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Vitamin D And Diabetes Where Do We Stand

Vitamin D: 5 Conditions It Can Help

Vitamin D: 5 Conditions It Can Help

Multivitamins, meanwhile arent even recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force . The most commonly known positive health outcome associated with good vitamin D levels is bone health. The ones that are very evidenced are going to be bone issues, says Sontag. As far as bone thinning osteoporosis, osteopenia, as well as rickets in kids and osteomalacia in adults those are the ones that are really associated with legitimate vitamin D deficiency, in which case vitamin D helps. Newer evidence shows that it also helps prevent falls and fractures in the elderly, and thats why the elderly are now supposed to be taking higher doses of vitamin D. Vitamin D has long been known for its association with good bone health. But new research suggests the sunshine vitamin could be effective at warding off a host of other ailments as well. A study published last month in PLOS One found that people with vitamin D deficiency could face a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Researchers studied healthy, older adults with no prior warning signs of diabetes or prediabetes. Over a 12-year period, many participants developed diabetes or prediabetes. Of those participants, it was found that vitamin D deficiency was a strong predictor of whether a participant would develop those complications. Ultimately, it was found that those with vitamin D levels above 30 nanograms per millilitre had one-third the risk of developing diabetes, while those with levels above 50 nanograms per millilitre had one-fifth the risk. The studys authors acknowledged that more research is needed, but that the results show promise. Further research is needed on whether high 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels might prevent type 2 diabetes or the transition from prediabetes to diabetes, said study co-author Cedric F Continue reading >>

Vitamin D And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Where Do We Stand? - Em|consulte

Vitamin D And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Where Do We Stand? - Em|consulte

Received:3January2011; accepted:8January2011 Vitamin D and type 2 diabetes mellitus: Where do we stand? Vitamine D et diabte de type 2: le point en 2011 , P.Delanaye b , J.-C.Souberbielle c , R.-P.Radermecker d aDepartment of Clinical Chemistry, University of Liege, CHU Sart-Tilman, 4000 Lige, Belgium bDepartment of Nephrology, Dialysis and Hypertension, University of Liege, CHU Sart-Tilman, 4000 Lige, Belgium cLaboratoire dexplorations fonctionnelles, hpital NeckerEnfants-Malades, 75743 Paris, France dDepartment of Diabetes, Nutrition and Metabolic Disorders, University of Liege, CHU Sart-Tilman, 4000 Lige, Belgium Corresponding author. Tel.: +32 43 66 76 92; fax: +32 43 66 76 91. In-vitro and observational studies have established a link between vitamin D deficiency and different type 2 diabetes outcomes (insulin resistance, insulin secretion, glucose intolerance). Although the number of randomized controlled trials vs placebo is small, vitamin D (VTD) has been shown to prevent increases in glucose concentration and insulin resistance, enhance insulin sensitivity and reduce systolic blood pressure in type 2 diabetic patients. In this review, we have focused on the potential mechanisms that might explain the association between VTD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We have also evaluated the different epidemiological and observational studies on the topic, as well as the various interventional studies. Although the in vitro studies appear to be promising in explaining the link between VTD metabolism and T2DM, the results of in vivo studies are conflicting. This could be related to differences in their methodological approaches. Although more studies are needed to confirm the role of VTD in the treatment of T2DM, there is nevertheless enough evidence at this time to Continue reading >>

Association Of Vitamin D Repletion With Normalization Of Elevated Serum 17-oh-progesterone

Association Of Vitamin D Repletion With Normalization Of Elevated Serum 17-oh-progesterone

