diabetestalk.net

Warning Signs Of Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Has your doctor diagnosed you with gestational diabetes (GD or GDM), a form of diabetes that appears only during pregnancy? While it might feel overwhelming at first, it turns out that this pregnancy complication is much more common than you might think. In fact, up to 9.2 percent of pregnant women have GD, according to a 2014 analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Know that with careful monitoring and treatment, it can be managed, and you can have a safe and healthy pregnancy. READ MORE: What causes gestational diabetes? Who's most at risk? What are the symptoms? How is it diagnosed? What are the complications? How can you prevent gestational diabetes? How is it treated? What happens to mom and baby after birth? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes usually starts between week 24 and week 28 of pregnancy when hormones from the placenta block insulin — a hormone produced in the pancreas that regulates the body's metabolism of fats and carbs and helps the body turn sugar into energy — from doing its job and prevent the body from regulating the increased blood sugar of pregnancy effectively. This causes hyperglycemia (or high levels of sugar in the blood), which can damage the nerves, blood vessels and organs in your body. Who’s most at risk for gestational diabetes? While researchers aren't certain why some women get gestational diabetes while others don’t, they do know that you may be at an increased risk if: You are overweight. Having a BMI of 30 or more going into pregnancy is one of the most common risk factors for gestational diabetes because the extra weight affects insulin's ability to properly keep blood sugar levels in check. You have a higher level of abdominal fat. Recent research published in the American Di Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Complications

Gestational Diabetes: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Complications

MORE Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that develops, or is first diagnosed, during pregnancy. The condition, like other forms of diabetes, involves high blood sugar levels. Often times, gestational diabetes is a temporary disorder that occurs around the second trimester of pregnancy, and disappears after a woman gives birth. "Even if a woman had required quite a bit of therapy and treatment to keep her blood sugars under control when she was pregnant … usually the day after delivery, [her] sugars go back down to normal," said Dr. Christopher Glantz, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Rochester Medical Center. But women who've had gestational diabetes should be monitored closely after birth, because they are more likely to develop diabetes later in life, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). A 2014 study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that between 4 and 9 percent of pregnant women in the United States develop gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs more frequently among certain ethic groups, including African Americans, Hispanics, American Indians, Asians, and Pacific Islanders according to the March of Dimes. Symptoms Women with gestational diabetes usually have no symptoms or mild, non-life-threatening symptoms, according to the NIH. These symptoms are mostly related to abnormal blood sugar levels, and can include fatigue, excessive thirst and increased urination. Causes During pregnancy, changes happen in the mother's body to make sugar more available to the fetus, Glantz said. One of these changes is that the placenta produces hormones that interfere with the action of insulin, a hormone that helps sugar (or glucose) get from the bloodstream into cells. This means that sugar i Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Gestational Diabetes

What You Need To Know About Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes means diabetes that develops for the first time during pregnancy. According to the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada gestational diabetes affects between 3.7 and 18 per cent of Canadian pregnancies. Diabetes happens when your body can't produce enough of a hormone called insulin. Insulin is made by your pancreas, and it does two jobs: regulating the amount of sugar available in your blood for energy enabling any sugar that isn't needed to be stored During pregnancy your body has to produce extra insulin to meet your baby's needs, especially from mid-pregnancy onwards. If your body can't manage this, you will have too much sugar in your blood. It's then that you may develop gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after your baby is born. It's unlike other types of diabetes, which are lifelong conditions. How will I know if I have gestational diabetes? You will be offered a routine glucose tolerance test between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. Or you may be offered one earlier or at the end of pregnancy, if sugar is found in your urine during a prenatal appointment. If you are considered low risk for gestational diabetes you may not be offered the glucose tolerance test at all. Factors that make you low risk include: Being under the age of 25 If you are Caucasian or a member of another ethnic group with a low prevalence of diabetes You have a body mass index (BMI) of 27 or less You have no previous history of gestational diabetes, glucose intolerance, or adverse pregnancy outcomes related to gestational diabetes You have no family history of diabetes What are the symptoms of gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes often doesn't have any symptoms, but you may experience the followi Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What is gestational diabetes (GDM)? GDM is a type of diabetes that develops during pregnancy, usually in the second or third trimester. GDM causes your blood sugar level to rise too high. This can harm you and your unborn baby. Blood sugar levels usually go back to normal after you give birth. What causes GDM? The cause of GDM is not known. The hormones made by the placenta may cause insulin resistance. Insulin helps move sugar out of the blood so it can be used for energy. Insulin resistance means your pancreas makes insulin, but your body cannot use it. As the placenta grows, more of these hormones are produced. The hormones block insulin and cause your blood sugar level to rise. What increases my risk for GDM? Lack of exercise A close family member with diabetes A history of high blood sugar, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol Being overweight or obese Previous delivery of a large baby Glycosuria (sugar in your urine) or polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) Being African American, Latino, Native American, Asian American, or Pacific Islander heritage What are the signs and symptoms of GDM? More hunger or thirst than usual Frequent urination Blurred vision More fatigue (tired) than usual Frequent bladder, vaginal, or skin infections More weight gain than your healthcare provider suggests during your pregnancy Nausea or vomiting How is GDM diagnosed? An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is usually done between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. Your healthcare provider may order either a one-step or two-step OGTT. One-step OGTT: Your blood sugar will be tested after you have not eaten for 8 hours (fasting). You will then be given a glucose drink. Your blood sugar will be tested again 1 hour and 2 hours after you finish the drink. Two-step OGTT: You Continue reading >>

