diabetestalk.net

Vitamin Deficiency In Type 1 Diabetes

Vitamin Deficiencies In People With Diabetes: The Supplements You Need

Vitamin Deficiencies In People With Diabetes: The Supplements You Need

As an orthopedic surgeon, I have many patients with diabetes who tell me, “I can’t have surgery because I won’t heal.” That is certainly not the case, however. Diabetes does affect the small blood vessels and the function of immune cells when blood sugar is high, but with proper nutrition and blood sugar management, people with diabetes are very safe to undergo knee replacements, abdominal surgery, and many elective procedures. It is critical, of course, that people with diabetes who undergo elective or traumatic surgery work closely with their doctor to manage their blood sugar, but supplementation is also a vital part of recovery. Diabetes frequently causes nutritional deficiencies, often initiated by changes in diet or medications. As a result, people with diabetes must use supplements. Helping my patients identify their nutritional deficiencies and educating them on the importance of essential vitamins has made an overwhelming difference in their recovery from surgery and their overall daily health. The following essential vitamins are often deficient in people with diabetes. Vitamin B12 Vitamin B12 is bound to protein in food. The activity of hydrochloric acid and gastric protease in the stomach releases vitamin B12 from its protein. Once it is released, vitamin B12 begins to work quickly. It is important for the formation of red blood cells, neurological function, and DNA synthesis. It also supports the digestive system in keeping glucose levels stable. A simple blood test can determine the level of B12 in the body. Adults who have a value below 170 to 250 pg/mL are considered deficient in the vitamin. An elevated blood homocysteine level or elevated methylmalconic acid level may also suggest a B12 deficiency. Symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency are megalob Continue reading >>

Glycemic Changes After Vitamin D Supplementation In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus And Vitamin D Deficiency

Glycemic Changes After Vitamin D Supplementation In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus And Vitamin D Deficiency

Glycemic changes after vitamin D supplementation in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and vitamin D deficiency From the Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, King Fahad Armed Forces Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Correspondence: Dr. Khalid Aljabri, Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, King Fahad Armed Forces Hospital, Jeddah, PO Box 6572, Makkah, Saudi Arabia T: +966-590-008035 F: +966-2-576-0665 [email protected] This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. A prospective, nonblinded and nonrandomized controlled trial was conducted to test the hypothesis that vitamin D supplementation would improve glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who have vitamin D deficiency. Eighty patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who had 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels less than 50 nmol/L were assigned to receive 4000 IU of vitamin D3. Calcium supplements were provided to ensure a total calcium intake of 1200 mg/d. Glycosylated hemoglobin and 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were measured at baseline and at 12 weeks. There was a significant difference in mean (SD) glycosylated hemoglobin level (%) between the groups that achieved 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of <35.4 nmol/L, 35.4-51 nmol/L and >51 nmol/L at 12 weeks (P=.02). There was a significant difference in glycosylated hemoglobin change from baseline between the groups that achieved 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of <35.4 nmol/L, 35.4-51 nmol/L and >51 nmol/L at 12 weeks (P=.04). There was a significant difference in 25-hydroxyvitamin D level betwe Continue reading >>

Significant Vitamin D Deficiency In Youth With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus - Sciencedirect

Significant Vitamin D Deficiency In Youth With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus - Sciencedirect

Volume 154, Issue 1 , January 2009, Pages 132-134 Significant Vitamin D Deficiency in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Author links open overlay panel Britta M.SvorenMDab Get rights and content Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was measured in 128 youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Less than 25% of the patients were vitamin D sufficient. Because individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus possess multiple risk factors for skeletal fragility, ensuring vitamin D sufficiency throughout childhood and adolescence in this population seems especially warranted. Choose an option to locate/access this article: Check if you have access through your login credentials or your institution. Supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (RO1DK046887 to L.L. and K12DK63696 to B.S.). Support was also received from the Charles H. Hood Foundation and Eli Lilly and Company. The authors declare no affiliations, financial agreements, or other involvements that would constitute a conflict of interest. Copyright 2009 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved. Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Might Prevent Type 1 Diabetes

