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Vitamin D Improves Insulin Sensitivity

Vitamin D Supplementation Does Not Improve Insulin Sensitivity, Insulin Secretion

Vitamin D Supplementation Does Not Improve Insulin Sensitivity, Insulin Secretion

Vitamin D supplementation does not improve insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion Gulseth HL, et al. Diabetes Care. 2017;doi:10.2337/dc16-2302. Insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion were not changed with vitamin D supplementation in adults with type 2 diabetes and vitamin D deficiency, suggesting that therapeutic vitamin D3 supplementation does not improve glucose homeostasis, according to study findings published in Diabetes Care. Hanne L. Gulseth, MD, PhD, of the department of endocrinology, morbid obesity and preventive medicine and the Hormone Laboratory at Oslo University Hospital, and colleagues evaluated 62 adults (mean age, 55.7 years) with type 2 diabetes (mean diabetes duration, 10 years; mean HbA1c, 7.8%; mean BMI, 31.9 kg/m2) and vitamin D deficiency randomly assigned to a single dose of 400,000 IU oral vitamin D3 or placebo for 6 months to determine the efficacy of vitamin D supplementation on insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion. Participants receiving vitamin D supplementation received an additional 200,000 IU D3 after 4 weeks if serum 25-(OH)D was less than 100 nmol/L. Mean serum 25-(OH)D levels increased from 30 nmol to 96.9 nmol and 73.2 nmol after 4 weeks and 3 months, respectively, in the vitamin D group; no significant change in mean serum 25-(OH)D was observed in the placebo group. Serum 25-(OH)D was higher in the vitamin D group compared with the placebo group (53.7 nmol/L vs. 38.2 nmol/L; P < .001) after 6 months. Over the study period, total exposure to 25-(OH)D was 1,870 nmol/L in the vitamin D group and 1,090 nmol/L in the placebo group each week (P < .001). The target serum 25-(OH) of at least 100 nmol/L after 4 weeks was reached by 48.5% of the vitamin D group. Researchers observed no significant differences between the two groups Continue reading >>

Is There A Relationship Between Vitamin D With Insulin Resistance And Diabetes Mellitus?

Is There A Relationship Between Vitamin D With Insulin Resistance And Diabetes Mellitus?

Is there a relationship between vitamin D with insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus? Kamal AS Al-Shoumer, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolic Medicine, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, 13110 Safat, Kuwait Kamal AS Al-Shoumer, Thamer M Al-Essa, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolic Medicine, Department of Medicine, Mubarak Al Kabeer Hospital, 46304 Jabriya, Kuwait Author contributions: Both authors contributed to this work. Correspondence to: Kamal AS Al-Shoumer, MD, FRCP, PhD, FACE, Professor and Consultant, Head, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolic Medicine, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, PO Box 24923, 13110 Safat, Kuwait. [email protected] Telephone: +965-25-319596 Fax: +965-25-313511 Received 2014 Dec 7; Revised 2015 Apr 17; Accepted 2015 May 5. Copyright The Author(s) 2015. Published by Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Available data suggest a possible link between abnormal vitamin D level and abnormal glucose homeostasis, two of the most common chronic medical conditions. Both conditions are associated with inflammation, and the exact mechanism for role of either on the other is not well clear. Literature investigating the link between vitamin D and either pre-diabetic states or diabetes is reviewed. Vitamin D deficiency is detrimental to insulin synthesis and secretion in animal and human studies. In humans, it has been shown by majority of observational studies, that vitamin D is positively correlated with insulin sensitivity and its role is mediated both by direct mechanism through the availability of vitamin D receptors in several tissues and indirectly through the changes in calcium levels. Large number of, Continue reading >>

