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Vitamin A Deficiency Diabetes

Could Vitamin A Deficiency Be A Cause Of Diabetes?

Could Vitamin A Deficiency Be A Cause Of Diabetes?

Could vitamin A deficiency be a cause of diabetes? A new study published in The Journal of Biological Chemistry claims to have identified a potential driver of type 2 diabetes: vitamin A deficiency. The researchers, from the Weill Cornell Medical College in New York, NY say that their findings may lead to new treatments for the condition, including consumption of yogurt which is a good source of vitamin A. According to senior author Dr. Lorraine Gudas, vitamin A boosts beta cell activity, meaning lack of the vitamin may play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes. Past studies have shown that, during fetal development, vitamin A is key for beta cell production. But Dr. Gudas and colleagues say it was unclear as to whether vitamin A played such a role in adulthood. To find out, the team analysed the beta cell development among two groups of adult mice; one group of mice had been genetically modified to be unable to store dietary vitamin A, while the other group was able to store the vitamin from foods as normal. The researchers found that the mice unable to store vitamin A experienced beta cell death, meaning these mice were unable to produce insulin. What is more, when the researchers removed vitamin A from the diets of healthy mice, they found that this led to significant beta cell loss, resulting in reduced insulin production and increased blood glucose levels key factors involved in development of type 2 diabetes . When the researchers restored vitamin A to the rodents diets, beta cell production rose, insulin production increased and blood glucose levels returned to normal. This findings suggest vitamin A may have the potential to reverse type 2 diabetes and could partly explain how yogurt may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes by as much as 28% . Something w Continue reading >>

Development Of Type 2 Diabetes May Be Related To Vitamin A Deficiency

Development Of Type 2 Diabetes May Be Related To Vitamin A Deficiency

Development of type 2 diabetes may be related to vitamin A deficiency Metabolic syndrome could increase risk of endometrial cancer, regardless of weight The development of type 2 diabetes may be accelerated by a vitamin A deficiency, according to new research. The study, conducted at the Weill Cornell Medical College and published in The Journal of Biological Chemistry, suggests that vitamin A increases the production of beta cells in the pancreas , which in turn produce the hormone insulin. Not having enough vitamin A, therefore, slows the body's natural production of insulin. At advanced stages, type 2 diabetes causes a loss of beta cells. When the researchers removed vitamin A from the diet of a group of mice, they observed significant beta cell losses, and, as a result, less insulin production and increases in blood sugar levels. The number of beta cells returned to normal - along with insulin production and blood glucose levels - when vitamin A was reintroduced to the diet. Previous research has indicated vitamin A is key to insulin production during fetal development, but this is the first study to suggest that this importance continues into adulthood. The findings raise several questions: is vitamin A deficiency related to the development of type 2 diabetes? Could a synthetic analogue of vitamin A reverse the effects of type 2 diabetes ? Dr. Steven Trasino, first author of the study, said: "From a therapeutic point of view, our research is a very important contribution because there are no drugs available to do this." Dr. Lorraine Gudas, senior author and chairman of the Department of Pharmacology and the Revlon Pharmaceutical Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Weill Cornell, explained: "While there are thousands of publications on diabetes, there hasn Continue reading >>

Could Lack Of Vitamin A Be A Cause Of Diabetes?

Could Lack Of Vitamin A Be A Cause Of Diabetes?

