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Water Fasting Type 1 Diabetes

Faux Fasting Diet Regenerates Pancreas To Reverse Diabetes

Faux Fasting Diet Regenerates Pancreas To Reverse Diabetes

Using stem cells to create insulin-producing beta cells that could be transplanted into diabetics is being investigated as a possible cure for type 1 diabetes and treatment for type 2, but new research suggests that a special diet could reprogram cells in the pancreas to do the same thing. Researchers at the University of Southern California (USC) claim that a diet that mimics the effects of fasting spurs the growth of new insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreases of mice, essentially reversing the disease. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes center around insulin, or rather, the lack thereof. Put very simply, in type 1 diabetes, the body – specifically, the pancreas – stops producing insulin, while in type 2 diabetes, the body doesn't use insulin properly and eventually is unable to produce enough insulin to compensate. In both type 1 and late-stage type 2 diabetes, insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas are lost, meaning many diabetics need to take insulin to replace what's not being made by the pancreas. Looking to discover the effects of a fasting-mimicking diet (FMD) on diabetes sufferers, USC researchers used mice with type 2 diabetes and another group in which type 1 diabetes had been simulated by giving them high doses of a drug to kill their insulin-producing beta cells. They found that mice in both groups – even those in the later stages of the disease – regained healthy insulin production, had a reduction in insulin resistance, and had more stable blood glucose levels. The researchers say the brief, periodic diet, which was designed to mimic the effects of a water-only fast, activated genes that are normally only switched on in the developing pancreases of fetal mice. These genes prompted the production of neurogenin-3 (Ngn3), a protein that le Continue reading >>

Fasting Diet Regenerating Beta Cells?

Fasting Diet Regenerating Beta Cells?

I WILL post a review ASAP, hopefully by tomorrow Sorry about the continued delay in posting this. I have spent about 3 hours at work today trying to finish this off and I still have a little way to go. Its probably going to be Monday. I will try to upload the report as a Word file - its way too long to post direct. Here is my review of Cheng et al 2017, Fast-Mimicking Diet Promotes Ngn3-driven -Cell Regeneration to Reverse Diabetes. Cell 168:775-788. I have tried to include a running commentary in red which is a more personal take on the paper, what I think its strengths and weakness are and how it might shed light on potential treatments or even cures for T1 and T2D. Well, this is the brilliant assessment for which wed hoped! Thank you, Joel. Obviously so far Ive only read your red but will reread several times with your other notes. Here is my review of Cheng et al 2017, Fast-Mimicking Diet Promotes Ngn3-driven -Cell Regeneration to Reverse Diabetes. Cell 168:775-788. I have tried to include a running commentary in red which is a more personal take on the paper, what I think its strengths and weakness are and how it might shed light on potential treatments or even cures for T1 and T2D. I go back to my previous notein the olden days they fasted patients because they had no insulin to give them, feeding them every 2 -3 daysthey had early death and loss of limb and other complications. WE HAVE INSULIN NOWit has been shown and proven to rest the pancreas and enable the regeneration of cellsAny Diabetic presenting with numbers >250 should be considered needing temporary if not permanent insulin therapy Any Diabetic presenting with numbers >250 should be considered needing temporary if not permanent insulin therapy And a great many people would agree. Without getting into Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Prolonged Fasting.

Type 1 Diabetes And Prolonged Fasting.

