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Vitamin C And Diabetes Type 1

Effect Of Vitamins C And E On Endothelial Function In Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Effect Of Vitamins C And E On Endothelial Function In Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Effect of Vitamins C and E on Endothelial Function in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Rachel-Marie Cazeau ,1,2 Hong Huang ,3 John A. Bauer ,3and Robert P. Hoffman 1,2,4 1Section of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, Nationwide Childrens Hospital, 700 Childrens Drive, Columbus, OH 43205, USA 2Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, Department of Pediatrics, The Clinical Research Center, The Ohio State University College of Medicine and Public Health, Columbus, OH 43205, USA 3Department of Pediatrics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506, USA 4The Research Institute, Nationwide Childrens Hospital, Columbus, OH 43205, USA Received 1 June 2015; Accepted 14 July 2015 Copyright 2016 Rachel-Marie Cazeau et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Background/Objectives. Endothelial dysfunction due to hyperglycemia-induced oxidative damage is an important predictor of future cardiovascular risk in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and is present in adolescent T1DM. We hypothesized that combined treatment with the antioxidant vitamins C and E might improve endothelial function (EF) and other biochemical risk factors in adolescents with T1DM. Subjects/Methods. Open-label antioxidant supplementation was given for six weeks with endpoint measurements collected at baseline and study completion. Endpoints measured included EF and plasma measurements of biochemical endothelial risk. Results. Two males and 7 females were studied. Mean age was 12.9 0.9 yrs; mean T1DM duration was 5.5 2.5 yrs; mean BMI was 22.1 3.8 kg/m2; and mean hemoglobin A1c was 9.3 1.1%. No differences Continue reading >>

Vitamin C And Diabetes

Vitamin C And Diabetes

D.D. Family Getting much harder to control I am not sure what your trying to do here, I take vitamin C also but am still diabetic. I've taken at least 1 gram (1000mg) a day (usually a lot more, like 3-4 grams) most days for many, many years---like 40 years. Like Fur, I'm still diabetic (but I almost never get colds or flu). D.D. Family T1 since 1966, pumper since '03, transplant '08 First off, it's a study of only 84 people, so pretty much useless. And secondly, while they say they had "significant" decreases in the lipids and bg measurements they took, it's possible that anything over about 3% change or so could be considered "significant". So you really have no idea how helpful the vitamin C really is. You also don't know if these people changed their diets, levels of exercise, or anything else about their routine. They had been, after all, referred to a diabetes research center, so very well may have received help in other areas. So whatever the decreases in markers were, they could very likely have been due to something other than the vitamin C All in all, a very misleading and vague study. Cut back on carbs and you could pretty much get the same results and not spend money. T1 since 1966, dialysis in 2001, kidney transplant in 02 from my cousin, pumping 03 - 08, pancreas transplant Feb 08 Continue reading >>

Relation Between Intake Of Vitamins C And E And Risk Of Diabetic Retinopathy In The Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities Study

Relation Between Intake Of Vitamins C And E And Risk Of Diabetic Retinopathy In The Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities Study

Relation between intake of vitamins C and E and risk of diabetic retinopathy in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study From the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences (AEM, RK, and JAM) and the Departments of Population Health and Biostatistical Medical Informatics (MP), University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison; the Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (ARF); and the Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (JS) Search for other works by this author on: From the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences (AEM, RK, and JAM) and the Departments of Population Health and Biostatistical Medical Informatics (MP), University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison; the Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (ARF); and the Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (JS) Search for other works by this author on: From the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences (AEM, RK, and JAM) and the Departments of Population Health and Biostatistical Medical Informatics (MP), University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison; the Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (ARF); and the Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (JS) Search for other works by this author on: From the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences (AEM, RK, and JAM) and the Departments of Population Health and Biostatistical Medical Informatics (MP), University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison; the Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (ARF); and the Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chap Continue reading >>