Could lack of vitamin A be a cause of diabetes? Researchers have found that blocking vitamin A receptors on the surface of pancreatic beta cells reduces insulin secretion. Researchers have found that vitamin A may be crucial to the insulin-secreting function of beta cells, a discovery that could open the door to new treatments for diabetes. Diabetes is estimated to affect more than 29 million people in the United States. Type 2 diabetes accounts for around 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases, and this arises when the beta cells of the pancreas fail to produce enough insulin - the hormone that regulates blood glucose - or when the body is no longer able to use insulin effectively. Type 1 diabetes , which accounts for the remaining 5 percent of cases, occurs when the immune system destroys beta cells, hampering insulin production. In a new study - recently reported in the Endocrine Journal - researchers from the United Kingdom and Sweden discovered that there are large quantities of vitamin A receptors on the surface of beta cells, called GPRC5C. "When we discovered that insulin cells have a cell surface expressed receptor for vitamin A, we thought it was important to find out why and what the purpose is of a cell surface receptor interacting with vitamin A mediating a rapid response to vitamin A," says study co-author Albert Salehi, of the University of Lund in Sweden. On partially blocking the vitamin A receptors in beta cells from mice - eliminating the ability of vitamin A to bind to these cells - the team found that their ability to secrete insulin was reduced in response to sugar. Vitamin A deficiency may destroy beta cells For their study, Salehi and colleagues also tested beta cells derived from humans with and without type 2 diabetes. Again, the researchers Continue reading >>

Role Of Vitamin A In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Biology: Effects Ofintervention Therapy In A Deficient State - Sciencedirect

Role Of Vitamin A In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Biology: Effects Ofintervention Therapy In A Deficient State - Sciencedirect

Volume 31, Issues 78 , JulyAugust 2015, Pages 901-907 Role of vitamin A in type 2 diabetes mellitus biology: Effects ofintervention therapy in a deficient state Author links open overlay panel SarahIqbalM.Sc. ImranaNaseemPh.D. Vitamin A is a potent antioxidant and has the potential to alter gene expression. Vitamin A regulates insulin release and energy homeostasis. Putative targets of retinol therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus are free radicals and genes involved in insulin signaling and obesity. Diabetes has emerged as the biggest pandemic of our times, growing parallel to obesity. Insulin treatment regimens have been unable to completely inhibit protein glycation, which is responsible for the development of increased oxidative stress in diabetic tissues. Coupled with recent evidences that highlight the role of reactive oxygen species in the onset and progression of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the antioxidants have taken prime focus as a possible intervention strategy. Studies have established a role of antioxidant vitamins C and E in improving patient condition in the past. Vitamin A, in addition to its role as an antioxidant, boasts a pleiotropic role in cell regulation through its action on gene regulation, maintenance of epithelial cell integrity, and resistance to infection. Studies have also ascribed a role to vitamin A in up-regulating the antioxidant enzyme functions in the body. Additionally, a link has been found between diabetes and deficient vitamin A levels indicating vitamin A supplementation may have a role in T2DM biology. This review therefore focuses on the vitamin A intervention in T2DM patients having deficient in vitamin A. Continue reading >>

Best Vitamins For Diabetics

Best Vitamins For Diabetics

Eating a varied diet rich in natural sources of vitamins is a good idea for diabetics. Nutritional support is critical for diabetics because diabetes tends to drain nutrients. When levels of glucose are high in the blood, the body tries to ‘wash’ the excess sugar out. This is why diabetics need to use the washroom frequently. Unfortunately, diabetics also lose nutrients via their urine. Research studies show that diabetics are repeatedly found to be deficient in important water-soluble vitamins and minerals. What’s more, the loss of these vitamins worsens the body’s ability to manage blood sugar, creating a vicious cycle. Combining a healthy diabetes diet plan and a daily exercise routine with the best vitamin supplements for diabetics goes a long way in achieving stable blood sugar levels. What Vitamins Are Diabetics Deficient In? The term vitamin is short for “Vital Amino Acid”. This means that these are vital for the proper functioning of hundreds of chemical processes in the body which the body cannot manage by itself. Proper blood sugar control is one such function for which vitamins are critical. There are 13 essential vitamins that the human body requires and they must be obtained from an external source — through food and/or supplements. Diabetics need two kinds of vitamins: Water Soluble – Vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6, B12, C, Biotin, and Folate are water-soluble and cannot be stored in the body for longer periods of time. Diabetics are often deficient in these vitamins since they pass greater amounts of urine daily. As their body tries to get rid of extra sugar, diabetics lose more water-soluble vitamins than most others. That’s why diabetics need to to get these vitamins daily in doses larger than what normal people need. Luckily, you can get all Continue reading >>

