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Walnuts And Diabetes Type 2

Eat Nuts For Better Diabetes Management

Eat Nuts For Better Diabetes Management

University of Wollongong Research Online Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive) Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health 2009 Eat nuts for better diabetes management Linda C. Tapsell University of Wollongong, [email protected] Kate M. Dehlsen [email protected] Rebecca L. Thorne University of Wollongong, [email protected] Jane E. O'Shea University of Wollongong, [email protected] Qingsheng Zhang University of Wollongong, [email protected] Research Online is the open access institutional repository for the University of Wollongong. For further information contact the UOW Library: [email protected] Publication Details Tapsell, L. C., Dehlsen, K. M., Thorne, R. L., O'Shea, J. E. & Zhang, Q. (2009). Eat nuts for better diabetes management. Healthy & HeartWise, 44 54-55. Abstract Eating walnuts everyday may help reduce insulin levels in people with type 2 diabetes. Smart Food Centre researchers at the University of Wollongong Professor Linda Tapsell, Kate Dehlsen, Beck Thorne, Jane O'Shea and Kiefer Zhang tell you how. Keywords eat, better, diabetes, management, nuts Disciplines Arts and Humanities | Life Sciences | Medicine and Health Sciences | Social and Behavioral Sciences Publication Details Tapsell, L. C., Dehlsen, K. M., Thorne, R. L., O'Shea, J. E. & Zhang, Q. (2009). Eat nuts for better diabetes management. Healthy & HeartWise, 44 54-55. This journal article is available at Research Online: diet. go nuts - Eating walnu veryday may help reduce insulin levels in people with type 2 diabetes. Smart Food Centre researchers at the University of WolJongong Professor Linda Tapsell Kate Deh/sen Beck Thorne, Jane o Shea and Kiefer Zhang tell you how. Not only do walnuts taste great, they have been shown to be good for you. A recent Australian stud Continue reading >>

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

Print Font: When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the 4 healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up Prevention's Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taki Continue reading >>

A Home Run Breakfast With Diabetes

A Home Run Breakfast With Diabetes

Seven things I do to beat the hardest meal of the day. With diabetes, the stakes are high in the morning. A well-managed breakfast can dramatically improve my time in zone (70-140 mg/dl) for the rest of the day. Conversely, I might regret poor choices at breakfast three, five, even eight hours later. Unfortunately, the morning brings a perfect storm for blood sugar spikes: high-carb and sugary food options, insulin resistance and inactivity, time demands, stress, and caffeine. Breakfast is also the most likely meal to prompt outrage: “How can I be LOW right now?! I did the same thing yesterday and was HIGH!” This article shares what I’ve learned through diabetes trial-and-error about managing breakfast with diabetes, including many personal examples collected over the past few weeks. The tactics that have had the biggest impact on my diabetes are listed first, though all seven have made a major difference. Click on a tactic in the table of contents below to skip right down to it. At the end of the article, I’ve added two other approaches that might improve blood sugar around breakfast (cut caffeine and reduce stress), but I couldn’t confirm them from my own data. Please send feedback or other tactics by email or on Twitter; I love hearing from readers! And if you find this article useful, check out my upcoming book, Bright Spots & Landmines! I’m NOT a healthcare provider. Always confirm changes with a professional, especially when using insulin. Summary 2. Eat non-traditional foods for breakfast: almond flour, nuts and seeds, lentils, etc. 3. Dose insulin 20+ minutes before eating carbs, and wait longer if blood glucose is above target or when eating something really sugary. 4. More breakfast insulin: I use a more aggressive morning correction factor and mor Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Nuts On Your A1c