Type I Diabetes

Type I Diabetes

Summary Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. It is a condition where your own immune system attacks certain cells called beta-cells. Beta-cells help you produce a hormone called insulin. You need insulin to help your body manage glucose you get from food and turn it into energy for your body to use. Researchers don’t know what increases your chances of developing type 1 diabetes. Researchers believe that having a family member who has type 1 diabetes might increase your risk of getting type 1 diabetes. Also, viral infections and environmental factors may increase your chances of developing type 1 diabetes, but we need more research to say for sure or understand which factors play a role. Research shows that there is a link between vitamin D and type 1 diabetes. People with high vitamin D intake during their first year of life are less likely to develop type 1 diabetes later in life. Some research also suggests having high vitamin D levels during pregnancy might help prevent type 1 diabetes in their children later in life. However, this research has been observational, meaning we don’t know for sure if getting enough vitamin D prevents type 1 diabetes. Studies have shown that vitamin D supplementation may help improve insulin sensitivity and help control blood glucose levels in those with type 1 diabetes, though research has been small and inconclusive, so we can’t say for sure if vitamin D helps at all in type 1 diabetes. If you have type 1 diabetes or you are trying to prevent type 1 diabetes and want to take vitamin D, it is unlikely to make your type 1 diabetes worse or cause you any harm, as long as you take less than 10,000 IU per day. However, it’s not proven that it will help your type 1 diabetes. It’s also not proven if taking vitamin D will help Continue reading >>

Stopping Type 1 Diabetes Damage With Vitamin C

Stopping Type 1 Diabetes Damage With Vitamin C

Stopping type 1 diabetes damage with vitamin C Researchers at the Harold Hamm Oklahoma Diabetes Center have found a way to stop the damage caused by Type 1 diabetes with the combination of insulin and a common vitamin found in most medicine cabinets. While neither therapy produced desired results when used alone, the combination of insulin to control blood sugar together with the use of Vitamin C, stopped blood vessel damage caused by the disease in patients with poor glucose control. The findings appear this week in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. "We had tested this theory on research models, but this is the first time anyone has shown the therapy's effectiveness in people," said Michael Ihnat, Ph.D., principal investigator and a pharmacologist at the OU College of Medicine Department of Cell Biology. Ihnat said they are now studying the therapy in patients with Type 2 diabetes . The goal of the work being done by Ihnat and British scientists from the University of Warwick led by Dr. Antonio Ceriello is to find a way to stop the damage to blood vessels that is caused by diabetes. The damage, known as endothelial dysfunction, is associated with most forms of cardiovascular disease such as hypertension, coronary artery disease, chronic heart failure, peripheral artery disease, diabetes and chronic renal failure. By reducing or stopping the damage, patients with diabetes could avoid some of the painful and fatal consequences of the disease that include heart disease, reduced circulation and amputation, kidney disease and diabetic retinopathy, which can lead to blindness. Insulin and many other drugs have long been used to control blood sugar, but Ihnat - in an earlier project with scientists in Italy and Hungary - found that cells have a "memory" t Continue reading >>

Vitamins And Minerals

Vitamins And Minerals

Tweet Depending on the type of treatment regimen you use to control your diabetes, there are some vitamins and minerals that may be beneficial for your condition. Before adding any vitamins or adding dietary supplements to your daily diet, discuss these changes with your healthcare team and doctor to ensure they are safe alongside any prescribed medication you're on. ALA and GLA ALA (alpha-lipoic acid) is a versatile and potent antioxidant, and may function to help diabetic neuropathy and reduce pain from free-radical damage. Also, some studies link ALA to decreased insulin resistance and thus the control of blood sugar. GLA (gamma-lipoic acid) is another naturally occurring antioxidant that is present in evening primrose oil, borage oil and blackcurrant seed oil. GLA may improve the function of nerves damaged by diabetic neuropathy. Biotin Biotin works in synergy with insulin in the body, and independently increases the activity of the enzyme glucokinase. Glucokinase is responsible for the first step of glucose utilisation, and is therefore an essential component of normal bodily functioning. Glucokinase occurs only in the liver, and in sufferers from diabetes its concentration may be extremely low. Supplements of biotin may have a significant effect on glucose levels for both type 1 and type 2 diabetics. Carnitine (L-Carnitine, Acetyl L-Carnitine) Carnitine is required by the body in order to correctly use body fat in the production of energy. It is naturally occurring and derives from hydrophilic amino acids. Diabetics who try carnitine generally respond well, and high levels of fat in the bloodstream (cholesterol and triglycerides) may fall fast. Carnitine helps to break down fatty acids in the body and binds acyl residues. For these reasons, it may be useful to pre Continue reading >>

