diabetestalk.net

Video Diabetic Juice

Fruit Juices And Smoothies

Fruit Juices And Smoothies

Many of you have contacted us confused about fruit, fruit juices and smoothies and whether they are something you can have if you have diabetes. So we’ve set out to answer your questions and explain the difference between drinking fruit juice and smoothies and eating whole fruit and how this can affect your diabetes management and overall health. • What is fructose? • What is added sugar? • Why do I need to watch fruit juices and smoothies but not whole fruit? • Do I need to avoid fruit juices and smoothies? • Should I avoid sugar completely? All fruit, fruit juices and smoothies contain a naturally occurring sugar called fructose. Fructose from whole fruit doesn’t add to your intake of free (or added) sugar, but in fruit juice or a smoothie it does. Free (added) sugar includes the sugars added to foods by manufacturers, eg in cakes, chocolates, jam, some pasta sauces, fizzy drinks and breakfast cereals. It also includes the sugar found in fruit juices, smoothies and honey. A recent report by the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN), stated that we need to reduce our intake of free (added) sugars by half. The report recommends that we should consume no more than 5 per cent of our energy from free sugar. This means the maximum daily intake of free (added) sugar should be: 19g, equal to 5 cubes or 5 tsp of sugar, for children (aged 4 to 7) 24g, equal to 6 cubes or 6 tsp of sugar, for children aged (7 to 10) 30g, equal to 7 cubes or 7 tsp of sugar, for children (over 11) and adults Eating too much free (added) sugar contributes towards obesity, tooth decay and also puts people at risk of Type 2 diabetes. The report clearly states that we do not need to cut down our intake of whole fruit and, in fact, recommends that we eat more. The best thing yo Continue reading >>

What Juices Can Diabetics Drink?

What Juices Can Diabetics Drink?

It is recommended to consume citrus fruit juice Drink juice along with meal if you are diabetic Along with a diabetes-healthy diet, diabetics may consume certain fruit juices, but in moderation. Whole fruits, however, are a better and healthier choice than juices. Juices, such as grapefruit juice, pineapple juice and orange juice, if taken in moderation, are considered appropriate for diabetics. All types of citrus fruit juices are superfood for diabetics as they are nutrient-rich, says American Diabetes Association (ADA). Apart from citrus juices, diabetics may also drink apple juice for it is rich in fibre, lemon juice as it is low on carbs, tomato juice as it is low on sugar content and carrot juice as it is juiced raw. All fruit juices, however, also contain significant amount of sugar, which can cause blood sugar levels to spike. Therefore, moderate consumption of fruit juices is advised. Carbs from juices also adds to your total intake of carbohydrates for the day. Having juice along with the meal can surely reduce the effects of sugar content of the juice. While citrus juices are low on Glycemic Index table, pineapple and orange juice is rated 46 and grapefruit juice is rated 48. Consumption of carbs present in the juices results in increased blood sugar levels, though the impact varies from individual to individual. Here are a few points that diabetics should consider if they wish to consume juices or other beverages. The recommended amount of a fruit or any other drink is 4 oz. per day. Drinking juices separately can lead to quicker spike in blood glucose level. Added sugar in the juices is a major concern for the diabetics well-being. Fruit and vegetable juice prepared with the original pulp is a good choice for diabetics. Two of the best juices for diabetics Continue reading >>

