diabetestalk.net

Vitamin D Deficiency Obesity And Diabetes

Does Vitamin D Deficiency Lead To Insulin Resistance In Obese Individuals?

Does Vitamin D Deficiency Lead To Insulin Resistance In Obese Individuals?

Research Article - Biomedical Research (2017) Volume 28, Issue 17 Does vitamin D deficiency lead to insulin resistance in obese individuals? Zeynep Hlya Durmaz 1 * , Aslhan Dilara Demir 2 , Tuba Ozkan 3 , etin Kln 4 , Rdvan Gkan 4 and Meral Tiryaki 5 1 Department of Biochemistry, Amasya University Research Hospital, Amasya, Turkey 2 Department of Internal Medicine, Amasya University Research Hospital, Amasya, Turkey 3 Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Amasya University Research Hospital, Amasya, Turkey 4 Department of Microbiology, Amasya University Research Hospital, Amasya, Turkey 5 Department of Pathology, Dkap Yldrm Beyazt Education and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey Visit for more related articles at Biomedical Research Aim: Obesity has become an important health problem in developed and developing countries. Nowadays, vitamin D deficiency is very common in obese individuals. Vitamin D deficiency and obesity are associated with cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and other diseases. In our study, we aimed to investigate the effect of vitamin D deficiency on insulin resistance in obese subjects. Materials and Methods: A total of 170 individuals, (146 females and 24 males) were included in the study. According to Body Mass Index (BMI), patients were divided into 3 groups. Serum vitamin D was compared with insulin resistance and HbA1c. Results: It was shown that serum vitamin D levels were statistically decreased according to BMI. There was also a statistically significant increase in Hba1c level due to increased BMI. There is also a positive correlation between BMI and insulin resistance. Positive correlation was found between HbA1C and insulin resistance. There was no statistically significant difference between the levels of insuli Continue reading >>

Obesity And Vitamin D Deficiency Linked To Insulin Resistance

Obesity And Vitamin D Deficiency Linked To Insulin Resistance

Obesity and Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Insulin Resistance The combination of obesity and vitamin D deficiency may put people at even greater risk of insulin resistance than either factor alone, according to new research from the Drexel University School of Public Health recently published early online in the journal Diabetes Care . Insulin resistance is a major risk factor for Type 2 diabetes, a condition that affects 25.6 million adults and is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Vitamin D insufficiency and obesity are individual risk factors for insulin resistance and diabetes, said lead author Shaum Kabadi, a doctoral candidate in epidemiology at Drexel. Our results suggest that the combination of these two factors increases the odds of insulin resistance to an even greater degree than would have been expected based on their individual contributions. In the study, obese individuals who had healthy levels of vitamin D had insulin resistance almost 20 times more often than the overall study population. But in obese individuals whose serum vitamin D was low, insulin resistance was much higher: about 32 times more common than the average. Senior author Dr. Longjian Liu , an associate professor in the School of Public Health, noted, Its not clear whether obesity itself causes a low vitamin D level or if its the other way around. Vitamin D is stored in adipose fat tissues, making it unavailable for the body to use; as a result, people who are overweight are already more likely to have low levels of serum vitamin D. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with multiple health conditions including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases including stroke, depression, dementia and other conditions. Kabadi, Liu and co-author Dr. Brian Lee , an assistant professor Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Deficiency In Obese Children And Its Relationship To Glucose Homeostasis

Vitamin D Deficiency In Obese Children And Its Relationship To Glucose Homeostasis

