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Vegetarian Diabetic Meal Plan

Vegan Menu For People With Diabetes

Vegan Menu For People With Diabetes

Meal Plans By Nancy Berkoff, RD, EdDWith Contributions by Cathy Conway, MS, RD, CDN; Erin M. Crandell; and Reed Mangels, PhD, RD, FADA his Vegan Menu for People with Diabetes is designed to provide a balance of protein, carbohydrate, fat, vitamins, and minerals while following the basic principles of a diabetic meal plan. Every person who has diabetes has his or her own individual energy and nutrient needs, so please consult your health care professional to make sure our suggestions will work for you. The menu is designed for young adults through seniors. It is not designed for children or people who need close medical management of diabetes. The menus have been written based on the American Diabetes Association's Exchange Lists for Meal Planning. Since carbohydrates are the nutrients that diabetics need to monitor the closest, the exchange lists are designed to help maintain the proper amount of carbohydrates in your diet. Carbohydrates, proteins, and fats are the three major nutrients found in the foods we eat, but carbohydrates have the greatest effect on our blood sugar. Since controlling blood sugar is the number one goal of diabetes management, controlling your intake of carbohydrates can help you achieve that goal. This doesn't mean that carbohydrates should be eliminated; rather, it becomes important for you to plan your meals and snacks so they provide a consistent amount of carbohydrates. And that brings us back to the Exchange Lists. The Exchange Lists include foods from the following food groups: Starches, Fruit, Milk, Vegetables, Proteins, Fats, and Free Foods. Carbohydrates are primarily found in Starches, Fruit, and Milk. One serving (or exchange) of a Starch, Fruit, or Milk will provide 15 grams of carbohydrate (the amount of protein and fat in each car Continue reading >>

Vegetarian Diet: Can It Help Me Control My Diabetes?

Vegetarian Diet: Can It Help Me Control My Diabetes?

Could switching to a vegetarian diet cure my diabetes? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. A vegetarian diet probably won't cure your diabetes. But it may offer some benefits over a nonvegetarian diet — such as helping to better control your weight, reducing your risk of some diabetes-associated complications and possibly even making your body more responsive to insulin. There's no single vegetarian eating plan. For example, some allow dairy products while others don't allow any animal products (vegans). The benefits of a vegetarian diet depend on the type of diet you choose and the food choices you make when following the diet. For most, however, eating a vegetarian diet: Promotes a healthy weight. Vegetarian diets are often lower in calories than are nonvegetarian diets, which can help with weight management. Also, people following a vegetarian diet tend to have lower body mass indexes (BMIs) than do people who follow a nonvegetarian diet. A healthy body weight can improve blood sugar control and reduce your risk of diabetes complications. Improves blood sugar control and insulin response. Eating vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes and nuts — features of a vegetarian diet — can improve blood sugar control and make your body more responsive to insulin. This may mean taking less medication and lowering your risk of diabetes-related complications. But even a vegetarian diet can have adverse effects on blood sugar if it is rich in simple carbohydrates — especially starches, such as potatoes, white rice and white bread. Reduces your risk of cardiovascular disease. A strict vegan diet is cholesterol-free, low in saturated fat and usually high in soluble fiber. A low-fat vegetarian diet can reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease — a common complication of Continue reading >>

