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Vodka And Diabetes

Does Alcohol And Tobacco Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Does Alcohol And Tobacco Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Yes, alcohol and tobacco use may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Alcohol Although studies show that drinking moderate amounts of alcohol may actually lower the risk of diabetes, the opposite is true for people who drink greater amounts of alcohol. Moderate alcohol use is defined as one drink a day for women of all ages and men older than age 65, and up to two drinks a day for men age 65 and younger. Too much alcohol may cause chronic inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), which can impair its ability to secrete insulin and potentially lead to diabetes. Tobacco Tobacco use can increase blood sugar levels and lead to insulin resistance. The more you smoke, the greater your risk of diabetes. People who smoke heavily — more than 20 cigarettes a day — have almost double the risk of developing diabetes compared with people who don’t smoke. Continue reading >>

12 Best Alcoholic Mixed Drinks For Diabetics

12 Best Alcoholic Mixed Drinks For Diabetics

Diabetes is no joke, so do you know which are the 12 best alcoholic mixed drinks for diabetics? There are approximately 371 million diabetic people worldwide. A lot of people don’t see diabetes like a serious disease, but according to CBS News, diabetes caused more deaths every year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. There was a significant diabetes campaign going on during my college years. Perhaps it was ONLY at my college. I really have no idea way. One of my more suggestible friends read a poster and was convinced for days, incorrectly, that she had diabetes. Fortunately for her, it wasn’t the case. The poster should’ve first asked “are you kind of gullible?” or “do you overreact to posters about diabetes?” If so, you’re not likely to be a diabetic. Unfortunately, that is actually a serious problem for the disease–awareness. There are two types of diabetes, “type 1 diabetes” and “type 2 diabetes”. Even though there are different types, the result is the same: the lost ability to produce insulin. The Mellitus type 1 is developing because of pancreas disease, infectious from events for example car accidents or surgeries as well. This diabetes type usually affects children or teenagers. Mellitus type 2, on the other hand, is most common among adult people. It is developed among people who are overweight or obese. Also, it can be developed if the individual is suffering from a lot of stress–one more reason to take that warm bath or meditation session or free massage depending on who’s offering it. If you are a diabetic you already know you must not consume many specific foods and drinks. A healthy diet consists 40% to 60% calories from carbohydrates, 20% protein and 30% or less fat, Family Doctor reported. Many people are wondering wheth Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Alcohol Intake On Insulin Sensitivity In Men

The Effect Of Alcohol Intake On Insulin Sensitivity In Men

A randomized controlled trial Abstract OBJECTIVE—Population data suggest that alcohol consumption may influence the risk of diabetes in a biphasic manner, but this has not been tested by any controlled interventions. The object of this study was to determine whether reducing alcohol intake in moderate-to-heavy drinkers (40–110 g/day) results in improvement in insulin sensitivity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A 4-week run-in period where subjects maintained their usual drinking pattern was followed by randomization to a two-way cross-over intervention study. In each of two 4-week treatment interventions, subjects either substituted their usual alcohol intake with a 0.9% alcohol beer or maintained their usual alcohol intake. At the end of each 4-week period, insulin sensitivity as determined by the low-dose insulin glucose infusion test and the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) score, and biomarkers of alcohol consumption (γ-glutamyl transpeptidase [γ-GT] and HDL cholesterol) were measured. RESULTS—A total of 16 healthy men aged 51.0 ± 2.7 (mean ± SEM) years with a BMI of 26.4 ± 0.61 kg/m2 completed the study. There was a large reduction in alcohol intake (72.4 ± 5.0 vs. 7.9 ± 1.6 g/day, P < 0.001) and significant reductions in γ-GT (geometric mean 24.4 units/l [95% CI 19.7–30.2] vs. 18.6 units/l [15.5–22.2], P < 0.01) and HDL cholesterol (1.36 ± 0.07 vs. 1.13 ± 0.07 mmol/l, P < 0.001). There was no effect of alcohol on insulin sensitivity index (ISI), fasting insulin, glucose, or HOMA score. CONCLUSIONS—A substantial reduction in alcohol intake from 7.2 to 0.8 standard drinks per day in healthy men did not change insulin sensitivity as measured by ISI or HOMA score. Presently, it is difficult to simply define overall effects of alcohol on the ins Continue reading >>