Vitamin D Might Prevent Type 1 Diabetes

Children who are genetically susceptible to type 1 diabetes could see their risk of the condition reduced if they get enough vitamin D. This is the conclusion of a new study published in the journal Diabetes. Researchers found that children with low blood levels of vitamin D were more likely to experience islet autoimmunity, compared with those who had higher levels of the vitamin. Islet autoimmunity is a process wherein the immune system mistakingly attacks the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, causing type 1 diabetes. Lead study author Jill Norris, Ph.D., of the Colorado School of Public Health at CU Anschutz in Aurora, CO, and colleagues say that their study is the first to show that higher levels of vitamin D may help to prevent islet autoimmunity. Type 1 diabetes is a condition in which the body fails to produce sufficient amounts of insulin, which is the hormone that regulates blood glucose levels. In type 1 diabetes, the immune system launches an attack on pancreatic cells called the Islets of Langerhans – which are often referred to as islets. These are clusters of cells that contain beta cells, whose function is to detect glucose in the blood and release it when required. As a result of the immune attack on islets, the beta cells fail to produce sufficient amounts of insulin, causing blood glucose levels to become too high. While type 1 diabetes can occur at any age, onset is most common in childhood. According to the American Diabetes Association, around 1.25 million children and adults in the United States have type 1 diabetes. Addressing the controversy Previous research has indicated that low levels of vitamin D may raise the risk of type 1 diabetes. In response to such studies, scientists have been investigating whether or not higher levels of the Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Vitamin D Deficiency Occurs In Early Stage

Type 1 Diabetes: Vitamin D Deficiency Occurs In Early Stage

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Type 1 diabetes: Vitamin D deficiency occurs in early stage Helmholtz Zentrum Mnchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health Low levels of vitamin D are commonly found in people with type 1 diabetes. But even children who have multiple positive islet autoantibodies without manifest type 1 diabetes have lower levels of vitamin D in their blood. This does not appear, however, to influence the progression of the disease from pre-diabetes to diabetes, according to scientists. "Vitamin D deficiency precedes the onset of type 1 diabetes. This may be a consequence of an immune response," one author says. "In the case of prediabetic children, we must therefore be mindful of the risk of vitamin D deficiency and consider recommending vitamin D supplementation at an early stage of type 1 diabetes." Vitamin D is known as a major regulator of calcium levels and bone metabolism. Furthermore, it also influences the immune system. Previous studies have shown that patients with recently diagnosed type 1 diabetes have significantly lower vitamin D levels. Scientists from the Institute of Diabetes Research (IDF) and the Helmholtz Zentrum Mnchen, a member of the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), as well as from the Diabetes Research Group at the Technische Universitt Mnchen (TUM) examined whether a vitamin D deficiency occurs during an early stage of type 1 diabetes, defined by the presence of multiple diabetes-specific islet autoantibodies. Furthermore they also determined whether vitamin D deficiency influences the progression to type 1 diabetes in children with multiple islet autoantibodies. Vitamin D deficiency already exists in prediabetes Children who had not yet developed clinical type Continue reading >>

Vitamin D In Type 1 Diabetes Prevention

Vitamin D In Type 1 Diabetes Prevention

Presented as part of the symposium Vitamin D Insufficiency: A Significant Risk Factor in Chronic Diseases and Potential Disease-Specific Biomarkers of Vitamin D Sufficiency given at the 2004 Experimental Biology meeting on April 18, 2004, Washington, DC. The symposium was sponsored by the American Society for Nutritional Sciences and supported in part by educational grants from the Centrum Foundation of Canada and The Coca-Cola Company. The proceedings are published as a supplement to The Journal of Nutrition. This supplement is the responsibility of the guest editors to whom the Editor of The Journal of Nutrition has delegated supervision of both technical conformity to the published regulations of The Journal of Nutrition and general oversight of the scientific merit of each article. The opinions expressed in this publication are those of the authors and are not attributable to the sponsors or the publisher, editor, or editorial board of The Journal of Nutrition. The guest editors for the symposium publication are Mona S. Calvo, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Laurel, MD, and Susan J. Whiting, College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, SK, Canada. The Journal of Nutrition, Volume 135, Issue 2, 1 February 2005, Pages 323325, Limited data from human observational studies suggest that early supplementation with 10 g/d (400 IU/d) or less of vitamin D may not reduce the risk for type 1 diabetes but that doses of 50 g/d (2000 IU/d) and higher may have a strong protective effect. Current U.S. recommendations (525 g/d, 200-1000 IU/d) fall in the largely unstudied dose range in between. All infants and children should receive between 5 g/d and 25 g/d of supplemental vitamin D, particularly if they have limit Continue reading >>

Could Vitamin D Supplements Have Prevented My Daughter’s Type 1 Diabetes?

Could Vitamin D Supplements Have Prevented My Daughter’s Type 1 Diabetes?