7-day Vegetarian Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

7-day Vegetarian Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

7-Day Vegetarian Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories By:Victoria Seaver, M.S., R.D., Digital Meal Plan Editor for EatingWell Incorporating more plant-based foods into your diet is a great way to boost your health. Whether you already follow a vegetarian diet or are just looking to go meatless sometimes, this 7-day, 1,200-calorie vegetarian meal plan makes it easy to eat your veggies! This 7-day meal plan makes it easy to eat your veggies. Incorporating more plant-based foods into your diet is a great way to boost your health. A vegetarian diet has been shown to reduce your risk of heart disease, type-2 diabetes and even certain types of cancer. Whether you already follow a vegetarian diet or are just looking to go meatless sometimes, this 7-day, 1,200-calorie vegetarian meal plan makes it easy to eat your veggies! The registered dietitians and culinary experts at EatingWell have done the work for you and planned out a week of delicious vegetarian meals and snacks. Since it can be challenging to get certain nutrients when limiting animal products, we made sure to include a variety of healthy foods like nuts, whole grains, plenty of fruits and vegetables, and protein-rich beans and tofu. We also included the calorie totals next to each meal so you can swap things in and out to make this plan work for you. We hope you enjoy this week filled with nourishing and healthy meatless meals. Not sure if this is the plan for you? We offer a variety of meal plans for different health conditions, needs and diets. Find the meal plan that works best for you. Continue reading >>

A Vegetarian Meal Plan

A Vegetarian Meal Plan

Check out our vegetarian meal plan, complete with meal ideas for every time of the day! cup canned garbanzo beans (drained and rinsed) 7 cherry tomatoes, sliced into 2-3 pieces whole wheat pita, cut into wedges for dipping This cookbook features 150 recipes that focus on whole foods and unprocessed ingredients. It skips the artificial sweeteners, fat-free products, and other processed foods, but the recipes are still full of flavor and packed with nutrition. Vegetarian recipes and meal ideas so you can plan more meatless meals into your week. If you don't already, receive monthly updates when new recipes, meal plans, videos, and healthy tips are available. Find tips to adjust the carbohydrates and calories in this month's meal plan to better fit your needs. Calculate the number of calories you should eat each day to maintain your present body weight: Please select an option before you continue. I don't do any physical activity other than what I need to do for my usual activities, such as going to work or school, grocery shopping, or doing chores around the house. I do some moderate exercise every day in addition to doing my usual activities. For example, I walk about 1.5 to 3 miles a day at about 3 to 4 miles an hour. Or I do something else that's moderately active. I am very active every day in addition to doing my usual activities. For example, I walk more than 3 miles a day at about 3 to 4 miles an hour. Or I do something else that's very active. This number estimates how many calories you should eat per day to keep your body weight where it is now. If you want to lose weight, you may need fewer calories. You should talk with your health care team for more personalized recommendations, but this calculator can help to get you started. Continue reading >>

Vegan Meal Plans For Diabetics

Vegan Meal Plans For Diabetics

Diabetics can manage their conditions with a vegan diet. A vegan diet is comprised of plant-based foods that include fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, seeds and whole grains. This diet can provide advantages over omnivorous diets for diabetics, primarily because it includes foods containing monounsaturated fats and omega-3 fatty acids, which are healthy fats, and excludes foods that contain high amounts of saturated fat, which may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Consult your doctor before starting any diet. Video of the Day For breakfast, drink a glass of soy milk and eat a bowl of peaches and peanuts. Soy foods, peaches and peanuts are low glycemic foods that contain sugar, which your body absorbs slowly, helping you control your blood sugar levels. Soy milk is healthy beverage that contains all nine essential amino acids for a complete protein, healthy fats to help lower your cholesterol and reduce your risk of heart disease, isoflavone, an antioxidant that may lower your risk of heart disease and calcium to help reduce your risk of osteoporosis. A healthy low glycemic vegan lunch can include four bean salad with a mixture of vegetables. Beans, such as red kidney, navy, black and garbanzo, contain soluble fiber, an indigestible substance that can slow down the absorption of sugar and reduce your cholesterol levels. A mixture of vegetables, such as Romaine lettuce, carrot, cucumber, tomato, onion, bell pepper, celery and zucchini, provides vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Add in an olive oil-based dressing to obtain monounsaturated fatty acids, a healthy fat that can reduce your risk of heart disease. A healthy dinner can start off with a bowl of split pea soup. Peas are a low glycemic food. For your entrée, have grilled tempeh served with steamed bo Continue reading >>

