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Vitamin D Supplementation In Diabetes

Effect Of Vitamin D Supplementation In A Sample Of Type 2 Diabetes Patients From Karak Governorate In Jordan

Effect Of Vitamin D Supplementation In A Sample Of Type 2 Diabetes Patients From Karak Governorate In Jordan

Effect of Vitamin D Supplementation in a Sample of Type 2 Diabetes Patients from Karak Governorate in Jordan Fadwa Ghazi Hammouh , Salma Khalil Tukan and Hamed Rabah Takruri Abstract: Vitamin D status of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients in Karak Governorate in Jordan was assessed and the relationship between vitamin D supplementation and blood glucose was found. The study recruited thirty three confirmed T2DM subjects (19 males and 14 females) with deficient or insufficient vitamin D status. They were given a supplement of 2000 IU of vitamin D3 daily for 1 month. Fasting blood samples were taken before and after supplementation. Serum levels of fasting blood glucose (FBG), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), calcium (Ca), insulin, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 25 hydroxyvitamin D3 (25 (OH) D3) were determined and the homeostasis model assessment- insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), homeostasis model assessment-beta secretion (HOMA-beta) and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) indices were calculated. The statistical analysis of experimental data indicates that there was a significant increase (p<0.0001) in mean 25(OH) D3 levels after one month supplementation with the vitamin (from 31.11.9 to 68.16.1 nmol/L). A significant decrease in serum insulin level (16.53.7 vs. 9.01.1 U/mL; p<0.0001) was also found, together with significant improvement in functions of HOMA-IR (p<0.0001), HOMA-beta (p = 0.0006) and QUICKI (p<0.0001) in both sexes without any significant differences between them. This study shows that giving vitamin D supplement for one month to diabetic patients with insufficient vitamin level increases 25(OH) D3 concentrations and resulted in improvements in many diabetic indices. [Fulltext PDF] [References] [View Citation] [Report Citation] Fad Continue reading >>

Effect Of Vitamin D Supplementation For Obese Pregnant Women On Gestational Diabetes And Diabetes Biomarkers

Effect Of Vitamin D Supplementation For Obese Pregnant Women On Gestational Diabetes And Diabetes Biomarkers

Research Article,J Clin Nutr Metab Vol: 1 Issue: 2 Effect of Vitamin D Supplementation for Obese Pregnant Women on Gestational Diabetes and Diabetes Biomarkers Faten Tamim 1 * , Hamed Takruri 1 , Kamil Aframb 2 , Fedaa Thikrallahb 2 , Maisaa Al-Khadrab 2 and Asma Al-Bashab 2 1 Department of Dietetics and Nutritional Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Jordan, Jordan 2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Jordan University Hospital, Jordan Department of Nutrition and Food Processing, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Jordan, Jordan Received: November 06, 2017 Accepted: November 27, 2017 Published: December 03, 2017 Citation: Tamim F, Takruri H, Aframb K, Thikrallahb F, Al-Khadrab M, et al. (2017) Effect of Vitamin D Supplementation for Obese Pregnant Women on Gestational Diabetes and Diabetes Biomarkers J Clin Nutr Metab 1:2. Background: High rates of vitamin D deficiency in Jordan are alarming especially when they are associated with obesity during pregnancy. Objectives: To investigate the effect of vitamin D supplementation for obese pregnant women on gestational diabetes and diabetes biomarkers. Methods: 118 women were investigated and were divided into three groups. Each group was divided into two treatment subgroups. (1) Women (n=23) with normal 25(OH)D levels were given either no supplementation (1A=12) or given vitamin D supplementation of 10000 IU/wk (1B=11), (2) women (n=43) with insufficient 25(OH)D levels were given either 10000 IU/wk (2A= 22) or 20000 IU/wk of vitamin D supplementation (2B=21), (3) women of group 3 (n=52) with deficient 25(OH)D levels were given either 20000 IU/wk (3A=26) or 50000 IU/wk (3B=26) of vitamin D supplementation. Results: Fasting blood sugar showed decreased levels among B treatment subgroups in both group 1 and Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Vitamin D On Insulin Resistance In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

