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Vitamin C Type 2 Diabetes

Supplementation Of Vitamin C Reduces Blood Glucose And Improves Glycosylated Hemoglobin In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized, Double-blind Study

Supplementation Of Vitamin C Reduces Blood Glucose And Improves Glycosylated Hemoglobin In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized, Double-blind Study

Advances in Pharmacological Sciences Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 195271, 5 pages 1Department of Pharmacology, Indira Gandhi Government Medical College, Nagpur 440018, India 2Department of Pharmacology, Shree Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Chennai 603108, India Academic Editor: Mustafa F. Lokhandwala Copyright © 2011 Ganesh N. Dakhale et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract No study has ever examined the effect of vitamin C with metformin on fasting (FBS) and postmeal blood glucose (PMBG) as well as glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). The goal was to examine the effect of oral vitamin C with metformin on FBS, PMBG, HbA1c, and plasma ascorbic acid level (PAA) with type 2 DM. Seventy patients with type 2 DM participated in a prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 12-week study. The patients with type 2 DM were divided randomly into placebo and vitamin C group of 35 each. Both groups received the treatment for twelve weeks. Decreased PAA levels were found in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This level was reversed significantly after treatment with vitamin C along with metformin compared to placebo with metformin. FBS, PMBG, and HbA1c levels showed significant improvement after 12 weeks of treatment with vitamin C. In conclusion, oral supplementation of vitamin C with metformin reverses ascorbic acid levels, reduces FBS, PMBG, and improves HbA1c. Hence, both the drugs in combination may be used in the treatment of type 2 DM to maintain good glycemic control. 1. Introduction Diabetes mellitus (DM) is Continue reading >>

Nutrients | Free Full-text | Inadequate Vitamin C Status In Prediabetes And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Associations With Glycaemic Control, Obesity, And Smoking

Nutrients | Free Full-text | Inadequate Vitamin C Status In Prediabetes And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Associations With Glycaemic Control, Obesity, And Smoking

Nutrients 2017, 9(9), 997; doi: 10.3390/nu9090997 Inadequate Vitamin C Status in Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Associations with Glycaemic Control, Obesity, and Smoking Department of Medicine, University of Otago, Christchurch 8011, New Zealand Lipid and Diabetes Research Group, Canterbury District Health Board, Christchurch 8011, New Zealand Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, Dunedin 9016, New Zealand Department of Pathology, University of Otago, Christchurch 8011, New Zealand Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. Received: 14 July 2017 / Revised: 4 September 2017 / Accepted: 6 September 2017 / Published: 9 September 2017 Vitamin C (ascorbate) is an essential micronutrient in humans, being required for a number of important biological functions via acting as an enzymatic cofactor and reducing agent. There is some evidence to suggest that people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have lower plasma vitamin C concentrations compared to those with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). The aim of this study was to investigate plasma vitamin C concentrations across the glycaemic spectrum and to explore correlations with indices of metabolic health. This is a cross-sectional observational pilot study in adults across the glycaemic spectrum from NGT to T2DM. Demographic and anthropometric data along with information on physical activity were collected and participants were asked to complete a four-day weighed food diary. Venous blood samples were collected and glycaemic indices, plasma vitamin C concentrations, hormone tests, lipid profiles, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were analysed. A total of 89 participants completed the study, including individuals with NGT (n = 35), prediabetes (n = 25), and T2DM managed by diet Continue reading >>

Relation Between Intake Of Vitamins C And E And Risk Of Diabetic Retinopathy In The Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities Study

Relation Between Intake Of Vitamins C And E And Risk Of Diabetic Retinopathy In The Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities Study

Relation between intake of vitamins C and E and risk of diabetic retinopathy in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study From the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences (AEM, RK, and JAM) and the Departments of Population Health and Biostatistical Medical Informatics (MP), University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison; the Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (ARF); and the Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (JS) Search for other works by this author on: From the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences (AEM, RK, and JAM) and the Departments of Population Health and Biostatistical Medical Informatics (MP), University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison; the Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (ARF); and the Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (JS) Search for other works by this author on: From the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences (AEM, RK, and JAM) and the Departments of Population Health and Biostatistical Medical Informatics (MP), University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison; the Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (ARF); and the Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (JS) Search for other works by this author on: From the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences (AEM, RK, and JAM) and the Departments of Population Health and Biostatistical Medical Informatics (MP), University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison; the Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (ARF); and the Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chap Continue reading >>

Lymphocyte And Plasma Vitamin C Levels In Type 2 Diabetic Patients With And Without Diabetes Complications