Warning Signs Of Pregnancy-related Diabetes Appear Years Earlier

Warning Signs Of Pregnancy-related Diabetes Appear Years Earlier

In a new study, researchers say they've identified a series of routine health measures that can help doctors predict years in advance which women will develop pregnancy-related diabetes, paving the way for lifestyle changes and other early prevention efforts. FRIDAY, May 27, 2011 (Health.com) — Diabetes stemming from pregnancy can cause a host of problems for baby and mother alike, including birth complications and a higher risk of developing the more serious type 2 diabetes later in life. In a new study, researchers say they've identified a series of routine health measures that can help doctors predict years in advance which women will develop pregnancy-related diabetes, paving the way for lifestyle changes and other early prevention efforts. Obesity, elevated blood sugar, and high blood pressure were all linked to a higher risk of developing pregnancy-related diabetes, also known as gestational diabetes. The odds were nearly three times higher among overweight and obese women as among those of normal weight, the study found, and the odds were roughly 2.5 times higher among those with slightly elevated blood sugar. These findings weren't especially surprising, since high blood sugar and being overweight—along with a family history of the disease—are well-known risk factors for both gestational and type 2 diabetes. What was surprising is that these factors predicted gestational diabetes even though they were measured an average of seven years before the women became pregnant. In fact, this was the first study to assess the relationship between gestational diabetes and blood-sugar levels before (rather than during) pregnancy. "Not a lot is known about how factors before pregnancy influence a woman's risk of what happens during pregnancy," says the lead author of t Continue reading >>

Resources

Resources

Gestational diabetes describes the onset of diabetes during pregnancy. Diabetes encompasses a group of diseases that inhibit the body’s ability to properly process sugar, and results in dangerously high glucose levels. It usually goes away after delivery, but may raise a woman’s chances of developing diabetes later in life. What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is the appearance of diabetes during pregnancy in a woman who did not previously suffer from diabetes, and if left untreated, it can be very harmful for both you and your baby. Gestational diabetes usually develops during the second trimester of pregnancy and doesn’t have many warning signs, so healthcare providers tend to screen most women’s blood-sugar levels between 24 and 28 weeks, and perform a follow-up test, known as the Glucose Tolerance Test, if the initial screen raised any red flags. It affects between about 4-8% of all pregnant women. How can gestational diabetes affect the pregnancy? If a mom develops gestational diabetes, her baby could be at risk for a number of complications like jaundice, an increased risk of diabetes later in life, preterm birth, dangerously high birth weight, and respiratory distress syndrome, a condition in which the lungs aren’t well-enough formed to function on their own yet. Women who come down with gestational diabetes need to be extra careful about their diet and exercise to protect their babies from these complications. How can gestational diabetes affect you? A woman who develops gestational diabetes has an increased chance for developing preeclampsia, another dangerous condition of pregnancy, as well. Women with gestational diabetes also have a heightened risk for developing diabetes later in life, whether gestational or not. Those with gestation Continue reading >>

