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Vitamin C Glucometer

Crude Vitamin C Blood Measurements W/glucose Meter

Crude Vitamin C Blood Measurements W/glucose Meter

Post Number: #1 Post by ofonorow Thu Dec 13, 2012 9:15 am I copied this from a cancer post and would appreciate ideas/input. I have found a blood glucose meter that reacts to vitamin C. Freestyle-lite (Abbot Labs). The idea is to see whether I can measure and compare my own ascorbate blood levels after consuming different kinds of vitamin C in the morning (after fasting). Here are my Fasting "glucose" readings (not sure why my starting blood sugar was so high.. Been 120s for awhile) Ultra -C (9-CC -- level Cardio-C scoop) 6:56 a.m I took approx 9 CCs (grams) at 6:56 a.m. (DSM ultrafine vitamin C powder is fluffy, so might be less than 9 grams. Probably should weigh instead of using volume) After 15 minutes, my glucose reading doubled! (323 mg/dl). Interestingly after 30-45 minutes, blood sugar returned to baseline! (Thank you Drs. Hickey/Roberts) So this meter does give me at least a crude tool for measuring vitamin C levels in the blood. (This also means that clinics that do IV can use such a meter to follow Riordan's protocol. The Riordan clinic routinely measures vitamin C levels after an IV - if zero, more IV/C is given.) I think my next few experiments may be with Lypo-C, first one packet, then multiple packets. However, obviously the vitamin C I just took went through the stomach lining and not through the intestines (The effect w/ascorbic acid as reported by Hickey/Roberts in The Ridiculous Dietary Allowance lulu.com/ascorbate). Lypo-C may not produce the same result, as its contents (sodium ascorbate) may have to be absorbed through the intestinal tract. I may only be able to compare (apples to apples) different forms of ascorbic acid, time will tell. Thoughts/ideas appreciated. Only problem is waiting an hour after waking up for coffee.. Owen R. Fonorow, Follo Continue reading >>

Glucometer

Glucometer

Adaptations to the Blood Glucose Meter Despite the controversy around the use of glucometers for diabetes management beyond that of insulin-treated patients, a large and growing industry has developed around the use of mobile technology for glycemic control. Many of these technologies transform the mobile platform into what would otherwise be a traditional glucometer, typically through the (physical or wireless) connection of an external hardware unit used to perform blood analysis. For example, the iBGStar® glucometer (AgaMatrix, Salem, NH; Sanofi-Aventis, Frankfurt, Germany) consists of a small hardware unit (for blood analysis) that plugs into the data port of an Apple iPhone® or iPod Touch®, automatically synching the blood glucose measurements (along with insulin and carbohydrate information) via the iBGStar Diabetes Manager software app for longitudinal tracking and review by the patient and healthcare provider. Several studies have evaluated the accuracy and performance of iBGStar in comparison with numerous traditional glucometers, finding close correlation between glucose measurements [5], no clinically relevant interference from hematocrit at high or low glucose concentrations [66], and <5% variation in inter- and intra-assay precision analyses [67]. These studies suggest that mobile-based glucometer solutions can achieve performance characteristics similar to those of traditional devices. While iBGStar and other similar technologies transform mobile platforms into traditional glucometers, other innovative approaches are under development, typically involving noninvasive means to measure glucose. For example, one approach uses chemical sensors in a contact lens to measure glucose concentration in tear fluid as a surrogate for blood glucose concentration [68 Continue reading >>

Iv Vitamin C

Iv Vitamin C

IV Vitamin C or IV ascorbic acid is a pro-oxidative therapy widely used in Europe for support of cancer treatment. IV Vitamin C does not work the same way that oral Vitamin C works. Because oral vitamin C cannot achieve high levels in the body, IV Vitamin C is the only way to do so. Even liposomal Vitamin C cannot achieve the levels that IV C can achieve. The rate and dose is important, and we generally aim to have a 400 millimolar level in the blood. IV Vitamin C is converted into hydrogen peroxide in the extra-cellular space, and weakens or kills cancer cells through oxidation. Different cancer cells are differently susceptible to IV Vitamin C. Cancer cells that have catalase tend to be more resistant. IV Vitamin C may not kill all cancer cells, but it will help slow down the rate of growth. In general, IV Vitamin C, given together with chemotherapy, works better than either alone. The cheap way to check for adequate Vitamin C levels is to do an accucheck before and after IV Vitamin C infusion. This is because the IV Vitamin C 'fools' the glucometer and is read as glucose. Subtract the initial reading from the post infusion reading to get a rough estimate of serum levels. Continue reading >>