Vitamin D Deficiency in Obese Children and Its Relationship to Glucose Homeostasis Departments of Pediatrics (M.L.O., J.D.O., P.C.W., M.R.H.), Dallas, Texas Search for other works by this author on: Internal Medicine (N.M.M.), University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas Search for other works by this author on: Departments of Pediatrics (M.L.O., J.D.O., P.C.W., M.R.H.), Dallas, Texas Search for other works by this author on: Departments of Pediatrics (M.L.O., J.D.O., P.C.W., M.R.H.), Dallas, Texas Search for other works by this author on: Departments of Pediatrics (M.L.O., J.D.O., P.C.W., M.R.H.), Dallas, Texas Address correspondence to Michele R. Hutchison, M.D., Ph.D., University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75390-9063. Search for other works by this author on: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 97, Issue 1, 1 January 2012, Pages 279285, Micah L. Olson, Naim M. Maalouf, Jon D. Oden, Perrin C. White, Michele R. Hutchison; Vitamin D Deficiency in Obese Children and Its Relationship to Glucose Homeostasis, The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 97, Issue 1, 1 January 2012, Pages 279285, The aim of the study was to compare the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in obese and non-overweight children in North Texas, to examine relationships between dietary habits and 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] level in obese children, and to examine the relationship between 25(OH)D level and markers of abnormal glucose metabolism and blood pressure. Using a cross-sectional design, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, dietary information, serum 25(OH)D, fasting glucose and insulin, 2-h glucose from oral glucose tolerance test, hemoglobin A1c, and ho Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Deficiency, Obesity And Diabetes.

Vitamin D Deficiency, Obesity And Diabetes.

Vitamin D Deficiency, Obesity and Diabetes. Guangxi University College of Animal Science and Technology Nanning China. Guangxi University College of Animal Science and Technology Nanning China zhoulei@gxu.edu.cn. Cell Mol Biol (Noisy-le-grand). 2015 Jun 10;61(3):35-8. Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are main chronic diseases harming human health. Although the association between obesity and T2DM is well established, the molecular mechanism is still unclear. Accumulating evidence suggests vitamin D plays a role in the development of these diseases. Vitamin D is a necessary nutrient for humans. People usually do not pay attention to supplementing vitamin D, since vitamin D can be produced when their skin is exposed to the sunlight. Nevertheless, even in highly sunny regions, vitamin D deficiency exists, suggesting vitamin D deficiency is a global problem. Vitamin D deficiency has previously been considered only to influence bone metabolism. Accumulating evidence counters this opinion. In vivo studies have revealed that vitamin D deficiency reduces insulin secretion capacity of the islet beta cells in pancreas. Moreover, epidemiological studies have demonstrated that vitamin D deficiency is closely related to obesity and increased risk of T2DM. This review introduces the current work on vitamin D, obesity and diabetes. Continue reading >>

Associations Of Vitamin D With Insulin Resistance, Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, And Metabolic Syndrome.

Associations Of Vitamin D With Insulin Resistance, Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, And Metabolic Syndrome.

J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2018 Jan;175:177-189. doi: 10.1016/j.jsbmb.2016.09.017. Epub 2016 Sep 20. Associations of vitamin D with insulin resistance, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Endocrinology, Metabolisum & Nutrition, Cardio Metabolic Institute, NJ, USA. Electronic address: [email protected] The aim of this study is to determine the relationships of vitamin D with diabetes, insulin resistance obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Intra cellular vitamin D receptors and the 1- hydroxylase enzyme are distributed ubiquitously in all tissues suggesting a multitude of functions of vitamin D. It plays an indirect but an important role in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism as reflected by its association with type 2 diabetes (T2D), metabolic syndrome, insulin secretion, insulin resistance, polycystic ovarian syndrome, and obesity. Peer-reviewed papers, related to the topic were extracted using key words, from PubMed, Medline, and other research databases. Correlations of vitamin D with diabetes, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome were examined for this evidence-based review. In addition to the well-studied musculoskeletal effects, vitamin D decreases the insulin resistance, severity of T2D, prediabetes, metabolic syndrome, inflammation, and autoimmunity. Vitamin D exerts autocrine and paracrine effects such as direct intra-cellular effects via its receptors and the local production of 1,25(OH)2D3, especially in muscle and pancreatic -cells. It also regulates calcium homeostasis and calcium flux through cell membranes, and activation of a cascade of key enzymes and cofactors associated with metabolic pathways. Cross-sectional, observational, and ecological studies reported inverse correlations between vitamin D status with hyperglycemia and glycemic Continue reading >>

Joint Effects Of Obesity And Vitamin D Insufficiency On Insulin Resistance And Type 2 Diabetes

Joint Effects Of Obesity And Vitamin D Insufficiency On Insulin Resistance And Type 2 Diabetes

