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Walnuts For Diabetes

The Best Nuts For Diabetes: Walnuts, Almonds, And More

The Best Nuts For Diabetes: Walnuts, Almonds, And More

When you’re looking for a satisfying diabetes-friendly snack, it’s hard to beat nuts. “Nuts are a super snack food for people with diabetes because they’re the total package — low in carbs and high in protein, fiber, and healthy fat — and they create a feeling of fullness,” says Cheryl Mussatto, RD, founder of Eat Well to Be Well in Osage City, Kansas. Nuts: A Good Choice for Diabetes and Your Heart The healthy fat in nuts protects your ticker, says Melissa Joy Dobbins, RDN, CDE, a spokesperson for the American Association of Diabetes Educators. That’s important because people with diabetes are 2 to 4 times more likely to die of heart disease than those without it, according to the American Heart Association. Heart-healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats found in nuts can lower your LDL, or “bad” cholesterol, Mussatto says. “At the same time, nuts also raise levels of ‘good,’ or HDL, cholesterol,” she says. “This cholesterol acts sort of like a sanitation worker, removing cholesterol from the tissues for disposal, which prevents plaque buildup in the arteries.” What’s more, nuts help regulate blood sugar, which makes them a better option to reach for than, say, pretzels, when afternoon hunger strikes, Mussatto says. Many kinds of nuts have this effect: Almonds have been shown to slow down the blood sugar response when eaten with carbohydrate-rich foods, according to a small study published in the journal Metabolism that focused on healthy people without the disease. A study published in March 2011 in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition found similar results for pistachios when eaten by healthy volunteers. For those people already diagnosed with diabetes, regularly eating tree nuts can also improve blood sugar management, Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: The Benefits Of Eating Walnuts

Diabetes Diet: The Benefits Of Eating Walnuts

Many of our favorite cookies and desserts contain walnuts. While these walnuts may be surrounded by sugars and fats we don’t need, the nuts themselves have impressive health benefits for people with diabetes. Unless your doctor or dietitian objects, eating a few walnuts everyday is good for the heart, and helps with blood sugar and weight management. Five Reasons To Enjoy Walnuts In one study, overweight adults with type 2 diabetes had sizable reductions in fasting insulin levels after eating a quarter cup of walnuts daily for three months (when compared to those who didn’t eat walnuts). When added to daily diets walnuts have limited the consumption of less nutritious foods, appreciably improving overall diet quality without causing weight gain. Though walnuts are high in calories they are very satiating, and actually help with appetite control. Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) - found in walnuts - is a plant based omega-3 fat with anti-inflammatory properties. Eating an ounce of ALA-rich walnuts per day has been shown to support healthy cholesterol numbers and significantly lowers cardiovascular risk. Walnuts contain l-arginine, an amino acid that facilitates vascular health, and is particularly beneficial for those at increased risk for heart disease. The polyphenol antioxidants in walnuts bind to lipoproteins, inhibiting the oxidative processes that harm our cardiovascular system. Regular consumption of these antioxidants can reduce inflammation, improve lipid profiles, and endothelial (inner lining of blood vessels) function. Since one ounce of walnuts contains four grams of protein, individuals who need to watch their protein intake should factor this into their diet plan. An ounce of walnuts also contains 9 grams carbohydrate and 18 grams of fat. It is the protein a Continue reading >>

Walnut Ingestion In Adults At Risk For Diabetes: Effects On Body Composition, Diet Quality, And Cardiac Risk Measures

Walnut Ingestion In Adults At Risk For Diabetes: Effects On Body Composition, Diet Quality, And Cardiac Risk Measures