The Effect Of Nuts On Your A1c

Don’t go from the nourishment of nuts to chowing down on carbs. That’s the opposite of what I mean by the title of this article. I mean to suggest that substituting nuts in your diet for some of your carbs makes sense. A study that will appear in the August issue of Diabetes Care, a professional journal of the American Diabetes Association, shows that eating nuts every day can help us manage our type 2 diabetes and prevent its complications. This research reports that eating just two ounces of nuts as a replacement for carbohydrates proved effective in managing our blood glucose and lipid levels. Dr. Cyril W.C. Kendall of the University of Toronto, who is the corresponding author, sent me the full-text of the study, "Nuts as a Replacement for Carbohydrates in the Diabetic Diet." The abstract of the study is online. The lead author of the study is Dr. David J.A. Jenkins. That name is what brought the study to my attention because he created the most powerful tool to evaluate carbohydrates. That tool is the glycemic index, which his 1981 article in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition kicked off. Slow to gain traction here, the GI seems nowadays to be everywhere. When I learned in 1994 that I had diabetes, I began following the glycemic index, and my first book lauded it. Since then, however, I have gone beyond that diet. And Dr. Jenkins also seems to have done so. The new study recognizes that the standard recommendation for the proportions of the macro-nutrients – protein, fat, and carbohydrates – in our diet is in flux. "The influential dietary pattern" of the Atkins diet, the authors state, "is reflected in the relatively lower pre-study intake of about 45 percent in the current study rather than the 50 to 60 percent once recommended." That’s still a l Continue reading >>

Effects Of Walnut Consumption On Endothelial Function In Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

Effects Of Walnut Consumption On Endothelial Function In Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

Go to: Abstract To determine the effects of daily walnut consumption on endothelial function, cardiovascular biomarkers, and anthropometric measures in type 2 diabetic individuals. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This study was a randomized, controlled, single-blind, crossover trial. Twenty-four participants with type 2 diabetes (mean age 58 years; 14 women and 10 men) were randomly assigned to one of the two possible sequence permutations to receive an ad libitum diet enriched with 56 g (366 kcal) walnuts/day and an ad libitum diet without walnuts for 8 weeks. Subjects underwent endothelial function testing (measured as flow-mediated dilatation [FMD]) and assessment of cardiovascular biomarkers before and after each 8-week treatment phase. The primary outcome measure was the change in FMD after 8 weeks. Secondary outcome measures included changes in plasma lipids, A1C, fasting glucose, insulin sensitivity, and anthropometric measures. Endothelial function significantly improved after consumption of a walnut-enriched ad libitum diet compared with that after consumption of an ad libitum diet without walnuts (2.2 ± 1.7 vs. 1.2 ± 1.6%; P = 0.04). The walnut-enriched diet increased fasting serum glucose and lowered serum total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol from baseline (10.0 ± 20.5 mg/dl, P = 0.04; −9.7 ± 14.5 mg/dl, P < 0.01; and −7.7 ± 10 mg/dl, P < 0.01, respectively), although these changes were not significant compared with those for an ad libitum diet without walnuts. There were no significant changes in anthropometric measures, plasma A1C, and insulin sensitivity. A walnut-enriched ad libitum diet improves endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in type 2 diabetic individuals, suggesting a potential reduction in overall cardiac risk. Go to: RESEARCH DESIGN AND M Continue reading >>

Which Nuts Can A Diabetic Eat

Which Nuts Can A Diabetic Eat

Managing diabetes requires a number of lifestyle changes, including becoming more active and making changes in your diet. Often that means saying goodbye to foods you enjoy, but nuts aren't one you need to worry about. Not only can diabetics eat nuts, but they may actually help minimize the impact of some other health issues that often come along with diabetes. Depending on your condition and circumstances, there are several techniques you might use to manage your meals and their impact on your blood sugars and overall health. The American Diabetes Association favors counting the grams of carbs in your diet, while some people with diabetes monitor the glycemic index, or GI, of the foods they eat. If you're trying to lose weight, you might also be on a calorie-restricted plan. Nuts can play a role in your diet, whichever of these strategies you follow: Carb Counting: Most nuts have a low impact on your carb count. An ounce of walnuts contains only 4 grams of carbohydrates, almonds and peanuts have 6 grams, and cashews have 9 grams. Glycemic Index: The Glycemic Index, or GI, measures how quickly a food raises your blood sugar, and the lower the number the better, with any GI below 55 considered "low." Most nuts are very low: The GI of peanuts is 13, for example, and even cashews – relatively high in carbs, for a nut – have a GI of 22. * Calorie Counting: Nuts are more problematic in a weight-loss scenario, because they're high in calories. An ounce of walnuts contains 185 calories, for example, and almonds contain 170. However, their combination of protein, healthy fats and fiber make them a filling and healthful snack, and may help you stay away from less-virtuous foods. Nuts and Health Benefits "First, do no harm" is a fundamental principle in medicine, but nuts go Continue reading >>

Can My Child With Diabetes Eat Nuts?

Can My Child With Diabetes Eat Nuts?