Vitamin D And Diabetes

Vitamin D And Diabetes

Tweet Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that plays a number of important roles in the body, including maintaining the health of your bones, teeth and joints, and assisting immune system function. This underrated vitamin is found in certain foods but is also produced by the body in response to exposure to the sun. When the sun’s ultraviolet-B (UVB) rays are exposed to bare skin, the body converts a cholesterol derivative into Vitamin D. In fact, it’s now known that every cell and tissue within the body has a Vitamin D protein receptor. However, most of us in the UK and other Western countries are deficient in Vitamin D, including many patients with Type 2 diabetes, due to limited sunlight exposure caused by a number of factors, including more time spent at home, in the office or the car, shorter days in winter, sunscreen use in summer and fears of skin cancer. Vitamin D deficiency The signs of Vitamin D deficiency can range from bone pain and muscle weakness to depression and weakened immune system, while longer-term deficiency can result in obesity, high blood pressure, psoriasis, osteoporosis, chronic fatigue, Alzheimer’s disease, cancer and type 2 diabetes. Exposing your skin to the sun for 15-20 minutes each day can help increase your body’s own production of vitamin D and thus reduce your risk of diabetes and other serious medical conditions. Alternatively, you can get your daily intake of vitamin D through dietary supplements and foods such as nuts, oily fish, eggs, powdered milk and some fortified cereals. Effects on diabetes Vitamin D is believed to help improve the body’s sensitivity to insulin – the hormone responsible for regulating blood sugar levels – and thus reduce the risk of insulin resistance, which is often a precursor to type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Can A Vitamin A Deficiency Contribute To Diabetes?

Can A Vitamin A Deficiency Contribute To Diabetes?

Can a vitamin A deficiency contribute to diabetes? Researchers from Sweden and England have discovered a link between vitamin A and diabetes. According to their new study, vitamin A is essential for enabling pancreatic beta cells to produce insulin, the hormone that helps cells take up sugar. This discovery could open new doors to better diabetes therapies in the future. However, it is also important to focus on diet, weight management, and the intake of other nutrients like chromium for proper blood sugar control, which is necessary for preventing and treating diabetes. Nearly 300,000 Danes have diabetes, and an estimated 750,000 Danes have early stages of the disease. The number of diabetics has doubled in the past 10 years, and the majority have type 2 diabetes that is related to diet and lifestyle. Type 2 diabetes is associated with impaired quality of life, and every day all year round, nearly two diabetics undergo amputations that are typically a result of foot ulcers. Diabetes is a serious condition that costs Danish taxpayers in the neighborhood of DKR 86 million each day, so it makes good sense to look more into prevention an and better treatment. Vitamin A is important for pancreatic beta cells and for inflammation Scientists from Sweden and England have discovered that the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas contain a large number of vitamin A receptors. Serving as a sort of antennae, these receptors are located on the surface of the cells. According to Albert Salehi, a senior scientist from the Diabetes Center at Lunds Universitet in Sweden, all receptors on human cells are there for a specific reason. Cellular receptors have special assignments, but in many cases, they are unidentified, which is why they are called orphan receptors After discoveri Continue reading >>

Is Vitamin D Deficiency Linked With Diabetes? | Everyday Health

Is Vitamin D Deficiency Linked With Diabetes? | Everyday Health

Some research suggests avoiding vitamin D deficiency may help reduce your risk for heart disease, which people with diabetes are more likely to develop. Youve likely heard of the power of vitamin D, also known as the sunshine vitamin. You can either get vitamin D through the suns rays, which signal your body to make vitamin D, or through certain foods or supplements. Vitamin D is a fat-soluble, rather than water-soluble, vitamin so when you get it through your diet, youll best absorb it alongside a fat-containing food, such as almonds, peanut butter, or avocado. The vitamin is important for your health: Research suggests that it may help with everything from athletic performance to heart disease, and may even help protect against type 2 diabetes . What Does Vitamin D Do for Our Bodies and Our Health? Vitamin D plays many important roles in the body, and helps you maintain healthy bones, joints, and teeth, as well as a well-functioning immune system. Vitamin D aids in the absorption of calcium in the body to promote bone growth, notes Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE , author of The 2-Day Diabetes Diet: Just 2 Days a Week and Dodge Type 2 Diabetes , who is in private practice in Franklin, New Jersey. Some observational studies suggest vitamin D may also play a role in the prevention of certain diseases and disorders, such as diabetes. The sunshine vitamin may also help keep your ticker healthy: A review published in January 2014 in the journalCirculation Research suggested that vitamin D deficiency is detrimental for heart health. This is important to note because people with type 2 diabetes are at a greater risk for heart problems. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) notes people with diabetes are two times more likely to die from heart disease tha Continue reading >>