Association of Vitamin D Repletion with Normalization of Elevated Serum 17-OH-Progesterone Gabriel Fenteany, Taiga Inoue, Gul Bahtiyar and Alan S Sacerdote * Department of Medicine, New York City Health Hospitals/Woodhull, 760 Broadway, Brooklyn, New York 11206, USA Department of Medicine, New York City Health Hospitals/Woodhull Received date: May 04, 2017; Accepted date: June 24, 2017; Published date: June 26, 2017 Citation: Fenteany G, Inoue T, Bahtiyar G, Sacerdote AS (2017) Association of Vitamin D Repletion with Normalization of Elevated Serum 17- OH-Progesterone. Med Cas Rep 3:3. Visit for more related articles at Medical Case Reports Insulin resistance is associated with a number of conditions, such as non-classic 21-hydroxylase deficiency and allied disorders. Serum vitamin D is often deficient/ insufficient in insulin resistant individuals. Disorders associated with insulin resistance are often mitigated in association with vitamin D repletion. Here we report a patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus, lower extremity infection, vitamin D insufficiency, and elevated unstimulated serum 17-OH-progesterone (17-OHP), which normalized during vitamin D repletion. Serum 25-OHvitamin D (25-OHD) rose by 32% while serum 17-OHP fell by 87% over the course of four weeks receiving 50,000 IU ergocalciferol orally weekly. Vitamin D repletion in this setting restored normal serum 25-OHD levels and was associated with normalization of elevated serum 17-OHP. Serum 25-OHD levels should be determined before commencing glucocorticoids or mineralocorticoids for the treatment of elevated serum 17-OHP in disorders like non-classic adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH) and levels of 17- OHP, should be re-measured when vitamin D levels are replete to determine whether glucocorticoid/ mineralocortico Continue reading >>

Vitamin D And Diabetes: Where Do We Stand?

Vitamin D And Diabetes: Where Do We Stand?

Vitamin D and diabetes: Where do we stand? The potential beneficial effects of supplementing vitamin D or treatment with pharmacological doses of vitamin D in the prevention or cure of diseases like type 1 (T1D) or type 2 diabetes (T2D) remains the subject of debate. Data from epidemiological and association studies clearly indicate a correlation between vitamin D deficiency and a higher prevalence of both forms of diabetes. In animal models, vitamin D deficiency predisposes to type 1 and type 2 diabetes, whereas high doses of vitamin D or its active hormonal form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, prevent disease. Large scale, randomized, blinded prospective studies however, remain lacking. Here we discuss the current literature on a role for vitamin D in diabetes. We propose, in particular, to avoid vitamin D deficiency in individuals at risk of developing T1D or T2D. Applying international guidelines on supplementation of vitamin D using small daily doses of vitamin D (500-1000IU) may contribute to reduce the burden of diabetes by preventing vitamin D deficiency. Any other recommendations are at present not supported by data. Continue reading >>

Low Vitamin D May Raise The Risk Of Diabetes 5 Times That Of Individuals With A Healthy Blood Level Of This Vitamin.

Low Vitamin D May Raise The Risk Of Diabetes 5 Times That Of Individuals With A Healthy Blood Level Of This Vitamin.

"There was a strong relationship between vitamin D being low and a higher incidence of diabetes," says study co-author, Cedric Garland, DrPH, an adjunct professor of family medicine and public health at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine. Foods high in vitamin D include salmon, tuna, eggs, and fortified dairy products. The participants who were followed by Garland and his team were part of the ongoing Rancho Bernardo Study , a National Institutes of Health population-based trial of older adults, which included patients who were middle-income Caucasians living in a southern California suburb; the average age was 74 years on average at the start of the vitamin D portion of the study.5 These participants were confirmed as healthy, having no signs or symptoms of pre-diabetes or diabetes, initially.5During the study, the researchers measured blood levels of vitamin D from over the first two years and gave the men and women a fasting blood glucose test every two years. If the fasting blood glucose test was high (100 milligrams/deciliter or above), an oral glucose tolerance test was done to confirm the likelihood of diabetes. By the end of the follow-up portion of the study, 47 people were diagnosed as having developed diabetes and 337 had been identified with prediabetes. Based on these results, Garland and his team confirmed that the higher the vitamin D in the blood, the less likely they were to get diabetes.5 A Closer Look at the Relationship Between Diabetes and Vitamin D In trying to understand the study findings, it is important to appreciate that experts disagree on what a normal blood level for vitamin D should be,6but for the purposes of this study, the researchers identified a minimum healthy level of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D to be 30 nanogr Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Research