The Seven Deadliest Drinks

The Seven Deadliest Drinks

You're not stupid. You know drinking isn't good for you. But when is it really, really not good for you? We talked about the healthiest drinks last week. Today we're looking at the darker, sugarier, fattier underbelly of drinking, and oh, what an underbelly it is. It's Friday afternoon, you've made it through the long week, and it's time for Happy Hour, Gizmodo's weekly booze column. A cocktail shaker full of innovation, science, and alcohol. Potato vodka + potato chips! To help us determine the nastiest of the nasty, again we reached out to Maren Robinson, certified nutritional consultant (CNC) and master of public health (MPH). As a holistic nutritionist, she looks at a cocktail's comprehensive health profile, or lack thereof, in this case. Obviously Drinking alcohol in of itself is not healthy. Let's just get that out of the way. Even the "healthiest" drinks are unhealthy when you drink too many of them. As Robinson said last week, "The fewer the drinks, the fewer the calories, and reduced risk of longer term problems. Further, if you are an alcoholic, seek the appropriate treatment options, and avoid drinking alcohol." Plus, the simple act of getting drunk can be deadly, especially if you're stupid enough to get behind the wheel. Got it? Good. Mudslide Ingredients: Vodka, Kahlua, Bailey's, Cream or Ice Cream Let's not mince words here: The alcoholic milkshake known as a Mudslide is a shortcut to diabetes. From Robinson, "Dairy products in general are high in calories, saturated fat and cholesterol. Cream? Excessively so. In fact, Harvard's New Healthy Plate now recommends only 1-2 servings of dairy per day (the old Food Pyramid recommended 2-3 servings). This is backed up by The China Study, which finds that excess consumption of dairy can have health consequences m Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Alcohol, And Social Drinking

Diabetes, Alcohol, And Social Drinking

People with diabetes should be particularly cautious when it comes to drinking alcohol because alcohol can make some of the complications of diabetes worse. First of all, alcohol impacts the liver in doing its job of regulating blood sugar. Alcohol can also interact with some medications that are prescribed to people with diabetes. Even if you only rarely drink alcohol, talk with your healthcare provider about it so that he or she knows which medications are best for you. Here’s what you need to know: 1. Alcohol interacts with diabetes medications Alcohol can cause blood glucose levels to rise or fall, depending on how much you drink. Some diabetes pills (including sulfonylureas and meglitinides) also lower blood glucose levels by stimulating the pancreas to make more insulin. Combining the blood-sugar-lowering effects of the medication with alcohol can lead to hypoglycemia or “insulin shock,” which is a medical emergency. 2. Alcohol prevents your liver from doing its job The main function of your liver is to store glycogen, which is the stored form of glucose, so that you will have a source of glucose when you haven’t eaten. When you drink alcohol, your liver has to work to remove it from your blood instead of working to regulate blood sugar, or blood glucose. For this reason, you should never drink alcohol when your blood glucose is already low. 3. Never drink alcohol on an empty stomach Food slows down the rate at which alcohol is absorbed into the bloodstream. Be sure to eat a meal or snack containing carbohydrates if you are going to drink alcohol. 4. Always test blood sugar before having an alcoholic beverage Alcohol impairs your liver’s ability to produce glucose, so be sure to know your blood glucose number before you drink an alcoholic beverage. 5. Al Continue reading >>

Lemmy Says He's

Lemmy Says He's "indestructible", Switches From Whiskey To Vodka To "help With Diabetes"

