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Vitamin D Can Cure Diabetes

Vitamin D Pill Every Day Can Beat Diabetes

Vitamin D Pill Every Day Can Beat Diabetes

Vitamin D pill every day can beat diabetes Vitamin D pill every day can beat diabetes A DAILY vitamin D pill could be the key to staving off Type 2 diabetes, experts have revealed. The 'sunshine vitamin' could be used in the battle against diabetes (PIC POSED BY MODEL) [GETTY] Researchers are carrying out a major clinical trial to confirm whether taking the sunshine vitamin can prevent or delay the condition. It comes after a number of scientific studies credited vitamin D with lowering the risk of developing heart disease and diabetes. Based on observations from other studies, the researchers suspect that vitamin D may reduce diabetes risk by 25 per cent. There is mounting evidence that vitamin D could aid the prevention of chronic diseases and even help stop elderly people suffering falls. A daily dose of vitamin D could prevent the disease or delay its progression [GETTY] If you could prevent development of diabetes that would save people a lot of anguish and diabetes medication cost US Professor Philip Raskin, UT Southwestern Medical Center US Professor Philip Raskin, who will lead the study at the UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas, said: If you could prevent development of diabetes that would save people a lot of anguish and diabetes medication cost. The four-year trial across America will track 2,500 people age 30 or older who have pre-diabetes a precursor to diabetes where blood glucose levels are higher than normal. They will be given daily doses of vitamin D about five times higher than usually recommended. Dr Raskin said: The side-effects of vitamin D3 in the doses were going to use are few. Its a fairly safe and inexpensive treatment. Those with pre-diabetes are between five and 15 times more likely to develop the disease [GETTY] According to D Continue reading >>

Vitamin D

Vitamin D

What Is Its Role in Diabetes? What is your vitamin D level? Some day – maybe soon – having your vitamin D level measured may become as routine as having your cholesterol checked. According to some advocates of routine vitamin D testing, the results could prove to be a useful piece of medical information. The importance of adequate vitamin D levels in the body has been recognized for decades. In 1921, scientists proved that exposure to the sun hardens bones and prevents diseases of “rubbery,” weak bones called rickets (in children) and osteomalacia (in adults). It was later discovered that it is the vitamin D produced when the skin is exposed to sun that helps the body absorb calcium and strengthen the skeleton. Around the same time, cod liver oil was found to be a potent food source of vitamin D. Popular and scientific interest in vitamin D waned, however, once these diseases became relatively uncommon, particularly in the United States, where milk and some other foods have been routinely fortified with vitamin D since the 1930’s. Recently, however, new research on the so-called sunshine vitamin has shown that it plays a role in many more bodily systems than just the skeletal system. In fact, a deficiency of vitamin D is thought to possibly play a role in the development of numerous diseases, from cardiovascular disease to multiple sclerosis to complications of pregnancy. All of this new attention has made vitamin D a very popular supplement and the subject of renewed scientific inquiry. Vitamin D in the body The human body was designed to get most of its vitamin D through exposure to the ultraviolet (UVB) rays of the sun – the same rays that cause sunburn and skin damage. “Inactive” vitamin D is derived from cholesterol and “waits” in the skin tissu Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Levels Linked To Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Vitamin D Levels Linked To Type 2 Diabetes Risk

HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People with low levels of vitamin D appear to have an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, even if they aren't overweight or obese, a new study suggests. The study included almost 150 people in Spain. Their vitamin D levels were checked, as was their body mass index (BMI -- an estimate of body fat based on height and weight). They also had tests for diabetes, prediabetes or other blood sugar (glucose) metabolism disorders. Obese people who didn't have diabetes or related disorders had higher vitamin D levels than those with diabetes. Lean people with diabetes or related disorders were more likely to have low vitamin D levels than those without such disorders. The results show that vitamin D levels were more closely linked to blood sugar levels than BMI, according to the study. What the study wasn't able to tease out, however, was whether or not vitamin D played a role in causing diabetes or other disorders that affect the metabolism of glucose. The study was only designed to find an association between these factors. The findings were published recently in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. "Our findings indicate that vitamin D is associated more closely with glucose metabolism than obesity," study author Manuel Macias-Gonzalez, of the University of Malaga in Spain, said in a society news release. He said the study suggests that vitamin D deficiency and obesity may work together to heighten the risk of diabetes. "The average person may be able to reduce their risk by maintaining a healthy diet and getting enough outdoor activity," he said. Previous research has found that people with low vitamin D levels are more likely to be obese and to have diabetes, prediabetes and relat Continue reading >>