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

If you are living with diabetes, you've probably been told to minimize or eliminate your intake of fruit because "fruit is high in sugar." And if this is the case, maybe you refrain from eating fruits because it causes your blood glucose to spike. Attracted by the smell, color and taste, you may find yourself asking a simple question: "Should I avoid fruit in the long-term? And if so, will I ever be able to eat fruit again?” It turns out that this ant-fruit message is a perfect example of pseudoscience at its best. A recent study published in PLOS medicine tracked the health of 512,891 Chinese men and women between the ages of 30 and 79 for an average of 7 years, in order to understand the effect that their diet had on their overall health (1). We like these types of studies because they are: For those who did not have diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who had a higher fruit consumption were 12% less likely to develop diabetes, compared with those who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. The researchers found a dose-response relationship, which means that the more frequently these nondiabetic individuals ate fruit, the lower the risk for developing diabetes. Amongst those living with diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who ate fruit 3 times per week reduced their risk of all-cause mortality (death from any cause) by 17%, compared with diabetic individuals who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. In addition, researchers uncovered that those who ate fresh fruit 3 days per week were 13-28% less likely to experience macrovascular complications (heart disease and stroke) and microvascular damage (kidney disease, retinopathy and neuropathy). Even though this study was observational, the results of the study have profound implications for people living with Continue reading >>

Ready-to-drink Or Frozen Orange Juice: Same Value?

Ready-to-drink Or Frozen Orange Juice: Same Value?

Ready-to-Drink or Frozen Orange Juice: Same Value? Orange juice sales in the last 10 to 15 years have seen a major shift from frozen concentrate to ready-to-drink forms. Although we might assume that all orange juice is the same nutritionally, new research shows that ready-to-drink versions contain about 30 percent less of the biologically active form of vitamin C than juice made from frozen concentrate. Since vitamin C content gradually decreases, time in storage before and after purchase also make a critical difference. When most people think of vitamin C, they probably think of oranges or orange juice. In fact, studies show that for many Americans, orange juice is one of their only good sources of vitamin C. Actual vitamin C content of orange juice, however, varies with the variety and maturity of the oranges used, and processing and storage have major effects as well. Some cases of death or serious illness have occurred due to contaminated fresh juice, so most ready-to-drink juice is now pasteurized. (Frozen concentrate does not need to be pasteurized since freezing destroys dangerous bacteria.) If a fresh juice is not pasteurized, the Food and Drug Administration requires a clear label warning. But while helpful for food safety, pasteurizing reduces a juice's vitamin C content about 25 percent compared to that made from frozen concentrate. A new study in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association examines differences in vitamin C content of orange juice purchased in different forms, and how content is affected by storage time. Juice freshly made from frozen concentrate is clearly the form highest in both total vitamin C and the biologically active form of the vitamin (86 milligrams per cup). The next best source of C in its active form (65 mg per cup) is rea Continue reading >>

Quincy The Koala Uses Dexcom G6 (with Video)

Quincy The Koala Uses Dexcom G6 (with Video)

The Dexcom G6 Continuous Glucose Monitoring System that Quincy is wearing is the latest innovation in diabetes management technology, which started shipping to people with diabetes earlier this month. The sensor and transmitter placed on Quincy sends his blood glucose levels in real time to a smart device monitored by his caretakers. With the new G6 technology, his veterinarians will no longer need to prick his skin multiple times per day to test his blood glucose levels. The Dexcom CGM also has built in alerts and alarms that will proactively notify Quincys caretakers before his blood glucose reaches dangerous levels. You can imagine what this technology means for Quincy,and any person trying to manage this challenging disease. Just like Quincys veterinarian, people with diabetes and their family or friends can monitor their glucose levels from a mobile device, providing around-the-clock safety and peace of mind. Peter Simpson, vice president of advanced technology at Dexcom Koalas normally sleep during the day and are solitary animals.Animal care staff at the San Diego Zoo hope the new sensor will allow them to get more detail about Quincys glucose levels while also reducing the number of times they need to disturb him."Quincy has an insulin deficiency type of diabetes,and needs insulin to control his blood sugar levels and ensure he gets the energy needed to help him build muscle,gain weight and stay healthy much like our human patients," said Athena Philis Tsimikas, M.D., corporate vice president of the Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute."Hypoglycemia abnormally low blood sugar is a safety concern,and the limiting factor to using the right doses of insulin,especially in an animal that cant tell us their symptoms.The continuous glucose monitoring now allows optimal Continue reading >>