For 26 Years, I’ve Managed Type 1 Diabetes With A Plant-based Diet

For 26 Years, I’ve Managed Type 1 Diabetes With A Plant-based Diet

Until age 35, my health was very typical for an American. Then in November of 1988, all that changed: my immune system suddenly decided that my insulin-producing pancreas beta cells were foreign and attacked and annihilated them, leaving me with type 1 diabetes. In less than 30 days, I lost 45 pounds and grew deathly weak. Eventually, I was found barely conscious at my work desk and rushed to the hospital, where I immediately received my first shot of insulin. My doctor’s grim prognosis hit like a ton of bricks: even with the best possible diabetic control, I would still suffer many debilitating, chronic complications of the disease. I envisioned myself disabled, blind, amputated, and living in a wheelchair. More on that later… A few days into my hospital stay, a fill-in doctor literally saved my life with a very simple short statement. He said, “No doctor can manage your diabetes.” He explained that the insulin doses are dependent on metabolism which changes from minute to minute, and so are too variable to be predetermined or managed by any other person. He recommended that I keep a log and learn the effects of everything I ate and did, and adjust my diabetes control and lifestyle accordingly. The geek in me took that advice to heart. Back home, I immediately bought a glucometer, a kitchen scale, a nutrition facts book, and a notebook in which to begin logging my new life. I began to learn how to match up the food I ate, my activity levels, and my insulin intake to keep everything in sync. My Doctors Prescribed a Low-Carb, High-Fat Diet All of the nutritional information from my doctor, diabetes magazines and books, and even diabetes management classes strongly promoted a low-carb, high-fat diet. Confusion started to set in, however, as all my test-and-measure Continue reading >>

Getting Started With Vegetarian Meal Planning

Getting Started With Vegetarian Meal Planning

Getting started with vegetarian meal planning Choose a variety of foods, including whole grains, vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts, seeds, and, if desired, dairy products and eggs. Try gradually decreasing the amount of animal protein to allow time to adjust to a plant-based diet. Substitute soy products (tofu, meat substitutes) and legumes for meat, poultry and fish. When using soy products, choose lower-fat versions, such as low fat soy milk and reduced-fat tofu. If you use milk products and eggs, choose lower-fat versions of these foods, such as skim or 1% milk and yogurt, and egg whites or egg substitutes. If you are a vegan, be sure to include a regular source of vitamin B-12 in your diet along with a source of vitamin D if sun exposure is limited. Use fats sparingly; choose unsaturated fats, such as olive, canola and peanut oils, nuts and seeds, instead of saturated fats, such as butter, margarine and cream cheese. Limit your intake of high-fat foods, such as cheeses, whole milk, nuts, seeds, avocados and oils, especially if you are trying to lose weight.Be sure to count the carbohydrates in foods many vegetarian diets can be very high in carbohydrate. Keep your carbohydrate intake consistent and read food labels carefully for their carbohydrate content. Its important to monitor your blood glucose regularly if you are changing to a vegetarian diet. Your diabetes medication or insulin dose may need to be adjusted, especially if you are eating more carbohydrate than before. Continue reading >>

How To Manage Your Diabetes As A Vegetarian

How To Manage Your Diabetes As A Vegetarian

In this article, we will take a look at the benefits of following a vegetarian diet if you have diabetes. Though we cannot recommend a drastic change in one’s diet, we will enumerate the benefits of following a vegetarian diet. Prior to making any major changes in your diet if you have diabetes, it is imperative that you check with your primary care provider, and registered dietician or Certified Diabetes Educator for their input and expertise. Types of vegetarians Vegan A vegan is the strictest type of vegetarian. The vegan diet is referred to as a “total,” or “pure” vegetarian diet. People who are vegans do not eat any meat or animal products, including eggs and dairy products. This also includes fish and seafood. They are on a plant-based diet. To get the protein needed daily on a vegan diet, a person with diabetes could eat soy based products such as tofu or soy milk, all sorts of vegetables, and a variety of beans and whole grains. This is important because proteins are the “building blocks,” and have important functions related to cell structure and function, and even to make the hormone insulin. Because a vegan diet is low in vitamin B12, a multivitamin or supplement is usually recommended for a vegan diet. Ask your doctor before going on a vegan diet plan, and inquire about your vitamin B-12 needs while on a vegan diet. Lacto-vegetarian The lacto-vegetarian doesn’t eat meat or eggs. However, they don’t mind including milk products in their diet. Lacto-ovo vegetarian This group does not eat any meat, but they do enjoy animal products such as eggs and all varieties of milk products, such as eggs or cheese. Other Variations There are some variations on the theme, such as “pescetarian,” who will eat fish. There is also a version called, “raw Continue reading >>