The Effect Of Vitamin D On Insulin Resistance In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Abstract Over the past decade, numerous non-skeletal diseases have been reported to be associated with vitamin D deficiency including type2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Different studies provide evidence that vitamin D may play a functional role in glucose tolerance through its effects on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. This study evaluates the effects of vitamin D supplementation on insulin resistance in T2DM. Through a before-after study, 100 patients with T2DM, 30–70 years old, were recruited from an Arak diabetes clinic as consecutive attenders. Participants were assessed for clinical and biochemistry. Serum insulin and, 25(OH)D concentration, and HOMA-IR was calculated. All measurements were performed at the beginning and the end of the study. Patients received 50,000 unit of vitamin D 3 orally per week for eight weeks, Statistical analysis was made using SPSS17. The results were analyzed by descriptive tests, and a comparison between variables were made using paired T-tests or Wilcoxon tests, as appropriate. 100 participants including 70 women (70%) and 30 men (30%) took part in the study. All results were presented as Mean±SD, or medians of non-normally distributed. 24% of the participants were Vitamin D deficient {serum 25(OH)D ≤ 20 ng/ml(50 nmol/l)}. Mean serum 25 (OH) D concentration was 43.03± 19.28 ng/ml (107.5±48.2 nmol/l). The results at baseline and at the end, for FPG were 138.48±36.74 and 131.02±39 mg/dl (P=0.05), for insulin, 10.76±9.46 and 8.6±8.25 μIu/ml (P=0.028) and for HOMA-IR, 3.57±3.18 and 2.89±3.28 (P=0.008) respectively. Our data showed significant improvements in serum FPG, insulin and in HOMA-IR after treatment with vitamin D, suggested that vitamin D supplementation could reduce insulin resistance in T2DM. Introduction Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Supplementation In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: The Vitamin D For Established Type 2 Diabetes (ddm2) Study

Vitamin D Supplementation In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: The Vitamin D For Established Type 2 Diabetes (ddm2) Study

Vitamin D Supplementation in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: The Vitamin D for Established Type 2 Diabetes (DDM2) Study Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts Correspondence: Edith Angellotti, MD, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Tufts Medical Center, Box 268, 800 Washington Street, #268, Boston, Massachusetts 02111. E-mail: [email protected] . Search for other works by this author on: Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina Search for other works by this author on: Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts Bone Metabolism Laboratory, Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts Search for other works by this author on: Predictive Analytics and Comparative Effectiveness (PACE) Center, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts Search for other works by this author on: Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and Cincinnati VA Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio Search for other works by this author on: Cardiometabolic Risk Laboratory, CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, Pisa, Italy Search for other works by this author on: Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts Search for other works by this author on: Journal of the Endocrine Society, Volume 2, Issue 4, 1 April 2018, Pages 310321, Edith Angellotti, David DAlessio, Bess Dawson-Hughes, Jason Nelson, Robert M Cohen, Amalia Gastaldelli, Anastassios G Pittas; Vitamin D Supplementation in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: The Vitamin D for Establish Continue reading >>

Effect Of Vitamin D Supplementation On Glycemic Parameters And Progression Of Prediabetes To Diabetes: A 1-year, Open-label Randomized Study Kuchay Ms, Laway Ba, Bashir Mi, Wani Ai, Misgar Ra, Shah Za - Indian J Endocr Metab

Effect Of Vitamin D Supplementation On Glycemic Parameters And Progression Of Prediabetes To Diabetes: A 1-year, Open-label Randomized Study Kuchay Ms, Laway Ba, Bashir Mi, Wani Ai, Misgar Ra, Shah Za - Indian J Endocr Metab

Diabetes mellitus and Vitamin D deficiency are prevalent worldwide. Several large studies have suggested a relationship between hypovitaminosis D and the prevalence of diabetes. [1] , [2] , [3] Prediabetes is an intermediate stage between normal glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Many large studies have revealed a higher likelihood of progression of prediabetes to diabetes among Vitamin D deficient subjects. [4] , [5] Whether intervention with Vitamin D will decrease the progression of prediabetes to diabetes is not yet clear. Only a few, small and short term, studies in humans have analyzed the impact of Vitamin D supplementation on progression of prediabetes to diabetes. [6] , [7] The few recent studies of adequate sample size and duration also revealed mixed results. Pittas et al. reported a significant decrease in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) with calcium and Vitamin D supplementation over a period of 3 years in people with prediabetes, but not in those with normal glucose tolerance. [8] Another recent study, however, revealed that Vitamin D supplementation for 1-year in individuals with prediabetes and Vitamin D deficiency did not affect insulin sensitivity or development of diabetes though A1C levels significantly decreased. [9] A recent Indian study revealed a significant decrease in FPG, IR and systemic inflammatory markers in people with Vitamin D deficiency and prediabetes after Vitamin D and calcium supplementation over a period of 1-year. [10] The Kashmir valley of the Indian subcontinent is situated at an altitude of 1574-5425 feet above the sea level in the Northern mountainous regions of India. Vitamin D deficiency is endemic in the valley and is seen in about 83% of healthy adult Continue reading >>