Vitamin D And Its Role In Diabetes

Vitamin D And Its Role In Diabetes

Vitamin D, otherwise known as the “sunshine vitamin,” is vital for bone health but may soon be regarded as an important marker of health similar to cholesterol and blood pressure. Over the last few decades, scientists have looked past the skeletal support this micronutrient offers and are discovering that vitamin D may play a vital role in insulin, glucose, and inflammation regulation as well as potentially being a warning sign for different cardiovascular and endocrine diseases — including type 2 diabetes. So What Exactly Is Vitamin D? Vitamins are chemicals the body needs to function properly and are required to maintain good health. There are two main categories of vitamins: water soluble and fat soluble vitamins. Fat Soluble Vitamins Water Soluble Vitamins Vitamin A (retinol) B1 Thiamine B7 Biotin Vitamin D B2 Riboflavin B9 Folate Vitamin E B3 Naicin B12 Cobalamin K B5 Pantothenic acid C Ascorbic acid B6 Pyridoxine As seen in the table above, water-soluble vitamins like vitamin B and vitamin C are generally excreted and can be replenished daily with little to no worry about toxicity for most people. Fat-soluble vitamins like vitamin D are stored in the liver and fatty tissue and are not always required daily by everyone (depending on your nutritional status). Excessive amounts of vitamin D and other fat-soluble vitamins can be toxic, but being deficient in one of these vitamins can cause numerous other health problems as well. Vitamin D is unlike any other micronutrient in that the body can produce its own from sunlight whereas most other vitamins are acquired by the foods you eat. 3 Ways to Get Vitamin D The three main ways to get vitamin D are through sun exposure, vitamin D supplementation, and dietary intake. Sun/UVB The best way to get vitamin D is to get Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Vitamin D On Insulin Resistance In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

The Effect Of Vitamin D On Insulin Resistance In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Abstract Over the past decade, numerous non-skeletal diseases have been reported to be associated with vitamin D deficiency including type2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Different studies provide evidence that vitamin D may play a functional role in glucose tolerance through its effects on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. This study evaluates the effects of vitamin D supplementation on insulin resistance in T2DM. Through a before-after study, 100 patients with T2DM, 30–70 years old, were recruited from an Arak diabetes clinic as consecutive attenders. Participants were assessed for clinical and biochemistry. Serum insulin and, 25(OH)D concentration, and HOMA-IR was calculated. All measurements were performed at the beginning and the end of the study. Patients received 50,000 unit of vitamin D 3 orally per week for eight weeks, Statistical analysis was made using SPSS17. The results were analyzed by descriptive tests, and a comparison between variables were made using paired T-tests or Wilcoxon tests, as appropriate. 100 participants including 70 women (70%) and 30 men (30%) took part in the study. All results were presented as Mean±SD, or medians of non-normally distributed. 24% of the participants were Vitamin D deficient {serum 25(OH)D ≤ 20 ng/ml(50 nmol/l)}. Mean serum 25 (OH) D concentration was 43.03± 19.28 ng/ml (107.5±48.2 nmol/l). The results at baseline and at the end, for FPG were 138.48±36.74 and 131.02±39 mg/dl (P=0.05), for insulin, 10.76±9.46 and 8.6±8.25 μIu/ml (P=0.028) and for HOMA-IR, 3.57±3.18 and 2.89±3.28 (P=0.008) respectively. Our data showed significant improvements in serum FPG, insulin and in HOMA-IR after treatment with vitamin D, suggested that vitamin D supplementation could reduce insulin resistance in T2DM. Introduction Continue reading >>

Rct: Vitamin D Improves Insulin Sensitivity And Positively Affects Long-term Glucose Tolerance In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Rct: Vitamin D Improves Insulin Sensitivity And Positively Affects Long-term Glucose Tolerance In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

RCT: Vitamin D improves insulin sensitivity and positively affects long-term glucose tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes Posted on: April 11, 2014 by Will Hunter A study published in The European Journal of Medical Sciences found that large doses of vitamin D improved insulin sensitivity and led to a positive trend in HbA1c levels. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) makes up 90% of diabetes cases. In 2010, it was estimated that there were 285 million people with T2D globally. People with T2D have poor insulin sensitivity, which means that their cells are less responsive to insulin. Insulin transports glucose into cells, and poor insulin sensitivity means insulin isnt transporting glucose effectively, which leads to abnormally high blood glucose levels. Glucose is dangerous when it is circulating in the blood in high levels for too long. Chronically high blood glucose levels can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. You must be a paid member to read the rest of this post. Please login or register now. 2 Responses to RCT: Vitamin D improves insulin sensitivity and positively affects long-term glucose tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes This study and 514 other studies on injection of Vitamin D are at VitaminDWiki Continue reading >>