Vitamin D And Diabetes

Vitamin D And Diabetes

Go to: Case 1 A 63-year-old woman of African descent had a 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) level of 25 nmol/L, which was determined by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. She had been diagnosed with diabetes 5 years earlier. Her father had diabetes and had been taking insulin, and she had 2 older diabetic siblings who were both taking insulin as well. A younger sibling did not have diabetes. Her care included regular exercise, a modified diet, and medication: 500 mg of metformin 3 times daily; 2 mg of repaglinide 3 times daily, which she had been using for the past 4 years; and 4 mg of rosiglitazone daily, which had been added in the past year. Her HbA1c level was 8.4% after using rosiglitazone for several months. It was at that time she was found to be deficient in 25(OH)D, with a level of 25 nmol/L. Repletion of her VTD levels began with 2000 IU of vitamin D3 daily, which was later increased to 3000 IU. (This increase was made after reading that after a year of supplementation with 2000 IU of VTD, only 60% of African Americans return to normal 25[OH]D levels.7) After using VTD for a little more than 6 months, a repeat HbA1c test was done; HbA1c levels had fallen to 7.4% and her VTD levels had risen to 140 nmol/L. A review of her diabetic testing showed improvement in her average pre- and post-meal sugar levels. The patient reported more hypoglycemic events during the 6 months she used VTD, and so she reduced her metformin dosage from 3 times daily to twice daily. She also admitted to not exercising as faithfully as before. Her weight, though, remained stable. The patient had been previously warned that if there was no improvement in her diabetic status, we would need to consider insulin to manage her diabetes. She fully expected to hear this news when reviewing her Continue reading >>

Vitamin D And Its Role In Diabetes

Vitamin D And Its Role In Diabetes

Vitamin D, otherwise known as the “sunshine vitamin,” is vital for bone health but may soon be regarded as an important marker of health similar to cholesterol and blood pressure. Over the last few decades, scientists have looked past the skeletal support this micronutrient offers and are discovering that vitamin D may play a vital role in insulin, glucose, and inflammation regulation as well as potentially being a warning sign for different cardiovascular and endocrine diseases — including type 2 diabetes. So What Exactly Is Vitamin D? Vitamins are chemicals the body needs to function properly and are required to maintain good health. There are two main categories of vitamins: water soluble and fat soluble vitamins. Fat Soluble Vitamins Water Soluble Vitamins Vitamin A (retinol) B1 Thiamine B7 Biotin Vitamin D B2 Riboflavin B9 Folate Vitamin E B3 Naicin B12 Cobalamin K B5 Pantothenic acid C Ascorbic acid B6 Pyridoxine As seen in the table above, water-soluble vitamins like vitamin B and vitamin C are generally excreted and can be replenished daily with little to no worry about toxicity for most people. Fat-soluble vitamins like vitamin D are stored in the liver and fatty tissue and are not always required daily by everyone (depending on your nutritional status). Excessive amounts of vitamin D and other fat-soluble vitamins can be toxic, but being deficient in one of these vitamins can cause numerous other health problems as well. Vitamin D is unlike any other micronutrient in that the body can produce its own from sunlight whereas most other vitamins are acquired by the foods you eat. 3 Ways to Get Vitamin D The three main ways to get vitamin D are through sun exposure, vitamin D supplementation, and dietary intake. Sun/UVB The best way to get vitamin D is to get Continue reading >>