Vitamin C And Blood Glucose Meter

Vitamin C And Blood Glucose Meter

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Has anyone noticed a vitamin C supplement affecting their blood glucose meter results - increasing the readings? I took 2000mg Ascobic acid (caps) at lunch time and my pre dinner reading was 151 mg/dl. Then I took 2000mg Ascobic acid at dinner and my bedtime reading was 224 mg/dl. I took another 2000mg Ascobic acid at bedtime and my morning reading was 175 mg/dl. I took 2000mg Ascobic acid again at breakfast and my lunch time reading was 214mg/dl. Since I stopped taking the vitamin C the readings are getting back to normal levels again after a day or so. Usually my readings are around 80-100 mg/dl before meals taking insulin injections, and up to 120 mg/dl is high for me. There are some published papers mentioning this, especially with IV vitamin C. I'm wondering if anyone has noticed this in the real world taking the supplement form. In recent years I haven't been taking vitamin C as a supplement. The hard part is working out how much is going to be too much, and which supplements and how much will help taken at higher doses to get a particular job done. I did read about what Dr Bernstein wrote about vitamin C in his book, so this is something to think about. Vitamin C is very similar in structure to glucose and it uses the same transporter GLUT1. So it could be slowing down glucose uptake into the cells by competing for the transporter? At the same time, the blood glucose meter may be measuring the higher level of vitamin C in the blood due to the nearly identical structure and considering this as glucose. When large doses of vitamin C are given by IV, we cant use a regular blood glucose me Continue reading >>

Does Vitamin C Affect Meter Readings Or A1c?

Does Vitamin C Affect Meter Readings Or A1c?

does vitamin C affect meter readings or A1c? does vitamin C affect meter readings or A1c? I take 500 mg of vitamin C after supper and some pages talk like it can change meter readings but I'm not sure if it makes the reading higher or lower than it should be. I take 500 mg of vitamin C after supper and some pages talk like it can change meter readings but I'm not sure if it makes the reading higher or lower than it should be. I doubt any vitamin would affect meter readings. We're not even sure about this, some say that vitamin c in large doses can produce false highs and some say false lows. I don't think it's significant enough to worry about, as in a few points either way probably. I take 500 mg of vitamin C after supper and some pages talk like it can change meter readings but I'm not sure if it makes the reading higher or lower than it should be. Possibly. It's been known to happen at least at large doses. Effect of vitamin C on blood glucose, serum lipids & serum insulin in type 2 diabetes patients . << Nothing I say or express is medical or DIETARY advice so please do not take it as such. >> Although I may show my enthusiasm about my own success with a ketogenic diet (and no meds), I am NOT under any circumstances advising anyone else what to do, only sharing my personal experiences and often some of the science/research that led me to it. I've read that Vit. C has a molecular structure similar to glucose and can be mistaken by a glucose meter for glucose...it doesn't affect actual glucose, just fools the meter. I've never noticed that it affected my BG reading at all. Dr Bernstein in his book Diabetes Solutions says that large doses of Vit C will give false readings on yiur meter, usually lower. 115 pounds, Breast Cancer dx'd 6/16, 6 months of chemo and 6 weeks Continue reading >>

Interference Of Intravenous Vitamin C With Blood Glucose Testing

Interference Of Intravenous Vitamin C With Blood Glucose Testing

Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is an integral component in the management of diabetes. However, it is important to understand the limitations of SMBG due to presence of interfering substances (1). We present a patient with diabetes and malignancy, who had falsely elevated blood glucose readings following administration of intravenous ascorbic acid (AA). A 56-year-old woman with type 1 diabetes was diagnosed with metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. She administered insulin glargine and insulin aspart before meals. After three cycles of chemotherapy, due to poor response, she decided to stop further traditional therapies. She consulted a naturopath, who started her on intravenous AA at a dose of 75 g twice weekly. Following this, she noted that her SMBG levels were consistently elevated after intravenous AA. She presented to the University of Washington where her SMBG downloads were reviewed. On the days she received intravenous AA infusion, the average blood glucose was 26.9 ± 4.8 mmol/L, compared with an average of 12.36 ± 2.7 mmol/L on other days. She was using glucose oxidase (GOD)−based strips (OneTouch, LifeScan, Inc., Milpitas, CA) for her SMBG. We suspected interference with AA in the measurement of blood glucose using GOD-based strips and recommended that she measure her blood glucose using glucose dehydrogenase-flavin adenine dinucleotide (GDH-FAD)−based strips (Bayer Contour, Tarrytown, NY). She was advised not to change her insulin doses. A written log comparing the two chemistries with the same blood sample confirmed significantly higher glucose levels with the GOD strips. Unfortunately, the patient died before we could download the meter or compare blood results with a hospital laboratory. AA is used as an alternate or adjuvant to chem Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Management: What Your Doctor Doesn't Know About Glucose Testing.