Abstract AIMS: Fasting is common in several religions. The aims of this study were to determine if prolonged fasting (> 25 h) is safe for individuals with Type 1 diabetes and to identify factors associated with success. METHODS: Patients intending to fast were instructed on insulin dose adjustments, frequent glucose monitoring and when to terminate the fast using a standard protocol. Clinical and epidemiological factors were recorded and a comparison was made between successful and unsuccessful fasters. RESULTS: Of 56 subjects who intended to fast, 37 (65%) were successful. Individuals terminated their fast in the presence of either hypoglycaemia or hyperglycaemia and adherence to the protocol was high. There were no serious side-effects of fasting. Successful fasters had greater reductions in insulin dosage and higher HbA(1c). There were no differences between individuals taking intermittent insulin injections and those with continuous infusion pumps. CONCLUSIONS: Persons with Type 1 diabetes can participate safely in prolonged fasts provided they reduce their usual insulin dose significantly and adhere to guidelines regarding glucose monitoring and indications for terminating fasting. Continue reading >>

Fasting Diet Could Regenerate Pancreas And Reverse Diabetes, Researchers Say

Fasting Diet Could Regenerate Pancreas And Reverse Diabetes, Researchers Say

A fasting diet has the ability to regenerate the pancreas and could potentially reverse diabetes, researchers have found. A US study, published in scientific journal Cell, tested a modified version of the fasting-mimicking diet (FMD) on both mice and human cells. The findings showed cycles of the diet could regenerate pancreatic cells to restore insulin in type 1 diabetes patients and could also reverse both type 1 and 2 diabetes in mice. The study's co-author, Dr Valter Longo from the University of Southern California, told the ABC the findings were "potentially very exciting" because they could lead to cures for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, unlike type 2, is an autoimmune condition for which there is no known cause or cure. In patients with type 1 diabetes, the pancreas stops producing insulin. Dr Longo also said a FMD could also regenerate other organs because their research had shown similar effects for blood cells. "They show that extreme diets with very specific compositions can trigger self repair and regeneration processes in the mouse and possibly humans," Dr Longo said. Taking into account the challenges and side-effects of fasting in humans, Dr Longo and his team developed a modified low-calorie, low-protein and low-carbohydrate but high-fat four-day FMD. The diet caused changes in the levels of specific growth factors, glucose, and ketone bodies and reduced the blood glucose on pre-diabetic patients. Mice receiving the FMD showed improved glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance. The pancreas helps to control blood sugar levels and restoring the organ can reverse the symptoms of diabetes. The diet can regenerate the pancreas by reprogramming cells into "beta cells" that make insulin. The study found cycles of the FMD could promote the gen Continue reading >>

5 Day Water Fast Results Of A Type 1 Diabetic Female: Why, How, And What Happened

5 Day Water Fast Results Of A Type 1 Diabetic Female: Why, How, And What Happened

Why A 5 Day Water Fast? There are many reasons why one would fast. Let me explain to you the journey I took in the last month that brought me to this fasting experiment. I'm a diabetic. It's been over 20 years now since I was diagnosed in 1996 at the age of 13. I see the doctor every 6 months, give or take, and have my HbA1c taken. Mine is usually in the 7-8 range. While this is high, it's not something I've worried about a whole lot. Over the years, I've done low carb, paleo, gluten free, almost no carb, but have only once in this time gotten an HbA1c result below 7. The last doctor's appointment in February had my HbA1c at 8.6. The doctor was not happy, and I decided I was going to show him. The doctor suggested I see a nutritionist, but I really didn't see the point. I know what to do, I just got lazy and was enjoying that chocolate, popcorn, ice cream, corn chips a few too many times every week. I knew what to do, I just wasn't doing it. Now was the time to fix my diet. Judo is my sport and I want to compete in an event at the end of April. Since I compete in the 70 kg weight class, but my weight has been hovering around 76 kg, I needed to get my butt in gear if I was going to drop 6 kg in a couple of months. In order to motivate myself, I started researching on the web again. Visiting my favorite hunting grounds of paleo and keto diets, I came across the Bulletproof Diet, which I had heard about before, but never really looked at it. It seemed like a new approach to the same problem, so I wanted to read his take on it. This lead me down eating a ton of butter, trying to intermittent fast, and overall eating less and having much better blood sugars. I would still go out to eat and eat those corn chips, or eat way too much protein in a meal causing my blood sugar to Continue reading >>

