They Related?

Diabetes And Water Retention: How Are They Related?

By pH health care professionals If you have diabetes, or if someone close to you does, perhaps you’ve noticed some swelling in the ankles where fluid has built up, causing a puffy appearance. This is typically water retention, also called edema, and is relatively common among diabetics. Let’s take a look at how diabetes and water retention are related. What is water retention? Water retention is a buildup of fluid in an area of the body, causing swelling, often in the ankles, feet, wrists and/or arms. So, how are diabetes and water retention related? The most common type of water retention is in the legs and feet (peripheral edema). Sometimes, water retention occurs as a side effect of insulin therapy or diabetes drugs. Peripheral edema is sometimes a symptom of kidney problems or heart failure related to diabetes. However, water retention can occur as a result of an injury, surgery, long plane rides, pregnancy, hormone changes and certain medications. But if you have diabetes, you need to be extra cautious as water retention can make it more difficult for wounds to heal. Read here for other causes of water retention. So, how can you be more proactive? Work with a doctor. While the water retention itself may not seem to be giving you any trouble, it may be a red flag for something else, so it’s important to be proactive and tell your doctor right away about any swelling. Utilize body composition testing on a regular basis. You can gauge whether your body’s fluids are out of balance even before you see significant swelling through body composition testing. It only takes a few minutes to get information that can save you time, money and stress. Be proactive. Get to the root cause of your water retention. There may be other factors including problems with the thyro Continue reading >>

Water Retention And Diabetes

Water Retention And Diabetes

April 7, 2013 by Linda Lazarides 9 Comments I am a diabetic, I have water retention with swollen legs, ankles, feet. I first noticed it about a year or little less ago. I had been on Avandia, so my doctor took me off that. But, I started insulin in Sept and I gained 35 pounds in 5 months. I mentioned to my doc about the water retention but he says it is just weight gain. I have never had problem with this before and I have never been this heavy before. I was given a water pill and I felt like I went to the bathroom less that day than I normally do as I go to the bathroom a lot, between thediabetesand I drink A LOT of coffee/tea. I have been exercising (walking) and I cannot even go a half hour before my legs (shin area and ankles) hurt so bad I could cry and I have to stop. It feels kind of like they are tightening up. Is this a symptom of something? I want to keep walking and will push myself through the pain if I know it is ok, but am worried that something else is wrong and should i push myself?? PS I am 40 years old. I do medical transcription as my job, work 1 full time and 1 part time and am sitting at a desk the best part of my day EVERY day. Hi Linda, my wife is 33 and she has had diabetes all her life, In the past 12 months shes has lost her eyesight thorughtdiabeticretinopathy and now suffering fromdiabeticneuropathy of which she has been prescribed various different drugs (pain killers and neuropathy disease tablets). One of these drugs are called Gabapentin, just in the past week my wife has been taken off this drug beause its the main cause of severe water retention in her feet, ankles, legs, belly and (slighting lesser case in her) arms. She has been prescibed 20mg Furosemide and she has been taking these for the past couple of weeks but I cant see much c Continue reading >>

'water Pills' May Cut Heart Risks In Diabetes

'water Pills' May Cut Heart Risks In Diabetes

'Water Pills' May Cut Heart Risks in Diabetes Study: More Costly Drugs No Better Than Diuretics June 27, 2005 -- Water pills may work as well as other commonly used high blood pressure pills to protect the hearts of people with type 2 diabetes . The researchers say they found "no evidence" that newer, more costly high blood pressure medications were better at preventing heart disease deaths or heart attacks than water pills, also called diuretics. The findings were complex and "must be interpreted with caution," they write in the Archives of Internal Medicine. They say the type of diuretics they studied "should be strongly considered" as initial drug therapy for patients with high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes or prediabetes . Nearly one in three U.S. adults has high blood pressure . But almost a third of them don't know it, says the American Heart Association (AHA). High blood pressure affects nearly 50 million people in the U.S. and approximately 1 billion worldwide, according to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI). Uncontrolled high blood pressure can be very dangerous. It can raise the risk of heart attack , stroke , heart failure , or kidney failure , says the AHA. The relationship between blood pressure and heart disease risk is a continuous and consistent one, says the NHLBI. The higher the blood pressure, the greater the risk of heart attack , heart failure, stroke , and kidney disease . People with diabetes and high blood pressure have approximately twice the risk of complications compared with people who have high blood pressure alone. Medications can help curb high blood pressure and reduce the risk of complications from the disease. A healthy lifestyle -- including exercise and good nutrition -- can also make a difference. "Almost thre Continue reading >>

