diabetestalk.net

Walnuts And Diabetes

Diabetes, Type 1

Diabetes, Type 1

What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder that accounts for five to 10 percent of all cases of diabetes. It initially develops most often in children and young adults. With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas produces little or no insulin, the hormone needed to transport glucose into cells where it can be converted into energy. For this reason, if you have type 1 diabetes you will need to take insulin daily throughout your life. This form of diabetes has also been called juvenile or insulin-dependent diabetes. What are the symptoms? Some of the symptoms of diabetes, such as persistent thirst or irritability, can seem relatively benign, which is one of the reasons why diagnosis may be delayed. With type 1 diabetes, however, symptoms may come on suddenly. Early detection and treatment can decrease the odds of developing the acute complications that can stem from type 1 diabetes. Common symptoms of diabetes include: Frequent urination Excessive thirst Extreme hunger Unusual weight loss Increased fatigue Irritability Blurry vision If high blood sugar levels are not brought quickly under control via treatment, acute complications of type 1 diabetes include severe dehydration and development of diabetic ketoacidosis. This is a metabolic state characterized by high concentrations of ketone bodies, which are byproducts of fatty acid breakdown, and can render the body’s tissues dangerously acidic. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain, which in turn can lead to shock, coma, and even death. Longer term complications of type 1 diabetes – which are also common to those with type 2 diabetes – include: Eye damage: People with diabetes have a 40 percent higher than normal risk of developing glaucoma, increased pressure w Continue reading >>

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

"Don't eat between meals." That's one piece of advice diabetics might want to take with a grain of salt. If you go more than four or five hours between meals, a mid-afternoon snack might be just what the doctor ordered to help you keep your blood sugar steady. Snacking is also important if you're taking medication that could cause a blood-sugar low between meals. Discuss with your doctor or a registered dietitian what snacking approach is right for you. Keep your snacks to 150 calories or less The danger of snacks is that they can become more like extra meals if you go overboard. First, make sure you're truly hungry—and not just bored or stressed or craving chocolate—before reaching for a snack. Then limit yourself to 150 calories per snack. (Cutting calories is easier than you think.) This will help keep your snacking "honest." After all, it's hard to find a candy bar with only 150 calories. And if you're hankering for a candy bar, but a healthier snack doesn't appeal, you're probably not truly hungry. Beware of low-fat snacks Studies show that people tend to eat about 28 percent more of a snack when it's low-fat because they think they're saving on calories. But low-fat snacks, such as cookies, only have about 11 percent fewer calories than their full-fat counterparts. Stick to the same amount you'd eat if you thought the snack was full-fat. Need more snack ideas? Check out these delicious snacks for adults. Check the ingredients Avoid heavily processed crackers and chips. If the list of ingredients is long and has big words with lots of syllables, put it back on the shelf. Stay away from these worst eating habits for diabetics. Watch those carbs Carbohydrates are major culprits when it comes to raising blood sugar (though there are some good carbs for diabetes). Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes (gdm)

Gestational Diabetes (gdm)

What is GDM? GDM is a carbohydrate intolerance that can vary in severity and is generally usually diagnosed during the 24th to 28th week of pregnancy. It is recommended that all pregnant women be screened for gestational diabetes during the 24th and 28th weeks of their pregnancy with an oral glucose tolerance test. Risk factors for GDM include being older when pregnant, being of African or Hispanic ancestry, obesity, GDM in a previous pregnancy, and having a previous baby weighing over 9 pounds. The condition may present with symptoms including increased thirst, increased urination, weight loss dispite adequate intake, fatigue, etc. Symptoms are usually mild and not life-threatening to the pregnant woman, some women are even symptom free, and in many cases the blood glucose level returns to normal after delivery. Treatment of GDM Maintaining control of blood sugar levels significantly reduces the risk to the baby. The goals of treatment are to maintain blood glucose levels within normal limits during the duration of the pregnancy, and ensure the well-being of the fetus. Nutritional management includes providing adequate calories and nutrients required for pregnancy, as well as proper control of blood glucose levels. Meal Planning for Diabetes in Pregnancy Sample Menus for Diabetes in Pregnancy *************************************************************** Tips for Meal Planning To control your blood sugar, you need to watch what, how much, and when you eat. It is important to consume balanced meals and snacks, paying special attention to amounts and types of carbohydrates. Here are some general guidelines. Eat consistently during the day, distributing your carbohydrate choices evenly. The best way is to eat 3 meals a day. Try not to go longer than 4 hours without eatin Continue reading >>

