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Vitamin C Glucose

Glucose Modulates Vitamin C Transport

Glucose Modulates Vitamin C Transport

This is where the best forum discussions are preserved for posterity. Postby majkinetor Tue Apr 17, 2012 7:16 am Well, we knew that glucose competes with DHAA, but not with AA. It looks like we were wrong. It competes with DHAA and directly inhibits SVCT transporter "from inside" Postby VanCanada Tue Apr 17, 2012 3:08 pm Do you think the competition works both ways? A low(er) carb diet would be best for most of us, obviously, but to what extent do you think megadosing vitamin C could compensate for the deleterious health effects of a diet as high in simple carbohydrates as the Standard American Diet? If my memory is right I think the SAD is up to a daily average intake of 150 grams of sugar?? Linus Pauling recommended a maxiumum daily intake of 50 grams of sugar. I'm thinking of this as a thought experiment for those hypothetical people willing to megadose vitamin C but not willing to change their typical SAD consumption of Frosted Flakes and Slurpees...a rare breed of person indeed, but perhaps useful for exploring these concepts more fully. Postby majkinetor Wed Apr 18, 2012 3:47 am Yes, I think it works both ways in some extent based on some studies. Naylor et al (1985) showed that only by adding 3x1g of C in the ad libitum diet weight loss is achieved in women. They say: Though the use of ascorbic acid in obesity was first suggested because it may possibly indirectly affect the activity of the sodium pump, its mechanism of action is, of course, purely speculative and other explanations are equally possible, e.g. that 3g per day of ascorbic acid interferes with absorption of food. In the paper I provided in the first post (Malo & Wilson, 2000) they say that AA doesn't affect SGLT so first speculation is probably wrong. Bold part might be right because GI has high le Continue reading >>

Sugar, Vitamin C And Competitive Inhibition

Sugar, Vitamin C And Competitive Inhibition

Sugar, Vitamin C and Competitive Inhibition Saturday in Tucson before the 1982 version of the Tucson Marathon we were sitting on the Gentle Ben's patio with some of our running friends from Albuquerque having some carbohydrates of the liquid variety. Bob would consume 18 Dos Equis and run a blazing 2:31 marathon the next day. Sitting at another table was one of Tucson's running greats, Dr. Tom. Tom at one time had run a 2:21 marathon which was near world class at that time. Tom was loading yet a different variety -a cheeseburger. He would not run as fast as Bob the next day and would not run up to his amazing capability. At the 1978 version of the Fiesta Bowl marathon in Phoenix I was lucky enough to hear Dr. Thomas Bassler speak. When it came to running injuries he recommended vitamin C. I had been running 100 mile weeks in preparation and was aching all over. That day I got a bottle of vitamin C and ran the next day with no pain at all. I have been using vitamin C ever since with good results. The battle, however, would rage on. Dr. R never took vitamin C since he believed that it did not do any good since most of it he said "would be excreted in the urine." Dr. Bassler, on the other hand, stated emphatically that you should not run if you don't supplement vitamin C. My own experience has verified the latter, on an ongoing basis for all of my 25 year and two month running streak. Does the human body need supplemental vitamin C? Before we go any further, let's try to establish first whether or not the body needs vitamin C from outside sources, ie foods, drinks or supplements. To do this, we will take a brief look at the biochemistry of vitamin C from Stryer's Biochemistry Fourth Edition. Collagen is the major protein of connective tissue such as the Achille's tendon o Continue reading >>