Peripheral Edema And Diabetes

Peripheral Edema And Diabetes

By Elizabeth Woolley | Reviewed by Richard N. Fogoros, MD Peripheral edema is swelling from the collection of fluid in the feet, ankles, and legs. It can occur in one or both of your lower extremities. If you have diabetes, you need to take extra precautions when you have edema. Edema is the result of damage to capillaries or increased pressure causing capillaries to leak fluid into surrounding tissues and result in swelling. People with diabetes often have circulation problems that can cause wounds to heal slowly or not at all. Edema makes it more difficult for wounds to heal. Therefore, controlling edema is essential. There are many common causes of edema that are fairly benign. Some examples of more common causes of peripheral edema, not specifically related to diabetes, include physical inactivity, standing or sitting for long periods of time, surgery, burns, hot weather, pregnancy, menstruation, menopause, contraceptive pills, certain medications, excessive salt intake, malnutrition, or a bad diet. Edema may present in only one extremity (rather than both) due to deep venous thrombosis (DVT), cellulitis , osteomyelitis , trauma, a ruptured Baker's cyst , or a lymphatic obstruction. Peripheral edema can also be associated with more serious conditionsmany of which can be associated with diabetes complications such as heart disease , venous insufficiency, liver disease, and kidney disease . Certain diabetes medications can also cause edema, specifically the thiazolidinedione drugs Actos and Avandia. These drugs have come under a cloud because of their potential cardiac adverse effects, and should not be used in anyone who has had a history of congestive heart failure. People with diabetes are twice as likely to have heart disease or heart failure (such as congestive Continue reading >>

Seven Tips For Dealing With Diabetes-related Fluid Retention

Seven Tips For Dealing With Diabetes-related Fluid Retention

Fluid retention, also known as edema, is a problem that affects many diabetics, especially those with type 2 diabetes. Water retention can occur in any part of the legs, including the feet, ankles, calves and thighs. There are several reasons why edema occurs, such as fluid buildup or from inflammation in injured or diseased tissue and joints. Types of Edema There are three types of diabetes-related fluid retention: The first type is called macular edema. Macular edema is a swelling that occurs in the macular, which is near the center of the retina. The retina is responsible for a number of duties such as the ability to read, daytime vision and color reception. Macular edema can cause diabetic retinopathy, which starts with the leaking of fluid from blood vessels into the macula. If not treated, this condition can blind a person. Pulmonary edema is the second type of fluid retention, which occurs if someone is using certain diabetic medications and if the person has cardiovascular problems. This type of edema can be treated inserting a catheter that drains the fluids. Foot and leg edema is the third type of edema and is also the most commonly discussed. Edema in the legs and feet can cause a high risk of non-healing wounds in diabetics. This type of edema is usually treated with manual decongestive therapy and diuretics. Medication Risks for Edema People who take thiazolidinedione medications are known to experience water retention. Thiazolidinediones are commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes as they help the body produce more insulin. However, one of the downsides of this medication is that it can lead to weight gain and edema. Preventing and Treating Edema Edema can have a lot of harmful effects if not treated like loss of vision. One of the main ways to stop fluid r Continue reading >>

Rosiglitazone And Metformin (oral Route)

Rosiglitazone And Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure that this medicine is working properly. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. Call your doctor right away if you have chest pain or discomfort, nausea, pain or discomfort in the arms, jaw, back, or neck, shortness of breath, sweating, or vomiting. These may be symptoms of a heart attack. If you are rapidly gaining weight or having shortness of breath, chest pain or discomfort, extreme tiredness or weakness, irregular breathing, irregular heartbeat, or excessive swelling of the hands, wrist, ankles, or feet, check with your doctor right away. These may be symptoms of a heart problem or edema (fluid retention). Let your doctor or dentist know you are taking this medicine. Your doctor may advise you to stop taking this medicine before you have major surgery or diagnostic tests, especially tests that use a contrast dye. Under certain conditions, too much metformin can cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis. The symptoms of lactic acidosis are severe and appear quickly. Lactic acidosis usually occurs when other serious health problems are present, such as a heart attack or kidney failure. The symptoms of lactic acidosis include: abdominal or stomach discomfort, decreased appetite, diarrhea, fast or shallow breathing, a general feeling of discomfort, muscle pain or cramping, and unusual sleepiness, tiredness, or weakness. If you have more than one of these symptoms together, you should get immediate emergency medical help. If you have abdominal or stomach pain, dark urine, a loss of appetite, nausea or vomiting, unusual tiredness or weakness, or yellow eyes or skin, check with your doctor right awa Continue reading >>

