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Walking For Diabetes Control

How Much Exercise Is Enough If You Have Type 2 Diabetes?

How Much Exercise Is Enough If You Have Type 2 Diabetes?

If you have type 2 diabetes, you should aim for about 30 minutes of exercise at least five days a week, according to the American Diabetes Association. However, if you're like many newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics, you may not have exercised in a long timeif ever. If that's the case, it's fine to start slow and work up. In fact, until you get a feel for how exercise affects your blood sugar (and until you get your doctor's clearance), it might be a good idea for most newly diagnosed patients to take it slow. Aerobics or strength training? The best type of exercise is one that you will do. However, a 2007 study suggested that a combination of aerobic exercise and resistance training was better than either alone. The study included just over 250 adults with type 2 diabetes. All participants except for those in the control group worked out three times a week for six months. The group that did resistance training improved, as did the aerobic exercise group (both had a drop of roughly half a percentage point in hemoglobin A1C). But the best results "went to participants who did both strength training and aerobic exercise," says Ron Sigal, MD, associate professor of medicine at the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada, and the lead author of the study. That group had about a 1% drop in hemoglobin A1C compared to their sedentary peers. "That's often the result we hope for with medication," says George Griffing, MD, professor of medicine at Saint Louis University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Some approaches work better than others People who shoot for a specific goal (10,000 steps per day on a pedometer is a common one) tend to lose more weight than those who do noteven if they don't necessarily reach that goal. But buying a pedometer alone may not be enough to get you Continue reading >>

Standing Or 'easy' Walks May Help Type 2 Diabetics Control Blood Sugar

Standing Or 'easy' Walks May Help Type 2 Diabetics Control Blood Sugar

home / diabetes center / diabetes a-z list / standing or 'easy' walks control type 2 diabetes article Standing or 'Easy' Walks May Help Type 2 Diabetics Control Blood Sugar Want More News? Sign Up for MedicineNet Newsletters! WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For people with type 2 diabetes , better blood sugar control may be as easy as getting up off the couch and standing every so often, or taking a leisurely walk, a new study shows. Dutch researchers noted that "moderate to vigorous" exercise is often recommended for people with diabetes -- but most patients don't comply with that advice. This small new study suggests that even sitting a bit less might be of real benefit. One diabetes expert in the United States agreed with that advice. "For years, I would suggest an exercise regimen to my patients that I knew was doomed to failure," said Dr. Robert Courgi, an endocrinologist at Northwell Health's Southside Hospital in Bay Shore, N.Y. However, "by tweaking the message a bit, the odds of success increase significantly," he said. "Ultimately, any activity helps lower glucose [blood sugar]. The message of 'sitting less' will have a higher success rate than exercise regimens of the past." Current physical activity guidelines call for a minimum of 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise a week to help prevent type 2 diabetes . But the study authors pointed out that nine out of 10 people fail to meet this guideline. The new study was led by Bernard Duvivier of the department of human biology and movement science at Maastricht University Medical Center in the Netherlands. His team wanted to see if a program to reduce sitting time -- by encouraging patients to simply stand and do light-intensity walking -- could offer an alternative to a standard exercise re Continue reading >>