Effects Of Vitamins C And D In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Effects Of Vitamins C And D In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Authors Christie-David D, Girgis C, Gunton J Received 24 September 2014 Accepted for publication 26 November 2014 Checked for plagiarism Yes Peer reviewer comments 3 1Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Westmead Hospital, 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney, 3Westmead Millennium Institute, 4Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Scurvy and rickets are largely considered historical diseases in developed countries. However, deficiencies in vitamins C and D are re-emerging due to increased consumption of processed foods and reduced fresh foods in the Western diet, as well as to an indoor sedentary lifestyle away from sun exposure. These dietary and lifestyle factors also predispose one to diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Our understanding of the potential roles of vitamin C (an antioxidant) and vitamin D (a biologically active hormone) in disease is increasing. In this review, we present observational, interventional, and mechanistic studies that examine the potential links between vitamins C and D in reversing defects in glucose homeostasis and the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Studies suggest an association between vitamin C deficiency and diabetes. An association between vitamin D and insulin resistance has been well described; however, the role of vitamin C and D supplementation in diabetes and its prevention requires further controlled trials. Keywords: glucose homeostasis, diabetes, insulin resistance, vitamin C, vitamin D Nutrients play essential roles in health and the prevention of disease. Nutrients, including vitamins, are vital to cardiovascular health (ie, vitamin B1), nerve function (ie, vitamins B6 and B12), the production of red blood cells (ie, folate and vitamin B12), and coagulation (ie, vitamin K), among man Continue reading >>

Effect Of Vitamin C On Blood Glucose, Serum Lipids & Serum Insulin In Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

Effect Of Vitamin C On Blood Glucose, Serum Lipids & Serum Insulin In Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

Abstract BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE: Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common metabolic disorders that causes micro- and macro-vascular complications. Because of additive effects of hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia for cardiovascular diseases, lipid abnormalities should be evaluated in diabetes. As vitamin C is known for its beneficial effects on serum lipids and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), we evaluated the effect of different doses of vitamin C on blood glucose, serum lipids and serum insulin in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: A total of 84 patients with type 2 diabetes referred to Yazd Diabetes Research Center, Iran, were included in the study. They received randomly either 500 mg or 1000 mg daily of vitamin C for six weeks. Fasting blood sugar (FBS), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low and high density lipoprotein (LDL, HDL), glycated haemoglobin HbA(Ic) and serum insulin were measured before and after vitamin C consumption and the results were analyzed. RESULTS: A significant decrease in FBS, TG, LDL, HbA1c and serum insulin was seen in the group supplemented with 1000 mg vitamin C. The dose of 500 mg vitamin C, however, did not produce any significant change in any of the parameters studied. INTERPRETATION & CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that daily consumption of 1000 mg supplementary vitamin C may be beneficial in decreasing blood glucose and lipids in patients with type 2 diabetes and thus reducing the risk of complications. Continue reading >>

High Doses Of Vitamin C Supplement Increase Blood Glucose Levels

High Doses Of Vitamin C Supplement Increase Blood Glucose Levels

According to the July issue of Diabetes Care, high doses of supplementary vitamin C may cause an unexpected elevation of blood sugar levels and false diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Donald R. Branch, PhD, reports the case of a 49-year-old, slightly obese man who took high levels of vitamin C, causing high fasting (121 mg/dl) and after-meal (220 mg/dl) blood sugar levels. The man, who had earlier been diagnosed as a potential candidate for type 2 diabetes based on his age, obesity and repeat elevated blood sugar readings, had taken 4,500 mg. per day of a synthetic, unsweetened vitamin C product for the past five years. The patient was asked to discontinue the supplement and, after seven days, morning blood sugar averages dropped to 99 mg/dl. He then restarted vitamin C supplements in dosages of 4,500 mg. per day, and morning blood sugars rose to 110 mg/dl. He discontinued the supplement again and, after one week, blood sugars dropped to 79 mg/dl. Branch says that elevated blood sugars, as a result of taking such a high dose of vitamin C, “…could result in a misdiagnosis of diabetes and/or additional, unnecessary testing, as in this case.” He adds that “..vitamin C-induced production of glucose may interfere in the glucose monitoring of true diabetic patients.” Branch says that the man reduced his vitamin C intake to 1,500 mg. per day, and his blood sugars returned to the normal range. He says that vitamin C, taken in dosages of 1,500 to 2,000 mg. per day, has been proven to effectively reduce blood sugar and HbA1c levels. Also, research suggests it prevents kidney injury in diabetic rats. This time of year, I always like to look back at the previous year and reflect on the people and the events that shaped me; giving thanks for what I have learned and reflecting Continue reading >>

Glucose Modulates Vitamin C Transport In Adult Human Small Intestinal Brush Border Membrane Vesicles

Glucose Modulates Vitamin C Transport In Adult Human Small Intestinal Brush Border Membrane Vesicles

