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Warning Signs Of Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Diabetes Mellitus And Pregnancy

Diabetes Mellitus And Pregnancy

Practice Essentials Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance of variable degree with onset or first recognition during pregnancy. A study by Stuebe et al found this condition to be associated with persistent metabolic dysfunction in women at 3 years after delivery, separate from other clinical risk factors. [1] Infants of mothers with preexisting diabetes mellitus experience double the risk of serious injury at birth, triple the likelihood of cesarean delivery, and quadruple the incidence of newborn intensive care unit (NICU) admission. Gestational diabetes mellitus accounts for 90% of cases of diabetes mellitus in pregnancy, while preexisting type 2 diabetes accounts for 8% of such cases. Screening for diabetes mellitus during pregnancy Gestational diabetes The following 2-step screening system for gestational diabetes is currently recommended in the United States: Alternatively, for high-risk women or in areas in which the prevalence of insulin resistance is 5% or higher (eg, the southwestern and southeastern United States), a 1-step approach can be used by proceeding directly to the 100-g, 3-hour OGTT. The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for gestational diabetes mellitus after 24 weeks of pregnancy. The recommendation applies to asymptomatic women with no previous diagnosis of type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus. [2, 3] The recommendation does not specify whether the 1-step or 2-step screening approach would be preferable. Type 1 diabetes The disease is typically diagnosed during an episode of hyperglycemia, ketosis, and dehydration It is most commonly diagnosed in childhood or adolescence; the disease is rarely diagnosed during pregnancy Patients diagnosed during pregnancy most often present with unexpected Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes definition and facts Risk factors for gestational diabetes include a history of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, There are typically no noticeable signs or symptoms associated with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause the fetus to be larger than normal. Delivery of the baby may be more complicated as a result. The baby is also at risk for developing low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) immediately after birth. Following a nutrition plan is the typical treatment for gestational diabetes. Maintaining a healthy weight and following a healthy eating plan may be able to help prevent or minimize the risks of gestational diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes, or high blood sugar levels, that develops during pregnancy. It occurs in about 4% of all pregnancies. It is usually diagnosed in the later stages of pregnancy and often occurs in women who have no prior history of diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is thought to arise because the many changes, hormonal and otherwise, that occur in the body during pregnancy predispose some women to become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by specialized cells in the pancreas that allows the body to effectively metabolize glucose for later usage as fuel (energy). When levels of insulin are low, or the body cannot effectively use insulin (i.e., insulin resistance), blood glucose levels rise. What are the screening guidelines for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Most pregnant women are tested between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy (see Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar that develops during pregnancy and usually disappears after giving birth. It can occur at any stage of pregnancy, but is more common in the second half. It occurs if your body cannot produce enough insulin – a hormone that helps control blood sugar levels – to meet the extra needs in pregnancy. Gestational diabetes can cause problems for you and your baby during and after birth. But the risk of these problems happening can be reduced if it's detected and well managed. Who's at risk of gestational diabetes Any woman can develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy, but you're at an increased risk if: your body mass index (BMI) is above 30 – use the healthy weight calculator to work out your BMI you previously had a baby who weighed 4.5kg (10lbs) or more at birth you had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy one of your parents or siblings has diabetes your family origins are south Asian, Chinese, African-Caribbean or Middle Eastern If any of these apply to you, you should be offered screening for gestational diabetes during your pregnancy. Symptoms of gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes doesn't usually cause any symptoms. Most cases are only picked up when your blood sugar level is tested during screening for gestational diabetes. Some women may develop symptoms if their blood sugar level gets too high (hyperglycaemia), such as: But some of these symptoms are common during pregnancy anyway and aren't necessarily a sign of a problem. Speak to your midwife or doctor if you're worried about any symptoms you're experiencing. How gestational diabetes can affect your pregnancy Most women with gestational diabetes have otherwise normal pregnancies with healthy babies. However, gestational diabetes can cause problems s Continue reading >>