How Vitamin D Helps In Diabetes

How Vitamin D Helps In Diabetes

Vitamin D, or the “sunshine vitamin,” is actually made in our skin when it is exposed to sunlight. This vitamin is a vital cog in a machinery that performs a wide range of functions inside our body. More recently, scientists have uncovered the connection between vitamin D and diabetes. Studies suggest that vitamin D can have positive effects on people with type 2 diabetes. Apart from healthy bones, vitamin D is also helpful in the proper functioning of muscles as well as our immune system. Vitamin D also protects us from: Cancers (like that of breast, prostate, colon) Heart disease High blood pressure Multiple sclerosis What Does Research Say about Vitamin D Deficiency and Diabetes? For years, vitamin D was known for its role in bone health. New research is now concluding that this vitamin can actually have an important role in the overall health of a person. Doctors believe that there is an unmistakable link between vitamin D and diabetes. This is because studies have conclusively indicated that people with low levels of vitamin D are at a higher risk of developing diabetes, later in life. A study on 668 elderly individuals, who lived in the northern latitudes (where getting enough sunshine is a problem), found that these individuals were at a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes due to vitamin D deficiency. The researchers went on to say that vitamin D sufficiency provides protection against type 2 diabetes. A 2011 review looked at various studies that examined how much vitamin D people were getting, by conducting a blood test that assessed the amount of vitamin D in their blood. These people were then followed to see if they got type 2 diabetes later in life. It was found that people with higher amounts of vitamin D in the blood (> 25ng/ml) had a decreased Continue reading >>

Is Vitamin D Deficiency Linked With Diabetes? | Everyday Health

Is Vitamin D Deficiency Linked With Diabetes? | Everyday Health

Some research suggests avoiding vitamin D deficiency may help reduce your risk for heart disease, which people with diabetes are more likely to develop. Youve likely heard of the power of vitamin D, also known as the sunshine vitamin. You can either get vitamin D through the suns rays, which signal your body to make vitamin D, or through certain foods or supplements. Vitamin D is a fat-soluble, rather than water-soluble, vitamin so when you get it through your diet, youll best absorb it alongside a fat-containing food, such as almonds, peanut butter, or avocado. The vitamin is important for your health: Research suggests that it may help with everything from athletic performance to heart disease, and may even help protect against type 2 diabetes . What Does Vitamin D Do for Our Bodies and Our Health? Vitamin D plays many important roles in the body, and helps you maintain healthy bones, joints, and teeth, as well as a well-functioning immune system. Vitamin D aids in the absorption of calcium in the body to promote bone growth, notes Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE , author of The 2-Day Diabetes Diet: Just 2 Days a Week and Dodge Type 2 Diabetes , who is in private practice in Franklin, New Jersey. Some observational studies suggest vitamin D may also play a role in the prevention of certain diseases and disorders, such as diabetes. The sunshine vitamin may also help keep your ticker healthy: A review published in January 2014 in the journalCirculation Research suggested that vitamin D deficiency is detrimental for heart health. This is important to note because people with type 2 diabetes are at a greater risk for heart problems. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) notes people with diabetes are two times more likely to die from heart disease tha Continue reading >>

Low Vitamin D Linked To Poor Diabetes Control

Low Vitamin D Linked To Poor Diabetes Control

''Our study could not show cause and effect," says Esther Krug, MD, an endocrinologist at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore and assistant professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, who presented the findings at ENDO 2010, the annual meeting of The Endocrine Society, in San Diego. But she did find that vitamin D deficiency was common in her study, with more than 91% of participants deficient. As the deficiency worsened, so did diabetes control. Only eight of the 124 participants took vitamin D supplements, she found. About 18 million people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association, and about 6 million more are believed to have the condition but are undiagnosed. Krug and her colleagues decided to look at vitamin D deficiency in the wake of reports suggesting that vitamin D has an active role in regulating pancreatic beta cells, which make insulin. So they evaluated the medical charts of 124 people with type 2 diabetes (in which the body doesn't make enough insulin or the cells ignore the insulin) seen at an outpatient clinic from 2003 to 2008. The charts contained information on the patients' age, race, vitamin D levels, calcium intake, family history of diabetes, and results of their hemoglobin A1c blood test. The A1c provides an average measurement of blood sugar control over about a 12-week span. (For people with diabetes, the goal is 7%; for people without, the normal range is 4%-6%.) Krug's team divided the vitamin D levels they found into four groups: normal (defined in the study as above 32 nanograms per deciliter), mild deficiency, moderate deficiency, or severe. In all, 113 of the 124 patients (91.1%) were vitamin D deficient -- 35.5% severely, 38.7% moderately, and 16.9% mildly. Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Vitamin D On Insulin Resistance In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

The Effect Of Vitamin D On Insulin Resistance In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Abstract Over the past decade, numerous non-skeletal diseases have been reported to be associated with vitamin D deficiency including type2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Different studies provide evidence that vitamin D may play a functional role in glucose tolerance through its effects on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. This study evaluates the effects of vitamin D supplementation on insulin resistance in T2DM. Through a before-after study, 100 patients with T2DM, 30–70 years old, were recruited from an Arak diabetes clinic as consecutive attenders. Participants were assessed for clinical and biochemistry. Serum insulin and, 25(OH)D concentration, and HOMA-IR was calculated. All measurements were performed at the beginning and the end of the study. Patients received 50,000 unit of vitamin D 3 orally per week for eight weeks, Statistical analysis was made using SPSS17. The results were analyzed by descriptive tests, and a comparison between variables were made using paired T-tests or Wilcoxon tests, as appropriate. 100 participants including 70 women (70%) and 30 men (30%) took part in the study. All results were presented as Mean±SD, or medians of non-normally distributed. 24% of the participants were Vitamin D deficient {serum 25(OH)D ≤ 20 ng/ml(50 nmol/l)}. Mean serum 25 (OH) D concentration was 43.03± 19.28 ng/ml (107.5±48.2 nmol/l). The results at baseline and at the end, for FPG were 138.48±36.74 and 131.02±39 mg/dl (P=0.05), for insulin, 10.76±9.46 and 8.6±8.25 μIu/ml (P=0.028) and for HOMA-IR, 3.57±3.18 and 2.89±3.28 (P=0.008) respectively. Our data showed significant improvements in serum FPG, insulin and in HOMA-IR after treatment with vitamin D, suggested that vitamin D supplementation could reduce insulin resistance in T2DM. Introduction Continue reading >>

Vitamin D And Diabetes

Vitamin D And Diabetes

Tweet Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that plays a number of important roles in the body, including maintaining the health of your bones, teeth and joints, and assisting immune system function. This underrated vitamin is found in certain foods but is also produced by the body in response to exposure to the sun. When the sun’s ultraviolet-B (UVB) rays are exposed to bare skin, the body converts a cholesterol derivative into Vitamin D. In fact, it’s now known that every cell and tissue within the body has a Vitamin D protein receptor. However, most of us in the UK and other Western countries are deficient in Vitamin D, including many patients with Type 2 diabetes, due to limited sunlight exposure caused by a number of factors, including more time spent at home, in the office or the car, shorter days in winter, sunscreen use in summer and fears of skin cancer. Vitamin D deficiency The signs of Vitamin D deficiency can range from bone pain and muscle weakness to depression and weakened immune system, while longer-term deficiency can result in obesity, high blood pressure, psoriasis, osteoporosis, chronic fatigue, Alzheimer’s disease, cancer and type 2 diabetes. Exposing your skin to the sun for 15-20 minutes each day can help increase your body’s own production of vitamin D and thus reduce your risk of diabetes and other serious medical conditions. Alternatively, you can get your daily intake of vitamin D through dietary supplements and foods such as nuts, oily fish, eggs, powdered milk and some fortified cereals. Effects on diabetes Vitamin D is believed to help improve the body’s sensitivity to insulin – the hormone responsible for regulating blood sugar levels – and thus reduce the risk of insulin resistance, which is often a precursor to type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Type Ii Diabetes