How To Lower Blood Sugar? Take A 10-minute Walk After Meals, Study Says

How To Lower Blood Sugar? Take A 10-minute Walk After Meals, Study Says

Wondering how to lower blood sugar if you have Type 2 diabetes? Take a short walk right after your meals, say researchers from the University of Otago in New Zealand. An estimated 29 million people in the United States (approximately 9% of the population) and 250,000 people in New Zealand (roughly 5% of the population) are living with Type 2 diabetes. Regular physical activity is critical for managing diabetes. To determine whether walking at a specific time relative to meals could increase the benefits of exercise on blood sugar levels, the researchers worked with 41 people with Type 2 diabetes from 18–75 years of age. The participants were randomly assigned to a group either taking a 30-minute walk each day or taking a 10-minute walk after every meal each day for 14 days. At the end of this time frame, the subjects took a 30-day break, then were assigned to the other group. The investigators used an exercise monitor to collect activity information from the participants during waking hours, and food composition tables were used to assess the dietary information the subjects provided in food diaries. Blood sugar levels were measured with fasting blood samples, blood glucose meters, and continuous glucose monitors. The researchers found that when the participants walked for 10 minutes after each meal, their blood sugar levels were an average of 12% lower than when they took a single 30-minute walk each day. Taking a short walk after dinner showed the greatest benefit on blood glucose, particularly when the meal contained a lot of carbohydrate, lowering blood sugar levels by 22% compared to taking a single daily walk. “The improvement was particularly striking after the evening meal when the most carbohydrate was consumed and sedentary behaviors were highest,” the r Continue reading >>

Walking And Type 2 Diabetes

Walking And Type 2 Diabetes

If you need another reason to prioritize physical activity for your patients with type 2 diabetes, it is provided in the study by Di Loreto et al. (1) published in this issue of Diabetes Care. Results from the study show that you can get impressive improvements in health and reductions in health care costs just by getting your patients with type 2 diabetes to make modest increases in physical activity. A second message is that you can produce these increases in physical activity in a large proportion of your patients with a simple counseling program that requires only a modest commitment of time and effort. A unique aspect of the study is that the results were analyzed in a way to provide some guidance on how much physical activity is required for health and financial benefits in this population. Keep in mind that these analyses were obtained from a post hoc analysis of the data and must be treated with caution until confirmed by other prospective studies. Nonetheless, the results strongly suggest that small, achievable increases in physical activity can have a big impact on health in this population. In this study, all patients were given a counseling program designed to increase physical activity by at least 10 MET h/week. After 2 years, the results were analyzed based on how much physical activity was actually performed. The authors found significant health benefits with increases in physical activity of >10 MET h/week, and they suggest that this is the minimum increase in physical activity required to achieve health and financial benefits in sedentary patients with type 2 diabetes. Further, they found that the health benefits of physical activity continued to increase as physical activity increased up to a maximum of 21–30 MET h/week. Thus, they recommend 27 MET h Continue reading >>

Exercises To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Exercises To Lower Your Blood Sugar

It’s never too late to reap the benefits of exercise, whether you’re 45 or 95. First of all, it simply makes you feel good to move. By becoming more active, you can also lower your blood sugar to keep diabetes under control. “You don’t need to run a marathon to get results,” says Dawn Sherr, RD, of the American Association of Diabetes Educators. “Walking, swimming, and playing with the grandkids are all great ways to get exercise.” Follow these four steps to get started. If you're just starting, ask your doctor which exercise is right for you. Ask if you need to adjust your diabetes medicine before you hit the trail or the pool. Next, think about what you'll enjoy most. You’re more likely to stick with activities you like. Here are a few suggestions: Walk outdoors or indoors on a track or in a mall Take a dance class Bicycle outdoors or ride a stationary bike indoors Swim or try water aerobics Stretch Try yoga or tai chi Play tennis Take aerobics or another fitness class Do housework, yard chores, or gardening Try resistance training with light weights or elastic bands If more than one of these appeals to you, go for them! In fact, combining cardio, like walking or swimming, with stretching or balance moves gives you a better workout. Any way you move will help lower your blood sugar. When you do moderate exercise, like walking, that makes your heart beat a little faster and breathe a little harder. Your muscles use more glucose, the sugar in your blood stream. Over time, this can lower your blood sugar levels. It also makes the insulin in your body work better. You'll get these benefits for hours after your walk or workout. Just remember you don’t have to overdo it. Strenuous exercise can sometimes increase blood sugar temporarily after you stop exerc Continue reading >>