Glucose Modulates Vitamin C Transport in Adult Human Small Intestinal Brush Border Membrane Vesicles Membrane Transport Research Group, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada To whom correspondence should be addressed. Search for other works by this author on: Department of Physiology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada Search for other works by this author on: The Journal of Nutrition, Volume 130, Issue 1, 1 January 2000, Pages 6369, C. Malo, J. X. Wilson; Glucose Modulates Vitamin C Transport in Adult Human Small Intestinal Brush Border Membrane Vesicles, The Journal of Nutrition, Volume 130, Issue 1, 1 January 2000, Pages 6369, The uptake of l-ascorbate (vitamin C) and its oxidized form, dehydro-l-ascorbic acid (DHAA), was evaluated in brush border membrane vesicles isolated from adult human duodenum, jejunum and ileum. Ascorbate was taken up along the entire length of the small intestine with a threefold higher initial uptake rate in distal than proximal segments. Ascorbate uptake was Na+-dependent, potential-sensitive and saturable (Km, 200 mol/L), whereas DHAA transport involved facilitated diffusion (Km, 800 mol/L). Pharmacologic experiments were conducted to characterize further these transport mechanisms. DHAA uptake was not mediated by the fructose carrier GLUT5, the uridine transporter or the 4,4-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2-disulfonic acid (DIDS)-sensitive anion exchanger of the apical membrane. DIDS and sulfinpyrazone , an inhibitor of the urate/lactate exchanger, both significantly reduced the initial rate of ascorbate uptake. Acidic pH inhibited ascorbate uptake, and this effect was not due to a transmembrane proton gradient. Increasing concentrations of glucose in the transport media also Continue reading >>

Dr. James Howenstine --ascorbic Acid Competes With Sugar In The Immune System

Dr. James Howenstine --ascorbic Acid Competes With Sugar In The Immune System

Nearlyevery animal converts sugar into ascorbic acid (Vitamin C). Humanbeings, primates and guinea pigs are the only organisms unable to dothis. The enzyme L-gulonolactone oxidase that accomplishes thischemical reaction does not work in these beings. This forces thesebeings to obtain ascorbic acid from food or supplements. Researchstudies suggest that humans would produce about 2 to 4 grams of VitaminC daily under normal conditions and about 15 grams daily [1] whenunder stress. Insulinmoves both glucose and ascorbic acid into cells including phagocyticimmune cells. The phagocytic cells like leukocytes attack and removemicrobes, tumor cells and debris from the blood. The level of ascorbicacid in leukocytes may be 80 times greater than that found in plasma.Glucose and ascorbic acid are constantly competing for insulintransport so diets high in sugar and carbohydrates will decrease theamount of ascorbic acid that enters cells and thus create undesirableeffects on the immune response. Thereis another form of competition between glucose and ascorbic acid.Ascorbic acid stimulates the hexose monophosphate (HMP) shunt andglucose inhibits it. The HMP is a series of chemical reactions thatreduces niacin coenzyme NADP to NADPH. Phagocytesneed NADPH to create superoxide and other reactive oxygen species thatare used to destroy pathogens.In addition to creating NADPH ascorbic acid has the ability todeactivate excess quantities of NADPH and oxidative substances thatcould harm normal tissues. Thehexose monophosphate shunt also produces 5 carbon sugars (ribose anddeoxyribose). These 5 carbon sugars are neededto make DNA and RNA. When theimmune system faces microbial invasion it immediately signals forproduction of new immune cells that need these genetic materials DNAand RNA. If the b Continue reading >>