Walnuts In Diet Improves Hdl Cholesterol-total Cholesterol Ratio

Walnuts In Diet Improves Hdl Cholesterol-total Cholesterol Ratio

Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of a moderate-fat diet inclusive of walnuts on blood lipid profiles in patients with type 2 diabetes. Research Design and Methods: This was a parallel randomized controlled trial comparing three dietary advice groups each with 30% energy as fat: low fat, modified low fat, and modified low fat inclusive of 30 g of walnuts per day. Fifty-eight men and women, mean age 59.3 8.1 years, started the trial. Dietary advice was given at baseline with monthly follow-up and fortnightly phone calls for support. Body weight, percent body fat, blood lipids, HbA1c, total antioxidant capacity, and erythrocyte fatty acid levels were measured at 0, 3, and 6 months. Data were assessed by repeated-measures ANOVA with an intention-to-treat model. Results: The walnut group achieved a significantly greater increase in HDL cholesterol-to-total cholesterol ratio (P = 0.049) and HDL (P = 0.046) than the two other treatment groups. A 10% reduction in LDL cholesterol was also achieved in the walnut group, reflecting a significant effect by group (P = 0.032) and time (P = 0.036). There were no significant differences between groups for changes in body weight, percent body fat, total antioxidant capacity, or HbA1c levels. The higher dietary polyunsaturated fat-to-saturated fat ratio and intakes of -3 fatty acids in the walnut group were confirmed by erythrocyte biomarkers of dietary intake. Conclusions: Structured "whole of diet" advice that included 30 g of walnuts/day delivering substantial amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acid improved the lipid profile of patients with type 2 diabetes. Walnuts are distinguished from other nuts by virtue of their higher polyunsaturated fat content (and importantly their -linolenic acid [ALA] content) comb Continue reading >>

Are Walnuts Good For Kidney Patients That Have Diabetes And Bp?

Are Walnuts Good For Kidney Patients That Have Diabetes And Bp?

Walnuts pack significantly higher amount omega-3 fatty acids mng ll nuts. Th r l rich in fiber, B vitamins, antioxidants, protein, etc. Besides, th r good source f minerals lik magnesium, manganese, copper, potassium, calcium, iron, zinc, nd selenium. Yes, walnuts r good fr kidney patients having diabetes and BP. Th health benefits f walnuts n kidney disease patients r below: High blood pressure i a leading factor f causing kidney disease. Tht i t say, people with hypertension r t a higher risk f kidney disease. Besides, if high blood pressure d nt gt controlled, it will u furthr kidney damage. High levels f omega-3 fatty acids in walnuts r beneficial t reduce blood pressure. Heart disease i a major u f death in kidney disease. T reduce death rate, walnuts n reduce th risk f heart disease b improving blood vessels elasticity nd plaque accumulation. Therefore, kidney disease patients n eat walnuts. Jut lik high blood pressure, diabetes i l a leading u f kidney disease. A study i proven tht 2 ounces f walnuts r day improve blood flow in people with type 2 diabetes. Besides, a diet supplemented with walnuts hl type 2 diabetes patients lower thir LDL cholesterol b 10%. But thank God there are some effective solutions available for kidney disease narrated at THE KIDNEY DISEASE SOLUTION where you feel hope returning to your life. Walnuts are especially high in omega- 3 fatty acids, the same heart-healthy fat found in oily fish, but are a lot easier to stash in your pocket or purse. Further American Heart Association recommends a healthy dietary pattern that includes fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans, legumes, fish, skinless poultry, nuts, and fat-free/low-fat dairy products, and limits sodium, saturated fat, red meat and added sugars. A serving size is a small handful Continue reading >>