Why People With Type 2 Diabetes Should Start A Walking Program

Why People With Type 2 Diabetes Should Start A Walking Program

Today, more than 145 million adults in the United States include walking as part of a physically active lifestyle, and this staple exercise continues to grow in popularity. After all, walking can be done just about anywhere and, for most, is as simple as putting one foot in front of the other. Exercise is an especially beneficial and critical component of the treatment plans for the nearly 28 million Americans living with type 2 diabetes. However, maintaining a fitness routine can be challenging, and while people may recognize that they need to exercise regularly, they may not know where to start. That’s why AstraZeneca and the Diabetes Hands Foundation launched the Everyday Steps walking program, which features a walking guide with 12 motivational tips to help people with type 2 diabetes start a daily walking routine – and stick with it. Dr. Sheri Colberg, a professor of exercise science at Old Dominion University and adjunct professor of internal medicine at Eastern Virginia Medical School, recognizes how walking can benefit people with type 2 diabetes. For the past two decades, Dr. Colberg’s research has been devoted to exercise and type 2 diabetes, and ultimately, the benefits physical activity has on overall health. She’s also the author of 10 health-related publications focused on type 2 diabetes. Here, she helps to address some questions about the barriers people with type 2 diabetes may face when it comes to sticking to an exercise routine and how to push past them. What are the biggest concerns you hear when you talk to people with type 2 diabetes about exercise? Dr. Colberg: I see exercise as being the biggest challenge for them. In addition to managing other components of their treatment plan, many adults with type 2 diabetes can find maintaining a fi Continue reading >>

Why Walking Can Prevent Diabetes More Than Running Does

Why Walking Can Prevent Diabetes More Than Running Does

Why Walking Can Prevent Diabetes More Than Running Does Science has given you permission to ramp down your workout Take a breather during your next workout: Walking might protect against diabetes more than running does, research from Duke University suggests. In the study, researchers had people with prediabetes a common condition where your blood sugar is elevated, but not quite at the level to count as diabeteswalk briskly or jog 13.8 miles a week for 6 months. They discovered that those in the walking group showed nearly 6 times greater improvement in their glucose tolerancewhich measures how well their cells absorb blood sugarthan the joggers did. More research needs to be done to figure out why exactly walking seems more protective against diabetes than running, says study coauthor Cris A. Slentz, Ph.D. of Duke University. One possibility? When you perform moderate exerciselike walking three milesyour body taps into its stores of fatty acids to fuel it more than it does when you exercise vigorously, like if you jogged the same distance, he says. Thats good news for your diabetes risk: Too much fatty acids can make it harder for your body to process the hormone insulin. And if your body cant use insulin effectively, your cells wont be able to absorb blood sugar from your bloodstream. So your body cranks out more and more insulin to try to compensate. Eventually, you cant produce enough of it to effectively remove the blood sugar from your blood, which triggers prediabetes and diabetes. Related: How Walking Boosts Your Mood At Work Until further research is performed, its not quite clear whether walking affects the bodies of healthy guys in the same way it does for those who are prediabetic. Still, the findings apply to more guys than you may think: More than 1 out Continue reading >>