Lymphocyte And Plasma Vitamin C Levels In Type 2 Diabetic Patients With And Without Diabetes Complications

Lymphocyte and Plasma Vitamin C Levels in Type 2 Diabetic Patients With and Without Diabetes Complications 1General Clinical Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan 2Department of Health and Preventive Care Center, Shizuoka City Hospital, Shizuoka, Japan 3Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shizuoka City Hospital, Shizuoka, Japan 4National Institute of Health and Nutrition, Toyama, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. Hiroshi Yamada, MD, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, General Clinical Research Center, 1-20-1 Handayama, Hamamatsu 431-3192, Japan. E-mail: hyamada{at}hama-med.ac.jp Diabetes Care 2004 Oct; 27(10): 2491-2492. Diabetes has been considered to be associated with oxidative stress. It has been suggested that increased free radicals and decline of antioxidant defense mechanisms induce diabetic micro- and macrovascular complications ( 1 3 ). Vitamin C is one of the major antioxidants and is detected in various blood components ( 4 ). However, measurements of vitamin C levels have shown inconsistent results, and the interpretation of vitamin C levels in diabetes as an antioxidant biomarker has not been clarified ( 5 8 ). In this study, we investigated the lymphocyte and plasma vitamin C levels in type 2 diabetic patients with and without diabetes complications. Forty-one patients with type 2 diabetes (63 8.9 years [mean SD]; 25 men and 16 women) attending the Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism at Shizuoka City Hospital were recruited. Type 2 diabetes was diagnosed according to the American Diabetes Association criteria. The duration of illness was 11 8.3 years, fasting plasma glucose was 137 43 mg/dl, and HbA1c levels were 7.1 1.0%. Twenty-six patients had diabetes Continue reading >>

Vitamin C And Diabetes

Vitamin C And Diabetes

D.D. Family Getting much harder to control I am not sure what your trying to do here, I take vitamin C also but am still diabetic. I've taken at least 1 gram (1000mg) a day (usually a lot more, like 3-4 grams) most days for many, many years---like 40 years. Like Fur, I'm still diabetic (but I almost never get colds or flu). D.D. Family T1 since 1966, pumper since '03, transplant '08 First off, it's a study of only 84 people, so pretty much useless. And secondly, while they say they had "significant" decreases in the lipids and bg measurements they took, it's possible that anything over about 3% change or so could be considered "significant". So you really have no idea how helpful the vitamin C really is. You also don't know if these people changed their diets, levels of exercise, or anything else about their routine. They had been, after all, referred to a diabetes research center, so very well may have received help in other areas. So whatever the decreases in markers were, they could very likely have been due to something other than the vitamin C All in all, a very misleading and vague study. Cut back on carbs and you could pretty much get the same results and not spend money. T1 since 1966, dialysis in 2001, kidney transplant in 02 from my cousin, pumping 03 - 08, pancreas transplant Feb 08 Continue reading >>

Too Much Vitamin C Not Good For Diabetics’ Hearts

Too Much Vitamin C Not Good For Diabetics’ Hearts

Too Much Vitamin C Not Good for Diabetics’ Hearts Older women with diabetes who take high doses of vitamin C for the sake of their hearts may be doing more harm than good. The study, which followed nearly 2,000 postmenopausal women with diabetes for 15 years, found that those who took heavy doses of vitamin C supplements — 300 milligrams (mg) a day or more — were roughly twice as likely to die of heart disease or stroke compared with women who took no supplemental C. The researchers did find statistically weak evidence that lower supplement doses — up to 99 mg per day — curbed the risk of cardiovascular death, and high intakes of vitamin C from food were not related to a greater risk of death from cardiovascular causes. According to the researchers, their results suggest that taking supplements to correct the lower blood levels of vitamin C commonly seen in diabetes is not necessarily the right choice. And though the research focused on older women, the findings may apply to men as well, according to the study’s senior author. Dr. David R. Jacobs Jr., of the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis stated that, "Our results, if confirmed by other research, would suggest that diabetics should be more cautious than others about taking supplements." The current recommended dietary intake for vitamin C is 90 mg a day for men and 75 mg per day for women. Vitamin C is an antioxidant, meaning it helps neutralize potentially cell-damaging substances known as oxygen free radicals, which are a normal byproduct of metabolism. While the vitamin is clearly necessary for good health, studies have garnered conflicting results on whether supplements help lower the risk of heart disease and stroke. In addition, Jacobs and his colleagues note in the report, although people with Continue reading >>