Medical Xpress: Vitamin D Improves Insulin Sensitivity In Mice

Medical Xpress: Vitamin D Improves Insulin Sensitivity In Mice

Vitamin D improves insulin sensitivity in mice European Association for the Study of Diabetes New research presented at this year's European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) meeting in Munich, Germany (12-16 Sept) shows that giving vitamin D improves insulin sensitivity in mice that have become insulin resistant due to a chronic high fat high sugar diet. Vitamin D also reduces the accumulation of fat in muscles (myosteatosis), another sign of improving metabolism. The study is by Dr Elisa Benetti and colleagues from the University of Turin, Italy. Human studies indicate a strong association between vitamin D deficiency and type 2 diabetes. In particular, epidemiological evidence shows that a poor vitamin D status increases the risk of insulin resistance, however the mechanisms underlying this effect are still not completely understood. In addition, early clinical description reported that severe vitamin D deficiency is associated to myopathy, thus suggesting a potential association between vitamin D and muscle function. The aim of this new study was to evaluate the effect of vitamin D administration in a mouse model of diet induced insulin-resistance, focusing on skeletal muscle. A total of 40 male mice were provided with a standard diet or high fat-high sugar diet (HFHS) for 4 months. Subsets of animals were treated with Vitamin D (7 micrograms per kg, 3 times per week) for the last 2 months. Body weight and food intake were recorded weekly. At the end of the treatment, a glucose tolerance test was performed. The expression of markers of fat generation and insulin signalling were analysed. In comparison to standard diet, HFHS diet induced body weight increase (24.8g vs 31.8 g), hyperglycemia (108 vs 145mg/dl) and impaired glucose tolerance. At the muscle l Continue reading >>

The Link Between Vitamin D And Insulin Resistance

The Link Between Vitamin D And Insulin Resistance

Important Facts About Cholesterol and Heart Disease Vitamin D is a steroid hormone that influences virtually every cell in your body. Low levels are linked to poor bone health, as well as heart, brain, immune and metabolic dysfunction Animal studies have shown vitamin D is a foundational factor necessary for normal insulin secretion, and that vitamin D improves insulin sensitivity Atypical antipsychotics such as quetiapine, a bipolar medication, can increase your risk of hyperglycemia and diabetes. Research suggests vitamin D3 may counteract these effects Vitamin D is a steroid hormone that influences virtually every cell in your body, which is why maintaining a healthy level is so important. Low vitamin D levels are widely known to harm your bones, leading them to become thin, brittle, soft or misshapen. But vitamin D is equally important for your heart, brain, immune function and much more. For example, there's an important connection between insufficient vitamin D and insulin resistance and/or diabetes , both type 1 1 and type 2. Vitamin D Deficiency May Influence Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk According to recent research, vitamin D deficiency affects your glucose metabolism and may actually be more closely linked to diabetes than obesity. In a study of 118 people, those with low vitamin D levels were more likely to have type 2 diabetes, pre-diabetes or metabolic syndrome, regardless of their weight. Among obese people, those without metabolic disorders had higher levels of vitamin D than those with such disorders, and among lean people, those with metabolic disorders were more likely to have low levels of vitamin D. According to one of the study's authors: 2 "The study suggests that vitamin D deficiency and obesity interact synergistically to heighten the risk of diabe Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Repletion Boosts Insulin Sensitivity In Prediabetes