OBJECTIVE The possible interaction of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and obesity in regard to type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance has not been well studied. To explore the effect modification of obesity on the association between 25(OH)D and insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes, data were examined from a nationally representative sample. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The analytic sample for the type 2 diabetes analysis (n = 12,900) was limited to participants from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001–2006 over 20 years of age. Participants >20 years of age assigned to the morning session and free of diabetes were limited to the insulin resistance analysis (n = 5,806). Multiplicative interaction was assessed through a cross-product interaction term in a multiple logistic regression model. The presence of additive interaction between insufficient 25(OH)D and obesity (indicated by BMI or waist circumference) was evaluated by calculation of the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) and attributable proportion due to interaction (AP). RESULTS There was no multiplicative interaction of insufficient 25(OH)D and obesity on type 2 diabetes or insulin resistance. Furthermore, none of the RERI or AP values were statistically significant in the diabetes analysis. However, there was strong additive interaction between abdominal obesity and insufficient 25(OH)D (RERI 6.45 [95% CI 1.03–11.52]) in regard to insulin resistance. In addition, 47% of the increased odds of insulin resistance can be explained by interaction between insufficient 25(OH)D and high BMI (AP 0.47 [95% CI 0.08–0.87]). CONCLUSIONS Within a cross-sectional, nationally representative sample, abdominal obesity and insufficient 25(OH)D interact to synergistically influenc Continue reading >>

Association Of Obesity With Vitamin D Deficiency And The Clinical Implications

Association Of Obesity With Vitamin D Deficiency And The Clinical Implications

Association of obesity with vitamin D deficiency Anitha Oommen1*, Ibrahim Hassan Al-Zahrani2 Obesity is considered as a global epidemic and is associated with hypertension, insulin resistance and metabolic syndromes.1-2 Obesity and the related issues contribute significantly to modern healthcare costs, morbidity and mortality.3 Although several studies have been done to find out the relationship between obesity and Vitamin D deficiency, there is no consensus regarding the opinion that vitamin D deficiency causes obesity. Although researchers have reported that serum vitamin D levels can be a good predictor of obesity the role of vitamin D in lowering body weight is yet to be established.4-11 In a study done in the eastern province of Saudi Arabia, the researchers found that the overall prevalence of obesity was 43.8%, and the peak prevalence was in the age group 50-59 years. Obesity was found higher among women than men and significantly higher in housewives, and among the less educated than others.12 Diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension were found to be strongly associated with obesity in a study done in Saudi Arabia.13Another study done in Saudi women to find out the factors associated with osteoporosis in the Northern part of Saudi Arabia showed that 82 out of 100 women had vitamin D deficiency.14 This study is therefore aimed to find out Obesity is a complex disorder which leads to health problems like diabetes, hypertension and hyper cholesterolemia. It has been reported that obesity is associated with vitamin D insufficiency due to decreased bio- availability. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether vitamin D deficiency can be a causative factor for 100 Saudi female patients above 40 years who came to the outpatient department of Arar c Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Vitamin D Supplementation On Insulin And Glucose Metabolism In Overweight And Obese Individuals: Systematic Review With Meta-analysis

The Effect Of Vitamin D Supplementation On Insulin And Glucose Metabolism In Overweight And Obese Individuals: Systematic Review With Meta-analysis

The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effect of vitamin D supplementation on glucose and insulin metabolism in overweight and obese subjects. The search process was based on the selection of publications listed in the databases: PubMed, Scopus, Web of Knowledge, Embase and the Cochrane library that met the inclusion criteria. Twelve randomized controlled trials were included. The analysed population consisted of 1181 individuals with BMIs >23 kg/m2. Changes in the concentration of 25(OH)D, fasting glucose, insulin and the HOMA-IR index were assessed. In the meta-regression analysis, a restricted maximum likelihood method was applied. To combine individual study results, a meta-analysis was performed. Vitamin D supplementation did not have an effect on glucose concentrations, insulin level and HOMA-IR values when the supplemented dose, time of supplementation and baseline of 25(OH)D concentration were taken under consideration in subgroup-analysis. This meta-analysis provides evidence that vitamin D supplementation has no significant effect on glucose and insulin metabolism in overweight and obese individuals. According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), in 2013, 8.3% of adults in the world suffered from diabetes1. Around 80–90% of people with type 2 diabetes are obese or overweight (Body Mass Index (BMI) ≥25 kg/m2)2,3. It is well-known that obesity is related to insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia4,5,6. Therefore, obesity has been recognized as one of the most important single risk factors in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Currently, the role of vitamin D in the regulation of insulin secretion is highly investigated7,8. New findings suggest that supplementation with vitamin D could influence insulin secretion and improve Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Deficiency Linked More Closely To Diabetes Than Obesity