A few months ago, our six-year-old daughter, Bisi, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. It’s a condition she will have to manage carefully for the rest of her life, to avoid the many terrible potential complications of the disease. Since the diagnosis, my husband and I have often said to one another things like: “What if we had…?” “Maybe if we had …” And the other will respond by (half) jokingly quoting back the text on the box of diabetes information we received at the hospital from the Lilly pharmaceutical company (which makes the insulin Bisi now must take with her meals): “Pause. Take a deep breath. And remember: You couldn’t have prevented what’s happening with your child, so try not to beat yourself up.” The truth is, there is no known way to prevent type 1 diabetes. It is as a disease where our own immune system attacks our pancreas, eventually shutting down its ability to produce insulin. But there are some emerging theories about what makes type 1 diabetes more likely. The most intriguing of these — the one that causes my husband and me to take the most deep breaths — is the theory that links low vitamin D levels to type 1 diabetes. Several studies have shown this link, including one published in September in the journal Diabetologia. In that study, researchers from the Naval Health Research Center in San Diego and from universities in California and Florida compared the vitamin D levels of military servicemembers diagnosed with type 1 diabetes with the vitamin D levels of a control group of servicemembers without diabetes. They found that those servicemembers with the lowest concentration of vitamin D in their blood were 3.5 times more likely to develop diabetes than their peers with the highest vitamin D levels. In 2008, the Archives Continue reading >>

Treating Vitamin D Deficiency In Children With Type 1 Improves Glycemic Control

Treating Vitamin D Deficiency In Children With Type 1 Improves Glycemic Control

Use of cholecalciferol demonstrated reductions in HbA1c. The active form of vitamin D is a very important hormone that works in the body by increasing the absorption of calcium. Vitamin D deficiency has been implicated in a variety of chronic diseases, including bone mineral disease, malignancy, autoimmunity, and diabetes. In recent years, it has been found that beta cells express the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and variations in the genes controlling the vitamin D metabolism and expression of VDR have been associated with a higher risk of diabetes, including type 1 and type 2. Patients with serum concentration of vitamin D below 30 nmol/L and 30-50 nmol/L are categorized as deficient and insufficient, respectively. Daily supplementation of vitamin D in the diet and sunlight exposure in the diet is essential for preventing deficient levels. Some studies have associated vitamin D deficiency with beta cell dysfunction and insulin resistance with a consequent development of type 2 diabetes in the adult population. In children with type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM), the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency has been found to be higher when compared to children without diabetes. Other studies have found the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency is similar between children with and without diabetes. Furthermore, a Finnish study reported that there was a 4-fold increased risk of development of T1DM in children who had rickets, which is a long-term effect of vitamin D deficiency causing weak bones. All these background studies suggest that there is a possible correlation between vitamin D deficiency and the risk of both type 1 and 2 diabetes. However, there is poor evidence related to the effects of vitamin D treatment in children with diabetes and vitamin D deficiency. A retrospective s Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Deficiency Linked To Type 1 Diabetes

Vitamin D Deficiency Linked To Type 1 Diabetes

A study led by researchers from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine has found a correlation between vitamin D3 serum levels and subsequent incidence of Type 1 diabetes. The six-year study of blood levels of nearly 2,000 individuals suggests a preventive role for vitamin D3 in this disease. The research appears the December issue of Diabetologia, a publication of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). “Previous studies proposed the existence of an association between vitamin D deficiency and risk of and Type 1 diabetes, but this is the first time that the theory has been tested in a way that provides the dose-response relationship,” said Cedric Garland, DrPH, FACE, professor in UCSD’s Department of Family and Preventive Medicine. This study used samples from millions of blood serum specimens frozen by the Department of Defense Serum Registry for disease surveillance. The researchers thawed and analyzed 1000 samples of serum from healthy people who later developed type 1 diabetes and 1000 healthy controls whose blood was drawn on or near the same date but who did not develop type 1 diabetes. By comparing the serum concentrations of the predominant circulating form of vitamin D – 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) – investigators were able to determine the optimal serum level needed to lower an individual’s risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Based mainly on results of this study, Garland estimates that the level of 25(OH)D needed to prevent half the cases of type 1 diabetes is 50 ng/ml. A consensus of all available data indicates no known risk associated with this dosage. “While there are a few conditions that influence vitamin D metabolism, for most people, 4000 IU per day of vitamin D3 will be needed to achieve the eff Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: No Vitamin D-glycemic Control Link