It's been a while since we've checked in with Lemmy. Between suffering from diabetes, a defibrilator installed, dealing with a bout of hematoma, the last few years haven't been kind to Lemmy. But he's powering through even though recent photos show Kilmister has lost a significant amount of weight. In a new interview with The Guardian, they check in on his health, and it's not exactly a glowing endorsement: Lemmy has lost a lot of weight, and appears pale and drawn. His hands aren’t wholly steady, and he says that these days he has to walk with a stick because “my legs are fucked”. Nevertheless, he insists: “Apparently I am still indestructible.” He has changed his lifestyle – he’s down to a pack of [cigarettes] a week, and has swapped from Jack and Coke to vodka and orange, apparently to help with his diabetes, – though his assistant wonders whether swapping from one 40% spirit topped with sugar to another 40% spirit topped with sugar is really going to help. “I like orange juice better,” he says. “So, Coca-Cola can fuck off.” A full bottle of Absolut is put in front of him for the interview, and a full bottle of Jack Daniels is given to me. So Lemmy is walking with a cane, still drinking and still smoking? Progress, I guess? At least he's down to a pack a week, as opposed to a pack a day. The last time I was near him, which was at the Golden Gods in early 2014, he seemed to find it hard to even spit out words because it was hard for him to breathe (or he may have been shitfaced for all I know). The Guardian also recalls the band's recent Glastonbury performance where Motorhead started playing "Overkill" but Lemmy thought they were playing "Ace of Spades" and he started singing "Ace of Spades" over "Overkill" guitar riffs. I almost didn't believ Continue reading >>

Regular Alcohol Consumption Could Cut Diabetes Risk, Study Finds

Regular Alcohol Consumption Could Cut Diabetes Risk, Study Finds

Regularly drinking a moderate amount of certain alcoholic drinks could reduce a person’s chances of developing diabetes, according to a study. Consuming alcohol three or four days a week was associated with a reduced risk of developing diabetes – a 27% reduction in men and a 32% reduction in women – compared with abstaining, scientists found. Wine was considered particularly beneficial, probably because it has chemical compounds that improve blood sugar balance, researchers in Denmark found. Gin could have the opposite effect, along with other spirits, increasing women’s chances of getting diabetes by 83%. Experts said the findings, published in the journal Diabetologia, should not be seen as a green light to drink more than existing NHS guidelines suggest. The authors of the research, led by Prof Janne Tolstrup from the University of Southern Denmark, wrote: “Our findings suggest that alcohol drinking frequency is associated with the risk of diabetes and that consumption of alcohol over three to four weekdays is associated with the lowest risks of diabetes, even after taking average weekly alcohol consumption into account.” In the past, studies have suggested that light to moderate drinking can reduce the risk of developing diabetes but there has been no research into the frequency of alcohol consumption. Scientists studied data on 70,551 men and women who took part in a Danish survey. Respondents were quizzed about their drinking habits and monitored for five years. Afterwards, participants were followed up and 859 men and 887 women had developed diabetes. The investigation did not distinguish between the two forms of diabetes, type 1 and the much more common type 2. For both genders, seven glasses of wine a week lowered the risk of diabetes by 25% to 30% Continue reading >>

Drinking Alcohol Safely With Diabetes

Drinking Alcohol Safely With Diabetes

Alcohol. Yep, some people with diabetes drink it. I do, on occasion. Some argue that drinking alcohol with diabetes isn’t the healthiest choice, but I could say the same thing about diet soda. Whatever your stance on it is, it is something that should be handled with care, especially when you are dealing with diabetes. As anyone with diabetes (or someone who loves a PWD) knows, it is a balancing act. Between food, exercise, hormones and the like, we are constantly chasing that elusive 100 mg/dl on the meter. Alcohol can really throw your blood sugars into a tailspin. Let’s not even start on carbohydrates in your drink. Your liver and its functions are a very big player in how you manage diabetes while drinking. Instead of helping to regulate your blood sugar, your liver is busy metabolizing the alcohol, which can result in some scary lows. Be prepared with glucose tabs and make sure to check regularly if you are having a drink. What to Drink? I like to stick to drinks that don’t have carbohydrates in them: a good red wine, vodka and club soda or Fresca, or an occasional martini are predictable for me. Plus, I don’t have to take any insulin with them which makes it easier. If I am having a beer or something fruity like rum punch, I make sure to limit how much I am having. I once had an endocrinologist tell me that after every 3 drinks make your fourth one with carbs. I don’t know how good that advice was, I don’t follow it… But I do stick to what I know, I test very often, and I make sure to eat something while I am drinking. Bedtime Cautions Yes, you should be cautious before bed even when not drinking but you need to be even more on track of what your blood sugar is when you are. I cannot stress enough to test right before bed (and before you brush your t Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Diabetes: How Does It Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