Julia Sudnitskaya/iStock/Thinkstock Nuts are a terrific snack or addition to a meal for children and adults with either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. Nuts give us magnesium, B vitamins, vitamin E, fiber, protein, nourishing fats and more! Controlling Blood Glucose Nuts' combination of protein and fat is especially helpful when trying to manage blood sugar, says Vandana Sheth, RDN, CDE, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. "The key is to watch portion size as they are calorie-dense." By combining nuts with a high-carbohydrate food such as cereal, bread or fruit, you can expect lower blood glucose readings after eating than if you or your child eat the high-carb food alone. As part of a research study, individuals with Type 2 diabetes had lower blood glucose after eating an ounce of mixed nuts with white bread, as opposed to eating the bread alone. A similar study among healthy adults showed that eating pistachios with rice or pasta also limited the rise in blood glucose readings after eating. Love nuts for their magnesium content, too. Among its many roles, this mineral may affect the release and activity of insulin, the hormone that helps control blood glucose levels. Interestingly, many people with Type 2 diabetes have low blood levels of magnesium. And, according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, magnesium is one of the underconsumed nutrients. Other good sources of magnesium are whole grains, beans and spinach. Nutrient Powerhouse There are so many ways to please the taste buds and nourish the body with nuts. Along with their distinct tastes, nuts each have a unique nutrient profile. And when you pair them with other nutrient-dense foods, you're getting a super dose of good-for-you nutrition. Toss chopped pistachios and diced peaches into yo Continue reading >>

Nuts And Seeds Address 4 Problems | Reverse Diabetes

Nuts And Seeds Address 4 Problems | Reverse Diabetes

Author Sidebar: I didn't really care that much for nuts (or seeds) as a snack. I preferred potato chips or pretzels; or, a piece of fruit such as an apple or some grapes. But, after I recovered from my coma and returned to work, I realized that I needed something healthier than potato chips for a snack. :-) I started with salted, roasted peanuts; but, after doing some research, I discovered that roasted nuts tended not to be healthy because the heat caused damaged to the healthy fats within the nuts. In addition, I discovered that peanuts were one of the least healthy nuts. So, I gradually transitioned to raw nuts (no salt, not roasted), mainly almonds, pecans and walnuts; and, sometimes macadamia nuts, Brazil nuts, and pumpkin seeds. Beyond helping with blood pressure, cholesterol, weight gain, and other health issues, there are 4 major problems that nuts and seeds help address to have them quality as super fats that help reverse your diabetes. 1. Healthy Snacks: is key to help diabetics maintain proper glucose control, especially between major meals. Eating nuts and seeds make it a lot easier to prepare quick and healthy snacks. 2. Healthy Fats: is one of the areas where many diabetics are lacking from a nutrient content perspective. Nuts and seeds provide monounsaturated fats, oleic acid and Omega-3 fats to help address inflammation, oxidation, weight gain, blood glucose levels and insulin levels. 3. Cravings: is a problem area that nuts and seeds can help with because of their macronutrient and micronutrient content, especially the fat, protein and minerals. 4. Eating Fruits: can be better tolerated when eaten with a handful of nuts and seeds. Why? Because the protein and fat in the nuts and seeds offset the carbs in the fruit. Nuts and Seed | Reverse Diabetes| Othe Continue reading >>

5 Best Foods For Diabetes

5 Best Foods For Diabetes

Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S., and doubles the risk of heart attack and stroke.1 However, type 2 diabetes is a lifestyle disease - our food choices can either prevent or promote insulin resistance and resultant diabetes. Many conventional diabetes diets rely on meat or grains as the major calorie source. However, these strategies have serious drawbacks. High-nutrient, low glycemic load (GL) foods are the optimal foods for diabetics, and these foods also help to prevent diabetes in the first place: Green vegetables: Nutrient-dense green vegetables – leafy greens, cruciferous vegetables, and other green vegetables – are the most important foods to focus on for diabetes prevention and reversal. Higher green vegetable consumption is associated with lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and among diabetics, higher green vegetable intake is associated with lower HbA1c levels.2,3A recent meta-analysis found that greater leafy green intake was associated with a 14 percent decrease in risk of type 2 diabetes.4 One study reported that each daily serving of leafy greens produces a 9 percent decrease in risk.5 Non-starchy vegetables: Non-green, non-starchy vegetables like mushrooms, onions, garlic, eggplant, peppers, etc. are essential components of a diabetes prevention (or diabetes reversal) diet. These foods have almost nonexistent effects on blood glucose and are packed with fiber and phytochemicals. Beans: Beans, lentils, and other legumes are the ideal carbohydrate source. Beans are low in GL due to their moderate protein and abundant fiber and resistant starch, carbohydrates that are not broken down in the small intestine. This reduces the amount of calories that can be absorbed from beans; plus, resistant starch is fermented by bacteria in t Continue reading >>