Vitamin D Repletion Boosts Insulin Sensitivity In Prediabetes

Vitamin D Repletion Boosts Insulin Sensitivity in Prediabetes T2 Diabetes , ADA 2014 , Diabetes , Diabetes Type 2 , Insulin Vitamin D repletion reduces adipose tissue fibrosis and improves insulin sensitivity in persons at risk for diabetes mellitus (DM), according to a new study. Vitamin D reduces fibrosis in various tissues by inhibiting profibrotic processes and collagen synthesis. When fat tissue is less inflammatory, the liver is more responsive in overweight, middle-aged patients bordering on diabetes who have insulin resistance, Meredith Hawkins, MD, Professor of Medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, told ConsultantLive. Einstein researchers conducted a study to see whether vitamin D repletion could reduce adipose fibrosis and improve insulin sensitivity. They performed 2-step euglycemic, hyperinsulinemic pancreatic clamp studies in 9 obese, insulin-resistant patients. The patients, median age 43 years, had an average body mass index of 34 kg/m2 and homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance of 5.1, before and after normalizing vitamin D levels with more than 30 ng/mL of oral vitamin D3. Vitamin D repletion reduced subcutaneous adipose tissue fibrosis, reported Akankasha Goyal, MD, at the American Diabetes Associations 74th Scientific Sessions in San Francisco ( Abstract 90-OR ). Gene expression of collagen I, collagen V, and HiF-1-alpha in whole fat decreased significantly, and collagen immunofluorescence decreased by 48%. In addition, vitamin D repletion reduced adipose inflammation, with decreased expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha and PAI-1 in whole fat. It also significantly decreased expression of interleukin 6, inositol, and PAI-1by adipose macrophages. These findings were associated with 34% greater abili Continue reading >>

Vitamin D3 Supplementation Improves Insulin Sensitivity In Subjects With Impaired Fasting Glucose.

Vitamin D3 Supplementation Improves Insulin Sensitivity In Subjects With Impaired Fasting Glucose.

Vitamin D3 supplementation improves insulin sensitivity in subjects with impaired fasting glucose. Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA. Transl Res. 2011 Nov;158(5):276-81. doi: 10.1016/j.trsl.2011.05.002. Epub 2011 Jun 7. Vitamin D has invitro and invivo effects on cells and insulin sensitivity. Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) has been associated with the onset and progression of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2). However, studies involving supplementation of vitamin D in subjects with previously established diabetes have demonstrated inconsistent effects on insulin sensitivity. The aim of this open-label study was to assess the effects of high-dose vitamin D3 supplementation on insulin sensitivity in subjects with VDD and impaired fasting glucose. We studied 8 subjects with VDD and prediabetes with the modified, frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance (mFSIGT) test before and after vitamin D supplementation. Vitamin D3 was administered as 10,000 IU daily for 4 weeks. The mFSIGT was analyzed with MinMod Millennium (purchased from Dr. Richard Bergman, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, Calif) to obtain estimates of acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg), insulin sensitivity (SI), and disposition index (DI). We found that AIRg decreased (P = 0.011) and SI increased (P = 0.012) after a intervention with vitamin D. If these findings are repeated in a randomized, double-blind study, the results indicate that orally administered high-dose vitamin D3 supplementation improves insulin sensitivity in subjects with impaired fasting glucose and suggests that high-dose vitamin D3 supplementation might provide an inexpensive public health measure in preventing, or at least delaying, the progression from impaired fasting glu Continue reading >>

Does Vitamin D Deficiency Lead To Insulin Resistance In Obese Individuals?

Does Vitamin D Deficiency Lead To Insulin Resistance In Obese Individuals?

Research Article - Biomedical Research (2017) Volume 28, Issue 17 Does vitamin D deficiency lead to insulin resistance in obese individuals? Zeynep Hlya Durmaz 1 * , Aslhan Dilara Demir 2 , Tuba Ozkan 3 , etin Kln 4 , Rdvan Gkan 4 and Meral Tiryaki 5 1 Department of Biochemistry, Amasya University Research Hospital, Amasya, Turkey 2 Department of Internal Medicine, Amasya University Research Hospital, Amasya, Turkey 3 Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Amasya University Research Hospital, Amasya, Turkey 4 Department of Microbiology, Amasya University Research Hospital, Amasya, Turkey 5 Department of Pathology, Dkap Yldrm Beyazt Education and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey Visit for more related articles at Biomedical Research Aim: Obesity has become an important health problem in developed and developing countries. Nowadays, vitamin D deficiency is very common in obese individuals. Vitamin D deficiency and obesity are associated with cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and other diseases. In our study, we aimed to investigate the effect of vitamin D deficiency on insulin resistance in obese subjects. Materials and Methods: A total of 170 individuals, (146 females and 24 males) were included in the study. According to Body Mass Index (BMI), patients were divided into 3 groups. Serum vitamin D was compared with insulin resistance and HbA1c. Results: It was shown that serum vitamin D levels were statistically decreased according to BMI. There was also a statistically significant increase in Hba1c level due to increased BMI. There is also a positive correlation between BMI and insulin resistance. Positive correlation was found between HbA1C and insulin resistance. There was no statistically significant difference between the levels of insuli Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Supplementation Improves Insulin Sensitivity