The Negative Impact Of Sugar In Your Vitamin C Supplements

The Negative Impact Of Sugar In Your Vitamin C Supplements

The Negative Impact of Sugar in your Vitamin C Supplements The Negative Impact of Sugar in your Vitamin C Supplements The Negative Impact of Sugar in your Vitamin C Supplements Vitamin C is one of the most researched antioxidants available on the market, and its invaluable health benefits range from supporting the immunesystem and protecting against free radical damage to assisting in the treatment of infectious diseases. When Researcher Linus Pauling conducted his experiments on how the body utilizes Vitamin C in the 1970s, he discovered that white blood cells necessitate Vitamin C to combat viruses and bacteria. It has been shown that white blood cells require a concentration 50 times higher of Vitamin C inside the cell as compared to outside the cell, so this accumulation of Vitamin C is vital. Due to Vitamin C and glucose having similar molecular structures and chemical makeups, significant altercations can occur as sugar levels go up within the body. Because refined dietary sugars lack vitamins and minerals, they naturally draw upon the bodys micronutrient stores in order to be successfully metabolized by the body. What mediates the entry of Vitamin C into white blood cells is the same thing that mediates the entry of glucose. As such, both molecules end up competing against one another upon entering the cells. Thus, the more sugar that becomes available for uptake in the body, the less Vitamin C that is allowed into the white blood cells. So what does this have to do with your Vitamin C Supplements? The average American diet consumes approximately 1 3 pounds of sugar per week. Unfortunately, refined sugars are made available in many forms including high-fructose corn syrup, dextrose (corn sugar) and sucrose (table sugar). These various forms of the sugar molecule Continue reading >>

The Relationship Between Glucose And Vitamin C Plays A Huge Role In Health

The Relationship Between Glucose And Vitamin C Plays A Huge Role In Health

Vitamin C is made naturally in almost all living animals except humans, primates and guinea pigs. Dogs and cats produce their own vitamin C from ingested food that have metabolized into glucose. Humans must consume vitamin C from its food sources, or they risk severe health problems. There is an intimate relationship between glucose and vitamin C that has a dramatic impact on immunity and overall cellular health. Most animals and plants are able to synthesize their own vitamin C. This is done through a biochemical pathway that depends on 4 key enzymes which convert glucose to vitamin C. In mammals, the glucose is extracted from stored sugar (glycogen) and the transformation into vitamin C is produced in the liver. Humans lack the L-gulonolactone oxidase enzyme that is critical for the last step of vitamin C synthesis. Humans require a good amount of vitamin C in order to build healthy tissue collagen and promote strong immune function. When low levels of vitamin C are present, the body makes due by recycling the oxidized version of vitamin C. This redox cycling is performed by the master anti-oxidant glutathione. As long as enough glutathione is present, the vitamin C redox cycle can continue. In the 1970's, Dr. John Ely discovered the Glucose-Ascorbate-Antagonism (GAA) theory. Glucose and vitamin C (ascorbate) have a very similar chemical makeup. This theory proposes that elevated glucose levels compete and effectively restrict vitamin C from entering cells. Both glucose and vitamin C depend upon the pancreatic hormone insulin and its signaling effects in order to get into cells. The GLUT-1 Receptor There is an important receptor called the Glut-1 receptor that activates in response to insulin to allow both glucose and vitamin C to enter the cell. However, glucose has Continue reading >>

Faq : Vitamin Raises Blood Sugar? | Hoffman Center

Faq : Vitamin Raises Blood Sugar? | Hoffman Center

Q:I am a type 2 diabetic who takes 4,000 mg of vitamin C each day. I recently heard that C can raise your blood sugar. Is this true? A:Vitamin C is an important antioxidant for maintaining optimal health as well as managing infection and disease. It is hard to imagine such an important vitamin could cause adverse effects in anybody. I believe the conundrum of vitamin C raising blood sugar has several sources. A study in 2004 (Am J Clin Nutr 2004;80:1194-200) concluded a high vitamin C intake from supplements (just 300 mg or more) is associated with an increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in older women with diabetes. I have to take issue with this conclusion because it was extrapolated from the Iowa Womens Health Study which was designed to examine diet and lifestyle factors and the incidence of cancer and mortality, not vitamin C and its relationship to blood sugar. Fortunately, the authors responsibly note that their study had several limitations, one being there was only one diet and health assessment at the beginning of the study and secondly, the subjects in the study were self-reported diabeticsresearchers did not validate this important criteria. Fueling the conundrum are foods containing vitamin C, such as citrus fruit and juices. They can and will raise blood sugarespecially among diabetics. Fruit intake, let alone juice, has to be kept in check so as not to increase blood sugar. In this setting, high blood sugar is created by the fructose in fruit rather than any vitamin C contained in it. At the other end of the spectrum are reports that vitamin C in doses of 1,000 mg per day decrease blood sugar and improve Hemoglobin A1c in diabetes, while doses of only 500 mg did not significantly reduce blood sugar or HgbA1c (Indian J Med Res 2007;12 Continue reading >>