Alcohol And Diabetes: How Does It Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

For many people, a glass of alcohol here and there does not pose a problem. However, for those with health conditions, such as diabetes, alcohol can affect blood sugar levels and pose a health risk. Understanding what you are consuming and how alcohol influences blood glucose levels is particularly important for people with diabetes. Alcohol can interfere with blood sugar levels. People with diabetes should sip drinks slowly and not drink on an empty stomach. Alcohol and the body Alcohol is a depressant; it is classed as a "sedative-hypnotic drug" because it depresses the central nervous system. Every organ in the body can be affected by alcohol. Once consumed, it is rapidly absorbed by the stomach and small intestine and enters the bloodstream. In an average person, the liver can breaks down roughly one standard drink of alcohol per hour. Excess alcohol moves throughout the body. The amount not broken down by the liver is removed by the lungs,kidneys, and skin in urine and sweat. How alcohol affects a person's body depends on how much they consume. At low doses, alcohol can act as a stimulant - people may feel happy, or become talkative. Drinking too much alcohol, however, can impair the body. Alcohol and blood sugar levels A person's overall health plays a big role in how they respond to alcohol. People with diabetes or other blood sugar problems must be careful when consuming alcohol. Alcohol consumption can interfere with blood sugar as well as the hormones needed to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Frequent heavy drinkers can wipe out their energy storage in a few hours. Over time, excessive alcohol consumption can reduce the overall effectiveness of insulin. This results in high blood sugar levels. Many people with alcoholic liver disease also have either gluc Continue reading >>

Touchy Topics

Touchy Topics

A comprehensive guide to all the sticky situations that arise when you’re a college student with diabetes. Have a question that isn't answered here? Ask our student advice columnists (anonymously) and we'll get it answered for you. Type 1 diabetes is sometimes linked to another autoimmune disease called Celiac Disease. Alcohol It’s no surprise that drinking happens on campuses all over the country. If you plan on drinking while at school, make sure you understand how to do it safely with diabetes. Check out our FAQ below, which includes many of the common questions young adults have regarding drinking, and make sure to check out our partners at Drinking with Diabetes for additional information. FAQs We know it’s hard to bring up certain questions in the doctor’s office. But often, the hard questions are the ones we most need answers to. Below is an exhaustive list of questions you might be thinking about, but may or may not have asked a healthcare professional. If your question isn’t here, we’re happy to help – send it along, and we’ll get it answered. The information below is not meant to replace the advice of your healthcare team. Individual responses to diabetes management approaches can vary considerably. Speak with your physician before making any changes to your therapy. Answers courtesy of Gary Scheiner MS (T1D since 1985!), CDE and his team at IDS. How can I tell the difference between being low and being drunk? And being low while drunk? Being drunk and being low can look the same. And both conditions can severely impair your judgment as well as your ability to function. Intoxication, however, does not usually cause the “shaking/sweating/rapid heartbeat” associated with hypoglycemia. Unfortunately, drinking can actually suppress these sympto Continue reading >>

Drinking Alcohol Safely With Diabetes?

Drinking Alcohol Safely With Diabetes?