Background Despite their energy density, walnuts can be included in the diet without adverse effects on weight or body composition. The effect of habitual walnut intake on total calorie intake is not well studied. Effects on overall diet quality have not been reported. Methods Randomized, controlled, modified Latin square parallel design study with 2 treatment arms. The 112 participants were randomly assigned to a diet with or without dietary counseling to adjust calorie intake. Within each treatment arm, participants were further randomized to 1 of the 2 possible sequence permutations to receive a walnut-included diet with 56 g (providing 366 kcal) of walnuts per day and a walnut-excluded diet. Participants were assessed for diet quality, body composition, and cardiac risk measures. Results When compared with a walnut-excluded diet, a walnut-included diet for 6 months, with or without dietary counseling to adjust caloric intake, significantly improved diet quality as measured by the Healthy Eating Index 2010 (9.14±17.71 vs 0.40±15.13; p=0.02 and 7.02±15.89 vs -5.92±21.84; p=0.001, respectively). Endothelial function, total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol improved significantly from baseline in the walnut-included diet. Body mass index, percent body fat, visceral fat, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin, and blood pressure did not change significantly. Conclusions The inclusion of walnuts in an ad libitum diet for 6 months, with or without dietary counseling to adjust calorie intake, significantly improved diet quality, endothelial function, total and LDL cholesterol, but had no effects on anthropometric measures, blood glucose level, and blood pressure. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Continue reading >>

Walnuts Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk In Women

Walnuts Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk In Women

Walnuts linked to lower diabetes risk in women Recent research found an inverse relationship between walnut consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes in two large prospective cohorts of U.S. women. California Walnut Commission | Mar 02, 2013 Recent research published online by the Journal of Nutrition, found an inverse relationship between walnut consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes in two large prospective cohorts of U.S. women: the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and NHS II. The researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health followed 58,063 women (52 to 77 years) in NHS (1998 to 2008) and 79,893 women (35 to 52 years) in NHS II (1999 to 2009) without diabetes, cardiovascular disease or cancer at baseline. They found two or more servings (1 serving=28 grams) of walnuts per week to be associated with a 21 percent and 15 percent lower risk of incident type 2 diabetes before and after adjusting for body mass index (BMI) respectively. Diabetes is estimated to affect 12.6 million women in the United States and 366 million people worldwide, and the numbers are expected to rise to approximately 552 million globally by 2030. Diet and lifestyle modifications are key components in fighting this epidemic, and recent evidence suggests that the type of fat rather than total fat intake plays an important role in the development of type 2 diabetes. Specifically, a higher level of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), found significantly in walnuts, has been associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Compared with other nuts, which typically contain a high amount of monounsaturated fats, walnuts are unique because they are rich in PUFAs which may favorably influence insulin resistance and risk of type 2 diabetes. Walnuts are different among nuts specifically in that they are Continue reading >>

Can Walnuts Reduce Diabetes Risk? If So, In Whom?

Can Walnuts Reduce Diabetes Risk? If So, In Whom?

Can Walnuts Reduce Diabetes Risk? If So, in Whom? UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA Search for other works by this author on: UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA Search for other works by this author on: UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA Search for other works by this author on: Advances in Nutrition, Volume 7, Issue 1, 1 January 2016, Pages 42A, Lenore Arab, Alfonso Ang, Alena Larios; Can Walnuts Reduce Diabetes Risk? If So, in Whom?, Advances in Nutrition, Volume 7, Issue 1, 1 January 2016, Pages 42A, Background: In the US, the incidence of diabetes among Hispanics (9.6/1000) and African Americans (9.0/1000) is 3848% greater than among European Americans (6.5/1000). Higher risk and different lifestyles suggest the need for targeted strategies by ethnic group. Studies have shown walnut consumption associated with reducing risk of diabetes, however, comparisons among ethnic groups have not been conducted. Objective: To compare the associations between walnut consumption and biomarkers of diabetes risk among Hispanics, African Americans, and European Americans, we employed data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Methods: NHANES survey data for the years from 19981994 and again from 19992012 was stratified into 3 ethnic groups and diabetes risk was analyzed using the definition of undiagnosed diabetes as being FPG 126 mg/dL or A1C 6.5% (48 mmol/mol) and no diabetes risk as FPG <100 and HbA1c <5.7. Results: Walnut consumers showed lower risk for diabetes compared with non-nut consumers based on an analysis of biomarkers. HbA1c was lower across all walnut consumers, and the difference between consumers and non-consumers were greatest among Hispanics and 50% greater among African Americans than E Continue reading >>