15 Diabetes-friendly Vegetarian Recipes

15 Diabetes-friendly Vegetarian Recipes

Veggie benefits When you have type 2 diabetes, a healthy diet is key to controlling your blood sugar, preventing heart problems, and keeping your weight in check. One way to make your diet more diabetes-friendly is to reduce the amount of saturated fat you eat. Saturated fats occur mainly in animal products, especially beef. It's fine for people with type 2 diabetes to eat lean meats, but if you do want to cut back, these vegetarian recipes are so delicious that you won't even miss the meat. Just be sure to stick to the portion sizes that meet the calorie, carb, sodium, and fat recommendations from your doctor, diabetes educator, or dietitian. Artichoke Quiche Can you guess the secret ingredient in this savory quiche? It's all in the crust. A mix of long-grain rice and reduced-fat cheese replace the quiche's traditional pastry crust, which helps keep your carbs in check. You'll also get a dose of heart-healthy nutrients folate and potassium. Ingredients: Long grain rice, reduced-fat cheddar, egg substitute, dillweed, salt, garlic, artichoke hearts, fat-free milk, green onions, Dijon mustard, ground white pepper, green onion strips Calories: 169 per slice Try this recipe: Artichoke Quiche Veggie Sausage-Cheddar Frittata This frittata cuts saturated fat by using veggie sausage instead of meat, and ramps up the nutritional value of the dish by mixing in antioxidant-packed veggies. Each serving also packs in 21 grams of belly-flattening protein, so if you eat it for breakfast, you're guaranteed to feel satisfied until lunchtime. Ingredients: Green bell pepper, mushrooms, vegetable protein sausage, salt, pepper, egg substitute, fat-free half-and-half, reduced-fat sharp Cheddar cheese Calories: 184 Try this recipe: Veggie Sausage-Cheddar Frittata Black Bean and Poblano Tortil Continue reading >>

Adopting A Vegetarian Meal Plan

Adopting A Vegetarian Meal Plan

An Option to Consider The road to health is paved with vegetables, fruits, beans, rice and grains. – Polly Strand In the United States, vegetarianism has often been considered something of a fad or an aspect of an “alternative” lifestyle. In recent years, however, this way of eating has become more mainstream. Today, up to 10% of Americans call themselves vegetarians, although they don’t all define the word the same way. “Vegans” avoid all foods derived from animals and eat only plant-based foods. “Lacto-vegetarians” avoid meat, poultry, fish, and eggs but include dairy products in their diets along with plant foods. “Lacto-ovo vegetarians” eat eggs in addition to dairy products and plant foods. And “flexitarians” (sometimes called “semi-vegetarians”) follow a primarily plant-based diet but occasionally eat small amounts of meat, poultry, or fish. The reasons people adopt a vegetarian eating style are varied and may include concern for animals and/or the environment, personal health, and culture or religion. Following a vegetarian meal plan does appear to have health benefits. According to the American Dietetic Association, vegetarians are less likely than meat eaters to be overweight or obese or to have Type 2 diabetes. They also tend to have lower blood cholesterol levels and lower blood pressure, and they have lower rates of death from heart disease and prostate or colon cancer. The features of a vegetarian meal plan that may reduce the risk of chronic disease include lower intakes of saturated fat and cholesterol and higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, soy products, fiber, and phytochemicals (chemical compounds found in plants that may be beneficial to human health). In many ways, the characteristics of a well-planne Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan: List Of Foods To Eat And Avoid