Living With Gestational Diabetes

Living With Gestational Diabetes

Between three and 20 per cent of pregnant women develop gestational diabetes, depending on their risk factors. All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes within 28 weeks of pregnancy. What is Gestational Diabetes Mellitus? Gestational diabetes mellitus is a type of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. Your body cannot produce enough insulin to handle the effects of a growing baby and changing hormone levels. Insulin helps your body to control the level of glucose (sugar) in your blood. If your body cannot produce enough insulin, your blood glucose (sugar) levels will rise. The good news Your baby will not be born with diabetes. Gestational diabetes can be managed and you can expect to have a happy, healthy baby. What does gestational diabetes mean for my baby? If left undiagnosed or untreated, gestational diabetes can lead to high blood glucose (sugar) levels. This increases the risk that your baby will weigh more than 4 kg (9lbs) and will have a difficult delivery. Gestational diabetes can also increase the risk of your baby becoming overweight and developing type 2 diabetes in the future. What does gestational diabetes mean for me? A diagnosis of gestational diabetes means you will be working closely with your health-care team to manage your blood glucose (sugar) levels and keep them in the target range. This will help you avoid complications in labour and delivery. After your baby is born, blood glucose (sugar) levels will usually return to normal. However, you are at greater risk for gestational diabetes in your next pregnancy and of developing type 2 diabetes in the future. Risk factors for gestational diabetes Being: 35 years of age or older From a high-risk group (Aboriginal, Hispanic, South Asian, Asian and African) Obese (BMI of 30kg/m2 or Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms And Warning Signs In Women

Diabetes Symptoms And Warning Signs In Women

Diabetes can happen at any age, though type 2 diabetes is more common in those over 45 years of age. Many of the risks for diabetes are the same between men and women, but there are some differences. The risk of developing diabetes is higher for people who: Are overweight or obese Are do not lead active lives Have high levels of fats called triglycerides, low levels of "good" cholesterol, or both Are a member of a high-risk race or ethnicity Have a history of high blood sugar Have a first-degree relative with diabetes Have conditions that are associated with the body not using insulin effectively (insulin resistance) Contents of this article: Women and diabetes One condition that is unique to women and linked to the body not using insulin effectively (insulin resistance) is polycystic ovarian syndrome. In this condition, the ovaries become enlarged and are unable to release eggs properly. Other unique risk factors include a history of gestational diabetes or having given birth to a baby weighing over 9 pounds. According to the National Institutes of Heath (NIH), close to one-third of women with diabetes do not know they have the disease. It is recommended that screening for adults of both genders be done in those over the age of 45 who are overweight or obese and who have one of the risk factors listed above. On the other hand, men are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than women. The exact reasons why are unclear, however. One possible reason could be that men tend to carry their weight in the belly area more often than women, which can increase insulin resistance. Men are also more likely than women to develop heart disease as a result of their diabetes. The risks become relatively similar between the sexes once women reach menopause. Complications of diabetes fo Continue reading >>

Warning Signs: Gestational Diabetes

Warning Signs: Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes affects a small number of pregnant women each year. It starts about halfway through the pregnancy and usually goes away after giving birth. If gestational diabetes does not recede, it becomes type 2 diabetes. Certain risk factors are associated with gestational diabetes, so you may want to be on the lookout for symptoms of gestational diabetes if these factors apply to you. What Is It? Developmental hormones necessary for the baby’s growth may block efficient insulin production in mothers, which raises blood sugar levels. Pregnant women with unusually high blood sugar levels during pregnancy are said to have developed gestational diabetes. The baby often receives higher levels of glucose, raising his or her blood sugar levels as well, and causing him or her to store more fat. Risk Factors While this is not a comprehensive list, there are certain factors that increase the risk of developing gestational diabetes. These factors include: Mothers over 25 Family history of diabetes History of high blood pressure High levels of amniotic fluid Unexplained miscarriage or stillbirth Overweight or obese mothers Symptoms If you have experienced some of the risk factors for gestational diabetes, it may be a good idea to familiarize yourself with the common symptoms. Many women see no symptoms at all (or mild symptoms), and their blood glucose levels decrease after giving birth. Symptoms include: Blurred vision Fatigue Frequent infections Increased thirst Increased urination Nausea and vomiting Increased appetite Remember, pregnancy itself causes women to urinate more frequently and to experience an increased appetite, so experiencing these symptoms does not always point directly to gestational diabetes. Sources: WebMD, New York Times Type 2 diabetes is differe Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Cases On The Rise