Effect Of Vitamin C On Blood Glucose And Glycosylated Hemoglobin In Type Ii Diabetes Mellitus

Effect Of Vitamin C On Blood Glucose And Glycosylated Hemoglobin In Type Ii Diabetes Mellitus

Effect of Vitamin C on Blood Glucose and Glycosylated Hemoglobin in Type II Diabetes Mellitus 1Department of Physiology, Medicine program, Batterjee Medical College for Sciences and Technology (BMC), 21442 Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia 2Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Pharmacy Program, Batterjee Medical College for Sciences and Technology (BMC), 21442 Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is an antioxidant which is hypothesized to have an effect on the blood glucose in patients with type II diabetes. The aim of the study is to examine the effect of oral vitamin C on fasting blood glucose (FBG), two hours postprandial blood glucose (PPBG) as well as glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). One hundred patients participated in this study were divided into two groups. The first group was the control group contained fifty normal patients. The second group contained fifty patients having type II DM and given the drug Glucophage at a dose of 2000 mg/day beside healthy diet to control diabetes. They were left for three months then the blood samples were collected from both groups to detect the FBG, two hours PPBG and HbA1c. After that, the diabetic group was given beside the drug and diet treatment vitamin C drug (Vitacid calcium) 1000 mg orally three times /day for another three months. At the end of the three months, blood samples were collected from both groups to examine the FBG, two hours PPBG and the HbA1c. The diabetic group recorded a significantly higher level of FBG, two hours PPBG and HbA1c compared to the control group after the first three months. The diabetic group after being given vitamin C beside the drug and diet for three months recorded a significant decreased level of FBG, two hours P Continue reading >>

Vitamin C - Wikipedia

Vitamin C - Wikipedia

For other uses, see Vitamin C (disambiguation) . Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid and -ascorbic acid, is a vitamin found in food and used as a dietary supplement . [1] As a supplement it is used to treat and prevent scurvy . [1] Evidence does not support use in the general population for the prevention of the common cold . [2] [3] It may be taken by mouth or by injection. [1] It is generally well tolerated. [1] Large doses may cause gastrointestinal discomfort, headache, trouble sleeping, and flushing of the skin. [1] [3] Normal doses are safe during pregnancy . [4] Vitamin C is an essential nutrient involved in the repair of tissue . [1] Foods containing vitamin C include citrus fruits , broccoli , brussel sprouts , raw bell peppers , and strawberries . [2] Prolonged storage or cooking may reduce vitamin C content in foods. [2] Vitamin C was discovered in 1912, isolated in 1928, and first made in 1933. [5] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines , the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system . [6] Vitamin C is available as a generic medication and over the counter . [1] In 2015, the wholesale cost in the developing world was about 0.003 to 0.007 USD per tablet. [7] In some countries, ascorbic acid may be added to foods such as breakfast cereal . [2] A 2012 Cochrane review found no effect of vitamin C supplementation on overall mortality. [8] Although rare in modern times, scurvy and its associated destabilization of collagen , connective tissue , and bone can be prevented by adequate vitamin C intake. [1] A 2014 review found that, "Currently, the use of high-dose IV vitamin C [as an anticancer agent] cannot be recommended outside of a clinical trial." [9] A 2013 Cochrane review found no evidence that vitamin C supp Continue reading >>

Supplementation Of Vitamin C Reduces Blood Glucose And Improves Glycosylated Hemoglobin In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized, Double-blind Study

Supplementation Of Vitamin C Reduces Blood Glucose And Improves Glycosylated Hemoglobin In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized, Double-blind Study

