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Vitamin D Cured My Diabetes

Glycemic Changes After Vitamin D Supplementation In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus And Vitamin D Deficiency

Glycemic Changes After Vitamin D Supplementation In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus And Vitamin D Deficiency

Glycemic changes after vitamin D supplementation in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and vitamin D deficiency From the Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, King Fahad Armed Forces Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Correspondence: Dr. Khalid Aljabri, Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, King Fahad Armed Forces Hospital, Jeddah, PO Box 6572, Makkah, Saudi Arabia T: +966-590-008035 F: +966-2-576-0665 [email protected] This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. A prospective, nonblinded and nonrandomized controlled trial was conducted to test the hypothesis that vitamin D supplementation would improve glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who have vitamin D deficiency. Eighty patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who had 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels less than 50 nmol/L were assigned to receive 4000 IU of vitamin D3. Calcium supplements were provided to ensure a total calcium intake of 1200 mg/d. Glycosylated hemoglobin and 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were measured at baseline and at 12 weeks. There was a significant difference in mean (SD) glycosylated hemoglobin level (%) between the groups that achieved 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of <35.4 nmol/L, 35.4-51 nmol/L and >51 nmol/L at 12 weeks (P=.02). There was a significant difference in glycosylated hemoglobin change from baseline between the groups that achieved 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of <35.4 nmol/L, 35.4-51 nmol/L and >51 nmol/L at 12 weeks (P=.04). There was a significant difference in 25-hydroxyvitamin D level betwe Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Vitamin D On Insulin Resistance In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

The Effect Of Vitamin D On Insulin Resistance In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Abstract Over the past decade, numerous non-skeletal diseases have been reported to be associated with vitamin D deficiency including type2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Different studies provide evidence that vitamin D may play a functional role in glucose tolerance through its effects on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. This study evaluates the effects of vitamin D supplementation on insulin resistance in T2DM. Through a before-after study, 100 patients with T2DM, 30–70 years old, were recruited from an Arak diabetes clinic as consecutive attenders. Participants were assessed for clinical and biochemistry. Serum insulin and, 25(OH)D concentration, and HOMA-IR was calculated. All measurements were performed at the beginning and the end of the study. Patients received 50,000 unit of vitamin D 3 orally per week for eight weeks, Statistical analysis was made using SPSS17. The results were analyzed by descriptive tests, and a comparison between variables were made using paired T-tests or Wilcoxon tests, as appropriate. 100 participants including 70 women (70%) and 30 men (30%) took part in the study. All results were presented as Mean±SD, or medians of non-normally distributed. 24% of the participants were Vitamin D deficient {serum 25(OH)D ≤ 20 ng/ml(50 nmol/l)}. Mean serum 25 (OH) D concentration was 43.03± 19.28 ng/ml (107.5±48.2 nmol/l). The results at baseline and at the end, for FPG were 138.48±36.74 and 131.02±39 mg/dl (P=0.05), for insulin, 10.76±9.46 and 8.6±8.25 μIu/ml (P=0.028) and for HOMA-IR, 3.57±3.18 and 2.89±3.28 (P=0.008) respectively. Our data showed significant improvements in serum FPG, insulin and in HOMA-IR after treatment with vitamin D, suggested that vitamin D supplementation could reduce insulin resistance in T2DM. Introduction Continue reading >>