Vitamin A: A Missing Link In Diabetes?

Vitamin A: A Missing Link In Diabetes?

1Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA *Author for correspondence: Tel.: +1 212 746 6250; Fax: +1 212 746 8858; [email protected] The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Diabetes Manag (Lond) See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. Vitamin A has a critical role in embryonic development, immunity and the visual cycle. In recent years, evidence has demonstrated that vitamin A can also regulate metabolic pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity and diabetes. This has increased interest in the possible antiobesity and antidiabetic properties of natural and synthetic vitamin A derivatives. However, whether vitamin A deficiency or aberrations in vitamin A metabolism contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes is not known. This perspective article will review what is currently known and new data regarding the link between vitamin A and the clinical manifestations of common and atypical forms of diabetes. Keywords: cells, diabetes, dietary nutrient, glucose metabolism, insulin, islets, pancreas, retinoic acid, retinol, vitamin A Vitamin A refers to a family of compounds, also called retinoids, that exhibits structural and biochemical similarity to retinol, the form of dietary vitamin A absorbed from animal and plant sources[ 1 ]. For over 100 years studies have demonstrated a critical role for vitamin A in embryonic development, immunity, and the visual cycle[ 2 , 3 ]. In the past four decades synthetic analogs of vitamin A, known as retinoids, have been extensively developed and used for clinical treatment of dermatological disorders and a number of cancers[ 2 ]. In recent years, a growing body of evidence has demonstrated that vitamin A can also regulate metabolic pat Continue reading >>

Vitamin Deficiencies In People With Diabetes: The Supplements You Need

Vitamin Deficiencies In People With Diabetes: The Supplements You Need

As an orthopedic surgeon, I have many patients with diabetes who tell me, “I can’t have surgery because I won’t heal.” That is certainly not the case, however. Diabetes does affect the small blood vessels and the function of immune cells when blood sugar is high, but with proper nutrition and blood sugar management, people with diabetes are very safe to undergo knee replacements, abdominal surgery, and many elective procedures. It is critical, of course, that people with diabetes who undergo elective or traumatic surgery work closely with their doctor to manage their blood sugar, but supplementation is also a vital part of recovery. Diabetes frequently causes nutritional deficiencies, often initiated by changes in diet or medications. As a result, people with diabetes must use supplements. Helping my patients identify their nutritional deficiencies and educating them on the importance of essential vitamins has made an overwhelming difference in their recovery from surgery and their overall daily health. The following essential vitamins are often deficient in people with diabetes. Vitamin B12 Vitamin B12 is bound to protein in food. The activity of hydrochloric acid and gastric protease in the stomach releases vitamin B12 from its protein. Once it is released, vitamin B12 begins to work quickly. It is important for the formation of red blood cells, neurological function, and DNA synthesis. It also supports the digestive system in keeping glucose levels stable. A simple blood test can determine the level of B12 in the body. Adults who have a value below 170 to 250 pg/mL are considered deficient in the vitamin. An elevated blood homocysteine level or elevated methylmalconic acid level may also suggest a B12 deficiency. Symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency are megalob Continue reading >>

Vitamin Deficiencies And Diabetes

Vitamin Deficiencies And Diabetes

Most Americans take one or more dietary supplements. If you want to prevent diabetes or manage it better, you may be wondering if certain supplements can help. According to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, there’s no reason to pop that pill. There isn’t enough evidence to suggest dietary supplements make a difference regarding type 2 diabetes. Yet studies continue to roll in suggesting that a lack of certain nutrients in your diet may affect how diabetes develops. How much have you been getting of these three? Vitamin A An animal study published in The Journal of Biological Chemistry in 2015 found that a lack of vitamin A may play a role in how type 2 diabetes develops. Vitamin A supports your immune system and cell growth and promotes good vision. The animal research showed that having plenty of vitamin A on board may also prevent the loss of beta cells, which are cells in the pancreas that make insulin. The study suggests getting enough vitamin A may help your pancreas produce more insulin and normalize blood sugar levels, two factors that may prevent type 2 diabetes. Find it in food: Good sources of vitamin A include apricots, cantaloupe, carrots, liver, mangoes, peppers, pumpkin pie, spinach, and sweet potatoes. Vitamin B12 A recent study in the Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders found it’s common for people with type 1 and 2 diabetes to be low in vitamin B 12. Men and women need 2.4 mcg a day, or 2.6 mcg or 2.8 mcg if you’re pregnant or lactating. The vitamin helps form red blood cells and fosters a healthy nervous system, among other duties. Being low in vitamin B 12 can lead to problems such as impaired memory and nerve problems in your hands and feet. Vitamin B 12 deficiency is especially a concern among people who t Continue reading >>

Vitamin A Deficiency May Be Involved In Type 2 Diabetes, Researchers Say

Vitamin A Deficiency May Be Involved In Type 2 Diabetes, Researchers Say

Investigators have long sought the answer to a vexing question: What are the biological mechanisms involved in the development of type 2 diabetes? A recent study from Weill Cornell Medical College researchers suggests that the culprit may be a lack of vitamin A, which helps give rise to the cells, called beta cells, in the pancreas that produce the blood sugar-regulating hormone insulin. Vitamin A-deficient mice develop hyperglycemia (upper left) and reductions in insulin (upper middle) due to destruction of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas (upper right). Treatment of the vitamin A-deficient mice with vitamin A subsequently reduces hyperglycemia and restores insulin producing beta cells. Images: Compared to normal control mice given adequate vitamin A (left panel), pancreas images from vitamin A-deficient mice (middle) have high numbers of dying beta cells (green) and lower insulin (red). Vitamin A-deficient mice given back vitamin A consequently have restored beta cells and fewer dying beta cells (right). The researchers found in mice models that a lack of vitamin A spurred the death of beta cells, stunting the production of insulin, which is tasked with metabolizing sugars that come from food. These findings, published Dec. 1 in The Journal of Biological Chemistry, may offer new clues into the cause of type 2 diabetes, which is characterized by insulin-resistance, and in advanced cases, inadequate numbers of insulin-producing beta cells. When the investigators removed vitamin A from the rodents’ diet, they found that the mice began to experience massive losses of beta cells, which resulted in drops in insulin and a big increase in blood glucose. The researchers then reintroduced vitamin A into the animals’ diet and found that the number of beta cells s Continue reading >>

Vitamin A Deficiency Could Damage Beta Cells Insulin Secretion Leading To Type 2 Diabetes

Vitamin A Deficiency Could Damage Beta Cells Insulin Secretion Leading To Type 2 Diabetes

Sign up to get the latest science news delivered weekly right to your inbox! Vitamin A Deficiency Could Damage Beta Cells Insulin Secretion Leading To Type 2 Diabetes Lester MondragonJun 16, 2017 12:18 PM EDT Facebook Linkedin Twitter Google+ Print Email Vitamin A plays an important role in the human body as it helps in the formation and maintenance of healthy skeletal and soft tissues, teeth, skin, and mucous membranes. It also has another term, "Retinol," that produces pigments in the eyes' retina promoting good vision even in dim light. Vitamin A deficiency could weaken the immune system and destroy the function of the Beta Cells that store insulin in the body. It is a group of unsaturated nutritional organic compounds consisting of retinol, retinoic acid, and plenty of provitamin carotenoids, mostly Beta Carotene acting as an antioxidant, protecting the cells from free radicals. A team of scientists has a study that connects the onset of diabetes due to Vitamin A deficiency and considers a new approach basing on what the results show. 29 million Americans suffer from the condition from which an estimated 95% have Type 2 diabetes. This ailment arises when Beta cells no longer produce the hormone insulin which is responsible for the regulation of blood sugar in the body. The remaining five percent Type 1 diabetes statistic is what happens when the destruction of beta cells are complete and the body could no longer produce insulin, Medical News Today reported. Researchers from the United Kingdom and Sweden just discovered the considerable presence of Vitamin A receptors in Beta cells surfaces they call as GPRC5C, says study co-author Dr. Albert Salehi of the University of Lund in Sweden. The team disabled the function of these surface receptors that mediates the rapid Continue reading >>

Could Vitamin A Deficiency Be A Cause Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Could Vitamin A Deficiency Be A Cause Of Type 2 Diabetes?

A new study published in The Journal of Biological Chemistry claims to have identified a potential driver of type 2 diabetes: vitamin A deficiency. The researchers, from the Weill Cornell Medical College in New York, NY, say their findings may lead to new treatments for the condition. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes in the US, accounting for 90-95% of all diagnosed cases. The condition is characterized by insulin resistance, in which insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas are unable to function effectively. According to senior author Dr. Lorraine Gudas - chairman of the Department of Pharmacology at Weill Cornell - and colleagues, vitamin A boosts beta cell activity, meaning lack of the vitamin may play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes. There are two types of vitamin A. Preformed vitamin A, referred to as retinol, is present in meat, poultry, fish and dairy products, while pro-vitamin A, or beta-carotene, is found in many fruits and vegetables. Vitamin A aids cell growth and contributes to a healthy immune system and vision. Past studies have shown that, during fetal development, vitamin A is key for beta cell production. But Dr. Gudas and colleagues say it was unclear as to whether vitamin A played such a role in adulthood. Removal of dietary vitamin A led to beta cell loss in adult mice To find out, the team analyzed the beta cell development among two groups of adult mice; one group of mice had been genetically modified to be unable to store dietary vitamin A, while the other group was able to store the vitamin from foods as normal. The researchers found that the mice unable to store vitamin A experienced beta cell death, meaning these mice were unable to produce insulin. What is more, when the researchers removed vitamin A from Continue reading >>

Could Vitamin A Deficiency Cause Diabetes?

Could Vitamin A Deficiency Cause Diabetes?

Could Vitamin A Deficiency Cause Diabetes? A new study suggests that vitamin A plays a key role in the functioning of beta cells in the pancreas that secrete insulin. Vitamin A deficiency can damage and destroy these beta cells, causing diabetes. This discovery could lead to the development of new treatments for both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. The study was conducted by researchers in the U.K. and Sweden, and the results were published in the Endocrine Journal. Researchers discovered large numbers of vitamin A receptors on the surface of beta cells and set out to determine the function of these receptors. In animal subjects, blocking the vitamin A receptors reduced the cells ability to produce insulin in response to sugar by almost 30 percent. Impaired insulin production is a primary cause for type 2 diabetes. In addition, researchers found that inadequate levels of vitamin A impaired the beta cells ability to fight inflammation, causing them to die. The destruction of beta cells causes type 1 diabetes. High levels of vitamin A can be harmful, so supplementation is not the answer. Obesity in Pregnancy Increases Birth Defect Risk Moms-to-be who are overweight or obese during pregnancy are at increased risk for having a baby with birth defects, according to a study recently published in the BMJ. Most health care professionals stress the importance of maintaining a healthy weight during pregnancy and earlier studies suggested a correlation between maternal obesity and birth defect risk. In this new study, researchers took a closer look at whether expectant mothers who are overweight, rather than obese, are also at higher risk for birth defects. They analyzed information on more than 1.2 million single, live births in Sweden between 2001 and 2014. Expectant mothe Continue reading >>

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