37 Weeks Pregnant With Gestational Diabetes

37 Weeks Pregnant With Gestational Diabetes

By week 37 of pregnancy, a woman has likely been managing her gestational diabetes for about nine weeks. Blood tests for the condition are performed at the beginning of the third trimester, around 28 weeks. Although gestational diabetes does place women in a higher pregnancy risk category, the condition can be managed with careful vigilance. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists says that between two and 10 percent of women are diagnosed with gestational diabetes annually. The ACOG defines gestational diabetes as excess levels of glucose in the blood. Excess glucose occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin to convert glucose into energy. The condition comes and goes with pregnancy. Women who develop gestational diabetes with one pregnancy are more likely to develop it in subsequent pregnancies. The ACOG says that up to one half of them will develop type 2 diabetes later in life. Diet, exercise and, occasionally, medication are key to gestational diabetes control. Patients need to avoid refined carbohydrates, sugar and caffeine and maintain a regimen of either swimming, walking or prenatal yoga. Insulin shots are sometimes necessary. If gestational diabetes is not controlled, serious complications may occur. They include premature birth; preeclampsia, or abnormally high maternal blood pressure; respiratory distress syndrome, or difficulties with baby’s breathing at birth; birth defects; and macrosomia, or an extremely large baby. According to Midwifery Today, the baby can go into diabetic shock and die during birth in cases of improper disease management. By 37 weeks, women with gestational diabetes will be checked weekly. Because of the risks of preeclampsia and macrosomia, these women have a slightly higher chance of delivering their ba Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes (gd)

Gestational Diabetes (gd)

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes (GD) happens when you have too much sugar (glucose) in your blood during pregnancy. Your blood sugar levels can go up when your body isn’t producing enough of a hormone called insulin. Insulin helps: the cells in your body to get energy from blood sugar your body to store any blood sugar that isn’t needed During pregnancy, hormones make it harder for your body to use insulin efficiently. So your body has to make extra insulin, especially from mid-pregnancy onwards. If your body can't make enough extra insulin, your blood sugar levels will rise and you may develop GD. Having too much sugar in your blood can cause problems for you and your baby, so you’ll have extra care during your pregnancy. On average, GD affects one mum-to-be in 20. GD goes away after your baby is born, because it's a condition that's only caused by pregnancy. The other types of diabetes, which are not caused by pregnancy, are type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Some women have diabetes, without realising it, before they become pregnant. If this happens to you, it will be diagnosed as GD during your pregnancy. What are the symptoms of gestational diabetes? You probably won't notice any symptoms if you have GD. That's why you'll be monitored by your midwife, and offered a test if she thinks you're at risk. GD symptoms are like normal pregnancy symptoms, and easy to miss. By the time you have clear symptoms, your blood sugar levels may be worryingly high (hyperglycaemia) . Symptoms of hyperglycaemia include: feeling more thirsty needing to wee more often than usual having a dry mouth feeling more tired getting recurring infections, such as thrush, and UTIs having blurred vision If you have any of these symptoms, tell your midwife or doctor straig Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes means diabetes that develops or is recognised for the first time during pregnancy. It affects between five and nine per cent of pregnancies. Diabetes develops when the body can't produce enough insulin (insulin deficiency), or produces a normal amount of insulin but the body’s tissue does not respond normally to the insulin (insulin resistance). Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, which regulates the amount of sugar available in the blood for energy, and enables any sugar that isn't immediately required to be stored. During pregnancy your body has to produce extra insulin to meet your baby's needs and your body becomes naturally more insulin resistant, especially from mid-pregnancy onwards. If your body can't produce enough insulin or develops too much insulin resistance, you will have too much sugar in your blood and may develop gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes usually resolves itself after your baby is born. However, if you have had gestational diabetes in one pregnancy, you are more likely to get it again in future pregnancies. You are also at a greater risk of developing Type 2 diabetes later in life and you will need to be regularly screened by your doctor throughout your life. You can reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes by paying attention to what you eat and how much exercise you get. How will I know if I have gestational diabetes? You may be screened during the second trimester of your pregnancy for gestational diabetes. There is a range of different policies on who is tested for gestational diabetes and what test is given. You may want to ask your caregiver about their experience and preferences. If you are in a low risk group you will be offered a glucose challenge test (GCT) betwe Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Diabetes is a disease in which levels of glucose (sugar) in the bloodstream are higher than normal. Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes that can develop during pregnancy, usually in the second trimester. Glucose is produced in the body from the foods you eat. The pancreas, an organ located just behind the stomach, produces insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes the glucose from the bloodstream and carries it inside your body’s cells where it is used for energy, as well as allowing excess glucose to be stored properly. During pregnancy, the placenta produces hormones that help the baby develop. These hormones also block the effects of insulin in the woman’s body, increasing her blood sugar levels. Most women who have gestational diabetes have no symptoms. Who is at risk? Gestational diabetes affects about 4–8 of every 100 pregnant women in the United States. Any pregnant woman can develop the condition, but some women are at greater risk than others. Known risk factors include: Age (older than 25 years; the risk is even greater after age 35) Race (occurs more often in African Americans, Hispanics, American Indians, and Asian Americans) Overweight and obesity Personal history of gestational diabetes or prediabetes Having delivered a baby weighing more than 9 pounds Family history of type 2 diabetes (in parents or siblings) Among women with these risk factors, as many as 14 in 100 develop gestational diabetes. How do you know if you have gestational diabetes? Most women with gestational diabetes have no warning signs or symptoms, so all pregnant women should be tested for this condition between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. For minority women who are obese and who have had a previous history of gestational diabetes or a Continue reading >>