How To Control Diabetes Through Fasting

How To Control Diabetes Through Fasting

A lot of people ask me, “Tyler, how can I control diabetes naturally?” So I thought I’d share what I say to them here. During all these years that I have dedicated to helping people use food as medicine, one of the questions that I hear quite commonly comes from people with diabetes and their concerns about fasting. I have to admit that this is a tough one because there are people who have too much sugar (hyperglycemia), and there are also those who don’t have enough sugar (hypoglycemia). When it comes to fasting, I’ve actually facilitated Type I and many Type II diabetics through juice and water fasting. I somehow feel that this is one of those issues when people might want to have help from someone who is experienced in these conditions. Either way, the point is that if you’re a Type I or Type II diabetic, and you want to do a fast, it’s just a matter of monitoring where your blood sugars are at, and making sure to keep them within a comfortable level. Watch For Blood Sugar Spikes Typically, when Type I or Type II diabetics go on a fast, they’re drinking a lot of fresh-pressed juices, especially ones made from fruits, which might cause them to have a spike in their blood sugar immediately. What you’ll find, is after two or three days it doesn’t spike as much because there’s not as much fat in the circulatory system that’s causing that blood sugar to stay there. So, it comes down to drinking small amounts of juice through the entire day. Another crucial thing is to monitor and maintain balanced blood sugar levels! In that case, if it goes too high, you can go ahead and do your insulin. If it drops too low, you can just have some juice. I know that after only three to five days of fasting I’ve helped dozens of Type II diabetics and probably thr Continue reading >>

Water Fasting | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Water Fasting | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I am one day into a water fast competition with a friend. To see who can last the longest. I am a 30 year old type 1 on novorapid and lantus. Just wanted to ask if anyone has done this before and how they adjusted their lantus. I normally take 22 units per day and today I took 16 to adjust for the fast. I went for a nap just after lantus and woke up hypo 3 hours later. So will probably lower this again tomorrow. Any other comments and advice from someone who has done this before would be great. Thank you. Doesn't that mean your Lantus dose is too high though? Lantus (as any other background insulin) is supposed to only deal with whatever the liver secretes throughout the day (so theoretically should keep you fairly stable while fasting), while Novorapid takes care of any carb intake. Sounds like the "competition" is a good chance to do a basal test & tweak the Lantus dose? Did you find yourself snacking whilst no bolus was on board to stop hypos? (Prior to dropping the units for the fast?) Sounds like the "competition" is a good chance to do a basal test & tweak the Lantus dose? Did you find yourself snacking whilst no bolus was on board to stop hypos? (Prior to dropping the units for the fast?) Ive never heard of this app before. I will download now and see what its about. I had 2 hypos last night but just had a few dextrose. I reduced my lantus from 22 to 16 but obviously that was not enough so today I have reduced again to 10. Doesn't that mean your Lantus dose is too high though? Lantus (as any other background insulin) is supposed to only deal with whatever the liver secretes throughout the day (so theoretically should keep you fairly stable whil Continue reading >>

Fasting Diet Combined With Beta Cell Regeneration Might Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Fasting Diet Combined With Beta Cell Regeneration Might Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Periodic fasting has long been demonstrated to have beneficial effects on autoimmune disorders, cancer prevention and treatments, cardiovascular disease, and a myriad of other ailments. This most recent paper by Cheng et al. might add the treatment of Type 1 diabetes to that list[1]. If successful in humans, it has the potential to reverse some or most of the loss of insulin-producing cells within the pancreas. Just as remarkable, the treatment itself is relatively straightforward, consisting of a regimented protocol of periodic fasting-like conditions. Generally speaking, Type 1 diabetes results from an autoimmune mediated depletion of insulin-secreting pancreatic beta islet cells. In contrast, Type 2 results from lower cellular sensitivity to insulin. Type 2 is primarily caused by environmental factors such as poor diet. The current medical approach to treating Type 1 diabetes is the periodic administration of insulin, usually through self-administered injections. Most new therapies focused on curing Type 1 diabetes are looking to repopulating beta islet cells through the use of reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, these approaches are not as simple as the method demonstrated by Cheng et al in this recent study. The treatment consists of a “fasting mimicking diet” (FMD), which for mice corresponds to 3-4 day cycles of a high-fat and low-calorie diet, maintained for at least a month, followed by refeeding. This was performed on transgenic diabetic mice and also normal mice that had their beta cells depleted through the administration of high doses of a toxic drug. Results were also repeated using human diabetic primary beta cells in culture. In this case, the treatment consisted of the addition of human serum from individuals undergoing FMD. Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting With Type 1 Diabetes