Effects Of Walnut Oil On Lipid Profiles In Hyperlipidemic Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial

Effects Of Walnut Oil On Lipid Profiles In Hyperlipidemic Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial

Original Article | Open Effects of walnut oil on lipid profiles in hyperlipidemic type 2 diabetic patients: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial Nutrition & Diabetes volume 7, page e259 (2017) The role of herbal medicine is now well documented in preventing and controlling diabetes mellitus. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of walnut oil consumption on lipid profiles of hyperlipidemic patients with type 2 diabetes. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, 100 hyperlipidemic type 2 diabetic patients aged 3575 years were assigned to receive 15 cc Persian walnut oil or placebo every day for 90 days. The primary outcomes were the lipid profiles. Consumption of walnut oil by type 2 hyperlipidemic diabetic patients resulted in a significant decrease in total cholesterol levels (treatment difference (TD)=30.04, P<0.001), triglyceride (TG) level (TD=15.04, P=0.021), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) level (TD=30.44, P<0.001) and total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) ratio (TD=0.72, P<0.001) compared to the control group. There was a trend toward increasing HDL level with consumption of walnut oil (TD=2.28, P=0.06). Frequency of patients reaching a LDL level below 100 was higher in the case group (20 vs 0%). Addition of walnut oil in the daily diet of type 2 diabetic patients improves lipid profiles. Thus, it may be associated with a coronary artery disease risk factor modulation. Also, walnut oil may serve as a helpful natural remedy for hyperlipidemic patients with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is characterized by an array of dysfunctions ensuing as consequences of hyperglycemia. In 2011, the International Diabetes Federation estimated that 336 million people had diabetes and the number of diabetics Continue reading >>

Walnuts May Cut Diabetes, Heart Risk

Walnuts May Cut Diabetes, Heart Risk

(Reuters Health) -- Eating a handful of walnuts each day may be particularly good for people at risk of developing diabetes, a U.S. study suggests. When people in the study added 56 grams of walnuts (2 ounces, or about 14 walnuts) to their daily diet for 6 months, they had improvements in blood vessel function and reductions in LDL cholesterol. Walnuts, which are rich in fatty acids and other nutrients like folate and vitamin E, weren't linked to weight gain in the study even though they are a high-calorie food. "Adding walnuts to your diet will improve your diet quality and health -- cardiometabolic health specifically -- and you can add walnuts without fear of weight gain because they are very satiating and appear to bump out other calories quite reliably and make room for themselves," said study author David L. Katz, MD, of the Yale University Prevention Research Center in Derby, Connecticut. The walnuts didn't seem to improve high blood pressure and high blood sugar, Katz and colleagues reported in BMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care. For the study, the researchers randomly assigned 31 men and 81 women at high risk for diabetes to follow a reduced calorie diet with or without nutrition counseling. Within these groups, half of the participants were assigned at random to add walnuts to their diet for 6 months. After a 3-month break from the experiment, researchers then switched the groups and assigned walnuts to the participants who were previously asked to abstain from eating them. Participants ranged in age from 25 to 75. All had multiple risk factors for diabetes, such as being overweight, or having high blood sugar, blood pressure, or cholesterol, or having excess fat around the midsection. After taking into account factors such as age, exercise habits, calorie c Continue reading >>