Living With Gestational Diabetes

Living With Gestational Diabetes

Between three and 20 per cent of pregnant women develop gestational diabetes, depending on their risk factors. All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes within 28 weeks of pregnancy. What is Gestational Diabetes Mellitus? Gestational diabetes mellitus is a type of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. Your body cannot produce enough insulin to handle the effects of a growing baby and changing hormone levels. Insulin helps your body to control the level of glucose (sugar) in your blood. If your body cannot produce enough insulin, your blood glucose (sugar) levels will rise. The good news Your baby will not be born with diabetes. Gestational diabetes can be managed and you can expect to have a happy, healthy baby. What does gestational diabetes mean for my baby? If left undiagnosed or untreated, gestational diabetes can lead to high blood glucose (sugar) levels. This increases the risk that your baby will weigh more than 4 kg (9lbs) and will have a difficult delivery. Gestational diabetes can also increase the risk of your baby becoming overweight and developing type 2 diabetes in the future. What does gestational diabetes mean for me? A diagnosis of gestational diabetes means you will be working closely with your health-care team to manage your blood glucose (sugar) levels and keep them in the target range. This will help you avoid complications in labour and delivery. After your baby is born, blood glucose (sugar) levels will usually return to normal. However, you are at greater risk for gestational diabetes in your next pregnancy and of developing type 2 diabetes in the future. Risk factors for gestational diabetes Being: 35 years of age or older From a high-risk group (Aboriginal, Hispanic, South Asian, Asian and African) Obese (BMI of 30kg/m2 or Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes And Pregnancy

One in twenty pregnant women in Australia is affected by diabetes. Although the disease can cause serious complications for mothers and babies, good planning and comprehensive antenatal care can keep you and your baby healthy. By Joanna Egan. Diabetes is a chronic condition characterised by the body's inability to control glucose levels in the blood. Glucose is a simple sugar found in foods such as breads, cereals, fruit, starchy vegetables, legumes, dairy products and sweets. A hormone produced by the pancreas, called insulin, converts this glucose into energy that is used to fuel the body. When a person has diabetes, they either don't produce enough insulin or are unable to use insulin effectively. This causes glucose to build up in their bloodstream. There are several types of diabetes: Type 1: People with type 1 diabetes don't produce insulin. As a result, they need to monitor their blood glucose levels carefully and require regular insulin injections (up to four times a day). Generally, type 1 diabetes arises in children and young adults, but it can occur at any age. Type 2: This is the most common form of diabetes. Some people have a genetic predisposition to developing the disease but often, it is caused by lifestyle factors such as high blood pressure, obesity, insufficient exercise and poor diet. People with type 2 diabetes produce insulin, but either don't produce enough or are unable to use it effectively. Generally, it is initially managed with healthy eating and regular physical activity, but as the condition progresses, glucose-lowering tablets and/or insulin injections may be prescribed. Gestational diabetes: This form of diabetes develops, or is first diagnosed, during pregnancy. It usually appears late in the second trimester and resolves after childbir Continue reading >>