Intermittent Fasting With Type 1 Diabetes

Intermittent Fasting with Type 1 Diabetes If your first reaction to intermittent fasting with type 1 diabetes isOh my gosh, my blood sugar would be so low! I could never do that! then definitely keep reading. In this guide, I will cover everything you need to know about intermittent fasting with type 1 diabetes: Whats the point of intermittent fasting? There are 3 general reasons a person might want to pursue intermittent fasting. Weight-loss: This is the most obvious and most common reason to give it a try. Simplicity: Reducing the number of hours each day that you have to think about food, track food, make decisions around food, and cook food can be really freeing! Instead of frantically and unexpectedly skipping meals because of a hectic schedule, intermittent fasting allows you to properly and methodically skip eating during parts of the time. Energy: Once you get going, and youre no longer freaking out about, How hungry will I feel!?!this approach to eating can actually give you quite a boost of energy because your body will be burning fat for fuel instead of relying on sugar from your blood. Body fat is an endless source of energy. Before we get started: if your blood sugar drops just because you dont eat for a handful of hours, youre taking too much background/basal insulin via pump or injection. Talk to your CDE or primary care doctor about basal testing. (Or check out Gary Scheiners book, Think Like a Pancreas and do the basal testing yourself!) Basal testing literally consists of purposefully skipping a meal (or two) in order to see if your insulin keeps your blood sugar steady, or if your blood sugar significantly rises or falls out of your personal goal range. If it rises, youre not getting enough background/basal insulin. If it falls, then youre clearly ge Continue reading >>

Can You Do A 24h Fast With Type 1 Diabetes?

Can You Do A 24h Fast With Type 1 Diabetes?

Can You Do A 24h Fast With Type 1 Diabetes? Recently, Ive read a lot about fasting, intermittent fasting and how to do it. Intermittent fasting can be done in many ways, depending on your preferences and lifestyle, and basically means to cut down on calories for a limited period of time, to give the body a chance to use its own reserves. This can be especially helpful if youre trying to lose weight, or keep your blood glucose levels more stable. In some cases, these two are interlinked (read: Type 2 Diabetes). What is important to remember is to stilleat enough calories. You just do it within a limited time window.Intermittent fasting makes your body use the energy (food) consumed more efficiently. And no, skipping a meal (or even two) wont send your body into a crisis-starvation mode. That takes a good few days to happen. Intermittent fasting usually has numbers attached to it, depending on how long youre fasting for; 5:2 means youre restricting calories on 2 days of the week, while eating normal the other 5. 20:4 means you fast for 20 hours, eating one or more meals within the remaining 4 hours. 24/36/48/72:0 simply means a 24/36/48/72 hour fast. 16:8 means you eat your meals within an 8 hour time span, fasting the remaining 16 hours. Ive done a 16:8 fast in my daily life for a few months now. For me it works really well, as it enables me to keep my blood glucose levels more stable for a longer period of time (which is really beneficial on so many levels!). And to be honest, in practice it only means skipping breakfast, and eating lunch and dinner as normal. This feels doable for me, and I can easily function without having breakfast every day. But, is a 24 hour possible to do with insulin dependent Type 1 Diabetes as your BFF? I decided to test it out, in the name o Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetic Water Fast