Chicken Salad With Walnuts

Chicken Salad With Walnuts

Ingredients Directions Poach the chicken breasts in simmering broth until cooked through, about 15 minutes. Drain, cool, and cut (or shred) into bite-sized pieces. In a small bowl, combine the sour cream, mayonnaise, and vinegar. Combine the chicken and dressing. (Can be made ahead and refrigerated to this point one day in advance.) Before serving, add the celery, walnuts, tarragon, salt, and pepper to taste. Nutrition Information Per 1/2-cup serving: 271 calories (19% calories from fat), 46 g protein, 6 g total fat (0.9 g saturated fat), 7 g carbohydrates, 1 g dietary fiber, 111 mg cholesterol, 253 mg sodium Diabetic exchanges: 6 very lean protein, 1/2 carbohydrate (bread/starch) Welcome to the Type 2 Diabetes Center! This is your launching pad for living better with type 2 diabetes. We’ve gathered all the latest type 2 diabetes information, research updates, and advances in devices and medications. And because diabetes impacts every facet of your life, you’ll also find practical advice from leading experts and other people living with type 2 diabetes featured here. That includes mouth-watering, healthy recipes; money-saving tips; advice to help navigate social, professional, and relationship issues; and inspiring personal stories from people just like you. Explore the resources here and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter to be alerted to new additions. Continue reading >>

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Prevent dangerous blood sugar spikes with the help of these foods. Almonds Almonds provide a healthy, low-carb mix of monounsaturated fats plus magnesium, which is believed to be instrumental in carbohydrate metabolism. A large study out of Harvard University found that high daily magnesium intake reduced the risk of developing diabetes by 33 percent. Therefore, including more magnesium-rich foods like almonds, pumpkin seeds, spinach, and Swiss chard in your diet is a smart move. Continue reading >>

Health Benefits Of Walnuts For Diabetes

Health Benefits Of Walnuts For Diabetes

It's been suggested that walnuts are a heart healthy addition to any diet, including a diet for type 2 diabetes. And that's exactly what we're going to explore today. Known for their unique wrinkly brain-like appearance, walnuts have a wide range of health benefits from boosting brain health to preventing heart disease to weight loss. Let’s take a closer look at what they can do for us: What are Walnuts? Walnuts are tree nuts that originated from India. Now walnuts are grown all over the globe, the largest growers being China and the US. The two main types are: English Walnuts and Black Walnuts. The nutritional value does not vary significantly between the two. If you've ever come across them whole, you'll know that walnuts have very hard shells that need to be cracked to access the nut. That's why we commonly buy them already cracked – it's easier! Walnut Nutrition Facts Walnuts are made up of around 15% protein and 65% fat. Their fat content is heart-healthy fat. For instance, a one ounce serve (28g, around a quarter cup) of walnuts contains around 16 grams of fat. This is made up of 11 grams polyunsaturated, 5 grams monounsaturated, and just a small amount of saturated fat, 1 gram. Though polyunsaturated fats are lumped into the same category, there are actually two types – omega 6 and omega 3. A quarter of a cup of walnuts contain more than 100% of the recommended daily intake for omega 3, a fat that is well known for it's anti-inflammatory powers. Walnuts are very low in carbs (14%), with a one ounce serve coming in at just 2.7 grams total carbs. And they are high in fiber (1.9 g/oz) so they will have very little effect on your blood sugar levels. Walnuts also contain plant sterols, antioxidants, and many vitamins and minerals. Because fat is higher in calori Continue reading >>