Nuts And Seeds Address 4 Problems | Reverse Diabetes

Nuts And Seeds Address 4 Problems | Reverse Diabetes

Author Sidebar: I didn't really care that much for nuts (or seeds) as a snack. I preferred potato chips or pretzels; or, a piece of fruit such as an apple or some grapes. But, after I recovered from my coma and returned to work, I realized that I needed something healthier than potato chips for a snack. :-) I started with salted, roasted peanuts; but, after doing some research, I discovered that roasted nuts tended not to be healthy because the heat caused damaged to the healthy fats within the nuts. In addition, I discovered that peanuts were one of the least healthy nuts. So, I gradually transitioned to raw nuts (no salt, not roasted), mainly almonds, pecans and walnuts; and, sometimes macadamia nuts, Brazil nuts, and pumpkin seeds. Beyond helping with blood pressure, cholesterol, weight gain, and other health issues, there are 4 major problems that nuts and seeds help address to have them quality as super fats that help reverse your diabetes. 1. Healthy Snacks: is key to help diabetics maintain proper glucose control, especially between major meals. Eating nuts and seeds make it a lot easier to prepare quick and healthy snacks. 2. Healthy Fats: is one of the areas where many diabetics are lacking from a nutrient content perspective. Nuts and seeds provide monounsaturated fats, oleic acid and Omega-3 fats to help address inflammation, oxidation, weight gain, blood glucose levels and insulin levels. 3. Cravings: is a problem area that nuts and seeds can help with because of their macronutrient and micronutrient content, especially the fat, protein and minerals. 4. Eating Fruits: can be better tolerated when eaten with a handful of nuts and seeds. Why? Because the protein and fat in the nuts and seeds offset the carbs in the fruit. Nuts and Seed | Reverse Diabetes| Othe Continue reading >>

Walnuts Show Beneficial Effects On Hunger Say Brain Scientists

Walnuts Show Beneficial Effects On Hunger Say Brain Scientists

Walnuts show beneficial effects on hunger say brain scientists Walnuts show beneficial effects on hunger say brain scientists High consumption of sugary food and drink linked to poor mental health 28 July 2017 Eating a good helping of walnuts each day could help to reduce hunger according to a new study. Researchers from the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have demonstrated that the nut may help to quell hunger. As a consequence, walnuts appear to be useful in preventing obesity and possibly type 2 diabetes. Consuming them sets off a part of the brain linked to the regulation of hunger and cravings, according to the research published in the Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism journal . Dr Olivia M Farr, who was involved in the study, said: "We don't often think about how what we eat impacts the activity in our brain. We know people report feeling fuller after eating walnuts, but it was pretty surprising to see evidence of activity changing in the brain related to food cues, and by extension what people were eating and how hungry they feel." The study involved 10 obese people being given prescribed diets over two sets of five-day sessions and living at the research centre during these periods. This ensured that they did not consume any non-prescribed food or drink which can easily happen in studies when people are living outside of research centres. Over the course of the two five-day sessions, they were given two types of smoothies daily. One type of smoothie had 48 grams of walnuts, the amount suggested by dietary guidance published by the American Diabetes Association , while the other batch did not contain walnut but were designed to taste the same and have equal nutritional value. The volunteers reported having a reduced appetite in the session where they had th Continue reading >>

Effects Of Walnut Consumption On Endothelial Function In Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

Effects Of Walnut Consumption On Endothelial Function In Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