What To Do If You Have Water Retention And Diabetes

What To Do If You Have Water Retention And Diabetes

Edema, or water retention, occurs when theres an excess fluid accumulated in different body tissues. This, in turn, causes swelling in the affected areas, usually in feet, legs, ankles, and hands. Even though everyone should take the proper measures to treat edema, those who have diabetes should take extra precautions. They usually have problems with the blood circulation which can impede the healing of wounds. And, water retention can further worsen the healing of wounds. Thats why controlling this condition is of particular importance for those with diabetes. Swelling in certain parts of the body is the main symptom of edema. Other symptoms include: Skin that retains a dimple after pressing it for a few seconds Water retention can occur because of different medical conditions, or as a side effect of certain medications. Some of the most common causes of edema are the following: Congestive heart failure if you have this condition, your heart is not able to circulate enough blood. So, your kidneys have to retain sodium in order to help the body keep water and improve the blood volume. Deep vein thrombosis a blood clot in a deep leg vein can damage the valves within the veins which regulate the circulation. If deep vein thrombosis causes your edema, the most affected body parts would be ankles, calf, and thighs. Diabetic nephropathy this and other kidney diseases can cause water retention due to excess sodium and fluid retention. Side effects of certain medication pioglitazone (Actos), and rosiglitazone (Avandia) which are popular antidiabetic medications. In some cases, the beginning of an insulin therapy can also cause mild and temporary edema. Other drugs that might cause edema as a side effect are high blood pressure medications, estrogens, nonsteroidal anti-inflamm Continue reading >>

Pills For Type 2 Diabetes

Pills For Type 2 Diabetes

Eisenberg Center at Oregon Health & Science University. Different kinds of diabetes pills work in different ways to control bloodsugar (blood glucose). All the diabetes pills in this guide lower blood sugar. Combining two different kinds of diabetes pills can work better to lower yourblood sugar than a single medicine. But combining two kinds of diabetes pills can make it more likely that yourblood sugar will drop too low. Most diabetes pills can cause weight gain. One kind, metformin (Glucophage), does not make you gain weight. Diabetes pills wont raise or lower your blood pressure enough to affect yourhealth. Type 2 diabetes means the body has a problem with insulin. This causes blood sugar toget too high. Insulin is a hormone, or chemical, made by the body that is needed tochange food into energy. When you have type 2 diabetes, your body either does notmake enough insulin, or it doesnt use insulin as well as it should. Diabetes istreated with insulin or oral medicines (pills). This guide can help you talk with your doctoror nurse about pills for type 2 diabetes. It covers: How well they work for adultswith type 2 diabetes. The information in this guide comes from a government-funded review of research aboutpills for type 2 diabetes. This guide does not cover all the possible ways to treat type 2 diabetes. It does notinclude information on diet and exercise. It does not cover insulin or using thesepills along with insulin. It does not include older diabetes pills, like chlorpropamide (Diabinese), or new pills, like sitagliptin (Januvia). It does not cover children, pregnant women, or type 1diabetes. If blood sugar stays high for a long time, people may have a higher chance ofheart attacks, strokes, kidney damage, blindness, and amputations. Keeping yourblood sugar at Continue reading >>

Fluid Retention Is Often Just An Annoyance, But It Can Point To Serious Illness

Fluid Retention Is Often Just An Annoyance, But It Can Point To Serious Illness

If a plate of salty buffalo wings makes your feet swell up like balloons, you might be experiencing edema — fluid trapped in the body’s tissues, most often in the feet, ankles and legs. Fluid retention can be an annoyance, but it can also indicate a more serious condition. Edema is sometimes caused by damage to or pressure within veins that causes them to leak fluid — blood plasma that is mostly water — into nearby tissue. (At other times, edema is caused by heart, kidney or liver disease that causes water to accumulate in the lungs, abdomen and elsewhere.) Fluid usually pools in the feet, ankles and legs, but it can also be more generalized throughout the body. Swelling can either disappear overnight or persist. The severity and duration will depend on the condition causing it. Fluid retention has many causes, and not all of them are alarming, says Ann O’Hare, an associate professor of medicine at the University of Washington in Seattle. “Many people will get some mild ankle swelling when they are on a long plane ride, or they may get hand swelling on a hot day,” O’Hare says. “It’s nothing to worry about if it resolves within a day or two.” Peripheral edema, the term for swelling or fluid buildup in the lower legs or hands, can be brought on by such things as hormonal changes during menstruation, pregnancy, standing or sitting for long stints, and consuming salty food and drink. One common cause is venous insufficiency, in which damage to valves in the legs’ deep veins hinders the return of blood to the heart. This causes fluid to collect and pool in the legs and feet. Superficial varicose veins can also cause legs to swell. The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ibuprofen (Advil and its generic cousins) and naproxen (Aleve and its generics) c Continue reading >>