Broccoli Juice Could Keep Diabetes At Bay And Even Prevent The Fatal Condition

Broccoli Juice Could Keep Diabetes At Bay And Even Prevent The Fatal Condition

Broccoli pill could 'prevent thousands of stroke deaths' The compound sulforaphane could be a viable alternative for obese patients unable to take metformin - the first line of treatment - because of its effect on their kidneys. Professor Anders Rosengren, of Lund University Diabetes Centre in Sweden, said: We will now work to make broccoli sprout extract available to produce as a functional food. The research also suggests eating or drinking broccoli may help stave off type 2 diabetes in vulnerable individuals. A chemical found in broccoli had a dramatic impact on lowering blood sugar levels, a study found There are claims for lots of foods having health benefits, but here we have shown sulforaphane targets a critical disease process. Prof Rosengren said: Since sulforaphane has very few side effects and can easily be provided as a broccoli shake or drink - for example - it has the potential to become an important compliment to existing treatment options for type 2 diabetes. He said it could also be recommended as a functional food for people with pre-diabetes - meaning their blood sugar level is higher than normal but not yet high enough to be type 2 diabetes. Prof Rosengren said: There are claims for lots of foods having health benefits, but here we have shown sulforaphane targets a critical disease process. The study, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, found the compound had a significant benefit for obese patients whose type 2 diabetes was poorly regulated. Prof Rosengren said: Sulforaphane is highly concentrated in cruciferous vegetables like broccoli which was exciting because that enabled us to provide it as a highly concentrated broccoli extract to the patients. Drinking broccoli may help stave off type 2 diabetes in vulnerable individuals Continue reading >>

To Cut Risk Of Diabetes, Eat More Fruit But Skip The Juice

To Cut Risk Of Diabetes, Eat More Fruit But Skip The Juice

Eating blueberries, grapes and apples seems to lower your risk of diabetes but drinking fruit juice increases it, according to a new study led by researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health. The study, published in the British Medical Journal, was the first to look at the effects of individual whole fruits on the risk of type 2 diabetes, according to the researchers. "While fruits are recommended as a measure for diabetes prevention, previous studies have found mixed results for total fruit consumption," said the study's senior author, Qi Sun, an assistant professor in the school's Department of Nutrition and at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. "Our findings provide novel evidence suggesting that certain fruits may be especially beneficial for lowering diabetes risk." The study is one more example of how a diet rich in fruit can improve your health. Earlier this month, researchers reported that fruits could protect against a type of deadly aneurysm that develops in the abdomen. About 25.8 million people living in the United States had a form of diabetes as of 2011, most of them type 2 diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. An additional 79 million Americans had pre-diabetes, but many did not know they were at risk. In type 2 diabetes, the body either does not produce enough insulin to break down sugar and starch or the insulin that is present is ignored by cells. Over time, high glucose levels can damage the eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. In the most recent study, researchers from the United States, Britain and Singapore examined data collected from about 187,000 participants in three long-running studies in the United States to determine which fruits were associated with a risk of diabetes. Nurses and other health professionals were q Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergency

Diabetic Emergency

Diabetes is a lifelong medical condition where the body cannot produce enough insulin. Insulin is a chemical made by the pancreas (a gland behind the stomach), which regulates the blood sugar (glucose) level in the body. Normally our bodies automatically keep the right blood sugar levels, but for someone with diabetes their body can't. Instead, they have to control the blood sugar level themselves by monitoring what they eat, and taking insulin injections or pills. There are two types of diabetes: Type1, or insulin-dependent diabetes, and Type 2, also known as non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Sometimes people who have diabetes may have a diabetic emergency, where their blood sugar becomes either too high or too low. Both conditions are potentially serious and may need treatment in hospital. Watch our video - diabetic emergency Hyperglycaemia Too little insulin can cause high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia). If it’s not treated and gets worse, the person can gradually become unresponsive (going into a diabetic coma). So it's important to get them to see a doctor in case they need emergency treatment. Hypoglycaemia Too much insulin can cause low blood sugar or hypoglycaemia (hypo). This often happens when someone with diabetes misses a meal or does too much exercise. It can also happen after someone has had an epileptic seizure or has been binge drinking. If someone knows they are diabetic, they may recognise the start of a hypo attack, but without help they may quickly become weak and unresponsive. What to look for - Diabetic emergency If you think someone is having a diabetic emergency, you need to check against the symptoms listed below to decide if their blood sugar is too high or too low. High blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) • Warm, dry skin • Rapid pulse and breathin Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes: 3 Inexpensive Foods You Need To Know About