Vitamin D And Diabetes

Vitamin D And Diabetes

Tweet Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that plays a number of important roles in the body, including maintaining the health of your bones, teeth and joints, and assisting immune system function. This underrated vitamin is found in certain foods but is also produced by the body in response to exposure to the sun. When the sun’s ultraviolet-B (UVB) rays are exposed to bare skin, the body converts a cholesterol derivative into Vitamin D. In fact, it’s now known that every cell and tissue within the body has a Vitamin D protein receptor. However, most of us in the UK and other Western countries are deficient in Vitamin D, including many patients with Type 2 diabetes, due to limited sunlight exposure caused by a number of factors, including more time spent at home, in the office or the car, shorter days in winter, sunscreen use in summer and fears of skin cancer. Vitamin D deficiency The signs of Vitamin D deficiency can range from bone pain and muscle weakness to depression and weakened immune system, while longer-term deficiency can result in obesity, high blood pressure, psoriasis, osteoporosis, chronic fatigue, Alzheimer’s disease, cancer and type 2 diabetes. Exposing your skin to the sun for 15-20 minutes each day can help increase your body’s own production of vitamin D and thus reduce your risk of diabetes and other serious medical conditions. Alternatively, you can get your daily intake of vitamin D through dietary supplements and foods such as nuts, oily fish, eggs, powdered milk and some fortified cereals. Effects on diabetes Vitamin D is believed to help improve the body’s sensitivity to insulin – the hormone responsible for regulating blood sugar levels – and thus reduce the risk of insulin resistance, which is often a precursor to type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Can Low Levels Of Vitamin D-3 Raise Sugar Levels?

Can Low Levels Of Vitamin D-3 Raise Sugar Levels?

Vitamin D-3, also known as cholecalciferol, is the form of vitamin D your body makes when your skin is exposed to direct sunlight. Vitamin D-3 is frequently called just vitamin D. Healthy vitamin D levels have been associated with a reduced risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, although there is no scientific evidence to show that vitamin D directly affects your blood sugar levels. However, vitamin D is essential for healthy bones and teeth, as it helps your body absorb calcium, so ensuring you have sufficient amounts of vitamin D is important to overall health. Vitamin D and Blood Sugar A study published in "Diabetes Care" in April 2007 showed that taking vitamin D and calcium supplements over the course of three years might help reduce the risk of developing insulin resistance. Insulin resistance, where you body does not respond normally to insulin secretions in your body, is a precursor of diabetes, which is characterized by raised blood sugar levels. According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, high vitamin D levels were associated with a reduced risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, but there was no conclusive proof that vitamin D helps prevent or cure diabetes. Vitamin D, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Health According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, you are at greater risk of developing Type 2 diabetes if you have raised cholesterol or triglyceride levels in your blood, high blood pressure and excessive body fat, especially in your abdominal area. A study published in “The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition” in September 2007 found that postmenopausal women who took vitamin D and calcium supplements for a period of three years were less likely to exhibit weight gain. The conclusion was that low vitamin D levels may make it more likely fo Continue reading >>

Can Vitamin D Treat Diabetes - Many Articles

Can Vitamin D Treat Diabetes - Many Articles

Can Vitamin D treat Diabetes - many articles There is a lot of evidence that vitamin D can PREVENTdiabetes But only hits so far that vitamin D can TREATDiabetes Note that >10,000 IU vitamin D reduces the symptoms of MS . Diabetes may besimilar A brief look at the recent MedicalLiterature Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. 2010 Jun;39(2):419-46, table of contents. Takiishi T, Gysemans C, Bouillon R, Mathieu C. Laboratory for Experimental Medicine and Endocrinology (LEGENDO), Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, UZ Gasthuisberg, O&N I Herestraat, Leuven, Belgium. Type 1 (T1D) and type 2 (T2D) diabetes are considered multifactorial diseases in which both genetic predisposition and environmental factors participate in their development. Many cellular, preclinical, and observational studies support a role for vitamin D in the pathogenesis of both types of diabetes including: (1) T1D and T2D patients have a higher incidence of hypovitaminosis D; (2) pancreatic tissue (more specifically the insulin-producing beta-cells) as well as numerous cell types of the immune system express the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and vitamin D-binding protein (DBP); and (3) some allelic variations in genes involved in vitamin D metabolism and VDR are associated with glucose (in)tolerance, insulin secretion, and sensitivity, as well as inflammation. Moreover, pharmacologic doses of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D), the active form of vitamin D, prevent insulitis and T1D in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice and other models of T1D, possibly by immune modulation as well as by direct effects on beta-cell function. In T2D, vitamin D supplementation can increase insulin sensitivity and decrease inflammation. This article reviews the role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of T1D and T2D, focusing on the therapeut Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Supports Healthy Blood Sugar