Advances in Pharmacological Sciences Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 195271, 5 pages 1Department of Pharmacology, Indira Gandhi Government Medical College, Nagpur 440018, India 2Department of Pharmacology, Shree Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Chennai 603108, India Academic Editor: Mustafa F. Lokhandwala Copyright © 2011 Ganesh N. Dakhale et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract No study has ever examined the effect of vitamin C with metformin on fasting (FBS) and postmeal blood glucose (PMBG) as well as glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). The goal was to examine the effect of oral vitamin C with metformin on FBS, PMBG, HbA1c, and plasma ascorbic acid level (PAA) with type 2 DM. Seventy patients with type 2 DM participated in a prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 12-week study. The patients with type 2 DM were divided randomly into placebo and vitamin C group of 35 each. Both groups received the treatment for twelve weeks. Decreased PAA levels were found in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This level was reversed significantly after treatment with vitamin C along with metformin compared to placebo with metformin. FBS, PMBG, and HbA1c levels showed significant improvement after 12 weeks of treatment with vitamin C. In conclusion, oral supplementation of vitamin C with metformin reverses ascorbic acid levels, reduces FBS, PMBG, and improves HbA1c. Hence, both the drugs in combination may be used in the treatment of type 2 DM to maintain good glycemic control. 1. Introduction Diabetes mellitus (DM) is Continue reading >>

Healthy Options Vitamin C/glucose Tablet

Healthy Options Vitamin C/glucose Tablet

What is Healthy Options Vitamin C/glucose? Healthy Options Vitamin C/glucose Tablet is used for Low blood glucose , Scurvy, Cell damage, Wound healing, Tissue repair, Red blood cell production and other conditions. Healthy Options Vitamin C/glucose Tablet may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Healthy Options Vitamin C/glucose Tablet contains Glucose and Vitamin C as active ingredients. Healthy Options Vitamin C/glucose Tablet works by increasing the blood sugar level; blocking the damage caused by free radicals thus heals wounds; Detailed information related to Healthy Options Vitamin C/glucose Tablet's uses, composition, dosage, side effects and reviews is listed below. Healthy Options Vitamin C/glucose Tablet Uses Healthy Options Vitamin C/glucose Tablet is used for the treatment, control, prevention, & improvement of the following diseases, conditions and symptoms: Healthy Options Vitamin C/glucose Tablet may also be used for purposes not listed here. Blocking the damage caused by free radicals thus heals wounds. Healthy Options Vitamin C/glucose Tablet - Composition and Active Ingredients Please note that this medicine may be available in various strengths for each active ingredient listed above. Healthy Options Vitamin C/glucose Tablet - Side-effects The following is a list of possible side-effects that may occur from all constituting ingredients of Healthy Options Vitamin C/glucose Tablet . This is not a comprehensive list. These side-effects are possible, but do not always occur. Some of the side-effects may be rare but serious. Consult your doctor if you observe any of the following side-effects, especially if they do not go away. Healthy Options Vitamin C/glucose Tablet may also cause side-effects not listed here. If you notice oth Continue reading >>

Stability And Bioavailability Of Vitamin C-glucose In Clarias Hybrid Catfish (clarias Gariepinus X Clarias Macrocephalus)

Stability And Bioavailability Of Vitamin C-glucose In Clarias Hybrid Catfish (clarias Gariepinus X Clarias Macrocephalus)

Volume 151, Issues 14 , 15 May 1997, Pages 219-224 Stability and bioavailability of vitamin C-glucose in Clarias hybrid catfish (Clarias gariepinus X Clarias macrocephalus) Author links open overlay panel JowamanKhajarern Get rights and content A stable form of vitamin C, ascorbate-glucose, was tested for stability, bioavailability, safety and efficacy in Clarias hybrid catfish. Six test diets containing 0 and 100 mg L-ascorbic acid (ASA) and 40, 60, 80 and 100 mg ascorbate vitamin C-glucose (AAG) per kg of diet were fed to fingerling catfish. Weight gain, feed conversion and survival of fish on the diet with no added ascorbic acid was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than that of fish fed with vitamin C. This study indicated that 3142 mg of ascorbic acid activity or 6080 mg of AAG per kg of diet was required for rapid growth and 42 mg of ascorbic acid activity or 80 mg of AAG per kg of diet was required for good health, better feed conversion and survival and prevention of deficiency signs. Ascorbate-glucose appeared to be comparable to ASA on a molar-equivalency basis and was found to be very stable during processing, storage and leaching studies. Continue reading >>

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