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes: 3 Inexpensive Foods You Need To Know About

Is there a way to reverse diabetes? Specifically, type 2 diabetes? You might be surprised to discover there are three unbelievable natural remedies that I don’t believe the medical establishment—or, more specifically, the pharmaceutical companies—want you to know about. Why would they not want you to know about this stuff? It’s because the pharmaceutical industry is a gigantic machine which has to sustain itself. The diabetic industry alone is massive, owing to the fact that over 300 million people in the world have type 2 diabetes. The treatments and medication used to treat diabetes are big business, so why would these companies be at all interested in truly reversing diabetes? How would that benefit them financially? Unfortunately, a lot of diabetes drugs don’t actually work, or work with limited success and a lot of potential side effects. Science has shown that—in terms of diabetic management—these drugs are more dangerous than anything. Drugs used in the 1950s, for the most part, have all been taken off the market because they were shown to increase the risk of heart disease. This has even happened recently with drugs like Avandia. It was the world’s most popular Type 2 diabetes drug until it was revealed to have side effects that caused serious heart problems. New drugs haven’t proven to be much better. With that in mind, I’m going to share with you 3 amazing, all-natural solutions to reverse diabetes. Even if you don’t have type 2 diabetes, these solutions can help you prevent it. Here’s something I want you to realize; please never forget this: If you have type two diabetes, it’s not a life sentence. It’s actually one of the easiest—and I don’t say that in a condescending way; I say it in an optimistic way—diseases to completel Continue reading >>

Diabetes Juicing | Green Smoothies | Reverse Diabetes

Diabetes Juicing | Green Smoothies | Reverse Diabetes

Diabetes Juicing | Green Smoothies | Reverse Diabetes Ex-Diabetic's Perspective:When I was diabetic, I discovered that diabetes juicing (and raw salads) had the biggest impact on my overall health. Drinking a small glass of fresh raw juice 30 minutes before your breakfast and other meals helps to accelerate your body's cell repair processes. Why? Because the nutrients get into cells very quickly. And, if you drink the juice very slowly and allow the juice to "sit" in your mouth and be absorbed sublingually into your lymphatic system, it requires almost zero energy on your body's part to take advantage of all the nutrients. This is very important especially for diabetics, overweight people and people with chronic fatigue. By being able to bypass the gastrointestinal system, your body utilizes less energy to take advantage of the powerful nutrients within the juice. All of this helps to initiate your body's cell repair process and also strengthens the immune system to fight an foreign invaders. And, if you're diabetic, there's nothing more powerful than helping your body to repair the damage caused by the diabetes! Most, if not all, of the other diabetes programs talk about lowering your blood sugar, but, they fail to mention how to repair the cells that have damaged by your diabetes. And, if you want to prevent the typical complications associated with diabetes, then, cell repair is critical to your overall health and well-being. During my research, I found that most people were aware of the obvious health benefits of raw juicing to reverse Type 2 diabetesnaturally. However, due to TV infomercials, various health and nutrition books, YouTube videos, and the Internet, there were some major misunderstandings and misuses of diabetesjuicing. I discovered that some diabetics Continue reading >>