Vitamin D Research

Vitamin D supplement science abstracts related to diabetes and pre-diabetes metabolic syndrome. Go to PubMed and copy the title in the search field. New insights about vitamin d and cardiovascular disease: a narrative review. Hypovitaminosis D Associations with Adverse Metabolic Parameters Are Accentuated in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Type 2: A BMI-Independent Role of Adiponectin? Study on the relationship between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and vascular calcification in hemodialysis patients with consideration of seasonal variation in vitamin D levels. Vitamin D, diabetic neuropathy and supplementation post-gestational diabetes. Plasma vitamin D levels and risk of metabolic syndrome in Canadians. Health effects related to low vitamin d concentrations: beyond bone metabolism. Relationship between vitamin D and hyperglycemia in older people from a nationally representative population survey. Vitamin D deficiency and endothelial dysfunction in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients. Vitamin D Deficiency and Supplementation and Relation to Cardiovascular Healt The effect of vitamin D supplementation on peripheral regulatory T cells and cell function in healthy humans: a randomized controlled trial. Vitamin d and metabolic syndrome risk factors: evidence and mechanisms. Does Vitamin D deficiency play a role in peripheral neuropathy in Type 2 diabetes? Effect of daily vitamin D supplementation on hemoglobin A1c in patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus: a pilot study. Vitamin D3 supplementation improves insulin sensitivity in subjects with impaired fasting glucose. Vitamin D supplementation to prevent the progression of prediabetes to diabetes: getting closer to a recommendation. Vitamin D supplementation for cardiovascular disease prevention. T Continue reading >>

Vitamin D And Diabetes: Where Do We Stand? - Sciencedirect

Vitamin D And Diabetes: Where Do We Stand? - Sciencedirect

Volume 108, Issue 2 , May 2015, Pages 201-209 Vitamin D and diabetes: Where do we stand? Author links open overlay panel ChantalMathieu Get rights and content The potential beneficial effects of supplementing vitamin D or treatment with pharmacological doses of vitamin D in the prevention or cure of diseases like type 1 (T1D) or type 2 diabetes (T2D) remains the subject of debate. Data from epidemiological and association studies clearly indicate a correlation between vitamin D deficiency and a higher prevalence of both forms of diabetes. In animal models, vitamin D deficiency predisposes to type 1 and type 2 diabetes, whereas high doses of vitamin D or its active hormonal form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, prevent disease. Large scale, randomized, blinded prospective studies however, remain lacking. Here we discuss the current literature on a role for vitamin D in diabetes. We propose, in particular, to avoid vitamin D deficiency in individuals at risk of developing T1D or T2D. Applying international guidelines on supplementation of vitamin D using small daily doses of vitamin D (5001000IU) may contribute to reduce the burden of diabetes by preventing vitamin D deficiency. Any other recommendations are at present not supported by data. Continue reading >>

Treating Vitamin D Deficiency In Children With Type I Diabetes Could Improve Their Glycaemic Control

Treating Vitamin D Deficiency In Children With Type I Diabetes Could Improve Their Glycaemic Control