Health Benefits Of Walnuts For Diabetes

Health Benefits Of Walnuts For Diabetes

It's been suggested that walnuts are a heart healthy addition to any diet, including a diet for type 2 diabetes. And that's exactly what we're going to explore today. Known for their unique wrinkly brain-like appearance, walnuts have a wide range of health benefits from boosting brain health to preventing heart disease to weight loss. Let’s take a closer look at what they can do for us: What are Walnuts? Walnuts are tree nuts that originated from India. Now walnuts are grown all over the globe, the largest growers being China and the US. The two main types are: English Walnuts and Black Walnuts. The nutritional value does not vary significantly between the two. If you've ever come across them whole, you'll know that walnuts have very hard shells that need to be cracked to access the nut. That's why we commonly buy them already cracked – it's easier! Walnut Nutrition Facts Walnuts are made up of around 15% protein and 65% fat. Their fat content is heart-healthy fat. For instance, a one ounce serve (28g, around a quarter cup) of walnuts contains around 16 grams of fat. This is made up of 11 grams polyunsaturated, 5 grams monounsaturated, and just a small amount of saturated fat, 1 gram. Though polyunsaturated fats are lumped into the same category, there are actually two types – omega 6 and omega 3. A quarter of a cup of walnuts contain more than 100% of the recommended daily intake for omega 3, a fat that is well known for it's anti-inflammatory powers. Walnuts are very low in carbs (14%), with a one ounce serve coming in at just 2.7 grams total carbs. And they are high in fiber (1.9 g/oz) so they will have very little effect on your blood sugar levels. Walnuts also contain plant sterols, antioxidants, and many vitamins and minerals. Because fat is higher in calori Continue reading >>

Effects Of Walnut Consumption On Endothelial Function In Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

Effects Of Walnut Consumption On Endothelial Function In Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

Go to: Abstract To determine the effects of daily walnut consumption on endothelial function, cardiovascular biomarkers, and anthropometric measures in type 2 diabetic individuals. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This study was a randomized, controlled, single-blind, crossover trial. Twenty-four participants with type 2 diabetes (mean age 58 years; 14 women and 10 men) were randomly assigned to one of the two possible sequence permutations to receive an ad libitum diet enriched with 56 g (366 kcal) walnuts/day and an ad libitum diet without walnuts for 8 weeks. Subjects underwent endothelial function testing (measured as flow-mediated dilatation [FMD]) and assessment of cardiovascular biomarkers before and after each 8-week treatment phase. The primary outcome measure was the change in FMD after 8 weeks. Secondary outcome measures included changes in plasma lipids, A1C, fasting glucose, insulin sensitivity, and anthropometric measures. Endothelial function significantly improved after consumption of a walnut-enriched ad libitum diet compared with that after consumption of an ad libitum diet without walnuts (2.2 ± 1.7 vs. 1.2 ± 1.6%; P = 0.04). The walnut-enriched diet increased fasting serum glucose and lowered serum total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol from baseline (10.0 ± 20.5 mg/dl, P = 0.04; −9.7 ± 14.5 mg/dl, P < 0.01; and −7.7 ± 10 mg/dl, P < 0.01, respectively), although these changes were not significant compared with those for an ad libitum diet without walnuts. There were no significant changes in anthropometric measures, plasma A1C, and insulin sensitivity. A walnut-enriched ad libitum diet improves endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in type 2 diabetic individuals, suggesting a potential reduction in overall cardiac risk. Go to: RESEARCH DESIGN AND M Continue reading >>

Walnuts Can Help Your Heart

Walnuts Can Help Your Heart

When you have diabetes, you want to think about how to eat to manage your blood sugar levels. But you should also consider eating to prevent the complications so often seen with type 2 diabetes, including heart disease. Walnuts are one food you should consider adding to your diabetic diet since they can help your heart. Here's why. How Walnuts Are Good for Your Heart Walnuts are an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids. Numerous studies have shown that the benefits of omega-3 fatty acids include reducing inflammation and providing a level of protection from chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, and arthritis. People with diabetes often have high triglycerides and low HDL levels. Omega-3 fatty acids can help lower triglycerides and raise HDL, so eating walnuts or foods high in omega-3s may help people with diabetes. In fact, even a relatively small amount of walnuts each day (about 1-2 ounces) has been shown to improve some cardiovascular markers in people with diabetes—most notably, improved cholesterol levels. What the Research Says There have been several studies that have specifically focused on the effects of adding walnuts to the diets of people with diabetes or at risk for diabetes. In epidemiological studies, researchers have found that eating nuts is correlated with a lower incidence of heart disease in men and women and a lower incidence of diabetes in women. Eating nuts lowered the presence of incident diabetes (diabetic blood sugar levels) by 50% and heart disease risk by 30% in a long-term nutrition intervention published in the April 2015 issue of the British Journal of Nutrition. Aren't Walnuts Really High in Calories? Walnuts are a very calorie- and nutrient-dense food. A quarter cup of walnuts provides about 165 calories, but also 3.8 grams Continue reading >>