Alcohol can cause hypoglycemia shortly after drinking and for 24 hours after drinking. So, if the diabetic patient want to drink alcohol, check with the blood glucose before drinking and eat either before or while drinking. It is important to check the blood glucose before going to bed to make sure it is at a safe level – between 100 and 140 mg/dL. If blood glucose is low, make eat something to raise it. ADA is provided some guidelines that Men can drink 2 or fewer alcoholic drinks a day. Women can drink 1 or fewer alcoholic beverages a day (1 alcoholic drink equals a 12 oz beer, 5 oz glass of wine, or 1 ½ oz distilled spirits (vodka, whiskey, gin, etc.). But as a I feel to recommand that to take alcohol only when the blood glucose levels are strictly under control. Alcohol can lessen to resolve to stay on track with healthy eathing. But still there are many contraversions about the alcohol and diabetes on safety of the patient. Continue reading >>

Drinking And Type 2 Diabetes

Drinking And Type 2 Diabetes

Popping a champagne bottle, clinking glasses for a toast, or sharing a beer with friends are time-honored rituals. If you have type 2 diabetes, does this mean those rituals can no longer be part of your life? Questions to Ask Before Imbibing You should ask yourself these three questions before you consider drinking alcohol: Is your diabetes under control? Do you have any other illnesses that could be made worse by drinking alcohol? Do you know how to manage your blood sugar if it dips too low or rises too high? If your diabetes is not under control; if you have other illnesses affecting your liver, heart, or nerves; or if you don’t know what to do if your blood sugar fluctuates too much, alcohol may cause some significant side effects. Finally, if you didn’t drink alcohol before you were diagnosed with diabetes, you probably shouldn’t start now. Regular drinking can also interfere with good diabetes self-care. A large study of nearly 66,000 patients with diabetes published in April 2013 in the journal Acta Diabetologica found that the more patients drank, the less likely they were to adhere to important self-care behaviors like getting enough exercise, not smoking, eating a healthy diet, and taking their diabetes medications. Your Physician’s Input Is Important Cynthia Herrick, MD, a Washington University endocrinologist with Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, says people with type 2 diabetes should talk with their physician about how often — and how much — they drink. If you’re healthy and your doctor doesn’t see any reason why you can’t drink alcohol, as always, moderation is the key. Robert Ruxin, MD, an endocrinologist in Ridgefield, Connecticut, says moderation means a daily limit of "one alcoholic drink equivalent or less for women and two or l Continue reading >>

Free Diabetic Recipe: Vodka Cream Penne Pasta

Free Diabetic Recipe: Vodka Cream Penne Pasta

Think any recipe that has the word “cream” is unhealthy? Think again. This recipe does feature a sauce that is undeniably rich and creamy, but it also doesn’t feature the kind of caloric and fat content that these types of pasta dishes typically possess. Calories: 324, Fat: 11 g, Saturated Fat: 5 g, Cholesterol: 27 mg, Sodium: 379 mg, Carbohydrate: 44 g, Fiber: 7 g, Protein: 12 g Servings: 8 Ingredients: 1 chopped large onion 4 minced garlic cloves 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 28 oz. can of diced tomatoes 1 14.5 oz. can of diced tomatoes 1 12 oz. package of whole wheat penne pasta 1/4 cup vodka 2 teaspoons prepared pesto 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 1 cup whole milk 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1/2 cup shredded Parmesan cheese Directions: Sautee the onion in oil in a large saucepan until tender. Add the garlic, and then cook 1 additional minute. Stir in the vodka and the tomatoes. Bring to a boil, and then lower the heat. Simmer, uncovered, for 30 to 35 minutes or until it is slightly thickened, stirring occasionally. Cook the penne pasta per the directions on the package. Stir the salt, pepper flakes, and pesto into the tomato mixture. Combine the cream and flour in a small bowl until smooth, and then stir into pan. Add the milk. Bring to a boil; cook and stir the sauce for 2 minutes or until it is thickened slightly. Drain the penne pasta. Serve pasta covered with the sauce, and sprinkled with cheese. Tips: If you don’t have any pesto, you can substitute it with basil seasoning and bay leaves. Be sure to remove the bay leaves before you add the milk. Avoid using cheap vodka if at all possible. As is the case with all ingredients, the better the quality of the vodka, the better the dish will turn out. FOR Continue reading >>