Go to: Abstract To determine the effects of daily walnut consumption on endothelial function, cardiovascular biomarkers, and anthropometric measures in type 2 diabetic individuals. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This study was a randomized, controlled, single-blind, crossover trial. Twenty-four participants with type 2 diabetes (mean age 58 years; 14 women and 10 men) were randomly assigned to one of the two possible sequence permutations to receive an ad libitum diet enriched with 56 g (366 kcal) walnuts/day and an ad libitum diet without walnuts for 8 weeks. Subjects underwent endothelial function testing (measured as flow-mediated dilatation [FMD]) and assessment of cardiovascular biomarkers before and after each 8-week treatment phase. The primary outcome measure was the change in FMD after 8 weeks. Secondary outcome measures included changes in plasma lipids, A1C, fasting glucose, insulin sensitivity, and anthropometric measures. Endothelial function significantly improved after consumption of a walnut-enriched ad libitum diet compared with that after consumption of an ad libitum diet without walnuts (2.2 ± 1.7 vs. 1.2 ± 1.6%; P = 0.04). The walnut-enriched diet increased fasting serum glucose and lowered serum total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol from baseline (10.0 ± 20.5 mg/dl, P = 0.04; −9.7 ± 14.5 mg/dl, P < 0.01; and −7.7 ± 10 mg/dl, P < 0.01, respectively), although these changes were not significant compared with those for an ad libitum diet without walnuts. There were no significant changes in anthropometric measures, plasma A1C, and insulin sensitivity. A walnut-enriched ad libitum diet improves endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in type 2 diabetic individuals, suggesting a potential reduction in overall cardiac risk. Go to: RESEARCH DESIGN AND M Continue reading >>

Eating Just Two Servings Of Nuts A Day May Combat Type 2 Diabetes (but Peanuts Won't Help, Say Experts)

Eating Just Two Servings Of Nuts A Day May Combat Type 2 Diabetes (but Peanuts Won't Help, Say Experts)

Eating nuts may help to combat type 2 diabetes, new research suggest. Two servings of tree nuts a day appears to lower and stabilise blood sugar levels in people with the disease, according to evidence collected from 12 clinical trials. Tree nuts cover most types including walnuts, cashews, hazelnuts and pecans, but exclude peanuts. A single serving was defined as 30 grams. Nut consumption improved two key markers of blood sugar, the results from analysing data on 450 trial participants showed. One, the HbA1c test, measures blood sugar levels over three months. The other, the fasting glucose test, assesses blood sugar after the patient has not eaten for eight hours. The best results were seen when nuts replaced refined carbohydrates rather than saturated fats. A single serving of tree nuts was defined as about a quarter of a cup, or 30 grams. Participants in the clinical trials were given 56 grams of nuts a day on average. Dr John Sievenpiper from St Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, who led the study, said: ‘Tree nuts are another way people can maintain healthy blood sugar levels in the context of a healthy dietary pattern.’ While nuts are high in fat, it is of the healthier unsaturated variety. Although nuts can be high in calories, trial participants did not gain weight. Continue reading >>

Can My Child With Diabetes Eat Nuts?

Can My Child With Diabetes Eat Nuts?

Julia Sudnitskaya/iStock/Thinkstock Nuts are a terrific snack or addition to a meal for children and adults with either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. Nuts give us magnesium, B vitamins, vitamin E, fiber, protein, nourishing fats and more! Controlling Blood Glucose Nuts' combination of protein and fat is especially helpful when trying to manage blood sugar, says Vandana Sheth, RDN, CDE, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. "The key is to watch portion size as they are calorie-dense." By combining nuts with a high-carbohydrate food such as cereal, bread or fruit, you can expect lower blood glucose readings after eating than if you or your child eat the high-carb food alone. As part of a research study, individuals with Type 2 diabetes had lower blood glucose after eating an ounce of mixed nuts with white bread, as opposed to eating the bread alone. A similar study among healthy adults showed that eating pistachios with rice or pasta also limited the rise in blood glucose readings after eating. Love nuts for their magnesium content, too. Among its many roles, this mineral may affect the release and activity of insulin, the hormone that helps control blood glucose levels. Interestingly, many people with Type 2 diabetes have low blood levels of magnesium. And, according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, magnesium is one of the underconsumed nutrients. Other good sources of magnesium are whole grains, beans and spinach. Nutrient Powerhouse There are so many ways to please the taste buds and nourish the body with nuts. Along with their distinct tastes, nuts each have a unique nutrient profile. And when you pair them with other nutrient-dense foods, you're getting a super dose of good-for-you nutrition. Toss chopped pistachios and diced peaches into yo Continue reading >>