Vitamin D Supplementation Improves Insulin Sensitivity

Vitamin D supplementation improves insulin sensitivity Vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency are commonly found in many populations worldwide. The effects of inadequate vitamin D status may be seen in many physiological systems in the body, including the ability to properly control blood glucose. Risk factors for vitamin D inadequacy include reduced sunlight exposure, darker skin color, low vitamin D intake and obesity. For example, obese children are known to have significantly lower vitamin D status than their lean counterparts. Obesity can be an important contributor to low vitamin D status given the high rates of obesity in many countries, and it is also an important risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Mounting evidence suggests a role for vitamin D in insulin and glucose metabolism. However, there are few clinical trials that have demonstrated, particularly in children, whether correction of poor vitamin D status with supplementation can improve insulin action. A recent study conducted by researchers at the University of Missouri has provided interesting evidence that high dose vitamin D supplementation (4000 IU/d, the current Institute of Medicine Tolerable Upper Intake Level) improves fasting insulin and insulin resistance in obese adolescents. Obese (mean BMI 39.2 kg/m2) adolescent patients, who had a mean initial serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration (a biomarker of vitamin D status) of 48 mmol/L, were randomly assigned to receive either placebo or 4000 IU vitamin D per day for six months. The current Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for vitamin D intake is based on maintaining a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration of 50 mmol/L in almost all of the population. As expected, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D increased significantly by doubling to 98 mmol/L in the Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Improves Insulin Sensitivity, Helps Prevent Diabetes

Vitamin D Improves Insulin Sensitivity, Helps Prevent Diabetes

Vitamin D Improves Insulin Sensitivity, Helps Prevent Diabetes Friday, March 12, 2010 by: David Gutierrez, staff writer (NaturalNews) High-dose vitamin D supplements may help increase the body's sensitivity to the blood sugar-regulating hormone insulin, thus reducing the risk of diabetes, researchers have found. Insulin resistance (or insensitivity) occurs when the body's tissues stop responding as strongly to the presence of insulin. As a consequence, the cells uptake less sugar from the bloodstream, producing the elevated glucose levels characteristic of diabetes. In the current study, conducted by researchers from Massey University and published in the British Journal of Nutrition, researchers randomly assigned 81 South Asian women between the ages of 23 and 68 to take either a placebo or 4,000 IU of vitamin D once per day. All participants suffered from insulin sensitivity at the start of the study, but none were taking diabetes drugs or vitamin D supplements larger than 1,000 IU per day. At the start of the study, the average participant had vitamin D blood levels of approximately 50 nanomoles per liter, slightly lower than the average levels in a U.S. adult (60-75 nmol/L). After six months, women in the vitamin D group exhibited significantly more insulin sensitivity and less insulin resistance than women who had received a placebo. The largest effect was seen in women whose vitamin D blood levels had reached 80 to 119 nmol/L. According to the Vitamin D Council, blood levels should be at least 125 nmol/L for optimal health. Vitamin D has long been known to play an important role in bone and tooth health, and recommended daily intakes were originally calculated for these functions. Yet a growing body of research suggests that much higher intakes may be required to Continue reading >>