Which Nuts Can A Diabetic Eat

Which Nuts Can A Diabetic Eat

Managing diabetes requires a number of lifestyle changes, including becoming more active and making changes in your diet. Often that means saying goodbye to foods you enjoy, but nuts aren't one you need to worry about. Not only can diabetics eat nuts, but they may actually help minimize the impact of some other health issues that often come along with diabetes. Depending on your condition and circumstances, there are several techniques you might use to manage your meals and their impact on your blood sugars and overall health. The American Diabetes Association favors counting the grams of carbs in your diet, while some people with diabetes monitor the glycemic index, or GI, of the foods they eat. If you're trying to lose weight, you might also be on a calorie-restricted plan. Nuts can play a role in your diet, whichever of these strategies you follow: Carb Counting: Most nuts have a low impact on your carb count. An ounce of walnuts contains only 4 grams of carbohydrates, almonds and peanuts have 6 grams, and cashews have 9 grams. Glycemic Index: The Glycemic Index, or GI, measures how quickly a food raises your blood sugar, and the lower the number the better, with any GI below 55 considered "low." Most nuts are very low: The GI of peanuts is 13, for example, and even cashews – relatively high in carbs, for a nut – have a GI of 22. * Calorie Counting: Nuts are more problematic in a weight-loss scenario, because they're high in calories. An ounce of walnuts contains 185 calories, for example, and almonds contain 170. However, their combination of protein, healthy fats and fiber make them a filling and healthful snack, and may help you stay away from less-virtuous foods. Nuts and Health Benefits "First, do no harm" is a fundamental principle in medicine, but nuts go Continue reading >>

Walnuts Cuts Diabetes Risk By One Quarter

Walnuts Cuts Diabetes Risk By One Quarter

Walnuts cuts diabetes risk by one quarter Eating walnuts just two or three times a week can reduce the risk of type two diabetes by a almost a quarter, according to new research. A study of nearly 140,000 women in the US shows regular helpings of a small portion of nuts can have a powerful protective effect against a disease that is threatening to become a global epidemic. Women who consumed a 28 gramme packet of walnuts at least twice a week were 24 per cent less likely to develop type two diabetes than those who rarely or never ate them. The latest findings, published in the Journal of Nutrition, are not the first to highlight the anti-diabetic effects of walnuts, with earlier research showing similar benefits. However, this is thought to be one of the largest studies to find regularly snacking on them can help prevent the condition. Although the latest research was carried out on female nurses, it's likely that the same benefits apply to men. According to the charity Diabetes UK, at the current rate of increase, the numbers affected by type two diabetes in the UK will rise from around 2.5 million currently to four million by 2025 and five million by 2030. Left untreated, it can raise the risk of heart attacks, blindness and amputation. Being overweight, physically inactive and having a poor diet are major risk factors for the disease. Scientists at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, US, tracked 137,893 nurses aged from 35 to 77 over a ten year period to see how many developed type two diabetes. Their dietary habits were closely monitored, including details on how often they ate nuts, particularly walnuts. After allowing for body fat and weight, the researchers found eating walnuts one to three times a month curbed the risk by four per cent, once a week b Continue reading >>

Does Eating Walnuts Lower Blood Sugar?

Does Eating Walnuts Lower Blood Sugar?