Faq : Vitamin Raises Blood Sugar? | Hoffman Center

Faq : Vitamin Raises Blood Sugar? | Hoffman Center

Q:I am a type 2 diabetic who takes 4,000 mg of vitamin C each day. I recently heard that C can raise your blood sugar. Is this true? A:Vitamin C is an important antioxidant for maintaining optimal health as well as managing infection and disease. It is hard to imagine such an important vitamin could cause adverse effects in anybody. I believe the conundrum of vitamin C raising blood sugar has several sources. A study in 2004 (Am J Clin Nutr 2004;80:1194-200) concluded a high vitamin C intake from supplements (just 300 mg or more) is associated with an increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in older women with diabetes. I have to take issue with this conclusion because it was extrapolated from the Iowa Womens Health Study which was designed to examine diet and lifestyle factors and the incidence of cancer and mortality, not vitamin C and its relationship to blood sugar. Fortunately, the authors responsibly note that their study had several limitations, one being there was only one diet and health assessment at the beginning of the study and secondly, the subjects in the study were self-reported diabeticsresearchers did not validate this important criteria. Fueling the conundrum are foods containing vitamin C, such as citrus fruit and juices. They can and will raise blood sugarespecially among diabetics. Fruit intake, let alone juice, has to be kept in check so as not to increase blood sugar. In this setting, high blood sugar is created by the fructose in fruit rather than any vitamin C contained in it. At the other end of the spectrum are reports that vitamin C in doses of 1,000 mg per day decrease blood sugar and improve Hemoglobin A1c in diabetes, while doses of only 500 mg did not significantly reduce blood sugar or HgbA1c (Indian J Med Res 2007;12 Continue reading >>

Vitamin C And Diabetes

Vitamin C And Diabetes

A new study has added to the growing amount of research showing that vitamin C- as well as a high intake of vegetables and fruits- may have protective effects against diabetes. This makes more than a little intuitive sense- after all Diabetes is a disease marked by a good amount of oxidative damage- damage done to your cells and DNA by rogue molecules called free radicals. Antioxidants- like vitamin C- can help protect against this. A cornerstone of the Atkins program has always been a diet high in antioxidants such as vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc and selenium, precisely because of their multiple protective benefits. In the current study, published in the July 28 edition of the Archives of Internal Medicine, researchers collected food questionnaires from over 21,000 subjects. The researchers also measured blood levels of vitamin C in all the participants. The subjects were then followed up for 12 years during which 735 individuals were diagnosed with diabetes (about .4% of the population studied). There was a significant inverse association between vitamin C levels in the blood and the risk of getting diabetes. In other words those patients with the highest blood levels of vitamin C at the beginning of the study were the least likely to be among those who developed diabetes. Since vitamin C is often a “marker” for fruit and vegetable intake- after all, we get 90% of our vitamin C from vegetables and fruits- the researchers decided to investigate the effect of fruit and vegetable consumption independently from blood levels of vitamin C. Using the questionnaires, they determined that indeed, fruit and vegetable consumption did protect against diabetes to some degree. But surprisingly, the protection was not nearly as dramatic as the protection obtained by high blood lev Continue reading >>

Nutrients | Free Full-text | Inadequate Vitamin C Status In Prediabetes And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Associations With Glycaemic Control, Obesity, And Smoking | Html

Nutrients | Free Full-text | Inadequate Vitamin C Status In Prediabetes And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Associations With Glycaemic Control, Obesity, And Smoking | Html

Nutrients 2017, 9(9), 997; doi: 10.3390/nu9090997 Inadequate Vitamin C Status in Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Associations with Glycaemic Control, Obesity, and Smoking Department of Medicine, University of Otago, Christchurch 8011, New Zealand Lipid and Diabetes Research Group, Canterbury District Health Board, Christchurch 8011, New Zealand Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, Dunedin 9016, New Zealand Department of Pathology, University of Otago, Christchurch 8011, New Zealand Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. Received: 14 July 2017 / Accepted: 6 September 2017 / Published: 9 September 2017 Vitamin C (ascorbate) is an essential micronutrient in humans, being required for a number of important biological functions via acting as an enzymatic cofactor and reducing agent. There is some evidence to suggest that people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have lower plasma vitamin C concentrations compared to those with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). The aim of this study was to investigate plasma vitamin C concentrations across the glycaemic spectrum and to explore correlations with indices of metabolic health. This is a cross-sectional observational pilot study in adults across the glycaemic spectrum from NGT to T2DM. Demographic and anthropometric data along with information on physical activity were collected and participants were asked to complete a four-day weighed food diary. Venous blood samples were collected and glycaemic indices, plasma vitamin C concentrations, hormone tests, lipid profiles, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were analysed. A total of 89 participants completed the study, including individuals with NGT (n = 35), prediabetes (n = 25), and T2DM managed by diet alone or on a regimen of Met Continue reading >>