Blood Sugar Management: What Your Doctor Doesn't Know About Glucose Testing.

What your doctor doesn't know about glucose testing. Blood sugar management is important for preventing everything from hypoglycemia to full blown diabetes. However, monitoring blood glucose is rarely as straightforward as it seems. In this article we’ll discuss the current gold standard for measuring a person’s blood sugar. We’ll share some problems with the most popular tests. And we’ll review the best ways to interpret your results. (Even if your doctor doesn’t know how). [Note: We’ve also prepared an audio recording of this article for you to listen to. So, if you’d rather  listen to the piece, click here .] Homeostasis is a fancy scientific word for “body balance”. Essentially, our bodies must keep internal levels of thousands of chemicals in check. Or else health can go awry. One of the most important homeostatic systems in our body is our blood sugar management system. When blood sugar is kept at a healthy range, we feel healthy, strong, energetic. On the other hand, unbalanced blood sugars put us at risk for problems ranging from reactive hypoglycemia to insulin resistance to full blown diabetes. But estimating blood sugar levels can be tricky. First, these levels change throughout the day, and with meals and exercise. So, unless you’re monitoring blood sugar levels continuously, every second of every day, it’s hard to get a complete picture of your glucose health. Second, the convenient glucose meters that many Type 1 diabetics use only give us a snapshot instead of a movie. They don’t show us how patients regulate blood sugars over time. And that may be the most important information of all when it comes to disease prevention. That’s why doctors and scientists have become obsessed with finding a test that measures blood glucose Continue reading >>

Intravenous Vitamin C In Cancer

Intravenous Vitamin C In Cancer

A brief overview of its use and considerations By Michael Traub, ND, DHANP, FABNO, and Paul Anderson, NMD New information has become available about the clinical use of intravenous vitamin C in recent years, particularly in its application in cancer. However, great variability in practice persists, reflecting a lack of knowledge of how this treatment should be most safely and effectively employed. This article reviews the forms of nutrients that best balance changes in blood chemistry inherent in this therapy and the appropriate use of B vitamins and glutathione. Intravenous vitamin C (IVC) is quite different physiologically than the oral form of the vitamin. Plasma values of intravenous vitamin C can reach more than 25 mmol/L versus the plasma limit of 250 mol/L for orally ingested vitamin C.1 Therefore, IVC infusions have unique clinical applications, including the use of high doses as a therapeutic tool in cancer care.2 Many clinical trials have been done or are currently being done assessing the use of IVC in cancer care.3-7 Such research into the biochemistry and application of this clinical tool is leading to a better understanding of best practices in implementing IVC in cancer care. IVC has at least 2 diverse therapeutic applications, one derived from high doses of vitamin C, the other from lower doses. Both uses may be clinically helpful over a wide range of applications. This apparent therapeutic dichotomy exists because at lower doses, IVC acts as a cell-support and antioxidant supplement, whereas at higher doses it acts as an oxidative pro-drug.8 While there is no concrete definition of high-dose versus low-dose vitamin C, the general consensus among practitioners is that high-dose intravenous vitamin C (HDIVC) is greater than 10 g/infusion and low-dose int Continue reading >>

Hospital Connectivity Glucose/ketone Monitoring System The Most Extensively Studied And Proven Glucose Measurement Technology

Hospital Connectivity Glucose/ketone Monitoring System The Most Extensively Studied And Proven Glucose Measurement Technology

In addition to the study submitted to the FDA, 138 other independent studies over the last eight years—including 53 critical care studies—have found no clinically significant interferences for StatStrip Glucose measurement technology. This is a statement that no other glucose meter manufacturer can make. StatStrip Glucose and StatStrip Xpress2 Glucose are the world’s most extensively studied and proven glucose test. It has been proven to be safe and effective for use throughout all hospital and professional healthcare settings including critical care. Wireless meter connectivity to LIS/HIS with StatStrip Glucose The StatStrip Glucose Hospital Meter System now offers bidirectional wireless connectivity to hospital HIS or LIS with complete security to protect patient data. Wireless connectivity can transmit patient results directly from the bedside, alleviating the need to bring the meter to a fixed location for meter docking and data transmission. Wireless connectivity saves time for the caregiver and allows for faster charting of results and clinical decision making to improve patient care. Dual-band wireless connectivity provides complete security and encryption to ensure that patient data remains uncompromised. Nova now offers a full range of StatStrip Glucose wireless connectivity capabilities, including wireless meters, wireless carrying cases, and wireless docking stations. All wireless devices use industry standard POCT1-A2 data format and are compatible with a choice of middleware partners. Measures ketones* with same meter Easy to use No meter preparation or calibration coding steps are required. Insert a ketone strip and StatStrip Glucose/Ketone automatically recognizes the strip and converts the meter to ketone measuring mode. Blood ketone testing should Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Choosing And Using Your Glucose Meter