Type 1 Diabetes: No Vitamin D-glycemic Control Link

Type 1 Diabetes: No Vitamin D-Glycemic Control Link But high levels of deficiency seen in children by Parker Brown Parker Brown, Staff Writer, MedPage Today This article is a collaboration between MedPage Today and: There was no significant relationship between glycemic control and vitamin D levels among children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes, according to a new observational study. Researchers analyzed nearly 200 children and found that 40.6% of them had what is considered deficient 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of 50 nmol/L; 49.2% of them had insufficient levels from 51 and 75 nmol/L, and 10.2% of them had a normal level of >75 nmol/L. But the relationship between HbA1c levels and vitamin D levels was not significant (P=0.057), according to co-author Terri Lipman, PhD , at the University of Pennsylvania school of nursing. Lipman and colleagues published their findings in Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice . "Although the benefit of normal 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in type 1 diabetes is yet to be established, the negative effects of vitamin D deficiency have been demonstrated," wrote the authors. "This data emphasize the importance of screening 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in all youth with type 1 diabetes." Previous studies have indicated that low vitamin D levels are a significant risk factor for worsened glucose control and type 1 diabetes, wrote the authors. But many studies looking at the link were longitudinal and weren't ideally powered to determine that relationship. All participants were 7-18 years old and had type 1 diabetes for at least 1 year. Data were drawn from the Diabetes Center for Children at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Patients who had a history of smoking, HbA1c levels of >12%, a history of ketoacidosis episodes, inflammatory Continue reading >>

Type I Diabetes

Type I Diabetes

Summary Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. It is a condition where your own immune system attacks certain cells called beta-cells. Beta-cells help you produce a hormone called insulin. You need insulin to help your body manage glucose you get from food and turn it into energy for your body to use. Researchers don’t know what increases your chances of developing type 1 diabetes. Researchers believe that having a family member who has type 1 diabetes might increase your risk of getting type 1 diabetes. Also, viral infections and environmental factors may increase your chances of developing type 1 diabetes, but we need more research to say for sure or understand which factors play a role. Research shows that there is a link between vitamin D and type 1 diabetes. People with high vitamin D intake during their first year of life are less likely to develop type 1 diabetes later in life. Some research also suggests having high vitamin D levels during pregnancy might help prevent type 1 diabetes in their children later in life. However, this research has been observational, meaning we don’t know for sure if getting enough vitamin D prevents type 1 diabetes. Studies have shown that vitamin D supplementation may help improve insulin sensitivity and help control blood glucose levels in those with type 1 diabetes, though research has been small and inconclusive, so we can’t say for sure if vitamin D helps at all in type 1 diabetes. If you have type 1 diabetes or you are trying to prevent type 1 diabetes and want to take vitamin D, it is unlikely to make your type 1 diabetes worse or cause you any harm, as long as you take less than 10,000 IU per day. However, it’s not proven that it will help your type 1 diabetes. It’s also not proven if taking vitamin D will help Continue reading >>

Teens With Type 1 May Have Vitamin D Deficiency

Teens With Type 1 May Have Vitamin D Deficiency

A new study suggests nearly 90 percent of teens with Type 1 could use more Vitamin D. In recent years, Vitamin D levels have become a yardstick for researchers to measure everything from heart health to bone density. Now, researchers have found that teens with Type 1 diabetes could be at increased risk of a Vitamin D deficiency. For the study, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing examined blood samples of 200 adolescents treated for diabetes at the Diabetes Center for Children in Philadelphia. They found that 40.6 percent of those tested had a Vitamin D deficiency (levels less than 20 ng/mL). Another 49.2 percent had what researchers considered low levels of Vitamin D (levels less than 35 ng/mL). In the study, only 10.2 percent of teens with Type 1 were found to have adequate or above adequate levels of Vitamin D. There is still some debate about how much Vitamin D one needs. Because of that, it’s difficult to find agreement about what the average level of Vitamin D deficiency is. An oft-cited 2009 study estimates that some 70 percent of U.S. children and teens had a Vitamin D deficiency. If the results of these two studies are accurate, that would mean teens with Type 1 would be at a higher risk of a deficiency. Vitamin D, also called the “sunshine vitamin”, is considered essential for bone health. Researchers also believe it’s an important nutrient for blood pressure maintenance and long-term heart health. Those diagnosed with a Vitamin D deficiency can take a supplement, eat more foods rich in Vitamin D, and get more sun exposure. The University of Pennsylvania researchers say the results show teens with Type 1 should be monitored for Vitamin D deficiency. More study is needed, however, to determine why teens with Type 1 might be mo Continue reading >>