Vitamin D Supports Healthy Blood Sugar

Q: I am 52-years-old and I consume 5,000 IU of vitamin D a day because I want to maintain my bone health and support my immune system. Diabetes runs in my family (my father and mother developed type 2 diabetes), and I know that diabetes increases the risk of heart attack and stroke. Can vitamin D help with blood sugar (and heart health)? A: The scientific support for vitamin D continues to impress our organization! In addition to beneficial effects on cell growth and maturation, bone integrity, and immune health, we discussed the important link between cardiovascular health and vitamin D in our September, 2007 magazine article titled “Vitamin D’s Crucial Role in Cardiovascular Protection.” Studies suggest that people who are vitamin D deficient are far more likely to suffer from high blood pressure, which is a risk factor for heart attack and stroke. For example, a study showed that in middle-aged men, serum vitamin D levels correlate with blood pressure and other cardiovascular risk factors.1 Another study showed that vitamin D and calcium supplementation improve blood pressure in aging women.2 Of further interest, diabetes is significantly more prevalent in people with low serum levels of vitamin D.3 In a recent double-blind, randomized, controlled trial published in 2009, one hundred male volunteers over the age of 34 were given either 120,000 IU of vitamin D3 or a placebo every fourteen days for six weeks to study the impact of vitamin D supplementation. Metabolic function was then evaluated by a variety of measurements and tests. Seventy-one trial participants completed the study. The results indicated that supplementation with the equivalent of about 8,500 IU of vitamin D3 daily significantly increased serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels and improved insulin s Continue reading >>

Vitamin D And Its Role In Diabetes

Vitamin D And Its Role In Diabetes

Vitamin D, otherwise known as the “sunshine vitamin,” is vital for bone health but may soon be regarded as an important marker of health similar to cholesterol and blood pressure. Over the last few decades, scientists have looked past the skeletal support this micronutrient offers and are discovering that vitamin D may play a vital role in insulin, glucose, and inflammation regulation as well as potentially being a warning sign for different cardiovascular and endocrine diseases — including type 2 diabetes. So What Exactly Is Vitamin D? Vitamins are chemicals the body needs to function properly and are required to maintain good health. There are two main categories of vitamins: water soluble and fat soluble vitamins. Fat Soluble Vitamins Water Soluble Vitamins Vitamin A (retinol) B1 Thiamine B7 Biotin Vitamin D B2 Riboflavin B9 Folate Vitamin E B3 Naicin B12 Cobalamin K B5 Pantothenic acid C Ascorbic acid B6 Pyridoxine As seen in the table above, water-soluble vitamins like vitamin B and vitamin C are generally excreted and can be replenished daily with little to no worry about toxicity for most people. Fat-soluble vitamins like vitamin D are stored in the liver and fatty tissue and are not always required daily by everyone (depending on your nutritional status). Excessive amounts of vitamin D and other fat-soluble vitamins can be toxic, but being deficient in one of these vitamins can cause numerous other health problems as well. Vitamin D is unlike any other micronutrient in that the body can produce its own from sunlight whereas most other vitamins are acquired by the foods you eat. 3 Ways to Get Vitamin D The three main ways to get vitamin D are through sun exposure, vitamin D supplementation, and dietary intake. Sun/UVB The best way to get vitamin D is to get Continue reading >>