Gestational Diabetes Cases On The Rise

Disease is type of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy CINCINNATI — The number of pregnant women being diagnosed with gestational diabetes is rising. This type of diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy, makes the process more painful and could pose risks down the line. Pregnancy can be tough by itself and when a hurdle like gestational diabetes is added into the mix, it can be a lot more difficult. One Tri-State woman went through it not once, but four times. “It's stressed me out. Worrying about like, if I didn't take good care of myself, what would happen to my baby,” Mary Aulick, mother of four, said. Mary and her husband, Chad's, newborn baby, Ben, was born healthy, just like his two big brothers and big sister. But during each of her pregnancies, Mary had to deal with gestational diabetes. “I didn't know that anything was going on until I failed that test and they sent me back for a three-hour test” Mary said. Gestational diabetes happens when the body makes less insulin during pregnancy. Dr. Arthur Evans, chair of the OBGYN Department at UC Med Center, said babies can be born smaller and moms can have ongoing problems if blood sugar levels remain high after pregnancy. “The risks of the fetus and early delivery then take off and become like they have regular pregestational diabetes,” said Evans. To keep both mom and baby healthy, many women, like Mary, need to change to a strict, specialized diet and monitor blood levels through finger pricking about seven times a day. Chad Aulick said his wife had to go through so much, but she always persevered. “She's the strongest person I know and she doesn't even know it. You know what I mean? She's a fighter. She's a soldier and she's been awesome every step of the way,” Chad Aulick said. If managed corr Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What is gestational diabetes (GDM)? GDM is a type of diabetes that develops during pregnancy, usually in the second or third trimester. GDM causes your blood sugar level to rise too high. This can harm you and your unborn baby. Blood sugar levels usually go back to normal after you give birth. What causes GDM? The cause of GDM is not known. The hormones made by the placenta may cause insulin resistance. Insulin helps move sugar out of the blood so it can be used for energy. Insulin resistance means your pancreas makes insulin, but your body cannot use it. As the placenta grows, more of these hormones are produced. The hormones block insulin and cause your blood sugar level to rise. What increases my risk for GDM? Lack of exercise A close family member with diabetes A history of high blood sugar, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol Being overweight or obese Previous delivery of a large baby Glycosuria (sugar in your urine) or polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) Being African American, Latino, Native American, Asian American, or Pacific Islander heritage What are the signs and symptoms of GDM? More hunger or thirst than usual Frequent urination Blurred vision More fatigue (tired) than usual Frequent bladder, vaginal, or skin infections More weight gain than your healthcare provider suggests during your pregnancy Nausea or vomiting How is GDM diagnosed? An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is usually done between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. Your healthcare provider may order either a one-step or two-step OGTT. One-step OGTT: Your blood sugar will be tested after you have not eaten for 8 hours (fasting). You will then be given a glucose drink. Your blood sugar will be tested again 1 hour and 2 hours after you finish the drink. Two-step OGTT: You Continue reading >>

Warning Signs And Risk Factors Of Premature Pregnancy

Warning Signs And Risk Factors Of Premature Pregnancy

Almost each pregnant female around would have a worry of providing her baby too soon. Early maternities prevail in around 15% of pregnancies and might happen due to a number of reasons. A premature pregnancy would signify the birth of a baby at least three weeks before its initial due day (i.e. before 37 weeks instead of a regular maternity that lasts around 40 weeks). A prematurely born baby is much more in jeopardy of developing health relevant problems. This is since the child would not have created to its complete prospective inside the womb at the time of an early distribution as well as so would be most susceptible to outside components and also conditions. A early maternity could be labelled as late preterm if the delivery happens between week 34 as well as 37 of the maternity, very preterm if the shipment takes place prior to week 32 of the pregnancy, and very preterm if the delivery occurs prior to week 25 of the maternity. Also though a lot of premature births can take place just as late preterm ones, in rare instances, a lady could likewise delivery a ‘really preterm’ or an ‘very preterm’ baby. Complications Developing from Premature Pregnancies Premature maternities can have a series of side impacts and health related complications on the infant. A preterm baby has high opportunities of having problems like low weight, breathing concerns, gastrointestinal system relevant problems, neurological difficulties and also development hold-up etc. The risks raise with the reduction in maternity term. In most cases, children born prior to 24 weeks would certainly either not make it through or would certainly experience wellness associated difficulties forever. Babies born before 32 weeks (late preterm) have high chances of survival yet could not be eliminated Continue reading >>