Ways To Make Nutritional Progress Against Diabetes

Ways To Make Nutritional Progress Against Diabetes

Diabetes Home WAYS TO MAKE NUTRITIONAL PROGRESS AGAINST DIABETES (Introduction by Abram Hoffer, M.D.: Reading this chapter will report what can be done over and above the use of insulin and classical dietetics. I am very familiar with Type I (insulin dependent diabetes or juvenile diabetes), as two members of my family have it. As this is not a medical text, the author does not describe the symptomatology and treatment using insulin. (By the way, doctors who treat diabetes are practicing orthomolecular medicine without knowing it, for they are using a hormone that is naturally present in the body.) Dr. Saul lists and describes both positive and negative factors in dealing with this condition. Thus for Type I, we have on the positive side the B complex vitamins, especially vitamin B-3, and vitamin C. The negative factors are diets which are too rich in free sugars and not rich enough in the complex carbohydrates. Negative factors also include milk, fluoride, coffee and vaccinations. When it is started at an early age, niacinamide will prevent diabetes from developing in many children born to families prone to the disease. I have also found niacin very helpful in preventing patients from suffering the long term ravages of diabetes, which are not directly due to high blood sugars, but to the side effects involving the vascular system. Niacin lowers total cholesterol, elevates HDL, and prevents the development of arteriosclerosis. Therefore these patients are less apt to become blind and lose their legs. With medical supervision, it may be used safely in dealing with diabetics, but you will need to find a doctor who knows niacin. Dr. Saul provides supporting references to the literature, which physicians will benefit from seeing. I was especially pleased to see that he cite Continue reading >>

Vitamin C And Diabetes

Vitamin C And Diabetes

A new study has added to the growing amount of research showing that vitamin C- as well as a high intake of vegetables and fruits- may have protective effects against diabetes. This makes more than a little intuitive sense- after all Diabetes is a disease marked by a good amount of oxidative damage- damage done to your cells and DNA by rogue molecules called free radicals. Antioxidants- like vitamin C- can help protect against this. A cornerstone of the Atkins program has always been a diet high in antioxidants such as vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc and selenium, precisely because of their multiple protective benefits. In the current study, published in the July 28 edition of the Archives of Internal Medicine, researchers collected food questionnaires from over 21,000 subjects. The researchers also measured blood levels of vitamin C in all the participants. The subjects were then followed up for 12 years during which 735 individuals were diagnosed with diabetes (about .4% of the population studied). There was a significant inverse association between vitamin C levels in the blood and the risk of getting diabetes. In other words those patients with the highest blood levels of vitamin C at the beginning of the study were the least likely to be among those who developed diabetes. Since vitamin C is often a “marker” for fruit and vegetable intake- after all, we get 90% of our vitamin C from vegetables and fruits- the researchers decided to investigate the effect of fruit and vegetable consumption independently from blood levels of vitamin C. Using the questionnaires, they determined that indeed, fruit and vegetable consumption did protect against diabetes to some degree. But surprisingly, the protection was not nearly as dramatic as the protection obtained by high blood lev Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Is Controlled By Vitamin C Treatment.

Diabetes Mellitus Is Controlled By Vitamin C Treatment.

Diabetes mellitus is controlled by vitamin C treatment. Kodama Research Institute of Preventive Medicine, Nagoya, Japan. The present study was started to investigate the question of whether or not vitamin C administration may help control diabetes mellitus (DM) by stimulating the insulin mechanism of a DM patient. We were motivated to take up the above thesis by the anticipation that vitamin C, being detectable in abundance in endocrine cells, may play a cardinal role in the production of hormones. In the preliminary experiment, we investigated the relation between glucose, insulin and vitamin C in the plasma of a non-diabetic male volunteer in whom vitamin C was introduced intravenously either by injection or by infusion, and with or without concomitant administration of glucose. In the follow-up study of 3 DM patients, the effect of the vitamin C infusion therapy on DM was assessed by summing up multiple clinical information. Results obtained are as follows: 1) the drip infusion system was superior to the ordinary injection system for maintaining plasma concentration of vitamin C at a high level and for a long period. 2) The plasma concentration of insulin, when tested in the vitamin C infusion system, followed a bimodal curve--a finding to suggest that vitamin C may stimulate the insulin mechanism in 2 distinct ways. The early mode was glucose-dependent at its height, but the late mode was independent of glucose charge. 3) The praxis of vitamin C infusion produced clinical improvements in 3 DM patients. The therapeutic efficacy of the treatment varied from patient to patient. In all cases, control of DM was started by combined use of the vitamin C infusion treatment and the insulin injection treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS). Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