Vitamin D

Vitamin D

What Is Its Role in Diabetes? What is your vitamin D level? Some day – maybe soon – having your vitamin D level measured may become as routine as having your cholesterol checked. According to some advocates of routine vitamin D testing, the results could prove to be a useful piece of medical information. The importance of adequate vitamin D levels in the body has been recognized for decades. In 1921, scientists proved that exposure to the sun hardens bones and prevents diseases of “rubbery,” weak bones called rickets (in children) and osteomalacia (in adults). It was later discovered that it is the vitamin D produced when the skin is exposed to sun that helps the body absorb calcium and strengthen the skeleton. Around the same time, cod liver oil was found to be a potent food source of vitamin D. Popular and scientific interest in vitamin D waned, however, once these diseases became relatively uncommon, particularly in the United States, where milk and some other foods have been routinely fortified with vitamin D since the 1930’s. Recently, however, new research on the so-called sunshine vitamin has shown that it plays a role in many more bodily systems than just the skeletal system. In fact, a deficiency of vitamin D is thought to possibly play a role in the development of numerous diseases, from cardiovascular disease to multiple sclerosis to complications of pregnancy. All of this new attention has made vitamin D a very popular supplement and the subject of renewed scientific inquiry. Vitamin D in the body The human body was designed to get most of its vitamin D through exposure to the ultraviolet (UVB) rays of the sun – the same rays that cause sunburn and skin damage. “Inactive” vitamin D is derived from cholesterol and “waits” in the skin tissu Continue reading >>

Should We Prescribe Vitamin D To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

Should We Prescribe Vitamin D To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

Should We Prescribe Vitamin D to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes? Ronan Roussel, MD, PhD; Chantal Mathieu, MD, PhD The following is an edited, translated transcript of a conversation taped in June 2015 between Ronan Roussel, MD, PhD, professor of endocrinology at Bichat Hospital, Paris, France, and Chantal Mathieu, MD, PhD, chair of the Division of Clinical Endocrinology at the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium. Prof Roussel: Hello and welcome to Medscape. Today we're going to look at the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and diabetes risk. For this, I am joined by Prof Chantal Mathieu from the University of Leuven, in Belgium. Hello, Chantal. Prof Roussel: This relationship between vitamin D deficiency and diabetes risk is no doubt quite common. How close is this link? Prof Mathieu: There are epidemiologic studies showing, in fact, that vitamin D deficiency or even vitamin D insufficiencythat is, fairly low levels but short of an actual deficiencycauses an increased risk of developing diabetes, especially type 2. Prof Roussel: In the case of vitamin D deficiency, is the risk increased by 10%? Is it doubled? Prof Mathieu: There are studies showing that, in certain populations, the risk is doubled. However, it is very difficult to interpret these epidemiologic studies. This is because vitamin D deficiency is always accompanied by a specific profile. Most of these vitamin Ddeficient people are also obese, older, and very often of non-European origin. Therefore, several risk factors accompany vitamin D deficiency in type 2 diabetes. Prof Roussel: So you're suggesting that there are confounding factors and that, in the end, this relationship is not one of causality. Prof Mathieu: There are definitely some confounding factors, but when they are adjusted for (obesity, a Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Levels Linked To Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Vitamin D Levels Linked To Type 2 Diabetes Risk

HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People with low levels of vitamin D appear to have an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, even if they aren't overweight or obese, a new study suggests. The study included almost 150 people in Spain. Their vitamin D levels were checked, as was their body mass index (BMI -- an estimate of body fat based on height and weight). They also had tests for diabetes, prediabetes or other blood sugar (glucose) metabolism disorders. Obese people who didn't have diabetes or related disorders had higher vitamin D levels than those with diabetes. Lean people with diabetes or related disorders were more likely to have low vitamin D levels than those without such disorders. The results show that vitamin D levels were more closely linked to blood sugar levels than BMI, according to the study. What the study wasn't able to tease out, however, was whether or not vitamin D played a role in causing diabetes or other disorders that affect the metabolism of glucose. The study was only designed to find an association between these factors. The findings were published recently in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. "Our findings indicate that vitamin D is associated more closely with glucose metabolism than obesity," study author Manuel Macias-Gonzalez, of the University of Malaga in Spain, said in a society news release. He said the study suggests that vitamin D deficiency and obesity may work together to heighten the risk of diabetes. "The average person may be able to reduce their risk by maintaining a healthy diet and getting enough outdoor activity," he said. Previous research has found that people with low vitamin D levels are more likely to be obese and to have diabetes, prediabetes and relat Continue reading >>

Could Vitamin D Supplements Have Prevented My Daughter’s Type 1 Diabetes?