Treating vitamin D deficiency in children with type I diabetes could improve their glycaemic control The relationship between vitamin D deficiency and type I DM is an ongoing area of interest. The study aims to identify the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in children and adolescents with T1DM and to assess the impact of treatment of vitamin D deficiency on their glycaemic control. Retrospective data was collected from 271 children and adolescents with T1DM. The vitamin D deficient (25(OH)D <30nmol/L) and insufficient (25(OH)D 3050nmol/L) patients were treated with 6000 units of cholecalciferol and 400 units of cholecalciferol, once daily for 3months respectively. HbA1c and 25(OH)D concentrations were measured before and at the end of the vitamin D treatment. 14.8% from the whole cohort (n=271) were vitamin D deficient and 31% were insufficient. Among the children included in the final analysis (n=73), the mean age and plasma 25(OH)D concentration (SD) were 7.7years (4.4) and 32.2nmol/l (8.2) respectively. The mean 25(OH)D concentration post-treatment was 65.3nmol/l (9.3). The mean HbA1c (SD) before and after cholecalciferol was 73.5mmol/mol (14.9) and 65mmol/mol (11.2) respectively (p<0.001). Children with higher pre-treatment HbA1c had greater reduction in HbA1c (p<0.001) and those with lower 25(OH)D concentration showed higher reduction in HbA1c (p=0.004) after treatment. Low 25(OH)D concentrations are fairly prevalent in children and adolescents with T1DM, treatment of which, can potentially improve the glycaemic control. Vitamin D deficiencyHbA1CType 1 diabetes mellitus The understanding of the effects and role of vitamin D and its analogues in the functioning of body tissues, systems and organs has improved substantially over the last decade. Vitamin D deficien Continue reading >>

Vitamin D And Diabetes: Where Do We Stand?

Vitamin D And Diabetes: Where Do We Stand?

Vitamin D and diabetes: Where do we stand? Clinical and Experimental Endocrinology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, KU Leuven, Leuven 3000, Belgium. Electronic address: [email protected] Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2015 May;108(2):201-9. doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2015.01.036. Epub 2015 Feb 7. The potential beneficial effects of supplementing vitamin D or treatment with pharmacological doses of vitamin D in the prevention or cure of diseases like type 1 (T1D) or type 2 diabetes (T2D) remains the subject of debate. Data from epidemiological and association studies clearly indicate a correlation between vitamin D deficiency and a higher prevalence of both forms of diabetes. In animal models, vitamin D deficiency predisposes to type 1 and type 2 diabetes, whereas high doses of vitamin D or its active hormonal form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, prevent disease. Large scale, randomized, blinded prospective studies however, remain lacking. Here we discuss the current literature on a role for vitamin D in diabetes. We propose, in particular, to avoid vitamin D deficiency in individuals at risk of developing T1D or T2D. Applying international guidelines on supplementation of vitamin D using small daily doses of vitamin D (500-1000IU) may contribute to reduce the burden of diabetes by preventing vitamin D deficiency. Any other recommendations are at present not supported by data. Continue reading >>

Vitamin D And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Vitamin D And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Vitamin D and Diabetes: What You Need To Know Thought LeadersDr. Cedric GarlandDepartment of Family Medicine and Public HealthUniversity of California San Diego An interview with Dr. Cedric Garland, DrPH, conducted by Kate Anderton, BSc Why is vitamin D important for the human body? Vitamin D is essential to the human body for a number of reasons. The first is that vitamin D is needed to absorb calcium, and also move calcium from the blood into the bone. This is necessary to prevent rickets. Image Credit: Syda Productions / Shutterstock Vitamin D is produced only in response to exposure to sunlight. Inadequate sunlight was discovered to be the main cause of rickets in 1832 in Poland. This was before the vitamin D compound was discovered. In 1890, Theodore Palm published a paper showing that rickets was due to a deficiency of sunlight. Sunlight was later found to be the source of Vitamin D, solving the mystery of the high incidence of rickets in the dark, narrow streets of winter in Europes major cities, especially those with air pollution such as London and Warsaw. A few decades later, vitamin D was discovered by Elmer McCollum of The Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. Vitamin D is also important for the prevention and alleviation of chronic diseases in addition to rickets. The first example of this was the discovery that Vitamin D prevents cancer by our group in 1980. Since then, there have been 8,550 papers published on vitamin D and cancer. Much of this progress was also due to William B, Grant, Ph.D., of the Sunlight and Nutrition Research Center in California). We are now confident that vitamin D can prevent certain forms of cancer. Similar epidemiological research has implicated vitamin D deficiency in multiple sclerosis. The most recent discovery in the hist Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Deficiency: A New Risk Factor For Type 2 Diabetes