You will find supplements for anything and everything these days. Even when you do not suffer from an ailment, supplements are suggested to keep you healthy and ailment-free. According to CDC, use of supplements is common among US adult population – over 50% adults used supplements during 2003-2006, with multivitamins/multiminerals being the most commonly used. So when you are a diabetic, especially if you have prediabetes and type-2 diabetes, you may find yourself confronting a large number of options for supplements that claim to support, reduce and even cure your diabetes. Diabetes is quite a frustrating disorder and you may find yourself tempted to try out these supplements one after another. But is it really safe to take supplements when you are a diabetic? Let us find out. But before that you need to understand what exactly supplements are. Defining Supplements As the name suggests, a supplement is anything that adds on to something. A dietary supplement is therefore something that one takes in addition to one’s diet to get proper nutrition. US Congress in the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act defines dietary supplements as having the following characteristics: It is a product that is intended to supplement the diet; It contains one or more dietary ingredients (including vitamins, minerals, herbs and other botanicals, amino acids, and other substances) or their constituents; It is intended to be taken by mouth as a pill, capsule, tablet, or liquid; It is not represented for use as a conventional food or as sole item of a mean or a diet; and, It is labeled on the front panel as being a dietary supplement. Now let us look at some general benefits and risks of taking supplements. We will discuss these in context of diabetes later in the article. Benefit Continue reading >>

Vitamin C Stops Blood Vessel Damage In Type 1 Diabetes

Vitamin C Stops Blood Vessel Damage In Type 1 Diabetes

Vitamin C Stops Blood Vessel Damage in Type 1 Diabetes Poor blood glucose control can lead to blood vessel and nerve cell damage in diabetics and the only known way to prevent this is to maintain healthy blood glucose levels, and even this does not always work. A recent research team, however, has found that combining insulin with vitamin C stops blood vessel damage in type 1 diabetics. Type 1 diabetics require insulin to maintain healthy blood glucose levels, which limits the risk of blood vessel damage, but insulin itself does not battle or stop blood vessel damage. In fact, some past research has demonstrated that once blood vessel damage begins in type 1 diabetics, it continues, even when blood glucose is properly controlled. Blood vessel damage, or endothelial dysfunction, results mostly from oxidative stress, and is a major reason that diabetics are at an incredibly high risk for cardiovascular disease. Oxidative stress in diabetics is also closely linked to neuropathy, retinopathy, and resulting pain, amputations and blindness. Vitamin C is an essential nutrient for all humans, and protects against numerous ailments, from common colds, to scurvy. Its anti-oxidant properties are what help in battling oxidative stress. Many citrus fruits, especially oranges, contain large amounts of vitamin C, as well as kiwi, broccoli, papaya, and many other fruits and vegetables. The following conclusions regarding vitamin C mixed with insulin are believed to be applicable to other anti-oxidants as well. Based on past successful research models that showed a combination of insulin and antioxidants helped stop cell and blood vessel damage, the current research applied this treatment to type 1 diabetics with previously poor blood glucose control, and resulting blood vessel damage. Continue reading >>

Interference Of Intravenous Vitamin C With Blood Glucose Testing

Interference Of Intravenous Vitamin C With Blood Glucose Testing

Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is an integral component in the management of diabetes. However, it is important to understand the limitations of SMBG due to presence of interfering substances (1). We present a patient with diabetes and malignancy, who had falsely elevated blood glucose readings following administration of intravenous ascorbic acid (AA). A 56-year-old woman with type 1 diabetes was diagnosed with metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. She administered insulin glargine and insulin aspart before meals. After three cycles of chemotherapy, due to poor response, she decided to stop further traditional therapies. She consulted a naturopath, who started her on intravenous AA at a dose of 75 g twice weekly. Following this, she noted that her SMBG levels were consistently elevated after intravenous AA. She presented to the University of Washington where her SMBG downloads were reviewed. On the days she received intravenous AA infusion, the average blood glucose was 26.9 ± 4.8 mmol/L, compared with an average of 12.36 ± 2.7 mmol/L on other days. She was using glucose oxidase (GOD)−based strips (OneTouch, LifeScan, Inc., Milpitas, CA) for her SMBG. We suspected interference with AA in the measurement of blood glucose using GOD-based strips and recommended that she measure her blood glucose using glucose dehydrogenase-flavin adenine dinucleotide (GDH-FAD)−based strips (Bayer Contour, Tarrytown, NY). She was advised not to change her insulin doses. A written log comparing the two chemistries with the same blood sample confirmed significantly higher glucose levels with the GOD strips. Unfortunately, the patient died before we could download the meter or compare blood results with a hospital laboratory. AA is used as an alternate or adjuvant to chem Continue reading >>