4 Incredible Benefits Of Vitamin C For Diabetes

4 Incredible Benefits Of Vitamin C For Diabetes

Home / Type 2 Diabetes / 4 Incredible Benefits Of Vitamin C For Diabetes 4 Incredible Benefits Of Vitamin C For Diabetes Vitamin C is needed by the body for various essential functions and for a healthy immune system. Among its various benefits, the vitamin is beneficial for preventing diabetes and helping diabetics in coping up with the illness. According to a study, people who consume food rich in Vitamin C have a 22% lower risk of developing diabetes as compared to those who didnt. And those with adequate level of the vitamin in their blood have a 62% lower risk of diabetes. In diabetes, the cells and DNA get damaged by free radicals. Vitamin C is an antioxidant that helps prevent this damage. Stops diabetes-induced blood vessel damage According to a new research published by The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, intake of a combination of insulin and Vitamin C may prevent diabetes-induced blood vessel damage, or endothelial dysfunction.Cells have memory, allowing damage to continue even after blood glucose has been brought within the target range. But this vitamin erases this memory of the cell and restores the functioning of the cell. This halt helps prevent complications of the heart, kidneysand eyes. Diabetes produces greater levels of oxidative stress in the body. Therefore, patients with diabetes type 2are more likely tosuffer from anxiety, depression and stress. This has an adverse effect on neurotransmitters, which are needed for many vital functions of the body. This damage iscontrolled by the consumption of Vitamin C as it can reduce cortisol in stressful situations. Cortisol is the hormone, which is released during stressful situations. All of these benefits make Vitamin C one of the essential vitamins for diabetics. Broccoli, cabbage, cau Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Supplements Overview

Type 2 Diabetes: Supplements Overview

Key Points There is limited scientific evidence on the effectiveness of dietary supplements as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for type 2 diabetes. The evidence that is available is not sufficiently strong to prove that any of the six supplements discussed in this report have benefits for type 2 diabetes or its complications. A possible exception may be the use of omega-3 fatty acids to lower triglyceridea levels. It is very important not to replace conventional medical therapy for diabetes with an unproven CAM therapy. To ensure a safe and coordinated course of care, people should inform their health care providers about any CAM therapy that they are currently using or considering. The six dietary supplements reviewed in this report appear to be generally safe at low-to-moderate doses. However, each can interact with various prescription medications, affecting the action of the medications. People with type 2 diabetes need to know about these risks and discuss them with their health care provider. Prescribed medicines may need to be adjusted if a person is also using a CAM therapy. aTerms that are underlined are defined in the dictionary at the end of this report. 1. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic condition in which the body cannot properly convert food into energy. Most food that a person eats is eventually broken down into blood glucose (also called blood sugar), which cells need for energy and growth. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose enter cells. In people with diabetes, the body does not make enough insulin, or it does not respond to insulin properly. This causes glucose to build up in the blood instead of moving into the cells. The most common type of diabetes is type 2 diabetes (formerly called adult-onset diabetes or noninsulin-depen Continue reading >>

Albertsons Vitamin C: Finding The Sweet Spot

Albertsons Vitamin C: Finding The Sweet Spot

Vitamin C, a Possible Addition to a Diabetes Care Plan Those who took twice-daily vitamin C supplements had significantly improved fasting and postmeal blood glucose levels For those managing type 2 diabetes , eating healthfully, getting regular physical activity every day, losing weight if youre overweight or obese, and taking medications as prescribed are known to be wise steps for managing diabetes. Now, adding a twice-daily vitamin C supplement to your self-care routine may be an additional way to help manage blood sugar levels. To study the effects of a vitamin C dietary supplement on blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes, researchers randomly selected 70 adults with type 2 diabetes to take 500 mg of metformina medication commonly used to manage blood sugar levels in people with diabetestwice per day, plus: a placebo pill (no vitamin C) twice daily. Study participants provided blood samples, and the researchers tracked indicators of blood sugar control at the beginning and end of the 12-week study, including: Fasting blood glucosea measure of blood sugar levels when a person has not eaten for at least eight hours Postmeal blood glucosea measure of blood sugar levels after a meal Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c)a measure of long-term blood sugar control (higher HbA1c indicates worse blood glucose control, which can lead to health problems, such as heart disease, kidney failure, and nerve damage) Compared with people who received metformin plus a placebo, those who took vitamin C supplements twice daily had: improved fasting and postmeal blood glucose levels, and Despite the studys short duration, these findings suggest that taking a vitamin C supplement may help people with diabetes regulate blood sugar levels better. The A, B, Cs of living well with diabetes Ty Continue reading >>