Diabetes Exercise: 7 Steps To Start Walking

Diabetes Exercise: 7 Steps To Start Walking

People are walking more. In 2005, 56 percent of adults said they went on a 10-minute walk at least once a week, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2010, the number rose to 62 percent. Today, about 145 million adults include walking as part of their physical activity, and it's no surprise. "Walking allows you to be more mobile," says Devon Dobrosielski, Ph.D., researcher and exercise physiologist at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore. "It builds muscle strength, which is vital to avoiding disability, frailty, and falls later in life." In just seven simple steps, you can jump on the bandwagon and start pounding the pavement today. 1. Make a Plan The best way to start a new exercise program is to schedule it. Carve time into your day and plant reminders, such as exercise clothes and shoes near your bed, to make it easy to stay on track, says Caroline Bohl, RD, CDE, a diabetes educator and personal trainer at the Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center in New York City. 2. Keep Yourself Motivated Build in rewards for yourself, such as listening to a radio program, music, or a book on tape while you walk. Music can help in multiple ways: It distracts from the effort and the passage of time, and it encourages you to pick up the pace, Bohl says. Or catch up with a long-distance friend on your cell phone (as long as you're safe from traffic). Walking with a partner -- human or a pet -- helps to hold you accountable. "When people get a dog, their physical activity goes through the roof," says Brett Ives, CDE, clinical outreach coordinator at Mount Sinai Diabetes Center in New York City. Join or form a walking club (check with your local American Diabetes Association office, gym, or YMCA) to socialize while you work out. Social media and smartpho Continue reading >>

Health: Walking For 45 Minutes Helps To Control Diabetes

Health: Walking For 45 Minutes Helps To Control Diabetes

People with diabetes can limit the impact of the condition simply by walking for an extra 45 minutes a day, according to scientists who found exercise helped to keep blood sugar levels in check. Scientists at Newcastle University studied people with late-onset, or type 2, diabetes. They found that walking improved their bodies' ability to store sugar and burn fat, which after a few weeks reduced the effects of diabetes. In Britain, more than 2.3 million people have diabetes. Around 90% of them have the type 2 form, which is linked to obesity and a sedentary lifestyle. If left untreated it can lead to blood vessel damage that triggers heart disease, strokes, and can require patients to have limbs amputated. "This gives people an immediate way to help control diabetes without any additional drugs. It's a simple message," said Michael Trenell, whose study appears in the journal Diabetes Care today. Trenell's team used MRI scanners to measure how efficiently 20 volunteers, 10 of whom had type 2 diabetes, burned energy in their leg muscles before and after taking part in the eight-week trial. Each volunteer was given a pedometer and asked to walk more than 10,000 steps a day. On average, people take around 6,000 steps during their daily routine. The scans revealed that by being more active, diabetics burned 20% more fat and were able to store more sugar in their muscles. Muscles are the biggest storage depots for sugar in the body, but when they fail to absorb enough, sugar levels stay abnormally high in the bloodstream, causing damage to veins, arteries and organs. "People often find the thought of going to the gym quite daunting, but we've found that nearly everyone with diabetes is able to become more active through walking. Many people got off the bus a few stops earlier Continue reading >>

Have Type 2 Diabetes? Try Walking After Eating

Have Type 2 Diabetes? Try Walking After Eating

HealthDay Reporter type 2 diabetes, a short walk after eating may help lower blood sugar levels more than exercising at other times of the day, a new study shows. A measurement of blood sugar called postprandial glycemia, which has been linked with heart disease risk, averaged 12 percent lower when study participants took a walk after eating, compared with those who exercised at other times. The largest drop in postprandial glycemia, 22 percent, was achieved by walking after dinner, the study authors found. "If you have type 2 diabetes, there is a guideline to be active for at least 150 minutes a week," said study author Andrew Reynolds, a researcher at the University of Otago, in New Zealand. But, he added, "the benefits we observed due to physical activity after meals suggest that current guidelines should be amended to specify after-meal activity, particularly when meals contain a substantial amount of carbohydrates," he said. "Consider walking after you eat as part of your daily routine," he added. However, one U.S. diabetes specialist offered a caveat on that advice. Exercise is indeed part of good management and care for those with type 2 diabetes, said Dr. Joel Zonszein, director of the Clinical Diabetes Center at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. But, he urged caution about the benefits of exercising right after meals. Because heart disease is common among those with type 2 diabetes, "we need to be careful in encouraging exercise after a meal, as the demands on the heart increase with meals," he explained. "This is especially important in people with heart disease, as diversion of blood from the coronary or carotid arteries to the gut is not always best for these patients." The study findings were published Oct. 17 in the journal Diabetologia. In the s Continue reading >>