Top 5 Vitamins For Type 1 Diabetes

Top 5 Vitamins For Type 1 Diabetes

The high blood sugar level in the body occurring because of the malfunctioning of the pancreas is a condition known as diabetes, which can further be divided into two types. The type 1 diabetes is a condition, where there is no insulin secreted by the pancreas whereas the type 2 diabetes is a condition, where the insulin secreted by the pancreas is very insufficient in amount because of some kinds of abnormal conditions within the people’s body that do not enable them to take in the insulin properly. Both the types of diabetes can be cured with the help of medication, diet and exercise but it is also important to include several vitamins in the diet in order to get the maximum help in diabetes. There are insulin injections needed to be taken by people suffering from type 1 diabetes because it is a condition, where there is no insulin secreted by the pancreas. Apart from the injections, there are several vitamins that also help in controlling diabetes to a large extent. The vitamins for type 1 diabetes are as follows: Vitamins For Type 1 Diabetes Vitamin D The richest sources of vitamin D like eggs, cheese, salmon, tuna and fishes should be taken by people suffering from type 1 diabetes because the deficiency of this vitamin can lead to the creation of diabetic problems in people. Source: For people, who are vegetarians, they can get enough of this vitamin by exposing themselves to the sun early in the morning because sunlight is a rich source of vitamin D. Vitamin C Vitamin C is also known to be one of the best vitamins for type 1 diabetes because it is said to lower the levels of sorbitol in a person, which is a very harmful sugar and can affect the blood level of a person and is found in large numbers in people suffering from type 1 diabetes. 3 Foods to Remove from Continue reading >>

Vitamin C Intake Reduces The Cytotoxicity Associated With Hyperglycemia In Prediabetes And Type 2 Diabetes

Vitamin C Intake Reduces The Cytotoxicity Associated With Hyperglycemia In Prediabetes And Type 2 Diabetes

Vitamin C Intake Reduces the Cytotoxicity Associated with Hyperglycemia in Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Vitamin C Intake Reduces the Cytotoxicity Associated with Hyperglycemia in Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes Silvia Isabel Rech Franke, Luiza Louzada Mller, [...], and Daniel Pr Hyperglycemia leads to the formation of free radicals and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). Antioxidants can reduce the level of protein glycation and DNA damage. In this study, we compared the levels of vitamin C intake, which is among the most abundant antioxidants obtained from diet, with the levels of fasting plasma glucose (FPG), glycated hemoglobin (A1C), DNA damage, and cytotoxicity in prediabetic subjects and type 2 diabetic subjects. Our results indicated that there was no significant correlation between FPG or A1C and DNA damage parameters (micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges, and nuclear buds). FPG and A1C correlated with necrosis (r = 0.294; P = 0.013 and r = 0.401; P = 0.001, resp.). Vitamin C intake correlated negatively with necrosis and apoptosis (r = 0.246; P = 0.040, and r = 0.276; P = 0.021, resp.). The lack of a correlation between the FPG and A1C and DNA damage could be explained, at least in part, by the elimination of cells with DNA damage by either necrosis or apoptosis (cytotoxicity). Vitamin C appeared to improve cell survival by reducing cytotoxicity. Therefore, the presen Continue reading >>

Too Much Vitamin C Not Good For Diabetics’ Hearts

Too Much Vitamin C Not Good For Diabetics’ Hearts

Too Much Vitamin C Not Good for Diabetics’ Hearts Older women with diabetes who take high doses of vitamin C for the sake of their hearts may be doing more harm than good. The study, which followed nearly 2,000 postmenopausal women with diabetes for 15 years, found that those who took heavy doses of vitamin C supplements — 300 milligrams (mg) a day or more — were roughly twice as likely to die of heart disease or stroke compared with women who took no supplemental C. The researchers did find statistically weak evidence that lower supplement doses — up to 99 mg per day — curbed the risk of cardiovascular death, and high intakes of vitamin C from food were not related to a greater risk of death from cardiovascular causes. According to the researchers, their results suggest that taking supplements to correct the lower blood levels of vitamin C commonly seen in diabetes is not necessarily the right choice. And though the research focused on older women, the findings may apply to men as well, according to the study’s senior author. Dr. David R. Jacobs Jr., of the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis stated that, "Our results, if confirmed by other research, would suggest that diabetics should be more cautious than others about taking supplements." The current recommended dietary intake for vitamin C is 90 mg a day for men and 75 mg per day for women. Vitamin C is an antioxidant, meaning it helps neutralize potentially cell-damaging substances known as oxygen free radicals, which are a normal byproduct of metabolism. While the vitamin is clearly necessary for good health, studies have garnered conflicting results on whether supplements help lower the risk of heart disease and stroke. In addition, Jacobs and his colleagues note in the report, although people with Continue reading >>

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