The Best Supplements For Diabetes

The Best Supplements For Diabetes

While eating a healthy diet (which includes mini-fasting) and exercising regularly are necessary to lower blood sugar naturally, these are not the only parts of my natural approach to managing diabetes. Nutritional support is also a key component of achieving healthy blood sugar levels. Supplements to Maintain Healthy Blood Sugar Levels Are Critical One reason nutritional support is so important is because diabetes is a nutritional wasting disease. Elevated glucose levels act like a diuretic and cause substantial loss of nutrients in the urine. Therefore, people with type 2 diabetes are likely to be deficient in important water-soluble vitamins and minerals. Incredibly, most experts specializing in diabetes make no attempt whatsoever to replace lost nutrients, leaving their patients to suffer the inevitable consequences of nutritional deficiencies. A second reason nutritional supplements are essential is that certain nutrients work to support your body’s ability to use insulin, which can help you maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Anyone who has diabetes should—at a minimum—take a high-quality vitamin and mineral supplement every day. Research has shown that taking a potent daily multivitamin dramatically reduces the incidence of infection and the number of sick days taken by patients with type 2 diabetes. Must-Have Supplements for Diabetes In addition to a multivitamin, make sure you are getting the following nutrients to help maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Many are included in multivitamins, but not always at the dosages I recommend. If your multi comes up short, supplement with additional doses of the specific nutrients until you’re taking the recommended amount. B-Complex Vitamins Vitamins B6 and B12 specifically support nerve health, which is critic Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

You will find supplements for anything and everything these days. Even when you do not suffer from an ailment, supplements are suggested to keep you healthy and ailment-free. According to CDC, use of supplements is common among US adult population – over 50% adults used supplements during 2003-2006, with multivitamins/multiminerals being the most commonly used. So when you are a diabetic, especially if you have prediabetes and type-2 diabetes, you may find yourself confronting a large number of options for supplements that claim to support, reduce and even cure your diabetes. Diabetes is quite a frustrating disorder and you may find yourself tempted to try out these supplements one after another. But is it really safe to take supplements when you are a diabetic? Let us find out. But before that you need to understand what exactly supplements are. Defining Supplements As the name suggests, a supplement is anything that adds on to something. A dietary supplement is therefore something that one takes in addition to one’s diet to get proper nutrition. US Congress in the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act defines dietary supplements as having the following characteristics: It is a product that is intended to supplement the diet; It contains one or more dietary ingredients (including vitamins, minerals, herbs and other botanicals, amino acids, and other substances) or their constituents; It is intended to be taken by mouth as a pill, capsule, tablet, or liquid; It is not represented for use as a conventional food or as sole item of a mean or a diet; and, It is labeled on the front panel as being a dietary supplement. Now let us look at some general benefits and risks of taking supplements. We will discuss these in context of diabetes later in the article. Benefit Continue reading >>

Effects Of Vitamins C And D In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Effects Of Vitamins C And D In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Authors Christie-David D, Girgis C, Gunton J Received 24 September 2014 Accepted for publication 26 November 2014 Checked for plagiarism Yes Peer reviewer comments 3 1Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Westmead Hospital, 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney, 3Westmead Millennium Institute, 4Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Scurvy and rickets are largely considered historical diseases in developed countries. However, deficiencies in vitamins C and D are re-emerging due to increased consumption of processed foods and reduced fresh foods in the Western diet, as well as to an indoor sedentary lifestyle away from sun exposure. These dietary and lifestyle factors also predispose one to diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Our understanding of the potential roles of vitamin C (an antioxidant) and vitamin D (a biologically active hormone) in disease is increasing. In this review, we present observational, interventional, and mechanistic studies that examine the potential links between vitamins C and D in reversing defects in glucose homeostasis and the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Studies suggest an association between vitamin C deficiency and diabetes. An association between vitamin D and insulin resistance has been well described; however, the role of vitamin C and D supplementation in diabetes and its prevention requires further controlled trials. Keywords: glucose homeostasis, diabetes, insulin resistance, vitamin C, vitamin D Nutrients play essential roles in health and the prevention of disease. Nutrients, including vitamins, are vital to cardiovascular health (ie, vitamin B1), nerve function (ie, vitamins B6 and B12), the production of red blood cells (ie, folate and vitamin B12), and coagulation (ie, vitamin K), among man Continue reading >>

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