Could Vitamin D Supplements Have Prevented My Daughter’s Type 1 Diabetes?

A few months ago, our six-year-old daughter, Bisi, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. It’s a condition she will have to manage carefully for the rest of her life, to avoid the many terrible potential complications of the disease. Since the diagnosis, my husband and I have often said to one another things like: “What if we had…?” “Maybe if we had …” And the other will respond by (half) jokingly quoting back the text on the box of diabetes information we received at the hospital from the Lilly pharmaceutical company (which makes the insulin Bisi now must take with her meals): “Pause. Take a deep breath. And remember: You couldn’t have prevented what’s happening with your child, so try not to beat yourself up.” The truth is, there is no known way to prevent type 1 diabetes. It is as a disease where our own immune system attacks our pancreas, eventually shutting down its ability to produce insulin. But there are some emerging theories about what makes type 1 diabetes more likely. The most intriguing of these — the one that causes my husband and me to take the most deep breaths — is the theory that links low vitamin D levels to type 1 diabetes. Several studies have shown this link, including one published in September in the journal Diabetologia. In that study, researchers from the Naval Health Research Center in San Diego and from universities in California and Florida compared the vitamin D levels of military servicemembers diagnosed with type 1 diabetes with the vitamin D levels of a control group of servicemembers without diabetes. They found that those servicemembers with the lowest concentration of vitamin D in their blood were 3.5 times more likely to develop diabetes than their peers with the highest vitamin D levels. In 2008, the Archives Continue reading >>

Could Vitamin D Help To Fight Diabetes?

Could Vitamin D Help To Fight Diabetes?

With diabetes now reaching epidemic proportions, unearthing an innovative way to tackle the condition is pressing. A new study investigates whether vitamin D might provide a new route to treatment. Boosting vitamin D's activity might, eventually, help to battle diabetes. Currently, there are around 30 million people in the United States living with type 2 diabetes , a lifelong condition that cannot yet be cured. Obesity , one of the major risk factors, is steadily rising, meaning that the number of people with type 2 diabetes is likely to follow suit. The condition is caused by faulty beta cells in the pancreas. These cells manufacture and release insulin , the hormone essential for controlling glucose levels in the blood. If beta cells produce too little insulin, or none at all, glucose can accumulate in the blood at levels that are toxic to cells and tissues. A recent study, now published in the journal Cell , looked into a novel way of protecting beta cells, thereby slowing the onset of diabetes . The researchers, from the Salk Institute in La Jolla, CA, concentrated on a well-known compound: vitamin D . Vitamin D is often referred to as the sunshine vitamin because it is created in our skin in response to direct sunlight. Previous studies have found a connection between low vitamin D levels and a higher risk of diabetes, but the mechanisms involved have been challenging to unravel. This is due, in part, to the wide-reaching physiological functions of vitamin D; for instance, vitamin D is involved in cell growth, bone maintenance, neuromuscular activity, and the immune system. Also, importantly for this study, it has been implicated in inflammation . "We know that diabetes is a disease caused by inflammation. In this study, we identified the vitamin D receptor as an Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Deficiency Again Linked To Higher Type 2 Diabetes Risk | Everyday Health

Vitamin D Deficiency Again Linked To Higher Type 2 Diabetes Risk | Everyday Health