Chicken Salad With Walnuts

Chicken Salad With Walnuts

Ingredients Directions Poach the chicken breasts in simmering broth until cooked through, about 15 minutes. Drain, cool, and cut (or shred) into bite-sized pieces. In a small bowl, combine the sour cream, mayonnaise, and vinegar. Combine the chicken and dressing. (Can be made ahead and refrigerated to this point one day in advance.) Before serving, add the celery, walnuts, tarragon, salt, and pepper to taste. Nutrition Information Per 1/2-cup serving: 271 calories (19% calories from fat), 46 g protein, 6 g total fat (0.9 g saturated fat), 7 g carbohydrates, 1 g dietary fiber, 111 mg cholesterol, 253 mg sodium Diabetic exchanges: 6 very lean protein, 1/2 carbohydrate (bread/starch) Welcome to the Type 2 Diabetes Center! This is your launching pad for living better with type 2 diabetes. We’ve gathered all the latest type 2 diabetes information, research updates, and advances in devices and medications. And because diabetes impacts every facet of your life, you’ll also find practical advice from leading experts and other people living with type 2 diabetes featured here. That includes mouth-watering, healthy recipes; money-saving tips; advice to help navigate social, professional, and relationship issues; and inspiring personal stories from people just like you. Explore the resources here and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter to be alerted to new additions. Continue reading >>

Are Nuts Good Or Bad For Diabetes?

Are Nuts Good Or Bad For Diabetes?

Nuts! Can nuts help prevent diabetes? Can nuts help control diabetes? Are nuts a healthy snack or just another fad? Should you include nuts in your diet? The simple answer is yes—though, read on, because there are some caveats (aren’t there always…) to the simple “yes” answer. What are Nuts? Nuts are seeds in a hard shell and are the seeds of various trees. These nuts are commonly called tree nuts. Botanically, nuts are also those where the shell does not break apart to release the nuts—these shells have to get broken to free the nut. However, for the sake of this article, the more general use of nuts—those in hard shells that need to be broken (chestnuts and hazelnuts) and other nuts that technically are legumes (like the peanut) and seeds (eg. Pecans, Almonds) are included. Some of the more common nuts are:[1] Hazelnuts/Filberts Brazil nuts Almonds Cashews Chestnuts Peanuts Pine nuts Walnuts Macadamia nuts Pistachios Coconuts Acorns The USDA’s “Choose My Plate” program designed to help people make healthy eating choices included nuts in the Protein Foods Group, but nuts are high in a number of other nutrients as well, including fiber, the heart healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, healthy omega-3 fats, vitamins and minerals. Nuts are also high in anti-oxidants. One thing to note is that nuts are also high in calories. However, while noting that, it is also important to remember that while you DO want to watch your calories, you are getting an awful lot of healthy nutrition along with those calories and are NOT getting a lot of sugars, cholesterol or unhealthy fats (the sorts of unhealthy saturated fats that can clog up arteries). The way you can get the health benefits of nuts without paying a large “calorie price” is to use nuts a Continue reading >>

Walnut Benefits: Nuts Can Protect You From Diabetes And Heart Disease

Walnut Benefits: Nuts Can Protect You From Diabetes And Heart Disease

Overweight adults can help protect themselves from diabetes and heart disease by adding walnuts to their diet. That’s the conclusion of a new Yale University study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition which put a small group of adults on a walnut-enriched diet for two eight-week sessions. For their research, scientists chose 46 adults between the ages of 30 and 75 who had a body mass index larger than 25 and a waist circumference exceeding 40 inches (102 cm) for men and 35 inches (89 cm) for women. All exhibited risk factors for metabolic syndrome, a precursor of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and none were smokers. Participants were assigned to either a walnut-enriched ad libitum diet or an ad libitum diet without walnuts. Those who followed the walnut diet were instructed to eat 56 g of shelled, unroasted walnuts a day as a snack or with a meal. At the end of the experiments, scientists observed improved endothelial function in overweight adults who consumed walnuts. Endothelial cells make up the inner lining of blood vessels and help with blood clotting and the formation of new blood cells, regulate inflammation and control blood pressure. No participants in the walnut-eating group gained weight. "We know that improving diets tends to be hard, but adding a single food is easy," explained lead author Dr. David Katz. "Our theory is that if a highly nutritious, satiating food like walnuts is added to the diet, there are dual benefits: the benefits of that nutrient rich addition and removal of the less nutritious foods." The Yale study is the latest research to vaunt the health benefits of walnuts. A longitudinal study out of Spain published this summer found that people who ate nuts, particularly walnuts, tended to have a lower body mass Continue reading >>