Vitamin D Deficiency Linked More Closely To Diabetes Than Obesity

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Vitamin D deficiency linked more closely to diabetes than obesity People who have low levels of vitamin D are more likely to have diabetes, regardless of how much they weigh, according to a new study. Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium and maintain bone and muscle health. The skin naturally produces this vitamin after exposure to sunlight. People also absorb smaller amounts of the vitamin through foods, such as milk fortified with vitamin D. More than 1 billion people worldwide are estimated to have deficient levels of vitamin D due to limited sunshine exposure. People who have low levels of vitamin D are more likely to have diabetes, regardless of how much they weigh, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. The results help clarify the connection between vitamin D, obesity and diabetes. According to the Society's Scientific Statement on the Non-skeletal Effects of Vitamin D, studies have found that people who have low levels of vitamin D are more likely to be obese. They also are more likely to have Type 2 diabetes, prediabetes and metabolic syndrome than people with normal vitamin D levels. Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium and maintain bone and muscle health. The skin naturally produces this vitamin after exposure to sunlight. People also absorb smaller amounts of the vitamin through foods, such as milk fortified with vitamin D. More than 1 billion people worldwide are estimated to have deficient levels of vitamin D due to limited sunshine exposure. "The major strength of this study is that it compares vitamin D levels in people at a wide range of weights (from lean to morbidly obese subjects) while taking whe Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes? Low Levels Of Vitamin D, Not Obesity, Predict Glucose Metabolism Disorders

What Causes Diabetes? Low Levels Of Vitamin D, Not Obesity, Predict Glucose Metabolism Disorders

What Causes Diabetes? Low Levels Of Vitamin D, Not Obesity, Predict Glucose Metabolism Disorders The message from our doctors is loud and clear: Being overweight is linked to diabetes, a disease in which blood sugar levels range much too high for our own good health. A new study finds this picture is not nearly so simple, but quite a bit more complex. Researchers at Universidad de Mlaga in Spain found people with low levels of vitamin D, regardless of whether they are overweight or thin, are more likely to have diabetes. Vitamin D is known as the "sunshine vitamin" because it is produced by our bodies through simple exposure to sunlight. Vitamin D, despite its name, is actually not a vitamin but a pro-hormone, a substance that amplifies the effects of hormones; it is important to maintaining healthy bones and teeth, while also aiding cell growth and assisting our immune system. Although sunlight is the easiest way to acquire a little necessary D, it can also be absorbed while eating common foods, including eggs, fish, and dairy products. Seemingly, nothing could be easier than getting enough vitamin D; however, up to half of all adults and children worldwide are deficient more than one billion people around the globe! How the Sunshine Vitamin Impacts Diabetes Risk For the current study, a group of researchers investigated the relationships between vitamin D, body mass index (BMI), and diabetes in 118 participants at a hospital associated with University of Mlaga and 30 additional participants at a second hospital in Girona, Spain. To start, the team classified all the participants according to BMI and also noted whether they had diabetes, prediabetes, or no glycemic disorders. Next, the researchers made two separate measurements for all the participants: levels of vita Continue reading >>