Early Detection: Gestational Diabetes & Preeclampsia

Early Detection: Gestational Diabetes & Preeclampsia

Diabetes and preeclampsia are among two of the reasons why regular prenatal visits are so important. Gestational Diabetes: The Basics Chances are you'll sail through pregnancy without trouble. But even if you're feeling great, you should still seek regular prenatal care because some health problems that could hurt your baby are symptomless. These include gestational diabetes, which raises blood sugar levels during pregnancy, and preeclampsia, a form of high blood pressure. But with early detection and treatment, you can manage these problems and still have a healthy baby. What Is It? Gestational diabetes occurs when pregnancy hormones interfere with the body's ability to use insulin, the hormone that turns blood sugar into energy, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Each year, up to 4 percent of women develop this serious illness in pregnancy. While most women with gestational diabetes have no symptoms, a small number may experience extreme hunger, thirst, or fatigue. How Do I Know If I Have It? Your doctor will probably screen you for gestational diabetes between your 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. If you have certain risk factors (see "Who's at Risk?" below), your doctor may opt to screen you sooner. During your screening, you'll drink a sugary liquid, then take a blood test. If your blood sugar levels appear high, you'll need to take a longer test, during which you'll drink more liquid and your blood sugar will be tested several times to determine whether you have gestational diabetes. What Are the Risks Associated with It? Women who fail to seek treatment for gestational diabetes run the risk of giving birth to big babies (9 pounds or more), since much of the extra sugar in the mother's blood ends up going to the fetus. Larger babies are more likely to suffer b Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational diabetes has become one of the most common pregnancy complications in the US, with about 7 percent of pregnant women developing the condition. But just because it’s more widespread doesn’t mean it comes without risks. So what is gestational diabetes—and how can you minimize your chances of getting it? In this article What is gestational diabetes? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes symptoms Gestational diabetes treatment How to prevent gestational diabetes What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes means your body can’t properly regulate your blood sugar levels while you’re pregnant—either because you don’t produce enough insulin or your body can’t properly use the insulin it does produce. That causes your blood sugar levels to spike when you eat, leading to a condition called hyperglycemia. Most moms-to-be diagnosed with gestational diabetes experience diabetes only during pregnancy, and the condition clears up soon after birth. But 5 to 10 percent of women continue to have type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, and those whose diabetes clears up after childbirth are still at a 20 to 50 percent risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 years. So why are doctors so concerned about this condition? “Gestational diabetes puts the mom and baby at increased risk for pregnancy complications,” says Sherry A. Ross, MD, a Santa Monica, California-based ob-gyn and author of She-ology: The Definitive Guide to Women’s Intimate Health. Period. For moms, those include: High blood pressure Preeclampsia Preterm labor C-section Gestational diabetes effects on baby can increase the risk of: Higher birth weight Shoulder dystocia (when the shoulders get stuck in the birth canal) Congenital malformations (such as abnormal sp Continue reading >>

Warning Signs: Gestational Diabetes

Warning Signs: Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes affects a small number of pregnant women each year. It starts about halfway through the pregnancy and usually goes away after giving birth. If gestational diabetes does not recede, it becomes type 2 diabetes. Certain risk factors are associated with gestational diabetes, so you may want to be on the lookout for symptoms of gestational diabetes if these factors apply to you. What Is It? Developmental hormones necessary for the baby’s growth may block efficient insulin production in mothers, which raises blood sugar levels. Pregnant women with unusually high blood sugar levels during pregnancy are said to have developed gestational diabetes. The baby often receives higher levels of glucose, raising his or her blood sugar levels as well, and causing him or her to store more fat. Risk Factors While this is not a comprehensive list, there are certain factors that increase the risk of developing gestational diabetes. These factors include: Mothers over 25 Family history of diabetes History of high blood pressure High levels of amniotic fluid Unexplained miscarriage or stillbirth Overweight or obese mothers Symptoms If you have experienced some of the risk factors for gestational diabetes, it may be a good idea to familiarize yourself with the common symptoms. Many women see no symptoms at all (or mild symptoms), and their blood glucose levels decrease after giving birth. Symptoms include: Blurred vision Fatigue Frequent infections Increased thirst Increased urination Nausea and vomiting Increased appetite Remember, pregnancy itself causes women to urinate more frequently and to experience an increased appetite, so experiencing these symptoms does not always point directly to gestational diabetes. Sources: WebMD, New York Times Type 2 diabetes is differe Continue reading >>

More in diabetes