Effect Of Vitamin D Supplementation On Glycemic Control In Type 2 Diabetes Subjects In Lagos, Nigeria

Effect Of Vitamin D Supplementation On Glycemic Control In Type 2 Diabetes Subjects In Lagos, Nigeria

Effect of Vitamin D supplementation on glycemic control in Type 2 diabetes subjects in Lagos, Nigeria We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Effect of Vitamin D supplementation on glycemic control in Type 2 diabetes subjects in Lagos, Nigeria Anthony Chinedu Anyanwu, Olufemi Adetola Fasanmade, [...], and Augustine Efedaye Ohwovoriole Improvement of glycemic control reduces the risk of diabetic complications. Reports suggest that Vitamin D supplementation improves glycemia. However, there are no data on the influence of Vitamin D on diabetes mellitus (DM) in Nigeria. To determine the effect of Vitamin D supplementation on glycemic control in Type 2 DM (T2DM) participants with Vitamin D deficiency. This was a single-blind, prospective randomized placebo-controlled trial, involving T2DM participants attending the Diabetes Clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital. Forty-two T2DM participants with poor glycemic control and Vitamin D deficiency were selected following a prior cross-sectional study on 114 T2DM participants for the determination of Vitamin D status and glycemia. These participants were randomized into two equal groups of treatment and placebo arms. Three thousand IU of Vitamin D3 were given to the participants in the treatment arm. Glycemic status was determined at baseline and after 12 weeks. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 20. P < 0.05 was consi Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Supplementation Improves Mood In Women With Type 2 Diabetes

Vitamin D Supplementation Improves Mood In Women With Type 2 Diabetes

Vitamin D Supplementation Improves Mood in Women with Type 2 Diabetes 1Loyola University Chicago, Health Sciences Campus, 2160 S. First Avenue, Maywood, IL 60153, USA 2Advocate Medical Group, 3825 Highland Avenue, Suite 400, Downers Grove, IL 60515, USA Correspondence should be addressed to Sue Penckofer ; [email protected] Received 28 April 2017; Accepted 27 July 2017; Published 7 September 2017 Copyright 2017 Sue Penckofer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Objective. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of vitamin D supplementation on improving mood (depression and anxiety) and health status (mental and physical) in women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods. Fifty women with T2DM and significant depressive symptomology were enrolled into the Sunshine Study, where weekly vitamin D supplementation (ergocalciferol, 50,000 IU) was given to all participants for six months. The main outcomes included (1) depression (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression, CES-D, and Patient Health Questionnaire, PHQ-9), (2) anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety), and (3) health status (Short Form, SF-12). Results. Forty-six women (92%) completed all visits. There was a significant decrease in depression (CES-D and PHQ-9, ). An improvement in mental health status (SF-12, ) was also found. After controlling for covariates (race, season of enrollment, baseline vitamin D, baseline depression (PHQ-9), and body mass index), the decline in depression remained significant (CES-D, ). There was a trend for a better response to supplementation for women who were not taking medications for mood (ant Continue reading >>

Effect Of Oral Vitamin D Supplementation On Glycemic Control In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus With Coexisting Hypovitaminosis D: A Parellel Group Placebo Controlled Randomized Controlled Pilot Study - Sciencedirect

Effect Of Oral Vitamin D Supplementation On Glycemic Control In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus With Coexisting Hypovitaminosis D: A Parellel Group Placebo Controlled Randomized Controlled Pilot Study - Sciencedirect

Effect of oral vitamin D supplementation on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with coexisting hypovitaminosis D: A parellel group placebo controlled randomized controlled pilot study Author links open overlay panel VimalUpreti Vitamin D supplementation in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients may lead to improved glycemic control by improving insulin secretion and decreasing insulin resistance. To investigate effect of oral vitamin D supplementation on glycemic control, in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and coexisting hypovitaminosis D. Randomized, Parallel Group, Placebo Controlled Trial carried out in a tertiary care hospital of Indian Armed Forces. Sixty patients with coexisting type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypovitaminosis D were randomized into cases and controls and were supplemented with oral Vitamin D and microcrystalline cellulose respectively for six months. Subjects' HbA1c and vitamin D levels were monitored at the beginning and end of the study, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) & post prandial plasma glucose (PPPG) during monthly OPD visits. Intra-group comparison was made by paired t test & unpaired t test was used for inter-group (A v/s B) comparisons. Repeated measures ANOVA was undertaken to compare values over time. The two groups were comparable for all parameters at baseline. Case group showed significant decrease in mean HbA1c levels (7.29% to 7.02%; P=0.01), mean FPG levels (131.4 to 102.6mg/dl; P=0.04) and mean PPPG levels (196.2 to 135.0mg/dl; P<0.001). Incidentally, significant improvement in systolic as well as diastolic blood pressure and total cholesterol was also noted in the cases, while for LDL cholesterol improvement tended towards significance (p=0.05). We found that oral vitamin D supplementation was associated w Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Supplementation And Glycemic Control In Type 2 Diabetes Patients: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis.

Vitamin D Supplementation And Glycemic Control In Type 2 Diabetes Patients: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis.

Generate a file for use with external citation management software. Metabolism. 2017 Aug;73:67-76. doi: 10.1016/j.metabol.2017.05.006. Epub 2017 May 22. Vitamin D supplementation and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Department of Endocrinology, Zhongda Hospital, Institute of Diabetes, Medical School, Southeast University, China. Department of Endocrinology, Zhongda Hospital, Institute of Diabetes, Medical School, Southeast University, China. Electronic address: [email protected] Low vitamin D status has been found to be associated with impaired glycemic control in patients who suffer from type 2 diabetes; however, whether vitamin D supplementation is associated with improved glycemic status remains controversial. The aim of this study was to summarize evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to assess the efficacy of vitamin D supplementation in reducing glycosylated haemoglobinA1c (HbA1c) and fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels. We searched PubMed, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library for reports published up to March 2017. We selected parallel RCTs investigating the effect of vitamin D or vitamin D analogues on HbA1c or FBG levels in type 2 diabetes patients. Cohen's d was calculated to represent the standardized mean difference (SMD) for each study, and the SMDs with 95%confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled using a random effects model. Twenty-four studies were included that evaluated HbA1c levels and 18 studies were included that evaluated FBG levels. Meta-analyses showed that vitamin D supplementation was associated with reduced HbA1c levels (standardized mean difference (SMD) -0.25 [-0.45 to -0.05]) but had no influence on FBG levels (SMD -0.14 [-0.31 to 0.03]). However, the subgroup analyses su Continue reading >>

How Vitamin D Helps In Diabetes

How Vitamin D Helps In Diabetes

Vitamin D, or the “sunshine vitamin,” is actually made in our skin when it is exposed to sunlight. This vitamin is a vital cog in a machinery that performs a wide range of functions inside our body. More recently, scientists have uncovered the connection between vitamin D and diabetes. Studies suggest that vitamin D can have positive effects on people with type 2 diabetes. Apart from healthy bones, vitamin D is also helpful in the proper functioning of muscles as well as our immune system. Vitamin D also protects us from: Cancers (like that of breast, prostate, colon) Heart disease High blood pressure Multiple sclerosis What Does Research Say about Vitamin D Deficiency and Diabetes? For years, vitamin D was known for its role in bone health. New research is now concluding that this vitamin can actually have an important role in the overall health of a person. Doctors believe that there is an unmistakable link between vitamin D and diabetes. This is because studies have conclusively indicated that people with low levels of vitamin D are at a higher risk of developing diabetes, later in life. A study on 668 elderly individuals, who lived in the northern latitudes (where getting enough sunshine is a problem), found that these individuals were at a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes due to vitamin D deficiency. The researchers went on to say that vitamin D sufficiency provides protection against type 2 diabetes. A 2011 review looked at various studies that examined how much vitamin D people were getting, by conducting a blood test that assessed the amount of vitamin D in their blood. These people were then followed to see if they got type 2 diabetes later in life. It was found that people with higher amounts of vitamin D in the blood (> 25ng/ml) had a decreased Continue reading >>

Vitamin D And Diabetes

Vitamin D And Diabetes

Tweet Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that plays a number of important roles in the body, including maintaining the health of your bones, teeth and joints, and assisting immune system function. This underrated vitamin is found in certain foods but is also produced by the body in response to exposure to the sun. When the sun’s ultraviolet-B (UVB) rays are exposed to bare skin, the body converts a cholesterol derivative into Vitamin D. In fact, it’s now known that every cell and tissue within the body has a Vitamin D protein receptor. However, most of us in the UK and other Western countries are deficient in Vitamin D, including many patients with Type 2 diabetes, due to limited sunlight exposure caused by a number of factors, including more time spent at home, in the office or the car, shorter days in winter, sunscreen use in summer and fears of skin cancer. Vitamin D deficiency The signs of Vitamin D deficiency can range from bone pain and muscle weakness to depression and weakened immune system, while longer-term deficiency can result in obesity, high blood pressure, psoriasis, osteoporosis, chronic fatigue, Alzheimer’s disease, cancer and type 2 diabetes. Exposing your skin to the sun for 15-20 minutes each day can help increase your body’s own production of vitamin D and thus reduce your risk of diabetes and other serious medical conditions. Alternatively, you can get your daily intake of vitamin D through dietary supplements and foods such as nuts, oily fish, eggs, powdered milk and some fortified cereals. Effects on diabetes Vitamin D is believed to help improve the body’s sensitivity to insulin – the hormone responsible for regulating blood sugar levels – and thus reduce the risk of insulin resistance, which is often a precursor to type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Is Vitamin D Deficiency Linked With Diabetes? | Everyday Health

Is Vitamin D Deficiency Linked With Diabetes? | Everyday Health

Some research suggests avoiding vitamin D deficiency may help reduce your risk for heart disease, which people with diabetes are more likely to develop. Youve likely heard of the power of vitamin D, also known as the sunshine vitamin. You can either get vitamin D through the suns rays, which signal your body to make vitamin D, or through certain foods or supplements. Vitamin D is a fat-soluble, rather than water-soluble, vitamin so when you get it through your diet, youll best absorb it alongside a fat-containing food, such as almonds, peanut butter, or avocado. The vitamin is important for your health: Research suggests that it may help with everything from athletic performance to heart disease, and may even help protect against type 2 diabetes . What Does Vitamin D Do for Our Bodies and Our Health? Vitamin D plays many important roles in the body, and helps you maintain healthy bones, joints, and teeth, as well as a well-functioning immune system. Vitamin D aids in the absorption of calcium in the body to promote bone growth, notes Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE , author of The 2-Day Diabetes Diet: Just 2 Days a Week and Dodge Type 2 Diabetes , who is in private practice in Franklin, New Jersey. Some observational studies suggest vitamin D may also play a role in the prevention of certain diseases and disorders, such as diabetes. The sunshine vitamin may also help keep your ticker healthy: A review published in January 2014 in the journalCirculation Research suggested that vitamin D deficiency is detrimental for heart health. This is important to note because people with type 2 diabetes are at a greater risk for heart problems. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) notes people with diabetes are two times more likely to die from heart disease tha Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Vitamin D Supplementation On Patients With Type 2 Diabetes And Vitamin D Deficiency (vdd)

The Effects Of Vitamin D Supplementation On Patients With Type 2 Diabetes And Vitamin D Deficiency (vdd)

This is a randomized, double blind, parallel group, clinical trial for 6 months duration. The study group participants will receive vitamin D supplementation (120,000 IU per month) versus the placebo group for 6 months. glycemic control indexes will be measured in T2DM diagnosed study subjects. Patient will be randomized 1:1 to one of two treatment groups. Vitamin D group vs placebo group. Randomization kits will include either vitamin D or vitamin D placebo. Blood screens will be taken prior, after 3 months from randomization and after 6 months from randomization. Anthropometric measurements will be drawn as well, at the same time points. Determination of sample size In order to find a 0.5 mean difference in HgA1C between the two treatment arms (standard deviation 1.2) a 184 sample size will be required to achieve 80% power, 5% alpha (two sided test). Individual patient's medical information obtained as result of this study is considered confidential and disclosure to third parties. The investigator should maintain a list of appropriately qualified people to whom trail duties are delegated. Source and study documents will be locked under the supervision of the PI- principle investigator for 15 years. Study documentations and storage The investigator should maintain a list of appropriately qualified people to whom trail duties are delegated. All persons authorized to make entries and/or correction on CRF will be included on the investigators team list delegation log. Study printout and electronic CRF's, ICF's and other study documents will be stored in the at Haemek medical center under the supervision of the PI. All identifying details will be completely erased. The investigator and staff are responsible for maintaining a comprehensive and centralized filing system of Continue reading >>

Nutrients | Free Full-text | The Effect Of Vitamin D Supplementation On Glycemic Control In Type 2 Diabetes Patients: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Nutrients | Free Full-text | The Effect Of Vitamin D Supplementation On Glycemic Control In Type 2 Diabetes Patients: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Nutrients 2018, 10(3), 375; The Effect of Vitamin D Supplementation on Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center, 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191, China Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. Received: 14 January 2018 / Revised: 13 March 2018 / Accepted: 15 March 2018 / Published: 19 March 2018 Observational studies have indicated an inverse association between vitamin D levels and the risk of diabetes, yet evidence from population interventions remains inconsistent. PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched up to September 2017. Data from studies regarding serum 25(OH)D, fasting blood glucose (FBG), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting insulin and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were pooled. Twenty studies (n = 2703) were included in the meta-analysis. Vitamin D supplementation resulted in a significant improvement in serum 25(OH)D levels (weighted mean difference (WMD) = 33.98; 95%CI: 24.6043.37) and HOMA-IR (standardized mean difference (SMD) = 0.57; 95%CI: 1.09~0.04), but not in other outcomes. However, preferred changes were observed in subgroups as follows: short-term (WMDFBG = 8.44; 95%CI: 12.72~4.15), high dose (WMDFBG = 8.70; 95%CI: 12.96~4.44), non-obese (SMDFasting insulin = 1.80; 95%CI: 2.66~0.95), Middle Easterners (WMDFBG = 10.43; 95%CI: 14.80~6.06), baseline vitamin D deficient individuals (WMDFBG = 5.77; 95%CI: 10.48~1.05) and well-controlled HbA1c individuals (WMDFBG = 4.09; 95%CI: 15.44~7.27). Vitamin D supplementation was shown to increase serum 25(OH)D and reduce insulin resistance effectively. This effect was especially prominent when vitamin D was given in large doses and for a s Continue reading >>

Vitamin D And Diabetes

Vitamin D And Diabetes

Renewed interest in vitamin D, the so-called “sunshine vitamin,” has occurred recently because it has been linked to everything from cancer and heart disease to diabetes.1 Research studies continue to pour into the literature stating that vitamin D is a superstar when it comes to health. However, most of the research is based on observational, epidemiological studies, which are important for generating hypotheses but do not prove causality. A PubMed search in 2011 using the term “vitamin D” and selecting articles published in the past 2 years resulted in more than 2,864 hits. The following diseases and conditions have been researched to assess their relationship with vitamin D status: osteomalacia/osteoporosis,2–5 muscle function and falls,6–8 cancer,9–14 multiple sclerosis,15 hypertension,16 type 1 diabetes,17 rheumatoid arthritis,18 tuberculosis,19,20 mental health,21 cardiovascular events,22,23 infection,24,25 seasonal affective disorder,26 obesity,27 aging,28 and overall mortality.23 The challenge for health care providers and nutrition researchers is to determine whether vitamin D deficiency actually causes or increases the incidence of certain diseases or whether, instead, low levels of vitamin D are simply coincidental given that the majority of the general population, regardless of disease, is likely to have insufficient levels of vitamin D. In other words, do people who develop disease states just happen to be deficient in vitamin D, or do low levels of vitamin D cause the disease? Will supplementation with vitamin D prevent diseases, and can it be used to treat diseases such as diabetes? The purpose of this article is to summarize the latest information related to diabetes and vitamin D. For readers who desire further information, Holick29 has wr Continue reading >>

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