Diabetes: Choosing And Using Your Glucose Meter

The process of monitoring one's own blood glucose with a glucose meter is often referred to as self-monitoring of blood glucose or "SMBG." To test for glucose with a typical glucose meter, place a small sample of blood on a disposable "test strip" and place the strip in the meter. The test strips are coated with chemicals (glucose oxidase, dehydrogenase, or hexokinase) that combine with glucose in blood. The meter measures how much glucose is present. Meters do this in different ways. Some measure the amount of electricity that can pass through the sample. Others measure how much light reflects from it. The meter displays the glucose level as a number. Several new models can record and store a number of test results. Some models can connect to personal computers to store test results or print them out. Choosing a Glucose Meter At least 25 different meters are commercially available. They differ in several ways including: Amount of blood needed for each test Testing speed Overall size Ability to store test results in memory Cost of the meter Cost of the test strips used Newer meters often have features that make them easier to use than older models. Some meters allow you to get blood from places other than your fingertip (alternative site testing). Some new models have automatic timing, error codes and signals, or barcode readers to help with calibration. Some meters have a large display screen or spoken instructions for people with visual impairments. Using Your Glucose Meter Diabetes care should be designed for each individual patient. Some patients may need to test (monitor) more often than others do. How often you use your glucose meter should be based on the recommendation of your health care provider. Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is recommended for all p Continue reading >>

Comparing Glucose Meter Accuracy

Comparing Glucose Meter Accuracy

One of the most frequent questions we get from our customers who purchase the iHealth Align Portable Glucometer or the iHealth Smart Wireless Glucometer is: How accurate are iHealths meters compared to other glucose meters on the market? Unfortunately, there is not a straightforward answer to this question, as no two meters will give you the same readings and a difference of even 20-30 points may be in the range of error. iHealth glucometers meet the most up-to-date FDA regulations and ISO standards, which state that over-the-counter home-use meters must be accurate within +/-15% compared to a formal lab measurement. This means that a person with a glucose level of 100 can read as low as 85 or as high as 115 and still be within the range of accuracy. According to the FDA and several clinical studies, many factors can determine the accuracy of your meter, including: interfering substances (Vitamin C, Tylenol, etc.) how well you perform the test. For example, you should wash and dry your hands before testing and closely follow the instructions for operating your meter. altitude, temperature, and humidity (High altitude, low and high temperatures, and humidity can cause unpredictable effects on glucose results). Check the meter manual and test strip package insert for more information. store and handle the meter and strips according to manufacturers instructions. It is important to store test strip vials closed and to make sure that you are not using expired strips to check your blood sugar. Rather than comparing meters to other meters to gauge accuracy, the FDA recommends using the three ways below to ensure that your meter is working properly: Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

What does this test do? This is a test system for use at home to measure the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood. What is glucose? Glucose is a sugar that your body uses as a source of energy. Unless you have diabetes, your body regulates the amount of glucose in your blood. People with diabetes may need special diets and medications to control blood glucose. What type of test is this? This is a quantitative test, which means that you will find out the amount of glucose present in your blood sample. Why should you take this test? You should take this test if you have diabetes and you need to monitor your blood sugar (glucose) levels. You and your doctor can use the results to: determine your daily adjustments in treatment know if you have dangerously high or low levels of glucose understand how your diet and exercise change your glucose levels The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (1993) showed that good glucose control using home monitors led to fewer disease complications. How often should you test your glucose? Follow your doctor's recommendations about how often you test your glucose. You may need to test yourself several times each day to determine adjustments in your diet or treatment. What should your glucose levels be? According to the American Diabetes Association (Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2011, Diabetes Care, January 2011, vol.34, Supplement 1, S11-S61) the blood glucose levels for an adult without diabetes are below 100 mg/dL before meals and fasting and are less than 140 mg/dL two hours after meals. People with diabetes should consult their doctor or health care provider to set appropriate blood glucose goals. You should treat your low or high blood glucose as recommended by your health care provider. How accurate is this test? The ac Continue reading >>

Influence Of Vitamin C And Maltose On The Accuracy Of Three Models Of Glucose Meters

Influence Of Vitamin C And Maltose On The Accuracy Of Three Models Of Glucose Meters