Vitamin D And Its Role In Diabetes

Vitamin D And Its Role In Diabetes

Vitamin D, otherwise known as the “sunshine vitamin,” is vital for bone health but may soon be regarded as an important marker of health similar to cholesterol and blood pressure. Over the last few decades, scientists have looked past the skeletal support this micronutrient offers and are discovering that vitamin D may play a vital role in insulin, glucose, and inflammation regulation as well as potentially being a warning sign for different cardiovascular and endocrine diseases — including type 2 diabetes. So What Exactly Is Vitamin D? Vitamins are chemicals the body needs to function properly and are required to maintain good health. There are two main categories of vitamins: water soluble and fat soluble vitamins. Fat Soluble Vitamins Water Soluble Vitamins Vitamin A (retinol) B1 Thiamine B7 Biotin Vitamin D B2 Riboflavin B9 Folate Vitamin E B3 Naicin B12 Cobalamin K B5 Pantothenic acid C Ascorbic acid B6 Pyridoxine As seen in the table above, water-soluble vitamins like vitamin B and vitamin C are generally excreted and can be replenished daily with little to no worry about toxicity for most people. Fat-soluble vitamins like vitamin D are stored in the liver and fatty tissue and are not always required daily by everyone (depending on your nutritional status). Excessive amounts of vitamin D and other fat-soluble vitamins can be toxic, but being deficient in one of these vitamins can cause numerous other health problems as well. Vitamin D is unlike any other micronutrient in that the body can produce its own from sunlight whereas most other vitamins are acquired by the foods you eat. 3 Ways to Get Vitamin D The three main ways to get vitamin D are through sun exposure, vitamin D supplementation, and dietary intake. Sun/UVB The best way to get vitamin D is to get Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Deficiency Is A Risk Factor For Obesity And Diabetes Type 2 In Women At Late Reproductive Age

Vitamin D Deficiency Is A Risk Factor For Obesity And Diabetes Type 2 In Women At Late Reproductive Age

Vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for obesity and diabetes type 2 in women at late reproductive age 1 Almazov's Centre of Heart, Blood and Endocrinology, Petersburg, 197134, Russia 2 I. P. Pavlov St Petersburg State Medical University, St. Petersburg, 197022, Russia 1 Almazov's Centre of Heart, Blood and Endocrinology, Petersburg, 197134, Russia 2 I. P. Pavlov St Petersburg State Medical University, St. Petersburg, 197022, Russia Correspondence to:Karonova T, MD/PhD; [email protected] Received 2012 Oct 22; Accepted 2013 Jul 18. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. It was suggested that glucose metabolism and body fat content depend on serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]. We studied 320 healthy women at late reproductive age of 40 to 52 years old (mean age 46.14.5) from St. Petersburg (North-West region of Russia). 25(OH)D levels were from 19.4 to 134.0 nMol/L (mean 52.922.7). Vitamin D deficiency (lower than 50 nMol/L) and insufficiency (50-75 nMol/L) was revealed in 59.1% and 27.8% of women, respectively. The study showed that low 25(OH)D levels were associated with obesity (r=-0.35, p<0.01), increased plasma glucose levels after OGTT (r=-0.31, p<0.01) and decreased insulin sensitivity index (r=-0.28, p<0.01). We found that 25(OH)D levels below 50 nMol/L were associated with obesity risk (OR 2.25[1.05-3.95], CI 95%) but not with risk of impaired glucose metabolism (1.07[0.54-2.12],CI95%). Our results showed that vitamin D insufficiency is highly prevalent in the population of healthy women. Low 25(OH)D level Continue reading >>

The Association Of Vitamin D Deficiency And Glucose Control Among Diabetic Patients - Sciencedirect

The Association Of Vitamin D Deficiency And Glucose Control Among Diabetic Patients - Sciencedirect