Type Ii Diabetes

Summary Type II diabetes is a condition in which the body has a hard time managing sugar the right way. Usually you develop type II diabetes in adulthood, past the age of 40, but you can develop it earlier, too. Once you get type II diabetes, it lasts for the rest of your life. If your diabetes isn’t managed, you can develop diabetes symptoms, including eyesight issues, skin conditions, circulation problems, and high blood pressure. Type II diabetes (T2D) usually occurs gradually, meaning that the condition is mild to start but gets worse and worse as time goes by. Most people with the disease are overweight when they are diagnosed. Treatments for T2D require lifelong monitoring of sugar levels in your blood, healthy eating, regular exercising, and possibly diabetes medication. Some people with T2D can manage their condition with diet and exercise alone, but many need additional help with medications. Researchers are interested in whether vitamin D helps your body manage sugar in your blood. Additionally, they’re interested in vitamin D’s role in regulating calcium, which also helps manage sugar in your blood. There is some research showing that young people who have higher vitamin D levels decreased their chances of developing T2D later in life compared to people who had lower vitamin D levels. Studies have also shown that vitamin D supplements can help some symptoms of T2D. At this time, the research is conflicting on whether supplementing people at high risk of developing diabetes is helpful in reducing the risk of T2D. If you are at risk of T2D and want to take vitamin D, it is unlikely to harm you or make your symptoms worse. However, it may not prevent diabetes. There is some evidence that vitamin D will improve symptoms associated with T2D, if you have T2D. Continue reading >>

Can Vitamin D Treat Diabetes - Many Articles

Can Vitamin D Treat Diabetes - Many Articles

Can Vitamin D treat Diabetes - many articles There is a lot of evidence that vitamin D can PREVENTdiabetes But only hits so far that vitamin D can TREATDiabetes Note that >10,000 IU vitamin D reduces the symptoms of MS . Diabetes may besimilar A brief look at the recent MedicalLiterature Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. 2010 Jun;39(2):419-46, table of contents. Takiishi T, Gysemans C, Bouillon R, Mathieu C. Laboratory for Experimental Medicine and Endocrinology (LEGENDO), Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, UZ Gasthuisberg, O&N I Herestraat, Leuven, Belgium. Type 1 (T1D) and type 2 (T2D) diabetes are considered multifactorial diseases in which both genetic predisposition and environmental factors participate in their development. Many cellular, preclinical, and observational studies support a role for vitamin D in the pathogenesis of both types of diabetes including: (1) T1D and T2D patients have a higher incidence of hypovitaminosis D; (2) pancreatic tissue (more specifically the insulin-producing beta-cells) as well as numerous cell types of the immune system express the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and vitamin D-binding protein (DBP); and (3) some allelic variations in genes involved in vitamin D metabolism and VDR are associated with glucose (in)tolerance, insulin secretion, and sensitivity, as well as inflammation. Moreover, pharmacologic doses of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D), the active form of vitamin D, prevent insulitis and T1D in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice and other models of T1D, possibly by immune modulation as well as by direct effects on beta-cell function. In T2D, vitamin D supplementation can increase insulin sensitivity and decrease inflammation. This article reviews the role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of T1D and T2D, focusing on the therapeut Continue reading >>

Glycemic Changes After Vitamin D Supplementation In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus And Vitamin D Deficiency

Glycemic Changes After Vitamin D Supplementation In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus And Vitamin D Deficiency