Diabetes - A Major Risk Factor For Kidney Disease

Diabetes - A Major Risk Factor For Kidney Disease

Diabetes mellitus, usually called diabetes, is a disease in which your body does not make enough insulin or cannot use normal amounts of insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone that regulates the amount of sugar in your blood. A high blood sugar level can cause problems in many parts of your body. The most common ones are Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 diabetes usually occurs in children. It is also called juvenile onset diabetes mellitus or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In this type, your pancreas does not make enough insulin and you have to take insulin injections for the rest of your life. Type 2 diabetes, which is more common, usually occurs in people over 40 and is called adult onset diabetes mellitus. It is also called non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In Type 2, your pancreas makes insulin, but your body does not use it properly. The high blood sugar level often can be controlled by following a diet and/or taking medication, although some patients must take insulin. Type 2 diabetes is particularly prevalent among African Americans, American Indians, Latin Americans and Asian Americans. With diabetes, the small blood vessels in the body are injured. When the blood vessels in the kidneys are injured, your kidneys cannot clean your blood properly. Your body will retain more water and salt than it should, which can result in weight gain and ankle swelling. You may have protein in your urine. Also, waste materials will build up in your blood. Diabetes also may cause damage to nerves in your body. This can cause difficulty in emptying your bladder. The pressure resulting from your full bladder can back up and injure the kidneys. Also, if urine remains in your bladder for a long time, you can develop an infection from the rapid growth of bacteria in urine that h Continue reading >>

Water Retention: Remedies, Symptoms, Causes, And More

Water Retention: Remedies, Symptoms, Causes, And More

bloating, especially in the abdominal area indentations in the skin, similar to what you see on your fingers when youve been in the bath or shower a long time A number of factors can cause water retention, including: flying in an airplane: Changes in cabin pressure and sitting for an extended period of time may cause your body to hold on to water. standing or sitting too long: Gravity keeps blood in your lower extremities. Its important to get up and move around often to keep blood circulating. If you have a sedentary job, schedule time to get up and walk around. menstrual changes and fluctuating hormones eating too much sodium: You may get too much sodium by using a lot of table salt or ingesting processed foods and soft drinks. medications: Some medications have water retention as a side effect. These include: According to a study published in the Journal of Caring Sciences , vitamin B-6 significantly helped with premenstrual symptoms like water retention. Protein attracts water and keeps your body balanced. A special protein called albumin keeps fluid in the bloodstream and prevents it from leaking out and causing swelling. Elevating your feet can help move the water upward and away from your lower extremities. Compression socks are becoming more popular and easier to find. They are available at athletic clothing stores and many online sites. Compression socks are made to fit tight. They may even feel a little uncomfortable at first. The purpose of compression apparel is to squeeze your legs and prevent fluid from accumulating. 7. Seek your doctors help if your problem persists Your doctor may prescribe a diuretic medication to make you urinate more. You can live a healthy life if you naturally retain water. Its a common health issue. Its side effects are usually li Continue reading >>

Why People With Diabetes Retain Water In The Body?

Why People With Diabetes Retain Water In The Body?

The blood vessels are important as they transport blood to body parts. Diabetes damages body vessels and makes them leaky. As a result, fluid starts to leak out of them and starts to collect in body tissues, which leads to fluid retention or edema. Water retention or edema affects many people with diabetes. In this condition, water commonly collects in the: Ankles Feet Wrists Arms There are three types of diabetes-related edema: Macular Edema – Water leaks into the center of your eye (retina). Fluids from the blood vessels leaking into the surrounding areas of the retina can affect the vision. A diabetic may find it difficult to read, see during the day or understand colors if they have macular edema. Pulmonary Edema – If one takes diabetes-related medications and has any heart disease, they may have this type of edema. Water collects in the lungs making it difficult to breathe. To treat this type of water retention, a doctor may suggest draining the water from the lungs by the use of a catheter – a thin pipe used to drain fluids from the body. Foot and leg edema – Water builds up in the ankle, foot and legs causing a painless swelling in the affected parts. If a diabetic is overweight, has a blood clot in the leg or has a leg infection, they may be running the risk of this kind of edema. This type of water retention is also common in elderly people. Diabetes-related medicines, like Thiazolidinediones, can be responsible for water retention in the body. Also, if one has a kidney, liver or heart disease, chances of water retaining in the body are much higher. Edema, if untreated, can have serious outcomes. It can usually be treated by changing medications. A diabetic should always talk to their doctor if they experience any unnatural swelling or weight gain. Sour Continue reading >>

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