Managing your blood sugar isn't usually a simple matter of cutting out a few specific foods or groups of foods. More often, it's about understanding how foods affect your blood sugar and eating them in combinations that result in better blood glucose and better overall health. For example, walnuts have demonstrated a clear ability to moderate blood sugar, as well as provide numerous other health benefits. Just an Ounce In the April 2013 issue of the "Journal of Nutrition," researchers evaluated data on walnut consumption and health for women involved in the Nurses' Health Study. After screening for other dietary factors, the study found that there was a strong correlation between walnut consumption and reduced risk of type-2 diabetes. The test subjects reported eating 28-gram portions of nuts -- about an ounce -- one to three times each week. Nuts and Blood Sugar Health care professionals assess variations in blood sugar levels through hemoglobin testing. Unlike home blood glucose tests, which take a snapshot of your blood sugar at that moment in time, the hemoglobin A1C test gives your caregiver a picture of your blood sugar levels over the preceding two to three months. A 2011 study performed at the University of Toronto focused specifically on the relationship of nut consumption to blood sugar. It demonstrated that consuming 75 grams of nuts each day, or just under 3 ounces, reduced hemoglobin A1C levels by 0.21 percent -- considered a noteworthy reduction. The Case for Walnuts The Toronto study used mixed nuts, rather than just walnuts, but the "Journal of Nutrition" study found walnuts more effective than other nuts in reducing blood glucose. Walnuts also contribute mightily to your overall health. The Toronto study noted a marked improvement in its test subjects' Continue reading >>

Are Nuts Good Or Bad For Diabetes?

Are Nuts Good Or Bad For Diabetes?

Nuts! Can nuts help prevent diabetes? Can nuts help control diabetes? Are nuts a healthy snack or just another fad? Should you include nuts in your diet? The simple answer is yes—though, read on, because there are some caveats (aren’t there always…) to the simple “yes” answer. What are Nuts? Nuts are seeds in a hard shell and are the seeds of various trees. These nuts are commonly called tree nuts. Botanically, nuts are also those where the shell does not break apart to release the nuts—these shells have to get broken to free the nut. However, for the sake of this article, the more general use of nuts—those in hard shells that need to be broken (chestnuts and hazelnuts) and other nuts that technically are legumes (like the peanut) and seeds (eg. Pecans, Almonds) are included. Some of the more common nuts are:[1] Hazelnuts/Filberts Brazil nuts Almonds Cashews Chestnuts Peanuts Pine nuts Walnuts Macadamia nuts Pistachios Coconuts Acorns The USDA’s “Choose My Plate” program designed to help people make healthy eating choices included nuts in the Protein Foods Group, but nuts are high in a number of other nutrients as well, including fiber, the heart healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, healthy omega-3 fats, vitamins and minerals. Nuts are also high in anti-oxidants. One thing to note is that nuts are also high in calories. However, while noting that, it is also important to remember that while you DO want to watch your calories, you are getting an awful lot of healthy nutrition along with those calories and are NOT getting a lot of sugars, cholesterol or unhealthy fats (the sorts of unhealthy saturated fats that can clog up arteries). The way you can get the health benefits of nuts without paying a large “calorie price” is to use nuts a Continue reading >>

What Are The Benefits Of Eating Walnuts If I Have Diabetes?

What Are The Benefits Of Eating Walnuts If I Have Diabetes?

If you have diabetes and trouble with high blood sugar, you might want to make this one of your mainstay snacks: a handful of walnuts. Walnuts are already in a heart-healthy league of their own because of their cholesterol-improving powers. And now a small new study suggests that eating walnuts every day may help give blood vessels a much needed tune-up in people with diabetes. In the study, people with type 2 diabetes were asked to eat about 2 ounces of walnuts every day. After 8 weeks, endothelial function improved significantly in the walnut eaters. Why is this good news? Because endothelial cells -- that thin layer of cells that lines the inside of blood vessels -- may be one of the first places to go bad when people with diabetes start developing vascular disease. Compared to other nuts, walnuts have higher amounts of alpha-linolenic acid, which may help protect against plaque formation in arteries. Walnuts also are a great source of an amino acid called L-arginine, which helps relax blood vessels and control blood pressure. And surprisingly, the nut eaters in the study didn't suffer any deleterious effects to their weight and waist sizes. Could be all the protein and fiber in walnuts helped the study participants eat less overall. Continue reading >>

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