3 Warning Signs Of Gestational Diabetes

3 Warning Signs Of Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is a rare yet serious condition that causes high blood sugar and insulin resistance in pregnant women. There are many reasons a woman might develop this condition during pregnancy, including obesity, high blood pressure or prediabetes. If undiagnosed, a child may become too large and cause other birth complications, too. Regardless of the cause, however, it is a doctor's responsibility to provide an accurate diagnosis if a mother develops this potentially serious condition. According to the Mayo Clinic, most women do not experience noticeable symptoms of the condition. Still, if someone has any or all of the risk factors, her doctor should be proactive in diagnosing the condition if any of the following warning signs exist: 1. Excessive thirst and urination It is not uncommon for pregnant women to urinate more than usual due to the pressure a fetus places on the bladder. If this is accompanied by excessive thirst, however, it could be a sign that gestational diabetes is developing. If a woman experiences thirst that is seemingly insatiable, she should discuss this symptom with her doctor so that gestational diabetes can be either diagnosed or ruled out. 2. Tingling and numbness sensations Sometimes women develop tingling and numbness in the hands during pregnancy due to carpal tunnel. It can also be a symptom of gestational diabetes, though, and this is especially true if she experiences such sensations throughout other parts of the body. Because diabetes damages the nerve fibers, it may be the culprit of this symptom. 3. Serious exhaustion and fatigue Of course, it is normal for pregnant women to be more tired than they would usually be. Pregnancy is hard work, and its stress on the body will be apparent. Fatigue that leaves a mother incapacitated Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Gestational Diabetes

What You Need To Know About Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes means diabetes that develops for the first time during pregnancy. According to the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada gestational diabetes affects between 3.7 and 18 per cent of Canadian pregnancies. Diabetes happens when your body can't produce enough of a hormone called insulin. Insulin is made by your pancreas, and it does two jobs: regulating the amount of sugar available in your blood for energy enabling any sugar that isn't needed to be stored During pregnancy your body has to produce extra insulin to meet your baby's needs, especially from mid-pregnancy onwards. If your body can't manage this, you will have too much sugar in your blood. It's then that you may develop gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after your baby is born. It's unlike other types of diabetes, which are lifelong conditions. How will I know if I have gestational diabetes? You will be offered a routine glucose tolerance test between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. Or you may be offered one earlier or at the end of pregnancy, if sugar is found in your urine during a prenatal appointment. If you are considered low risk for gestational diabetes you may not be offered the glucose tolerance test at all. Factors that make you low risk include: Being under the age of 25 If you are Caucasian or a member of another ethnic group with a low prevalence of diabetes You have a body mass index (BMI) of 27 or less You have no previous history of gestational diabetes, glucose intolerance, or adverse pregnancy outcomes related to gestational diabetes You have no family history of diabetes What are the symptoms of gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes often doesn't have any symptoms, but you may experience the followi Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes (gd)

Gestational Diabetes (gd)

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes (GD) happens when you have too much sugar (glucose) in your blood during pregnancy. Your blood sugar levels can go up when your body isn’t producing enough of a hormone called insulin. Insulin helps: the cells in your body to get energy from blood sugar your body to store any blood sugar that isn’t needed During pregnancy, hormones make it harder for your body to use insulin efficiently. So your body has to make extra insulin, especially from mid-pregnancy onwards. If your body can't make enough extra insulin, your blood sugar levels will rise and you may develop GD. Having too much sugar in your blood can cause problems for you and your baby, so you’ll have extra care during your pregnancy. On average, GD affects one mum-to-be in 20. GD goes away after your baby is born, because it's a condition that's only caused by pregnancy. The other types of diabetes, which are not caused by pregnancy, are type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Some women have diabetes, without realising it, before they become pregnant. If this happens to you, it will be diagnosed as GD during your pregnancy. What are the symptoms of gestational diabetes? You probably won't notice any symptoms if you have GD. That's why you'll be monitored by your midwife, and offered a test if she thinks you're at risk. GD symptoms are like normal pregnancy symptoms, and easy to miss. By the time you have clear symptoms, your blood sugar levels may be worryingly high (hyperglycaemia) . Symptoms of hyperglycaemia include: feeling more thirsty needing to wee more often than usual having a dry mouth feeling more tired getting recurring infections, such as thrush, and UTIs having blurred vision If you have any of these symptoms, tell your midwife or doctor straig Continue reading >>