5 Blood Sugar Friendly Diabetic Snacks

5 Blood Sugar Friendly Diabetic Snacks

back to Overview Looking for some snacks that are blood sugar friendly? Health coach and mySugr blogger Markus Berndt shares some of his secrets for taming the snack monster. Diabetic Snack Attack Today is all about diabetic snacks, or snacks that are more blood sugar friendly than your typical carb bombs we often crave. Thankfully we have Markus here to help. He was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in May of 2012 which catalyzed his devotion to healthy living through diet and exercise. He’s currently a management consultant for workplace health promotion and a health coach. He writes a popular blog (in German) at www.diabetesade.com and contributes regularly to the German side of our website. He has lots of great information to share, and from time to time I’ll do my best to bring a translation to you in English. Over to you, Markus! A Universal Feeling We all experience the urge to snack (if not outright binge) and reward ourselves with culinary delights. The monster is hungry! Finding snacks that are blood sugar friendly can help a lot. Of course, when the urge strikes, we’re not craving health food. Unfortunately, it’s usually the common snack foods, which, by the way, are designed to addict us. It’s a vicious cycle that can be really hard to break free from. So what to do? We don’t want to cave in completely, but constantly nibbling on naked celery isn’t fulfilling either. Finding blood sugar friendly snacks is often really hard. But thankfully there are a few goodies that we can turn to for some satisfaction without needing to feel terribly guilty. These small snacks that, in moderation, will increase your blood sugar a “tolerable” amount and are still really tasty! Some of them I even consider to be miracle products of nature! Walnuts These are cl Continue reading >>

Nuts Good For Some With Diabetes

Nuts Good For Some With Diabetes

July 8, 2011 -- Eating about 2 ounces of nuts daily in place of carbohydrates may be beneficial to people with type 2 diabetes by lowering bad cholesterol levels and improving blood sugar control, a new study shows. “There are two important factors in caring for diabetes: blood sugar control and heart health,” study researcher Cyril W.C. Kendall, PhD, of the University of Toronto, says in a news release. The study involved 117 people with type 2 diabetes who were randomly assigned to one of three groups. One group’s members ate about 2 ounces of mixed nuts daily, another a healthy muffin, and the third half nuts and half muffin. Researchers say those whose diet included 2 ounces of nuts showed better results after three months in both blood sugar and LDL "bad" cholesterol levels than participants in the other two groups. The nuts consisted of a mixture of unsalted and mostly raw almonds, pistachios, walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, peanuts, cashews, and macadamias. The muffin was concocted to be a healthy whole wheat product, sweetened with apple concentrate but with no sugar added. The muffins had similar protein content to the nuts from the addition of egg white and skim milk powder. Calories from monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) in the nuts were the same as the carbohydrate calories in the muffin, the researchers write. During the three-month study, participants were asked to maintain their oral diabetes medications. The main outcome researchers looked for was change in a marker of blood sugar control called HbA1c. Kendall described the results of the study as “a very exciting and promising finding about the treatment” of type 2 diabetes. The researchers write that the reduction in the HbA1c level was significantly more in those in the nuts-only group than pa Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Pistachios On Blood Glucose Comments

The Effects Of Pistachios On Blood Glucose Comments

Livestrong.Com Overview Blood glucose management is an important aspect of a healthy diabetes diet. Following a healthy diet plan can help stabilize your blood glucose levels and keep them within a healthy range. The American Diabetes Association praises the health benefits of nuts, calling them a diabetes superfood. You can healthfully incorporate pistachios in your diabetes diet. Carbohydrates Consuming foods that contain carbohydrate will cause your blood glucose levels to rise. Foods that contain carbohydrates include fruits, vegetables, beans, lentils, grains, milk and nuts. Carbohydrates include three main types: sugar, starch and fiber. Sugar and starch carbohydrates cause an increase in your blood glucose levels. Fiber, unlike sugar and starch, does not raise your blood glucose levels. High-fiber foods make excellent choices on a diabetes diet. Pistachios and other nuts -- as well as fruits and vegetables with edible seeds and skins, beans, legumes and whole grains -- are contain substantial amounts of fiber. Nutrition Facts A 1-oz. serving of raw pistachio nuts contains approximately 159 calories and 5.75 g of protein. One ounce of pistachios also contains about 5.54 g of total carbohydrate. Here is the carbohydrate breakdown: Out of the 5.54 g of total carbohydrate, 2.17 g is from naturally-occurring sugars, 0.47 g is from starch and 2.9 g is from fiber. Blood Glucose Basics After you eat pistachio nuts, the food debris travels to your stomach in order to undergo the process of digestion. Once in your stomach, the pistachios begin to break down. The sugar carbohydrates pass through the lining of your stomach and enter your bloodstream. The starch carbohydrates get broken down and converted into sugar molecules, so that they too can go through the lining of you Continue reading >>

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