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan: List Of Foods To Eat And Avoid

Currently, there are nine drug classes of oral diabetes medications approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Sulfonylureas, for example, glimepiride (Amaryl) and glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL) Meglitinides, for example, nateglinide (Starlix) and repaglinide (Prandin) Thiazolidinediones, for example, pioglitazone (Actos) DPP-4 inhibitors, for example, sitagliptin (Januvia) and linagliptin (Tradjenta) What types of foods are recommended for a type 2 diabetes meal plan? A diabetes meal plan can follow a number of different patterns and have a variable ratio of fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. The carbohydrates consumed should be low glycemic load and come primarily from vegetables. The fat and proteins consumed should primarily come from plant sources. What type of carbohydrates are recommended for a type 2 diabetic diet plan? Carbohydrates (carbs) are the primary food that raises blood sugar. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure the impact of a carbohydrate on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. The main factors that determine a food's (or meal's) glycemic load are the amount of fiber, fat, and protein it contains. The difference between glycemic index and glycemic load is that glycemic index is a standardized measurement and glycemic load accounts for a real-life portion size. For example, the glycemic index of a bowl of peas is 68 (per 100 grams) but its glycemic load is just 16 (lower the better). If you just referred to the glycemic index, you'd think peas were a bad choice, but in reality, you wouldn't eat 100 grams of peas. With a normal portion size, peas have a healthy glycemic load as well as being an excellent source of pro Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Anti-diabetes Diet

The Ultimate Anti-diabetes Diet

One of America's most common killer diseases, type 2 diabetes, jeopardizes the health, quality of life, and longevity of nearly 24 million Americans, according to the American Diabetes Association, and that number continues to rise. New cases have doubled over the past 30 years, and because the disease occurs gradually and often with no obvious symptoms, many people don't even know they have it. People who are overweight are at higher risk because fat interferes with the body's ability to use insulin, the crux of the disease. But a solution to the problem is within reach: a groundbreaking eating plan not only helps prevent this chronic disease, but actually reverses it while also promoting weight loss. Focusing on plant-based meals,the revolutionary plan was developed by Vegetarian Times former Ask the Doc columnist, Neal Barnard, MD, and is backed by the results of his long-term study. Your doctor may not tell you about this diet: dietitians generally counsel overweight diabetics to cut calories, reduce serving sizes, and avoid starchy carbohydrates that raise blood sugar levels. But Barnard's team at the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine and scientists at George Washington University and the University of Toronto thought this might be the wrong approach, considering that carbohydrate-rich rice, legumes, and root vegetables are staples throughout Asia and Africa, where most people are thin and diabetes rates are low. Barnard and his team studied a group of diabetics, comparing the effects of a diet based on standard recommendations versus a vegan-style diet with no limits on calories, carbs, or portions, and just three rules: eliminate meat, dairy, and eggs; minimize fat and oil; and favor low-glycemic foods (such as beans, vegetables, brown rice, and oatme Continue reading >>