Warning Signs Of Gestational Diabetes

Warning Signs Of Gestational Diabetes

Even if you feel good during your pregnancy, gestational diabetes is something you should be on the lookout for. This is a somewhat common occurrence that happens when your pregnancy hormones interfere with your body’s ability to process sugar. Although it happens in only a marginal (less than 5%) number of pregnancies, it can be alarming. Women with gestational diabetes run a risk of high blood pressure, elevated insulin (blood sugar) and other complications. This can put your baby at risk, especially if left untreated. Women with this type of “pregnancy diabetes” are more likely to give birth to large babies because of the extra sugar from the expectant mother being delivered through the umbilical cord to the fetus. As you can imagine, having a nine pound baby or more will cause more pain during labor and delivery, therefore many women with gestational diabetes are succumbed to C-sections. Their newborns are more likely to develop breathing problems or have jaundice, which causes the baby’s skin to appear yellowish in color. Or even worse, the baby could get stuck in the birth canal. Who is most at risk of gestational diabetes? Overall, these things all sound problematic, so it is best to check for diabetes somewhere around the 24 – 28th week of pregnancy. You may be more at risk if you are over the age of thirty, have a family history of diabetes or if you have ever had gestational diabetes in previous pregnancies. Certain races also have a higher risk of developing this, especially African-American, Eastern Asian, Native American, or Hispanic heritages. Women who are overweight also have a higher chance of developing gestational diabetes, no matter their ethnic background. If you are within one of the higher risk categories, your ob-gyn may decide to scree Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a condition of abnormally raised blood sugar levels that may occur in the second part of the pregnancy and goes away once the baby is born. Some women with gestational diabetes may need no treatment, some need a strict diet and others may need insulin injections. As GDM is a condition that occurs during pregnancy, it is not the same as having pre-existing diabetes during your pregnancy. Between 5% and 10% of pregnant women develop gestational diabetes, usually around the 24th to 28th week of pregnancy. Typically, women with gestational diabetes have no symptoms. Most women are diagnosed after special blood tests Some women with gestational diabetes (about 30%) have larger than average babies. As a result, they are more likely to have intervention in labour such as a caesarean birth. But the baby will not be born with diabetes. Studies have suggested that women who develop gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. Testing for gestational diabetes All women are screened for gestational diabetes at their 24 to 28 week routine check up. Women who are at higher risk may be tested more often. You are at higher risk of developing gestational diabetes if you: are overweight over the age of 25 years a family history of type 2 diabetes come from an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander or some Asian backgrounds have had gestational diabetes before have had a large baby before. The tests available for gestational diabetes are: Glucose challenge test There is no fasting required and you are given a 50g glucose drink (equivalent to 10 teaspoons of sugar) with a blood test taken one hour after. This is a screening test only and if the result is above a certain level, you will be advised to have a gl Continue reading >>

Understanding The Risks And Early Signs Of Gestational Diabetes

Understanding The Risks And Early Signs Of Gestational Diabetes

Diabetes can be particularly hard on pregnant women. It can affect both the mother and her unborn child. Known as gestational diabetes, this condition is now more common than ever. In the United States, it is estimated to affect up to 1 in every 10 pregnancies. The rate is said to be similar in Australia, with new cases of gestational diabetes rising a whopping 21% between 2000 and 2010. Fortunately with early diagnosis and treatment, any negative health effects on mother and child can be significantly minimised. In this article, HealthEngine looks at the health risks and early warning signs of gestational diabetes. What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is the term given to expecting mothers diagnosed with pre-diabetes (otherwise known as Glucose Intolerance) during their pregnancy. The risk of glucose intolerance – and therefore gestational diabetes – is greatly increased during pregnancy because the efficiency of insulin (the hormone required to remove sugar from our bloodstream) naturally declines during this period. Less efficient insulin means sugar can become 'stuck' in our bloodstream, which leads to many health issues. For this reason, added sugar is basically hazardous to health during and immediately after pregnancy. What are the health risks of gestational diabetes? Being diagnosed with gestational diabetes does not mean you had diabetes before falling pregnant, or that you will have diabetes after pregnancy. But it does mean you need to be extra mindful of the foods you eat to ensure both you and your baby remain healthy. The risks of poorly managed gestational diabetes are serious: The developing foetus is prone to excessive growth and large birth weight, which is not ideal for either mother or child. Children born to mothers with poorly ma Continue reading >>

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