The Healthiest Walking Workout For Diabetics

The Healthiest Walking Workout For Diabetics

Prevention may earn money from the links on this page. Why trust us? The Healthiest Walking Workout For Diabetics There's no question that walking is great for everyone: It dramatically boosts energy levels, fights fat, and protects your heart. But if you have high blood sugar, or if you have been diagnosed with prediabetes or diabetes, walking can be a lifesaver. (Walk off22 pounds in just 8 weeks and feel healthier with Walk Off Weight .) "Walking is one of the best types of 'medicine' we have to help prevent diabetes, or reduce its severity and potential complicationssuch as heart attack and strokeif you already have it," says JoAnn Manson, MD, DrPH, chief of the division of preventive medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. Women who did at least 30 minutes daily of moderate physical activity, such as brisk walking, slashed their risk of diabetes by 30%, according to results from the Harvard Nurses' Health Study. (This is your body on walking .) Even a single 90-minute session of aerobic exercise improved blood sugar control in at-risk women, according to research from the University of Michigan. MORE: 13 Power Foods That Lower Blood Pressure Naturally Walking also shrinks the dangerous abdominal fat that raises your risk of diabetes. Excess fat around your abdomen causes inflammation in cells, making them even more resistant to insulin, a hormone that controls blood sugar; this increases your odds of developing the disease. A Canadian study found that women who walked briskly for about an hour a day decreased their belly fat by 20% after 14 weekswithout changing their eating habits. This science-based workout combines powerful cardio walks with toning workouts . "Together, the two build lean muscle Continue reading >>

A Short Walk After Meals Is All It Takes To Lower Blood Sugar

A Short Walk After Meals Is All It Takes To Lower Blood Sugar

Seniors are more prone to developing diabetes, but a little exercise could make a big difference. A study published today in Diabetes Care found that three short walks each day after meals were as effective at reducing blood sugar over 24 hours as a single 45-minute walk at the same moderate pace. Even better, taking an evening constitutional was found to be much more effective at lowering blood sugar following supper. The evening meal, often the largest of the day, can significantly raise 24-hour glucose levels. The innovative exercise science study was conducted at the Clinical Exercise Physiology Laboratory at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services (SPHHS) using whole room calorimeters. Loretta DiPietro, Ph.D., chair of the SPHHS Department of Exercise Science, led the study. "These findings are good news for people in their 70s and 80s who may feel more capable of engaging in intermittent physical activity on a daily basis," DiPietro said in a press release. Putting Humans in a Box to Measure Their Energy Use The whole room calorimeter (WRM), which looks like a very small hotel room, is a controlled-air environment for human study that allows scientists to calculate a person's energy expenditure by testing samples of air. The balance of oxygen consumed and carbon dioxide produced varies according to the activity level of the person in the room. The WRM also measures the body’s use of different food fuels, such as carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. The 10 study participants spent three 48-hour periods in the small calorimeter rooms. Each room was equipped with a bed, toilet, sink, treadmill, television, and computer, leaving little room to move around. Participants ate standardized meals, and their blood sugar levels were monit Continue reading >>