Vitamin D Deficiency: A New Risk Factor For Type 2 Diabetes

Vitamin D Deficiency: A New Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes Mezza T. Muscogiuri G. Sorice G.P. Prioletta A. Salomone E. Pontecorvi A. Giaccari A. Endocrinologia e Malattie del Metabolismo Universit Cattolica del Sacro Cuore Policlinico A. Gemelli Largo A. Gemelli 8, IT00168 Rome (Italy) Recent compelling evidence suggests a role of vitamin D deficiency in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and insulin secretion derangements, with a consequent possible interference with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The mechanism of this link is incompletely understood. In fact, vitamin D deficiency is usually detected in obesity in which insulin resistance is also a common finding. The coexistence of insulin resistance and vitamin D deficiency has generated several hypotheses. Some cross-sectional and prospective studies have suggested that vitamin D deficiency may play a role in worsening insulin resistance; others have identified obesity as a risk factor predisposing individuals to exhibit both vitamin D deficiency and insulin resistance. The available data from intervention studies are largely confounded, and inadequate considerations of seasonal effects on 25(OH)D concentrations are also a common design flaw in many studies. On the contrary, there is strong evidence that obesity might cause both vitamin D deficiency and insulin resistance, leaving open the possibility that vitamin D and diabetes are not related at all. Although it might seem premature to draw firm conclusions on the role of vitamin D supplementation in reducing insulin resistance and preventing type 2 diabetes, this manuscript will review the circumstances leading to vitamin D deficiency and how such a deficiency can eventually independently affect insulin sensitivity. The increasing prevalence of obesity [ 1 ] is Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Status Is Inversely Associated With Markers Of Risk For Type 2 Diabetes: A Population Based Study In Victoria, Australia

Vitamin D Status Is Inversely Associated With Markers Of Risk For Type 2 Diabetes: A Population Based Study In Victoria, Australia

Vitamin D status is inversely associated with markers of risk for type 2 diabetes: A population based study in Victoria, Australia Poonam K. Pannu , Leonard S. Piers , Mario J. Soares , Yun Zhao , Zahid Ansari Affiliation: Food, Nutrition & Health, School of Public Health, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia Affiliation: Health Intelligence Unit, System Intelligence and Analytics Branch, Health Strategy, Productivity and Analytics Division, Department of Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Affiliation: Food, Nutrition & Health, School of Public Health, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia Affiliation: Occupation and the Environment, School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia Affiliation: Health Intelligence Unit, System Intelligence and Analytics Branch, Health Strategy, Productivity and Analytics Division, Department of Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia A growing body of evidence suggests a protective role of vitamin D on the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We investigated this relationship in a population sample from one Australian state. The data of 3,393 Australian adults aged 1875 years who participated in the 20092010 Victorian Health Monitor survey was analyzed. Socio-demographic information, biomedical variables, and dietary intakes were collected and fasting blood samples were analyzed for 25, hydroxycholecalciferol (25OHD), HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and lipid profiles. Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between tertiles of serum 25OHD and categories of FPG (<5.6 mmol/L vs. 5.66.9 mmol/L), and HbA1c (<5.7% vs. 5. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2: Vitamin D Deficiency Could Increase Risk Of Condition | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Diabetes Type 2: Vitamin D Deficiency Could Increase Risk Of Condition | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Diabetes symptoms: Type 2 risk lowered by taking vitamin D supplementsq Diabetes type 2: Vitamin D deficiency could increase risk of condition Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects millions of people worldwide. Uncontrolled cases can cause blindness, kidney failure, heart disease and other serious conditions, said Spritzler. Most health organisations recommend maintaining a vitamin D blood level of at least 30 ng/ml. However, for many people, supplementing with 2,0004,000 IU of vitamin D daily may be necessary to achieve and maintain optimal levels. Good food sources of vitamin D include fatty fish and cod liver oil. In addition, sun exposure can increase vitamin D levels in the blood. Diabetes symptoms: Vitamin D helps to control blood-sugar levels Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. People should be aware signs and symptoms of diabetes are not always obvious and the condition is often diagnosed during GP check ups. Diabetes symptoms: Between 2,000 and 4,000 UI of vitamin D is optimum, nutritionist claims Some herbs may help to increase insulin sensitivity, and reduce the chances of diabetes progression, Spritzler added. Curcumin has strong anti-inflammatory properties, and could lower the risk of arthritis and diabetes. Berberine could help to lower blood-sugar, and may be as effective as metformin - a widely used medication for diabetes - said the nutritionist. Eating a high-fibre diet, cutting down on portion sizes and drinking water as your primary beverage could also lower your risk of diabetes , said Spritzler. Diabetes symptoms: Fatigue and feeling thirsty are signs of condition Diabetes symptoms: Fatty fish an Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Benefits That Can Save Your Life | Reader's Digest