Glycemic changes after vitamin D supplementation in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and vitamin D deficiency From the Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, King Fahad Armed Forces Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Correspondence: Dr. Khalid Aljabri, Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, King Fahad Armed Forces Hospital, Jeddah, PO Box 6572, Makkah, Saudi Arabia T: +966-590-008035 F: +966-2-576-0665 [email protected] This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. A prospective, nonblinded and nonrandomized controlled trial was conducted to test the hypothesis that vitamin D supplementation would improve glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who have vitamin D deficiency. Eighty patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who had 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels less than 50 nmol/L were assigned to receive 4000 IU of vitamin D3. Calcium supplements were provided to ensure a total calcium intake of 1200 mg/d. Glycosylated hemoglobin and 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were measured at baseline and at 12 weeks. There was a significant difference in mean (SD) glycosylated hemoglobin level (%) between the groups that achieved 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of <35.4 nmol/L, 35.4-51 nmol/L and >51 nmol/L at 12 weeks (P=.02). There was a significant difference in glycosylated hemoglobin change from baseline between the groups that achieved 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of <35.4 nmol/L, 35.4-51 nmol/L and >51 nmol/L at 12 weeks (P=.04). There was a significant difference in 25-hydroxyvitamin D level betwe Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Can Save You From Diabetes And Dementia

Vitamin D Can Save You From Diabetes And Dementia

By Dr. Mercola Do you know your vitamin D level? If not, a simple blood test called 25(OH)D, or 25-hydroxyvitamin D, can reveal your levels and give you incredible insight into your potential future risk of disease. Low vitamin D levels are widely known to harm your bones, leading them to become thin, brittle, soft, or misshapen. But a lack of vitamin D does not only impact your bones. Far from it. You see, vitamin D isn’t a vitamin at all. It’s a steroid hormone that influences virtually every cell in your body. From your heart to your brain to your immune system, maintaining optimal vitamin D levels is incredibly important. It’s also incredibly easy, because the best way to get vitamin D is to have regular exposure to the sun or a high-quality tanning bed. If those aren’t options, you can take vitamin D3 orally (along with some synergistic nutrients, which I’ll discuss below). It’s one of the least expensive vitamin supplements… The point is, there’s no reason to put your health at risk from low vitamin D levels… yet researchers such Dr. Michael Holick estimate that 50 percent of the general population is at risk of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency. If you’re among them, new research shows your risk of diabetes and other metabolic disorders may be significantly increased. Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Diabetes You’re probably aware that obesity is associated with type 2 diabetes, but a new study found low vitamin D levels may be an even more significant factor. In a study of more than 100 people, those with low vitamin D levels were more likely to have type 2 diabetes, pre-diabetes, or metabolic syndrome, regardless of their weight. Among obese people, those without metabolic disorders had higher levels of vitamin D than those with such di Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Supports Healthy Blood Sugar

Vitamin D Supports Healthy Blood Sugar

Q: I am 52-years-old and I consume 5,000 IU of vitamin D a day because I want to maintain my bone health and support my immune system. Diabetes runs in my family (my father and mother developed type 2 diabetes), and I know that diabetes increases the risk of heart attack and stroke. Can vitamin D help with blood sugar (and heart health)? A: The scientific support for vitamin D continues to impress our organization! In addition to beneficial effects on cell growth and maturation, bone integrity, and immune health, we discussed the important link between cardiovascular health and vitamin D in our September, 2007 magazine article titled “Vitamin D’s Crucial Role in Cardiovascular Protection.” Studies suggest that people who are vitamin D deficient are far more likely to suffer from high blood pressure, which is a risk factor for heart attack and stroke. For example, a study showed that in middle-aged men, serum vitamin D levels correlate with blood pressure and other cardiovascular risk factors.1 Another study showed that vitamin D and calcium supplementation improve blood pressure in aging women.2 Of further interest, diabetes is significantly more prevalent in people with low serum levels of vitamin D.3 In a recent double-blind, randomized, controlled trial published in 2009, one hundred male volunteers over the age of 34 were given either 120,000 IU of vitamin D3 or a placebo every fourteen days for six weeks to study the impact of vitamin D supplementation. Metabolic function was then evaluated by a variety of measurements and tests. Seventy-one trial participants completed the study. The results indicated that supplementation with the equivalent of about 8,500 IU of vitamin D3 daily significantly increased serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels and improved insulin s Continue reading >>

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