Type 1 Diabetic Water Fast

P-Dubjess, Diabetes type 1 and 2 are reversible. Type 2 is much easier than type 1 to get rid of. I do not want to scare you, but I think you need do some research to find out how many days after stopping the use of insulin you can have your child fast. I would suggest you watch some videos on YouTube by Dr. Fung. He makes all his patients fast intermittently. Also there are other parents like you who talk about their experiences. I love the idea that you parents are fasting with your child. You will learn with your child what your body goes through. Fasting is amazing, cure for all, but for type 1 diabetic you have to be cautious. Fasting with water means just that. No salt, or supplements, body will produce what it needs. The things you need to do is to rest, drink water (filtered and warm) by thirst and stay warm, this affords your body to use all its energy in healing. You all will experience detox symptoms, depending on what your eating history is, headaches, pain in joints, nausea, acid reflux, dizziness are common symptoms. You will not face all symptoms at the same time. Most importantly after fasting a change in eating lifestyle will need to change. You don't say what is your diet, but I would suggest that eat nothing but vegetables, no fuits obviously, no meats, milk, cheese, fish or processed foods. Make yourself and let your child help you make salads and some cooked meals with vegetables, avoid carrots and potatoes. Read books by Dr. Neal Barnard and Dr. Gabriel Cousens. They talk about why we need to eat a raw vegan diet. And search my messages for to find a PDF link to Dr. Shelton's book on fasting. What a wealth of knowledge! It would be interesting to know what is your child's blood glucose. Also what is blood Sugar before and after fast each day. The B Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting: Not So Fast

Intermittent Fasting: Not So Fast

I’m sure that at least a few of you have heard or read about the latest trend in weight loss called “intermittent fasting.” The very word “fasting” is probably less than appealing, as it pretty much means you don’t eat or drink anything (except perhaps water) for a specified amount of time. Starvation is not exactly recommended among health professionals. But intermittent fasting is different. Is it something you should try? What is intermittent fasting, anyway? Intermittent fasting has been the talk of the town, so to speak, thanks to two recent books to hit the market: The Fast Diet by Dr. Michael Mosley and Mimi Spencer, and The Overnight Diet by Caroline Apovian, MD. Intermittent fasting essentially means that you skip a meal or severely restrict calories on certain days of the week with the intention of losing weight, controlling blood glucose, and/or decreasing heart disease risk. But on the other days of the week, you can pretty much eat what you want (within reason, of course). For many people, this concept sounds appealing. Limiting calories for a couple days a week doesn’t sound that bad if you can eat what you want the rest of the time. The Fast Diet, also called the The 5:2 Diet has you eat between 500 and 600 calories (women get 500 calories, men get 600 calories) for two days out of the week, spread over two meals of about 250 to 300 calories. These fast days should not be right in a row, and your food choices ideally should be more plant-based and emphasize protein. The premise is that after several hours of fasting, the body burns up its carbohydrate stores and shifts to burning fat for fuel. Many claim that intermittent fasting also helps to blunt appetite. The Overnight Diet emphasizes getting enough sleep; a lack of sleep can disrupt met Continue reading >>