Fitting Alcohol Into Your Meal Plan

Fitting Alcohol Into Your Meal Plan

The use of alcohol should be discussed with your physician and healthcare team. As a general guideline, for persons using insulin, two alcoholic beverages may be used in addition to their regular meal plan. No food should be omitted in exchange for an alcoholic drink. For persons who are not on insulin and are watching their weight, alcohol is best substituted for fat choices and in some cases extra bread/starch choices. Some alcoholic beverages contain higher amounts of sugar and carbohydrate — these include sweet wines, sweet vermouth and wine coolers. Use these sparingly as they may increase your blood glucose levels too much. Additional guidelines for the use of alcohol are printed below. Beverage Amount Calories Carbo- Equal to: hydrate (gms) ------------------------------------------------------------- Beer Regular beer 12 ounces 150 14 1 starch & 1-1/2 fats Light beer 12 ounces 100 6 2 fats Nonalcoholic beer 11 ounces 50 10 1 starch Distilled spirits 1.5 ounces 105 trace 2 fats 86 proof (gin, rum vodka, whiskey, scotch, bourbon) Wine red table or rose 4 ounces 85 1.0 2 fats dry white 4 ounces 80 .4 2 fats sweet wine 2 ounces 90 6.5 1/2 starch & 1-1/2 fats light wine 4 ounces 55 1.3 1 fat wine coolers 12 ounces 190 22.0 1-1/2 fruit & 3 fat champagne 4 ounces 100 3.6 2 fats sherry 2 ounces 75 1.5 1-1/2 fats sweet sherry/port 2 ounces 95 7.0 1/2 starch & 1-1/2 fats Vermouths dry 3 ounces 105 4.2 2 fats sweet 3 ounces 140 13.9 1 starch & 2 fats General Guidelines for the Use of Alcohol Alcoholic beverages are a common part of our social lives. Each adult must decide whether or not to use alcohol. When making this decision, you should understand what the potential effects of alcohol are on your health. Although alcohol has little effect on blood glucose control, it Continue reading >>

Diabetes: How Drinking Affects This Disease

Diabetes: How Drinking Affects This Disease

www.CardioSmart.org People who have diabetes need to be more careful with alcohol. Before you drink, consider a few things: Is your diabetes well-controlled? Do you know how drinking alcohol can affect you? Do you have high blood pressure, nerve damage, or eye problems from your diabetes? If you are controlling your diabetes and do not have other health issues, it may be okay to have an occasional drink. Learning how alcohol affects your body can help you make the right choices. How does alcohol affect you? If you take medicine for diabetes, drinking alcohol may cause low blood sugar. The low blood sugar reaction works like this: Normally, when your blood sugar starts to drop, your liver turns carbohydrate stored in your body into glucose (sugar) and sends it out into your bloodstream. This keeps your blood sugar steady. But when you drink, your liver wants to remove the alcohol as fast as possible. It will not send out more glucose into the blood until it gets rid of the alcohol. So if your blood sugar was already falling when you started drinking, it can drop even more. This could cause dangerous low blood sugar levels. Youmay be able to prevent this by only drinking alcohol with a meal or snack. Never drink on an empty stomach. Having as little as two drinks on an empty stomach could lead to low blood sugar. Drinking alcohol after you exercise can also cause problems. The exercise itself lowers blood sugar. So if your liver does not send glucose into your blood because of the alcohol, your blood sugar can go even lower. How much alcohol can you drink? Work with your doctor to find what is best for you. Make sure you know whether it is safe to drink if you are taking medicine for diabetes. Remember, these medicines work to remove the glucose from your blood. When your Continue reading >>

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