Vitamin D deficiency is clearly linked to a greater risk of bone disease, but some research suggests the vitamin may also affect diabetes risk. Previous research suggests that having deficient levels of vitamin D may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes, and study results released this month seem to support that association. The study, which was published in the April edition of PLoS One , followed 903 healthy adults for 12 years and found that those with lower amounts of vitamin D in their blood had a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes over the course of the study. Results of the study led researchers to conclude that getting enough vitamin D reduces the chance that a person will develop the disease. The person that takes enough vitamin D3 has only one-fifth the risk of type 2 diabetes as someone who does not get enough of the vitamin, says one of the study's coauthors, Cedric F. Garland, PhD , an adjunct professor at the University of California in San Diego School of Medicine. Yet, probably 90 percent of the population is deficient in having their vitamin D at a level to prevent diabetes, Dr. Garland says. RELATED: How to Know if Youre at Risk of Vitamin D Deficiency The body makes vitamin D3 when skin is exposed to sunlight, but the vitamin is also available in supplement form. Note that certain foods, like fortified yogurt and sardines, also contain vitamin D, but diet isnt a primary source of the vitamin. A January 2011 article in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism notes that the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommends taking no more than 4,000 international units (IU) of vitamin D per day. But Garland argues that people need a bit more 5,000 IU per day so their blood levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, which the liver produces during vitamin D p Continue reading >>

How Vitamin D Helps In Diabetes

How Vitamin D Helps In Diabetes

Vitamin D, or the “sunshine vitamin,” is actually made in our skin when it is exposed to sunlight. This vitamin is a vital cog in a machinery that performs a wide range of functions inside our body. More recently, scientists have uncovered the connection between vitamin D and diabetes. Studies suggest that vitamin D can have positive effects on people with type 2 diabetes. Apart from healthy bones, vitamin D is also helpful in the proper functioning of muscles as well as our immune system. Vitamin D also protects us from: Cancers (like that of breast, prostate, colon) Heart disease High blood pressure Multiple sclerosis What Does Research Say about Vitamin D Deficiency and Diabetes? For years, vitamin D was known for its role in bone health. New research is now concluding that this vitamin can actually have an important role in the overall health of a person. Doctors believe that there is an unmistakable link between vitamin D and diabetes. This is because studies have conclusively indicated that people with low levels of vitamin D are at a higher risk of developing diabetes, later in life. A study on 668 elderly individuals, who lived in the northern latitudes (where getting enough sunshine is a problem), found that these individuals were at a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes due to vitamin D deficiency. The researchers went on to say that vitamin D sufficiency provides protection against type 2 diabetes. A 2011 review looked at various studies that examined how much vitamin D people were getting, by conducting a blood test that assessed the amount of vitamin D in their blood. These people were then followed to see if they got type 2 diabetes later in life. It was found that people with higher amounts of vitamin D in the blood (> 25ng/ml) had a decreased Continue reading >>

Type Ii Diabetes

Type Ii Diabetes

Summary Type II diabetes is a condition in which the body has a hard time managing sugar the right way. Usually you develop type II diabetes in adulthood, past the age of 40, but you can develop it earlier, too. Once you get type II diabetes, it lasts for the rest of your life. If your diabetes isn’t managed, you can develop diabetes symptoms, including eyesight issues, skin conditions, circulation problems, and high blood pressure. Type II diabetes (T2D) usually occurs gradually, meaning that the condition is mild to start but gets worse and worse as time goes by. Most people with the disease are overweight when they are diagnosed. Treatments for T2D require lifelong monitoring of sugar levels in your blood, healthy eating, regular exercising, and possibly diabetes medication. Some people with T2D can manage their condition with diet and exercise alone, but many need additional help with medications. Researchers are interested in whether vitamin D helps your body manage sugar in your blood. Additionally, they’re interested in vitamin D’s role in regulating calcium, which also helps manage sugar in your blood. There is some research showing that young people who have higher vitamin D levels decreased their chances of developing T2D later in life compared to people who had lower vitamin D levels. Studies have also shown that vitamin D supplements can help some symptoms of T2D. At this time, the research is conflicting on whether supplementing people at high risk of developing diabetes is helpful in reducing the risk of T2D. If you are at risk of T2D and want to take vitamin D, it is unlikely to harm you or make your symptoms worse. However, it may not prevent diabetes. There is some evidence that vitamin D will improve symptoms associated with T2D, if you have T2D. Continue reading >>

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