Influence of Vitamin C and Maltose on the Accuracy of Three Models of Glucose Meters 1Department of Laboratory Medicine, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. Corresponding author: Sang-Guk Lee. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50-1 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722, Korea. Tel: +82-2-2228-2455, Fax: +82-2-364-1583, [email protected] Received 2015 Oct 29; Revised 2015 Dec 26; Accepted 2016 Feb 11. Copyright The Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( ) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Glucose meters are increasingly used in hospitals and home settings. These handheld devices provide instant readings and are therefore, beneficial for glucose-level monitoring in patients with diabetes [ 1 ]. Nonetheless, there have been concerns regarding the measurement accuracy of glucose meters. Some substances, such as vitamin C and maltose, are considered responsible for errors in glucose measurements using point-of-care testing glucose meters [ 1 , 2 , 3 ]. Vitamin C is widely used in the treatment of cancer, viral infections, severe burns, and chronic fatigue syndrome because of the antioxidant effects [ 4 ]. Maltose can be upregulated in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis involving icodextrin as an osmotic agent [ 3 ]. High concentrations of vitamin C and maltose in blood can lead to false increase in glucose meter readings, resulting in mi Continue reading >>

High Doses Of Vitamin C Supplement Increase Blood Glucose Levels

High Doses Of Vitamin C Supplement Increase Blood Glucose Levels

According to the July issue of Diabetes Care, high doses of supplementary vitamin C may cause an unexpected elevation of blood sugar levels and false diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Donald R. Branch, PhD, reports the case of a 49-year-old, slightly obese man who took high levels of vitamin C, causing high fasting (121 mg/dl) and after-meal (220 mg/dl) blood sugar levels. The man, who had earlier been diagnosed as a potential candidate for type 2 diabetes based on his age, obesity and repeat elevated blood sugar readings, had taken 4,500 mg. per day of a synthetic, unsweetened vitamin C product for the past five years. The patient was asked to discontinue the supplement and, after seven days, morning blood sugar averages dropped to 99 mg/dl. He then restarted vitamin C supplements in dosages of 4,500 mg. per day, and morning blood sugars rose to 110 mg/dl. He discontinued the supplement again and, after one week, blood sugars dropped to 79 mg/dl. Branch says that elevated blood sugars, as a result of taking such a high dose of vitamin C, “…could result in a misdiagnosis of diabetes and/or additional, unnecessary testing, as in this case.” He adds that “..vitamin C-induced production of glucose may interfere in the glucose monitoring of true diabetic patients.” Branch says that the man reduced his vitamin C intake to 1,500 mg. per day, and his blood sugars returned to the normal range. He says that vitamin C, taken in dosages of 1,500 to 2,000 mg. per day, has been proven to effectively reduce blood sugar and HbA1c levels. Also, research suggests it prevents kidney injury in diabetic rats. This time of year, I always like to look back at the previous year and reflect on the people and the events that shaped me; giving thanks for what I have learned and reflecting Continue reading >>

Vitamin C Benefits: How Vitamin C Benefits Your Health | Reader's Digest

Vitamin C Benefits: How Vitamin C Benefits Your Health | Reader's Digest

The 15 Best-Ever Vitamin C Benefits for Your Health Theres more to vitamin C benefits than you might think: From warding off colds to healing faster from surgery, this vitamin can nearly do it all. Vitamin C makes the best impact when taken at the start of cold symptoms, explains Keith Ayoob, EdD, RD , associate professor emeritus of pediatrics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City and the former director of the Nutrition Clinic at the Childrens Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center. As soon as you develop even a hint of a cold, he says, thats the sign to double down on your vitamin C intake. Be on the lookout for these crazy cold symptoms you probably didnt know about . Lisa Garcia, RDN at Food Coach, LLC in Laconia, New Hampshire, explains that you can get vitamin C in more foods than just oranges. Vitamin C is really delicious, easy to get, and fun to eatand its in all kinds of fruits and vegetables, she says. From kiwi and bell peppers to tomatoes and frozen peaches, she encourages everyone to eat the wide variety of these vitamin-C rich foods. Make sure you know these 14 simple ways to make vitamins more effective . A stronger immunity protects against more than pesky colds, points out Amy Gorin, MS, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in the New York City area. Gorin says early research suggests an association between vitamin C plus Concord grape polyphenolsboth powerful antioxidantsand a healthy immune system. To get her vitamin C benefits, she reaches for 100 percent grape juice made with Concord grapes. Its packed with vitamin C, offering 120 percent of the daily value per 8-ounce serving, she says. Ayoob says that adults arent the only ones who can reap vitamin C benefits. He explains that children, who have immature immune systems, also ne Continue reading >>

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