Low Levels Of Vitamin D And Minerals Increase Insulin Resistance

Low Levels Of Vitamin D And Minerals Increase Insulin Resistance

Low Levels of Vitamin D and Minerals Increase Insulin Resistance A study published in the Journal of Clinical Diagnostic Research compared the levels of vitamin D3, calcium, and magnesium in diabetic and nondiabetic patients. Researchers examined 30 diabetic patients and 30 matched controls. Glucose, insulin, and vitamin D3 levels were measured using fasting blood samples.1 Compared to vitamin D3 levels (19.55 ng/mL) found in healthy controls, levels (12.29 mg/mL) in the diabetic group were lower.In patients with diabetes, calcium and magnesium levels were low whereas fasting glucose and insulin levels and insulin resistance are high. Higher insulin levels are expected in individuals with insulin resistance. When cells are insulin resistant, theybecome ineffective in transportingglucosemoleculesinto cells. Because of this, theres more glucose circulating in the blood. In the presence of elevated blood glucose, the beta cells of the pancreas work harder to release more insulin. Eventually, the pancreas becomes exhausted and is no longer able to pump out insulin. Together, elevated blood glucose levels and ineffective pancreatic beta cells lead to type 2 diabetes. Circulating blood glucose levels are associated with many other chronic medical conditions like dementia, heart disease, obesity, and cancer. Nutrients are required for various functions in cells. Calcium, magnesium, and vitamin D3 all play important roles in disease prevention and health. When it comes to type 2 diabetes, vitamin D, calcium, and magnesium have been associated with supporting glycemic control. The following table highlights the effects of these nutrients and their food sources: Supports pancreatic beta cell activityBeta cells possess vitamin D receptors2Animal studies show that missing vitamin Continue reading >>

Role Of Vitamin D In Insulin Resistance

Role Of Vitamin D In Insulin Resistance

1Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan 2Department of Pediatrics, Taoyuan Armed Forces General Hospital, Taoyuan 325, Taiwan 3Department of Medicine, Cardinal Tien Hospital, School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City 231, Taiwan Received 15 June 2012; Revised 17 August 2012; Accepted 27 August 2012 Copyright 2012 Chih-Chien Sung et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Vitamin D is characterized as a regulator of homeostasis of bone and mineral metabolism, but it can also provide nonskeletal actions because vitamin D receptors have been found in various tissues including the brain, prostate, breast, colon, pancreas, and immune cells. Bone metabolism, modulation of the immune response, and regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation are all biological functions of vitamin D. Vitamin D may play an important role in modifying the risk of cardiometabolic outcomes, including diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. The incidence of type 2 DM is increasing worldwide and results from a lack of insulin or inadequate insulin secretion following increases in insulin resistance. Therefore, it has been proposed that vitamin D deficiency plays an important role in insulin resistance resulting in diabetes. The potential role of vitamin D deficiency in insulin resistance has been proposed to be associated with inherited gene polymorphisms including vitamin D-binding protein, vitamin D receptor, and vitamin D 1alpha-hydroxylase gene. Other roles have been propos Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Status And Its Association With Insulin Resistance Among Type 2 Diabetics: A Case -control Study In Ghana

Vitamin D Status And Its Association With Insulin Resistance Among Type 2 Diabetics: A Case -control Study In Ghana

Abstract Vitamin D plays a major role in physiological processes that modulate mineral metabolism and immune function with probable link to several chronic and infectious conditions. Emerging data suggests a possible influence of vitamin D on glucose homeostasis. This study sought to provide preliminary information on vitamin D status among Ghanaian type 2 diabetics and assessed its association with glucose homeostasis. In a case control study, 118 clinically diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) patients attending Diabetic Clinic at the Nkawie Government Hospital were enrolled between October and December 2015. Hundred healthy non-diabetics living in Nkawie district were selected as controls. Structured questionnaires were administered to obtain socio-demographic data. Venous blood samples were taken from both cases and controls to estimate their FBG, Lipid profile spectrophotometrically and IPTH, 25OHD by ELISA. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS v20.0 Statistics. The average age of the study participants was 58.81years for cases and 57.79year for controls. There was vitamin D deficiency of 92.4% among T2DM cases and 60.2% among the non diabetic controls. Vitamin D deficiency did not significantly associate with HOMA-β [T2DM: r2 = 0.0209, p = 0.1338 and Control: r2 = 0.0213, p = 0.2703] and HOMA-IR [T2DM: r2 = 0.0233, p = 0.1132 and Control: r2 = 0.0214, p = 0.2690] in both the controls and the cases. Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in both T2DM and non-diabetics. There is no association between vitamin D deficiency and insulin resistance or beta cell function in our study population. Vitamin D supplementation among type 2 diabetics is recommended. Continue reading >>

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