Volume 25, Issue 8 , December 2017, Pages 1179-1183 The association of vitamin D deficiency and glucose control among diabetic patients Author links open overlay panel Mansour SAlmetwaziab Open Access funded by King Saud University To evaluate the association between the level of vitamin D and glycemic control among patients with diabetes. We analyzed data collected from NHANES 20032006. We included only non-pregnant adult diabetic persons 18years or older. Participants who had vitamin D level less than 20ng/ml were considered as having vitamin D deficiency. Participants were considered to have a glucose control if the HbA1c level was less than 7% [53mmol/L]. We used students t test to compare the difference in HbA1c means between people with Diabetes with and without a vitamin D deficiency. We used a multivariate logistic regression model to predict the relationship between glucose control and vitamin D deficiency. We used race/ethnicity, BMI, age, gender, type of diabetic medication used, having health insurance or not, and comorbid conditions (hypertension, anemia, cholesterol, liver disease, and kidney disease) as control variables. The study population included a total of 929 non-institutionalized, non-pregnant, diabetic adult persons. About 57% of patients with diabetes had a vitamin D deficiency. Blacks (non-Hispanic patients) with diabetes had the highest rate of vitamin D deficiency (79%). The unadjusted means of HbA1c were significantly different between diabetic patients with no vitamin D deficiency and those with a vitamin D deficiency (7.06% [54mmol/L], 7.56 % [59mmol/L], respectively, P<0.0001). Multivariate adjustment showed a small but not significant, increase in odds (11%) of having uncontrolled diabetes in patients with a vitamin D deficiency after a Continue reading >>

Vitamin D And Diabetes

Vitamin D And Diabetes

Tweet Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that plays a number of important roles in the body, including maintaining the health of your bones, teeth and joints, and assisting immune system function. This underrated vitamin is found in certain foods but is also produced by the body in response to exposure to the sun. When the sun’s ultraviolet-B (UVB) rays are exposed to bare skin, the body converts a cholesterol derivative into Vitamin D. In fact, it’s now known that every cell and tissue within the body has a Vitamin D protein receptor. However, most of us in the UK and other Western countries are deficient in Vitamin D, including many patients with Type 2 diabetes, due to limited sunlight exposure caused by a number of factors, including more time spent at home, in the office or the car, shorter days in winter, sunscreen use in summer and fears of skin cancer. Vitamin D deficiency The signs of Vitamin D deficiency can range from bone pain and muscle weakness to depression and weakened immune system, while longer-term deficiency can result in obesity, high blood pressure, psoriasis, osteoporosis, chronic fatigue, Alzheimer’s disease, cancer and type 2 diabetes. Exposing your skin to the sun for 15-20 minutes each day can help increase your body’s own production of vitamin D and thus reduce your risk of diabetes and other serious medical conditions. Alternatively, you can get your daily intake of vitamin D through dietary supplements and foods such as nuts, oily fish, eggs, powdered milk and some fortified cereals. Effects on diabetes Vitamin D is believed to help improve the body’s sensitivity to insulin – the hormone responsible for regulating blood sugar levels – and thus reduce the risk of insulin resistance, which is often a precursor to type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Can Vitamin D Help Control Weight And Blood Glucose?

Can Vitamin D Help Control Weight And Blood Glucose?

“Low Vitamin D levels are consistently associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, yet no one understands if low Vitamin D levels are actually linked to the onset of obesity or linked to the progression of type 2 diabetes,” stated Stephanie Sisley, MD during her presentation on June 22, 2014 at The Endocrine Society Annual Meeting in Chicago, IL. Dr. Sisley is Assistant Professor at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, TX. Role of the Hypothalamus The brain’s hypothalamus is vitally important in regulating weight; it takes signals from the body that tells it what the body’s nutrient status is and regulates food intake and energy expenditure to maintain a steady body weight. In obesity, these processes are dysregulated, and because the brain is unable to sense what is happening in the body, weight, food intake, and energy expenditure is not controlled. Dr. Sisley stated, “It’s highly likely a Vitamin D deficiency is linked to the cause of obesity, but this action is actually through the brain, and the Vitamin D receptor, which is the only receptor known to actually control Vitamin D’s effects, is present in the brain.” Vitamin D and Weight Control? The purpose of Dr. Sisley’s study was to answer the question, “Can Vitamin D act in the brain to control weight?” It is known that Vitamin D has limited transport across the blood-brain barrier, and is known to affect calcium in the body. Using Long-Evans rats, Vitamin D was delivered directly into the brain through a stainless steel cannula into the third ventricle, which is surrounded by the hypothalamus. A mini osmotic pump was implanted beneath the skin and connected to the cannula. The rats were fed a 45% high-fat diet, which induced obesity for eight weeks. The active for Continue reading >>

More in diabetes