A Diabetic Vegan: An Interview With Adrian Kiger

A Diabetic Vegan: An Interview With Adrian Kiger

Adrian Kiger is a writer who grew up in Morgantown, West Virginia. She’s had type 1 diabetes since she was eleven. After years of struggling with weight issues and blood sugar levels, she found a diet that works for her – vegan. Adrian, who has written a children’s book “Veronica, the Vegetarian Diabetic,” talked to ASweetLife about her path to veganism and how it’s helped her improve her health. You’ve been a type 1 diabetic for 25 years. Did you (or your parents) change your diet when you were diagnosed? My mom had always been a gourmet cook and paid a lot of attention to the quality of food in our house, even I before my diabetes came along. We, my dad and two younger brothers, ate only whole wheat bread, wholesome foods, and a big salad that accompanied supper, which we ate together as a family almost every night. Absolutely no sugary cereals or sodas were around. My mom prepared most things from scratch and always had a garden. When I came home from the hospital after being diagnosed, there was Crystal Light drink mix in the house. It was new on the market at the time. There were a lot of sugar-free products too. Other than that, there wasn’t much of a need for a big, dramatic change. My mom also began making some sugar-free desserts. The biggest change was the fact that suddenly someone in the house had diabetes, and the intensity around food was heightened. What led you to become a diabetic vegan? Were you a vegetarian first? I was not a vegetarian first. Although I have never eaten a lot of meat, I did love a good cheeseburger and a tasty piece of salmon. But I never really liked the smell of cooked meat, so I rarely made it for myself at home. My best friend from childhood was raised completely vegetarian, so I was exposed at a young age to the Continue reading >>

Plant-based Weekly Meal Plan By Diet: Low-carb Menu

Plant-based Weekly Meal Plan By Diet: Low-carb Menu

Low-carb eating is a popular type of lifestyle that was first designed to manage blood sugar and aid in weight loss, though many people find it also helps with digestion, diabetes management, and maintaining a healthy weight (even if not trying to lose weight). It’s also been shown to provide some brain-boosting benefits, due the higher amounts of healthy fats and proteins that aid in neurotransmitter and hormone function. The key is to not go no carb, but choose real, whole foods that have little effect on the glycemic index. Low-carb eating is also an easy way to ensure you get enough protein, healthy fats, and non-starchy vegetables into your diet. The good news is, a low carb plan can all be done without one bit of animal products or processed low-carb products. It’s also a great way to cut added and refined sugars and refined/processed grains out of the diet that have been linked to diabetes. Focus foods include dark green leafy veggies, non-starchy veggies, high protein seeds, nuts, beans and legumes, low glycemic fruits such as tomatoes, cucumber, zucchini, pumpkin, berries, green apples, and citrus fruits. If enjoy specialty foods like superfoods and unsweetened non-dairy milk or yogurts, those are also fantastic to eat as well. Enjoy our low-carb eating plan if you’re looking to lower your blood sugar, lose some weight, or possibly reduce some digestive upset associated with gluten, sugar, or sugary, starchy foods. Continue reading >>

Vegan Menu For People With Diabetes

Vegan Menu For People With Diabetes

Quick Links to article contents: This Vegan Menu for People with Diabetes is designed to provide a balance of protein, carbohydrate, fat, vitamins, and minerals while following the basic principles of a diabetic meal plan. Every person who has diabetes has his or her own individual energy and nutrient needs, so please consult your health care professional to make sure our suggestions will work for you. The menu is designed for young adults through seniors. It is not designed for children or people who need close medical management of diabetes. The menus have been written based on the American Diabetes Association's Exchange Lists for Meal Planning. Since carbohydrates are the nutrients that diabetics need to monitor the closest, the exchange lists are designed to help maintain the proper amount of carbohydrates in your diet. Carbohydrates, proteins, and fats are the three major nutrients found in the foods we eat, but carbohydrates have the greatest effect on our blood sugar. Since controlling blood sugar is the number one goal of diabetes management, controlling your intake of carbohydrates can help you achieve that goal. This doesn't mean that carbohydrates should be eliminated; rather, it becomes important for you to plan your meals and snacks so they provide a consistent amount of carbohydrates. And that brings us back to the Exchange Lists. The Exchange Lists include foods from the following food groups: Starches, Fruit, Milk, Vegetables, Proteins, Fats, and Free Foods. Carbohydrates are primarily found in Starches, Fruit, and Milk. One serving (or exchange) of a Starch, Fruit, or Milk will provide 15 grams of carbohydrate (the amount of protein and fat in each carbohydrate exchange will vary, depending on the food). Monitoring serving sizes in this way is also ref Continue reading >>

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