The Step-by-step Approach To Better Blood Sugars: Walking

The Step-by-step Approach To Better Blood Sugars: Walking

If you’re like me, you might have a health-focused New Year’s resolution posted on your wall: "lose weight," "exercise more, "be less stressed." Unfortunately, making resolutions is easy, but sticking to them is hard. A 15,000-person survey found that four out of five people who make New Year’s resolutions eventually break them. And it gets worse: a sizeable percentage of people (11%) in one survey actually broke their resolution one week in! As I pondered this depressing data, I thought about scientifically testing the simplest, most fundamental exercise possible: walking. It can be done anywhere, does not cost anything, and requires no equipment. And because the barriers to doing it are so low, it also helps address that very basic New Year’s Resolution conundrum outlined above. What follows is my personal diabetes experience testing the blood sugar benefits of walking, a brief review of studies on diabetes and walking, and five tips to incorporate walking into your daily routine. If you find this article useful, check out my upcoming book, Bright Spots & Landmines! Walking with diabetes – my own experience As a fitness fiend my whole life, I tend to think of “exercise” with a very intense, all-or-nothing frame of reference: cycling, strength training, and playing basketball. So when I approached the question of how much walking could really drop my blood sugars, I was skeptical. In an effort to test it objectively, I performed a dozen periods of walking, and measured my blood glucose immediately before and immediately after finishing. I timed each walk with a stopwatch, always made sure I had less than one unit of insulin-on-board, and tried to go at a normal speed. On average, walking dropped my blood sugar by approximately one mg/dl per minute. The la Continue reading >>

Walking For Fitness With Diabetes

Walking For Fitness With Diabetes

For people with type 2 diabetes, exercise is nearly as important as diet in controlling the disease. And there are few forms of exercise as easy and convenient as walking. Walking for fitness requires no special equipment other than a good pair of shoes and perhaps some reflective clothing if you plan to walk at night. You don't need an expensive gym membership or a pricey treadmill. All you need is a street, sidewalk, shopping mall, or even the hallways of your own home. In return, you'll gain greater control over your type 2 diabetes. Before you start, do get the go-ahead from your doctor: People whose type 2 diabetes is not under control should generally not pursue exercise until blood sugars are better controlled and no longer erratic. Your doctor can tell you if you're in shape to start exercising and can recommend what types of exercise would be appropriate for your physical condition as well as how to get started with a walking regimen. Diabetes and Exercise: Benefits A diabetes exercise plan should involve a combination of aerobic exercise like walking and strength training. The benefits of walking, and exercise in general, include: Lowering blood glucose levels Improving the body's ability to use insulin Reducing risk of heart disease or stroke Raising good cholesterol levels while lowering bad cholesterol levels Lowering stress levels Strengthening muscles and bones Also keep in mind that there’s walking and then there’s walking — really picking up the speed. By walking at a brisk pace, you can raise your heart rate, which gives your heart and lungs a better workout. Brisk walking also burns more calories. Studies show that people who want to receive health benefits from aerobic exercise should work out for 30 minutes a day at least five days of the week Continue reading >>

How Much Walking Is Best For Diabetes Control?

How Much Walking Is Best For Diabetes Control?

How Much Walking Is Best for Diabetes Control? Exercise and walking are excellent tools for controlling Type 2 diabetes and improving health for people with diabetes. Brisk walking workouts can help you maintain a steady blood sugar level and body weight if you have Type 2 diabetes. A 30-minute walk at least five days per week is recommended by the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Diabetes Association. Learn how you can enjoy walking and manage your diabetes. Consult your health care team to see if walking is the right exercise for you and any precautions necessary for your individual circumstances and adjustments to your medications or diet. Walking Goal: To walk for 30 minutes, with at least 20 continuous minutes at a brisk pace of 15 to 20 minutes per mile (3 to 4 mph). Walking shoes and socks: You need to protect your feet and prevent developing blisters or sores. Get fitted for flat and flexible athletic shoes at the best running shoe store in your area. Avoid cotton socks and tube socks and choose athletic socks or diabetic socks made of sweat-wicking polyester fiber. Walking clothing: You need good freedom of movement and you need to prevent chafing, which can lead to sores. Wear a fitness T-shirt and fitness shorts, warmup pants or yoga pants. Sweat-wicking polyester fabric is preferred over cotton. Where to walk: You can use a treadmill for your walking workout. If you prefer to walk outside, you should look for a walking route where you can walk withfew interruptions to cross streets. Using a track at a nearby school is an option, or look for a greenway path or a park with a walking loop. Do a foot check: Check your feet before and after each walk. You may not feel blisters and hot spots, which could develop into ulcers if not treated. Get Continue reading >>

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