Go Nuts: 6 Seeds And Nuts Which Are Good For Diabetes

Go Nuts: 6 Seeds And Nuts Which Are Good For Diabetes

When I was a kid, my mother made me eat a spoonful of dry fruit mixture every day. Based on a recipe from her father, who dabbled in herbal medicine, the mixture was supposed to be “good for health” and I was supposed to gulp it down, no questions asked. Now I know why it had that tag—the mixture was made up of different nuts and seeds, and research increasingly points at them as being a powerhouse of nutrients such as proteins, vitamins, good fats and minerals. Nuts and seeds are not only good for general health, they also have protective effects for persons with diabetes. Read on to know which are the best nuts and seeds for diabetics. Almonds Why they are good: Almonds have been found to reduce both fasting and post-meal blood glucose and insulin levels. They also play a role in reducing oxidative stress, which is the underlying factor in diabetes as well as heart disease.(1) (2) How to consume: It’s best to eat almonds raw and unsalted; you may dry roast them but avoid roasting them in oil. Add shaved or chopped almonds to oatmeal, breakfast cereals, salads and yoghurt. Walnuts Why they are good: A 2015 study showed that high blood glucose levels reduce the antioxidant activity of cells; this effect can be reversed by the oil present in walnuts.(3) So taking walnuts regularly has a protective effect against oxidative stress which is responsible for many of the complications of diabetes. Another study found that consuming 30 grams of walnuts (approximately 7-8 walnuts) daily for a year causes weight loss and reduces fasting insulin levels (a marker of metabolic problems such as diabetes) in people with diabetes.(4) How to consume: It’s best to consume walnuts raw and with the skin intact although the skin may give a slight bitter taste. This is important be Continue reading >>

#134 Almonds Vs Walnuts: Which Nut Should You Eat?

#134 Almonds Vs Walnuts: Which Nut Should You Eat?

Almonds vs. Walnuts: Which Nut Should You Eat? Almonds are now more popular than peanuts. Indeed, almond consumption has increased ten-fold since the 1960s. In contrast, walnuts have seen little increase. Are almonds that much better for you than walnuts? Depending on which medical condition you are trying to prevent or reverse, the answer may vary. In this article, we will look at which nut is best for weight loss, brain health, heart health, and other medical conditions. Which Nut is Best for Weight Loss? As most people struggle with weight issues, I will start off this article by exploring which nut is best for weight loss. For years, people trying to lose weight avoided nuts because they are so high in fat and calories. Despite medical studies consistently showing that nut eaters were leaner, it wasn’t until the 1990s that nuts started to catch on as a way to help keep your weight in check. There are several ways that nuts help with weight loss. The first is that all of the protein and fiber fills you up. Second, the body has a hard time using all of the calories in a nut so you get some “free calories.” Lastly, nuts may increase your metabolism so you burn more calories even at rest. So which nut is best for weight loss? When it comes to almonds, a recent study showed that almond eating dieters were able to lose 65% more weight than their non-almond eating dieting counterparts. Many other studies have also shown significant weight loss with almonds. Walnuts also do not cause weight gain. Interestingly, one study showed that even eating large amounts of walnuts for six months did not cause weight gain. While you don’t gain weight eating walnuts, I could not find any convincing evidence that walnuts helped with weight loss. Thus, for weight loss I am going to Continue reading >>

More in diabetes