Vitamin D Benefits That Can Save Your Life | Reader's Digest

23 Vitamin D Benefits That Can Save Your Life Vitamin D is kind of a big dealare you getting all the vitamin D you really need? Vitamin D is called the sunshine vitamin because our bodies produce it in response to sunlight. Given valid concerns about skin cancer and premature aging, we tend to slather on sunscreenwhich protects skin, but also limits our bodies ability to produce vitamin D. Most doctors recommend spending about 15 minutes a day in the sun without sunscreen to give your body a chance to create its daily dose of vitamin D, Michael Holick, MD , professor, and director of the Vitamin D, Skin and Bone Research Laboratory at Boston University Medical Center says. You can also get it from milk and other types of dairy, and some breakfast cereals which are fortified with vitamin D. Healthier pregnancies for moms and babies Expecting moms with low blood levels of vitamin D during pregnancy are at higher risk for potentially fatal high blood pressure (preeclampsia), early delivery, and low birth weight babies. And it doesnt stop theremoms who are deficient in D are also more likely to require a C-section delivery and are at greater risk for infections, says Dr. Holick. Vitamin D is crucial for moms because D receptors in the uterine muscle may strengthen contractions during labor; the vitamin may also boost immunity for mom and baby, he says. So how much vitamin D does a pregnant woman need? In one study , women who took high doses of vitamin D during pregnancy had a much lower risk of complications. Discuss with your doctor whether you could benefit from supplements. Another reason for expecting moms to get enough D: Researchers out of the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California report that pregnant women who are deficient may actually p Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Can Save You From Diabetes And Dementia

Vitamin D Can Save You From Diabetes And Dementia

By Dr. Mercola Do you know your vitamin D level? If not, a simple blood test called 25(OH)D, or 25-hydroxyvitamin D, can reveal your levels and give you incredible insight into your potential future risk of disease. Low vitamin D levels are widely known to harm your bones, leading them to become thin, brittle, soft, or misshapen. But a lack of vitamin D does not only impact your bones. Far from it. You see, vitamin D isn’t a vitamin at all. It’s a steroid hormone that influences virtually every cell in your body. From your heart to your brain to your immune system, maintaining optimal vitamin D levels is incredibly important. It’s also incredibly easy, because the best way to get vitamin D is to have regular exposure to the sun or a high-quality tanning bed. If those aren’t options, you can take vitamin D3 orally (along with some synergistic nutrients, which I’ll discuss below). It’s one of the least expensive vitamin supplements… The point is, there’s no reason to put your health at risk from low vitamin D levels… yet researchers such Dr. Michael Holick estimate that 50 percent of the general population is at risk of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency. If you’re among them, new research shows your risk of diabetes and other metabolic disorders may be significantly increased. Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Diabetes You’re probably aware that obesity is associated with type 2 diabetes, but a new study found low vitamin D levels may be an even more significant factor. In a study of more than 100 people, those with low vitamin D levels were more likely to have type 2 diabetes, pre-diabetes, or metabolic syndrome, regardless of their weight. Among obese people, those without metabolic disorders had higher levels of vitamin D than those with such di Continue reading >>

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