Prevent And Treat Type 2 Diabetes - Consumer Reports

Prevent And Treat Type 2 Diabetes - Consumer Reports

But theres also good news. Theres no reason why someone with type 2 diabetes cant live a full and healthy life, says Marvin M. Lipman, M.D., Consumer Reports chief medical adviser. Relatively simple steps, such as losing weight, eating a healthful diet , getting physical activity, monitoring your health , and, when necessary, taking medication, can slow the course of the disease and improve your quality of life. Heres what recent research has uncovered on the best ways to reduce your risks and treat type 2 diabetes if you have it. Doctors used to think that if you received a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, youd have the condition for life. But now research shows thats not the case. Many times, type 2 diabetes can be partially or completely reversed by getting down to a normal weight, says Michael Hochman, M.D., M.P.H., an associate professor of clinical medicine at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles and director of the USC Gehr Family Center for Health Systems Science. A study published in 2017 in The Lancet, for instance, found that about half of people with type 2 diabetes who underwent an intensive weight-management program went into complete remission. The same goes for prediabetes. The majority of cases come from being overweight or obese, so simply losing weight can go a long way in preventing you from progressing to actual diabetes, says David Lam, M.D., associate director of the Mount Sinai Clinical Diabetes Institute in New York City. Case in point: People with prediabetes who lose around 7 percent of their body weight by consuming less fat and fewer calories and exercising for 150 minutes a week have a 58 percent lower risk of full-blown diabetes, according to the landmark Diabetes Prevention Program study. Thoug Continue reading >>

Intake Of Fruit, Vegetables, And Fruit Juices And Risk Of Diabetes In Women

Intake Of Fruit, Vegetables, And Fruit Juices And Risk Of Diabetes In Women

Abstract OBJECTIVE—The purpose of this study was to examine the association between fruit, vegetable, and fruit juice intake and development of type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A total of 71,346 female nurses aged 38–63 years who were free of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes in 1984 were followed for 18 years, and dietary information was collected using a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire every 4 years. Diagnosis of diabetes was self-reported. RESULTS—During follow-up, 4,529 cases of diabetes were documented, and the cumulative incidence of diabetes was 7.4%. An increase of three servings/day in total fruit and vegetable consumption was not associated with development of diabetes (multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio 0.99 [95% CI 0.94–1.05]), whereas the same increase in whole fruit consumption was associated with a lower hazard of diabetes (0.82 [0.72–0.94]). An increase of 1 serving/day in green leafy vegetable consumption was associated with a modestly lower hazard of diabetes (0.91 [0.84–0.98]), whereas the same change in fruit juice intake was associated with an increased hazard of diabetes (1.18 [1.10–1.26]). CONCLUSIONS—Consumption of green leafy vegetables and fruit was associated with a lower hazard of diabetes, whereas consumption of fruit juices may be associated with an increased hazard among women. The worldwide burden of type 2 diabetes has increased rapidly in tandem with increases in obesity. The most recent estimate for the number of people with diabetes worldwide in 2000 was 171 million, and this number is projected to increase to at least 366 million by the year 2030 (1). Fruit and vegetable consumption has been associated with decreased incidence of and mortality from a variety of health outcomes in Continue reading >>

5 Best Foods For Diabetes

5 Best Foods For Diabetes

Health Concerns: Diabetes , Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S., and doubles the risk of heart attack and stroke.1 However, type 2 diabetes is a lifestyle disease - our food choices can either prevent or promote insulin resistance and resultant diabetes. Many conventional diabetes diets rely on meat or grains as the major calorie source. However, these strategies have serious drawbacks. High-nutrient, low glycemic load (GL) foods are the optimal foods for diabetics, and these foods also help to prevent diabetes in the first place: Green vegetables: Nutrient-dense green vegetables leafy greens, cruciferous vegetables, and other green vegetables are the most important foods to focus on for diabetes prevention and reversal. Higher green vegetable consumption is associated with lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and among diabetics, higher green vegetable intake is associated with lower HbA1c levels.2, 3 A recent meta-analysis found that greater leafy green intake was associated with a 14 percentdecrease in risk of type 2 diabetes.4 One study reported that each daily serving of leafy greens produces a 9 percent decrease in risk.5 Non-starchy vegetables: Non-green, non-starchy vegetables like mushrooms, onions, garlic, eggplant, peppers, etc. are essential components of a diabetes prevention (or diabetes reversal) diet. These foods have almost nonexistent effects on blood glucose and are packed with fiber and phytochemicals. Beans: Beans, lentils, and other legumes are the ideal carbohydrate source. Beans are low in GL due to their moderate protein and abundant fiber and resistant starch, carbohydrates that are not broken down in the small intestine. This reduces the amount of calories that can be absorbed from beans; plus, resistan Continue reading >>