Vitamin D

Vitamin D

Vitamin D can be obtained from the diet or generated in the skin in response to sunlight; its metabolically active form is 1,25(OH)2D3. People with type 1 diabetes have lower circulating levels of this metabolite than controls, and lack of sunlight correlates well with the increased incidence of type 1 diabetes at higher latitudes. Three key genes involved in 1,25(OH)2D3 metabolism are associated with increased risk of type 1 diabetes, and functional studies confirm that this metabolite is under genetic control but set at lower levels than in control populations. 1,25(OH)2D3 receptors are present on pancreatic beta cells and on immunocytes, and vitamin D deficiency is a reversible cause of type 1 diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse. It has, however, yet to be demonstrated that administration of vitamin D or its analogues can delay the onset of of type 1 diabetes or influence its clinical course. Intervention studies are needed to resolve these issues. Introduction Vitamin D is strictly speaking not a vitamin, since humans can synthesise it for themselves under the influence of UV light; dietary sources are, however, essential under some conditions. In some respects it behaves more like a hormone. Vitamin D is available to the body in two main forms: ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) and cholecalciferol (vitamin D3). These are collectively referred to as vitamin D or calciferol. Vitamin D3 is generated in the skin by sunlight and is present in animal sources, especially fatty fish or their liver oils. Smaller amounts are present in dairy foods, and vitamin D is added to margarines and other products in some countries. Vitamin D2 is not produced by land plants, but is generated by fungi and other unicellular organisms in response to UV light. Vitamin D deficiency, wh Continue reading >>

Association Among Vitamin D Deficiency, Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus And Glycemic Control

Association Among Vitamin D Deficiency, Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus And Glycemic Control

1Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia 2Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia 3Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt Citation: Al-Agha AE, Ahmad IA (2015) Association among Vitamin D Deficiency, Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Glycemic Control. J Diabetes Metab 6:594. doi:10.4172/2155-6156.1000594 Copyright: © 2015 Al-Agha AE, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Visit for more related articles at Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism Abstract Background: Studies have identified that the deficiency of vitamin D is strongly connected with diabetes mellitus type 1. Vitamin D has the capability to control increased blood glucose level. Purpose: The study appraises the association among vitamin D deficiency, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and glycated hemoglobin among children. Methods: Around, 226 diabetic children were selected for this retrospective study from outpatient department of King Abdul Aziz University Hospital. Majority of the participants were female individuals, with the rate of 61.1% and were divided into three categories, based upon the rate of vitamin D deficiency. Every participant of the study was taking intensive insulin therapy. Results: The findings of the study have shown that 77% of the diabetic patients had reduced level of vitamin D in total. The study identified, from the evaluation between HbA1c control and vitamin D status, that 66% of the diabetic and vitamin D deficient participants were poorly controlled (HbA1c>9%). Concl Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Deficiency Linked To Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Vitamin D Deficiency Linked To Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Children with Type 1 Diabetes A recent study found a high prevalence of a large population of children with type 1 diabetes to be deficient in vitamin D. The study done at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing sought to check out the relationship between vitamin D and blood sugar management in children and teens with type 1 diabetes. Vitamin D is found in foods such as full-fat dairy products, egg yolks, fish, cod liver oil and is also known as the sunshine vitamin. Vitamin D is a fat soluble steroid hormone that the body makes when skin is exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV rays). Vitamin D and having healthy levels of it are considered extremely vital to good health and it is recently thought to play a large role in autoimmune health . What is the Connection between Vitamin D and Type 1 Diabetes? The researchers used non-fasting blood samples to measure 25-hydroxyvitamin D and blood sugar levels in the participating 197 children and teens of which 23% were overweight and 13% obese. (Being overweight or obese increases risk for low vitamin D) The researchers found 41% of the participants had levels below 50 nmol/L which is where they marked a deficiency however according to the US Department of Health and Human Services , low vitamin D begins at a plasma concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D below 25 nmol/L. The study revealedthat in the children thought to be at no or low risk for low vitamin D levels (healthy weight Caucasian children) a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was present. Type 1 Diabetic Children Should get Vitamin D Testing and More Studies Needed Dr. Terri Lipman, the senior study author said in a press release , To our knowledge this is the first study that has been adequately-powered to examine the ass Continue reading >>

More in diabetes