Fasting With Type 1 Diabetes

Fasting With Type 1 Diabetes

WRITTEN BY: Carly Crompton Note: This is part of our library of resources on Food. Learn more about dietary recommendations from nutritionists and foodies alike on our Food page! In the Type 1 community, food and eating habits are not only a common subject of conversation, but a necessary component of management. A common dietary practice that is important to acknowledge in this space is Fasting. Religious Reasons There are many different reasons for fasting and sometimes it cannot be avoided. Religious and spiritual fasting manifests in many different practices and belief systems such as Judaism, Buddhism and Islam. Fasting before medical procedures like surgery or blood tests is often required. Additionally, fasting for detoxification, or “doing a cleanse” is a growing dietary practice. So, is it safe for those with Type 1 diabetes to fast? If so, what are the best practices to follow while participating in a fast? Most of the research regarding fasting and diabetes surrounds Ramadan and most often, the medical recommendation for those with diabetes is to avoid fasting. The main health risk is hypoglycemia – particularly if you continue taking insulin while fasting without regular blood glucose monitoring. If you do choose to fast for spiritual or personal reasons, talk with your healthcare provider about a plan and regularly monitor glucose to avoid health emergencies. Safety first is the best practice, and this is recognized in most spiritual communities. I was raised Jewish and distinctly remember the announcements from our Rabbi during long Yom Kippur services pleading individuals in various circumstances to not fast for their own safety and instead display their faith through another outlet. Again, fasting may not be out of the question, just be sure to tal Continue reading >>

Safe Fasting With Diabetes

Safe Fasting With Diabetes

Whether you are honoring an ancient religious practice or heading to the lab for a fasting blood test, care is needed when missing meals with diabetes. Fasting can throw off the delicate balance of food, water, and blood glucose levels in potentially harmful ways. Fasting with diabetes poses significant risks, says Kathaleen Briggs Early, PhD, RD, CDE, of the Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences. Most of the research on fasting and diabetes surrounds Ramadan, the annual Islamic observance that requires fasting from sunrise to sundown for 29 or 30 days. A commentary published in 2010 in Diabetes Care developed in collaboration with the American Diabetes Association (ADA) focused on fasting during Ramadan, though many of the issues it raises are relevant to other types of fasting as well. It says that “most often, the medical recommendation will be not to undertake fasting” if you have diabetes. The paper acknowledges that fasting for spiritual reasons is a personal decision, but one that should include the guidance of a health care provider. A study found that 43 percent of people with type 1 diabetes and 79 percent of people with type 2 diabetes from 13 Islamic countries fast during Ramadan. With that reality, fasting safely becomes a priority for people with diabetes and their care providers. “Anybody with diabetes needs to first talk to their doctor about going on a fast,” says Early, and some experts recommend a pre-fasting medical assessment to help ensure safety. If you are considering fasting, talk to your health care provider about a plan that takes medication, nutrition, and hydration into account. Regularly monitoring blood glucose during fasting is key to avoiding health emergencies. Not eating when taking insulin or certain other diabetes Continue reading >>

Fasting Diet 'regenerates Diabetic Organ'

Fasting Diet 'regenerates Diabetic Organ'

The pancreas can be triggered to regenerate itself through a type of fasting diet, say US researchers. Restoring the function of the organ - which helps control blood sugar levels - reversed symptoms of diabetes in animal experiments. The study, published in the journal Cell, says the diet reboots the body. Experts said the findings were "potentially very exciting" as they could become a new treatment for the disease. People are advised not to try this without medical advice. In the experiments, mice were put on a modified form of the "fasting-mimicking diet". It is like the human form of the diet when people spend five days on a low-calorie, low-protein, low-carbohydrate but high unsaturated-fat diet. It resembles a vegan diet with nuts and soups, but with around 800 to 1,100 calories a day. Then they have 25 days eating what they want - so overall it mimics periods of feast and famine. Previous research has suggested it can slow the pace of ageing. Diabetes therapy? But animal experiments showed the diet regenerated a special type of cell in the pancreas called a beta cell. These are the cells that detect sugar in the blood and release the hormone insulin if it gets too high. Dr Valter Longo, from the University of Southern California, said: "Our conclusion is that by pushing the mice into an extreme state and then bringing them back - by starving them and then feeding them again - the cells in the pancreas are triggered to use some kind of developmental reprogramming that rebuilds the part of the organ that's no longer functioning." There were benefits in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in the mouse experiments. Type 1 is caused by the immune system destroying beta cells and type 2 is largely caused by lifestyle and the body no longer responding to insulin. Further t Continue reading >>

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