7 Good Habits To Give Up For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Good Habits To Give Up For Type 2 Diabetes

You know managing type 2 diabetes isn't just about taking medicine. So you've been trying to make better food and lifestyle choices. But figuring out what's healthy and what isn't can be confusing. Take these habits. They may seem like they're good for you, but they could actually be sabotaging your efforts. The supermarket is full of things that appear to be diabetes-friendly because they don't have added sugar. But many have sugar substitutes that contain carbs. That means they have the potential to send your blood sugar levels soaring. Before you put something in your cart, check the nutrition facts to see how many grams of carbs are in each serving and how much sugar is added. 2. Swapping meals for meal replacement bars Losing weight can help, and meal replacement bars may seem like an easy way to slim down. Many meal replacement products are aimed at athletes. So they can be high in calories. Others contain ingredients like sugar alcohols (sorbitol and mannitol, for example), which can cause stomach trouble. Occasionally, munching on a bar for breakfast when you're pressed for time is OK as long as you pay attention to the nutrition info. But it's smarter to stick with real meals. 3. Loading up on vitamins and supplements A diet with lots of fruits and vegetables should give you all the nutrients you need. A multivitamin may help fill in the gaps, but it still can't match the real thing -- food. Some people take supplements like cinnamon or chromium to try to keep their blood sugar levels stable. It's unclear whether these work. If you choose to try them -- or any supplement -- tell your doctor. He can make sure it's safe for you and won't interact with any medication you're taking. Natural doesn't always equal healthy. One cup of apple juice, for example, has 25 Continue reading >>

What To Drink With Diabetes?

What To Drink With Diabetes?

Is there anything good for diabetes you can buy in a bottle and drink? If not, what can you drink that’s healthy? Beverages to avoid First off, do not drink bottled fruit juice. Health author Joy Bauer rated fruit juice the number one worst food for diabetes. Most bottled juice is not 100% juice and has additional sugar added. But according to Bauer, “Fruit juices, even 100% fruit juices, are chock-full of fruit sugar and cause a sharp spike in blood sugar.” Juice has a very high glycemic index, which means the sugar gets into your blood very fast. According to diabetes.co.uk, unsweetened orange juice has a glycemic index between 66 and 76, higher than most chocolate cake. People with diabetes do not have enough insulin to keep up with such a fast surge of sugar. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) agrees. “Avoid sugary drinks like regular soda, fruit punch, fruit drinks, energy drinks, sports drinks, or sweet tea. They can provide several hundred calories in just one serving. ADA advises tea, coffee, water, or milk instead. They do say that less than 4 ounces of juice at a meal might be manageable for some people with diabetes. There are other problems with juice besides the sugar. Compared to whole fruits and vegetables, juice has almost no fiber. Bottled juice is usually stored in massive oxygen-depleted holding tanks for up to a year before it is packaged. Then lost flavor iss restored with “flavor packs.” Recent studies, however, have shown that juice does have some benefits. It helps prevent cancer and heart disease as well as whole fruits. It has more nutritional benefits than sodas, even if the sugar spike is just as bad. Dietitian Amy Campbell says vegetable juices such as V8 are healthier can be drunk in larger amounts than the sweeter juices. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes