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Vegetarian Diabetes Risk

Type 2 Diabetes Warning - Ditching Two Unexpected Foods From Diet Could Increase Risk

Type 2 Diabetes Warning - Ditching Two Unexpected Foods From Diet Could Increase Risk

Experts suggest this could be due to Vitamin A - a substance which is found in animal foods and dairy products. The vitamin boosts cells in the pancreas that produce the blood sugar-regulating hormone insulin, researchers said. There has previously been no known link between diabetes and Vitamin A - which is found in liver, oily fish and cheese - until now. Dr Albert Salehi, senior researcher at the Lund University Diabetes Centre in Sweden, said vitamin A is found mainly in offal and dairy products. The researchers said milk in Sweden is enriched with Vitamin A and there appears to be no deficiency in people who eat a varied diet. However he said some vegetarians perhaps need to be aware of the problem. The research team from King's College London and the Oxford Centre for Diabetes found the vitamin improves the function of the specialist cells - known as beta cells. They initially discovered the cells contain a large quantity of a cell surface receptor for vitamin A. Dr Salehi said: "There are no unnecessary surface receptors in human cells. They all serve a purpose but which, in many cases, is still unknown and because of that they are called 'orphan' receptors. "When we discovered insulin cells have a cell surface expressed receptor for vitamin A, we thought it was important to find out why and what the purpose is of a cell surface receptor interacting with vitamin A mediating a rapid response to vitamin A." Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. The researchers believe Vitamin A has an important role for the development of beta-cells in the early stages of life - and as people get older. They worked wi Continue reading >>

Nutrients | Free Full-text | Adherence To A Vegetarian Diet And Diabetes Risk: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis Of Observational Studies

Nutrients | Free Full-text | Adherence To A Vegetarian Diet And Diabetes Risk: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis Of Observational Studies

Nutrients 2017, 9(6), 603; doi: 10.3390/nu9060603 Adherence to a Vegetarian Diet and Diabetes Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies Department of Food and Nutrition, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 38541, Gyeongbuk, Korea Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. Received: 11 May 2017 / Revised: 7 June 2017 / Accepted: 10 June 2017 / Published: 14 June 2017 We quantitatively assessed the association between a vegetarian diet and diabetes risk using pooled estimates from observational studies. Electronic database searches for articles published from January 1980 to May 2016 were independently performed by two investigators, and 13 articles (14 studies) were identified. The pooled odds ratio (OR) for diabetes in vegetarians vs. non-vegetarians was 0.726 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.608, 0.867). In the subgroup analyses, this inverse association was stronger for the studies conducted in the Western Pacific region (OR 0.514, 95% CI: 0.304, 0.871) and Europe/North America (OR 0.756, 95% CI: 0.589, 0.971) than studies conducted in Southeast Asia (OR 0.888, 95% CI: 0.718, 1.099). No study had a substantial effect on the pooled effect size in the influence analysis, and the Eggers (p = 0.465) and Beggs tests (p = 0.584) revealed no publication bias. This meta-analysis indicates that a vegetarian diet is inversely associated with diabetes risk. Our results support the need for further investigations into the effects of the motivations for vegetarianism, the duration of the adherence to a vegetarian diet, and type of vegetarian on diabetes risk. View Full-Text Continue reading >>

How To Manage Your Diabetes As A Vegetarian

How To Manage Your Diabetes As A Vegetarian

In this article, we will take a look at the benefits of following a vegetarian diet if you have diabetes. Though we cannot recommend a drastic change in one’s diet, we will enumerate the benefits of following a vegetarian diet. Prior to making any major changes in your diet if you have diabetes, it is imperative that you check with your primary care provider, and registered dietician or Certified Diabetes Educator for their input and expertise. Types of vegetarians Vegan A vegan is the strictest type of vegetarian. The vegan diet is referred to as a “total,” or “pure” vegetarian diet. People who are vegans do not eat any meat or animal products, including eggs and dairy products. This also includes fish and seafood. They are on a plant-based diet. To get the protein needed daily on a vegan diet, a person with diabetes could eat soy based products such as tofu or soy milk, all sorts of vegetables, and a variety of beans and whole grains. This is important because proteins are the “building blocks,” and have important functions related to cell structure and function, and even to make the hormone insulin. Because a vegan diet is low in vitamin B12, a multivitamin or supplement is usually recommended for a vegan diet. Ask your doctor before going on a vegan diet plan, and inquire about your vitamin B-12 needs while on a vegan diet. Lacto-vegetarian The lacto-vegetarian doesn’t eat meat or eggs. However, they don’t mind including milk products in their diet. Lacto-ovo vegetarian This group does not eat any meat, but they do enjoy animal products such as eggs and all varieties of milk products, such as eggs or cheese. Other Variations There are some variations on the theme, such as “pescetarian,” who will eat fish. There is also a version called, “raw Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And The Vegetarian Diet

Type 2 Diabetes And The Vegetarian Diet

From the Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center (DJAJ, CWCK, AM, ALJ, and LSAA) and the Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism (DJAJ), St Michael's Hospital, Toronto; the Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto (DJAJ, CWCK, AM, and LSAA); the Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital, Boston (DSL); the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Washington, DC (NDB); and the VA Medical Center, Graduate Center for Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington (JWA). Address reprint requests to DJA Jenkins, Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center, St Michael's Hospital, 61 Queen Street East, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5C 2T2. E-mail: [email protected] . Search for other works by this author on: From the Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center (DJAJ, CWCK, AM, ALJ, and LSAA) and the Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism (DJAJ), St Michael's Hospital, Toronto; the Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto (DJAJ, CWCK, AM, and LSAA); the Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital, Boston (DSL); the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Washington, DC (NDB); and the VA Medical Center, Graduate Center for Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington (JWA). Search for other works by this author on: From the Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center (DJAJ, CWCK, AM, ALJ, and LSAA) and the Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism (DJAJ), St Michael's Hospital, Toronto; the Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto (DJAJ, CWCK, AM, and LSAA); the Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital, Boston (DS Continue reading >>

Peta Prime: Slice Your Diabetes Risk In Half: Go Vegan!

Peta Prime: Slice Your Diabetes Risk In Half: Go Vegan!

Posted by Heather Moore at 2:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (8) Heres yet another reason to observe Meatless Mondays and Tuesdays and Wednesdays and Thurswell, you get the idea. A new Harvard School of Public Health study shows that eating processed meats and red meat can increase ones risk of type 2 diabetesa potentially deadly condition that can cause blindness; heart, eye, and kidney problems; and nerve damage and affect circulation in the legsby as much as 51 percent! And theyre not just talking about ardent carnivores who eat 10 strips of bacon for breakfast, a couple of hot dogs at the ballpark, and a massive cheeseburger for dinner. Anyone who eats just 3.5 ounces of processed meatequivalent to two slices of bacon or a hot dogevery day has a 51 percent increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. People who eat one 100-gram serving of red meatabout the size of a deck of cardsa day have a 19 percent greater risk of developing the disease. Unfortunately, the average American meat-eater will consume twice that amount of meat each dayand thats no bologna. According to Mark Bittman , Americans eat about eight ounces of meat each dayor about twice as much meat as the average person worldwide. Not surprisingly, America spend more money on health care than does any other nation. Records show that approximately 25 million people in the U.S. now have diabetes and that around 57 million others have pre-diabetes. The saturated fat, cholesterol, and heme iron found in animal products put people at risk of developing diabetesor worsening the disease if they already have it. Fortunately, people can preventand even reversediabetes by eating a healthy plant-based diet. According to the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM), Vegetarian diets provide a nutrient combi Continue reading >>

Vegetarian Diabetic Diet

Vegetarian Diabetic Diet

Tweet Diet is important to maintain health for everyone. However, amongst diabetics, choosing a sustainable and healthy diet is essential. Diet is one of the most important ways of controlling diabetes, and combined with appropriate exercise and medication can offer a fast route to keeping blood glucose stable. A well-balanced vegetarian diet, with an emphasis on low fat, high fibres, and high carbohydrates can be particularly suitable for diabetic patients. See also: Diabetes and Vegetarianism I am diabetic, why eat well? Genetic pre-conditioning aside, obesity is the major risk factor for type 2 diabetics. Diets that are high in fat and a lifestyle lacking in exercise, have lead to obesity spreading like wildfire across the Western world. In the USA, Australia and England obesity is a major and developing problem. Excess abdominal fat lessens bodily ability to utilise insulin, leaving sugar to build up in the bloodstream. See also: Pre Diabetes A recent study by the Diabetes Prevention Program found that diets with low-fat and low-calories, when combined with moderate exercise, lead to significantly reduced risks of diabetes with a figure of over 50 per cent. By contrast, the popular diabetes drug metformin increased insulin sensitivity by just over 30 per cent. The importance of diet is obvious for diabetics. I am diabetic, why go vegetarian? Vegetarianism excludes high-calorie foods and animal products laden with saturated fats. It instead concentrates on foods that give necessary minerals and vitamins that help give diabetics a better chance of blood glucose control. These include whole grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables. Vegetarian diets are rich in fibre, which has numerous benefits. When a diabetic eats a fibre-rich meal, the desire for further food disappea Continue reading >>

Go Vegetarian To Lower Health Risks

Go Vegetarian To Lower Health Risks

Vegetarian dietary patterns are associated with a lower risk of metabolic syndrome, by Nico S. Rizzo and colleagues. Diabetes Care 34:1225-1227, 2011 What is the problem and what is known about it so far? The metabolic syndrome is a group of health problems including obesity, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol levels. People who have metabolic syndrome are more likely to get diabetes and heart disease. Some research has shown links between the type of diet a person follows and his or her chances of getting metabolic syndrome. However, there has been no agreement on which type of diet may be best for helping to prevent metabolic syndrome. Why did the researchers do this particular study? The researchers wanted to find out whether people who follow a vegetarian diet are less likely to get metabolic syndrome. The study included 773 adults who had participated in another study in which they answered a questionnaire about their eating habits and also had lab tests and physical exams done. The researchers looked at participants answers to the eating habits questionnaire and grouped them as vegetarian (eating no meat, poultry, or fish), semi-vegetarian (eating fish but having meat and poultry very infrequently), or not vegetarian (regularly eating meat and poultry). They also gathered information about participants cholesterol and glucose levels, blood pressure, and waist measurements. They then looked for links between any of these factors and the participants eating habits. People who followed a vegetarian diet had, on average, lower levels of glucose, blood pressure, and blood fats called triglycerides, as well as smaller waist measurements. The chance of getting metabolic syndrome was lowest in vegetarians and highest in people who regularly ate meat and poultry. T Continue reading >>

Vegetarian Diet, Change In Dietary Patterns, And Diabetes Risk: A Prospective Study

Vegetarian Diet, Change In Dietary Patterns, And Diabetes Risk: A Prospective Study

Vegetarian diet, change in dietary patterns, and diabetes risk: a prospective study Nutrition & Diabetesvolume8, Articlenumber:12 (2018) Vegetarian diets are inversely associated with diabetes in Westerners but their impact on Asianswhose pathophysiology differ from Westernersis unknown. We aim to investigate the association between a vegetarian diet, change in dietary patterns and diabetes risk in a Taiwanese Buddhist population. We prospectively followed 2918 non-smoking, non-alcohol drinking Buddhists free of diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases at baseline, for a median of 5 years, with 183 incident diabetes cases confirmed. Diet was assessed through a validated food frequency questionnaire at baseline and a simple questionnaire during follow-ups. Incident cases of diabetes were ascertained through follow-up questionnaires, fasting glucose and HbA1C. Stratified Cox Proportional Hazards Regression was used to assess the effect of diets on risk of diabetes. Consistent vegetarian diet was associated with 35% lower hazards (HR: 0.65, 95% CI: 0.46, 0.92), while converting from a nonvegetarian to a vegetarian pattern was associated with 53% lower hazards (HR: 0.47, 95% CI: 0.30, 0.71) for diabetes, comparing with nonvegetarians while adjusting for age, gender, education, physical activity, family history of diabetes, follow-up methods, use of lipid-lowering medications, and baseline BMI. Vegetarian diet and converting to vegetarian diet may protect against diabetes independent of BMI among Taiwanese. The rapid growth of diabetes creates tremendous health and economic burdens worldwide 1 . In Taiwan, diabetes patients incur 2.8 times more medical expense than matched non-diabetes individuals, and used up 29% of total healthcare expenditure 2 , while high blood gl Continue reading >>

Vegetarian Diets And Diabetes

Vegetarian Diets And Diabetes

More and more people are choosing to follow a vegetarian diet for many different reasons. It’s estimated that two per cent of the population now don’t eat meat or fish. Reasons for switching to a vegetarian diet include: the health benefits ethical and moral reasons religious or cultural reasons concern for animal welfare concern about the environment and sustainability taste – some people just don’t like the taste of meat or fish. A vegetarian diet, based on unprocessed foods, can provide many health benefits for us all, whether or not you have diabetes. If you have diabetes, it’s important to be more aware of how what you eat affects your body and, in turn, you’ll hopefully become more health conscious. So what is a vegetarian diet? Are there any ways it could help manage diabetes? Does it provide any health benefits for people with diabetes? What is a vegetarian? According to the Vegetarian Society, a vegetarian is: "Someone who lives on a diet of grains, pulses, nuts, seeds, vegetables and fruits with, or without, the use of dairy products and eggs. A vegetarian does not eat any meat, poultry, game, fish, shellfish or by-products of slaughter." There are different types of vegetarians: Lacto-ovo-vegetarians eat both dairy products and eggs (usually free range). Lacto-vegetarians eat dairy products, but avoid eggs. Vegans do not any products derived from animals – no meat, fish, dairy or eggs. Why try a plant-based diet? Plant-based foods, particularly fruit and vegetables, nuts, pulses and seeds have been shown to help in the treatment of many chronic diseases and are often associated with lower rates of Type 2 diabetes, less hypertension, lower cholesterol levels and reduced cancer rates. These foods are also higher in fibre, antioxidants, folate and Continue reading >>

Protein And Vegetarian Diets

Protein And Vegetarian Diets

Those who follow a vegetarian diet do not eat any beef, pork, poultry, or fish. Some do not include eggs and/or dairy products either. These are all high-protein foods that are plentiful in the traditional American diet. In the past, many people thought those who followed a vegetarian diet were not getting enough protein. However, research has shown that Americans are already getting more protein than they need. Protein is not a problem with a vegan or vegetarian diet when you eat a variety of the many plant foods that provide protein: Dried beans or canned beans that have been rinsed (black, pinto, garbanzo, navy, kidney, etc.) Other bean products (bean spreads, hummus, fat-free refried beans, baked beans or falafel) Nuts and nut spreads (almonds, almond butter, peanuts, peanut butter, walnuts, pistachios, cashews, etc.) Soy and Soy Products (soy milk, edamame, soy nuts, tofu, tempeh) Meat Substitutes (veggie burgers, black bean burgers, meatless chicken nuggets, beef crumbles, etc. These can be found in most grocery stores.) Continue reading >>

Vegetarian Diet: Can It Help Me Control My Diabetes?

Vegetarian Diet: Can It Help Me Control My Diabetes?

Could switching to a vegetarian diet cure my diabetes? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. A vegetarian diet probably won't cure your diabetes. But it may offer some benefits over a nonvegetarian diet — such as helping to better control your weight, reducing your risk of some diabetes-associated complications and possibly even making your body more responsive to insulin. There's no single vegetarian eating plan. For example, some allow dairy products while others don't allow any animal products (vegans). The benefits of a vegetarian diet depend on the type of diet you choose and the food choices you make when following the diet. For most, however, eating a vegetarian diet: Promotes a healthy weight. Vegetarian diets are often lower in calories than are nonvegetarian diets, which can help with weight management. Also, people following a vegetarian diet tend to have lower body mass indexes (BMIs) than do people who follow a nonvegetarian diet. A healthy body weight can improve blood sugar control and reduce your risk of diabetes complications. Improves blood sugar control and insulin response. Eating vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes and nuts — features of a vegetarian diet — can improve blood sugar control and make your body more responsive to insulin. This may mean taking less medication and lowering your risk of diabetes-related complications. But even a vegetarian diet can have adverse effects on blood sugar if it is rich in simple carbohydrates — especially starches, such as potatoes, white rice and white bread. Reduces your risk of cardiovascular disease. A strict vegan diet is cholesterol-free, low in saturated fat and usually high in soluble fiber. A low-fat vegetarian diet can reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease — a common complication of Continue reading >>

Adherence To A Vegetarian Diet And Diabetes Risk: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis Of Observational Studies

Adherence To A Vegetarian Diet And Diabetes Risk: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis Of Observational Studies

Adherence to a Vegetarian Diet and Diabetes Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies Department of Food and Nutrition, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 38541, Gyeongbuk, Korea; [email protected]_jy *Correspondence: [email protected] ; Tel.: +82-53-810-2879 Received 2017 May 11; Accepted 2017 Jun 10. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license ( ). We quantitatively assessed the association between a vegetarian diet and diabetes risk using pooled estimates from observational studies. Electronic database searches for articles published from January 1980 to May 2016 were independently performed by two investigators, and 13 articles (14 studies) were identified. The pooled odds ratio (OR) for diabetes in vegetarians vs. non-vegetarians was 0.726 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.608, 0.867). In the subgroup analyses, this inverse association was stronger for the studies conducted in the Western Pacific region (OR 0.514, 95% CI: 0.304, 0.871) and Europe/North America (OR 0.756, 95% CI: 0.589, 0.971) than studies conducted in Southeast Asia (OR 0.888, 95% CI: 0.718, 1.099). No study had a substantial effect on the pooled effect size in the influence analysis, and the Eggers (p = 0.465) and Beggs tests (p = 0.584) revealed no publication bias. This meta-analysis indicates that a vegetarian diet is inversely associated with diabetes risk. Our results support the need for further investigations into the effects of the motivations for vegetarianism, the duration of the adherence to a vegetarian diet, and type of vegetarian on diabetes risk. Keywords: vegetarian, diabetes, systematic review, meta-analysis Diabetes mellitus is one of the l Continue reading >>

Vegetarian Diet And Cardiometabolic Risk Among Asian Indians In The United States

Vegetarian Diet And Cardiometabolic Risk Among Asian Indians In The United States

Vegetarian Diet and Cardiometabolic Risk among Asian Indians in the United States 1WVU Public Health Training Center, 3313A, Robert C. Byrd Health Science Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9190, USA 2Clinical Nutritionist, Early Intervention, 1901 JFK Blvd, Philadelphia, PA 19103, USA 3Department of Public Health, Food Studies and Nutrition, 562 Falk College, Syracuse, NY 13244, USA 4Department of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA Correspondence should be addressed to Ranjita Misra Received 3 July 2017; Accepted 22 November 2017; Published 18 February 2018 Copyright 2018 Ranjita Misra et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Research studies have shown that plant-based diets confer cardiovascular and metabolic health benefits. Asian Indians (AIs) in the US (who have often followed plant-based diets) have elevated risk for chronic diseases such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and obesity suggesting ethnic vulnerability that imply genetic and/or lifestyle causative links. This study explored the association between this ethnic group and diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome after controlling for demographics, acculturation, family history of diabetes, and lifestyle and clinical risk factors. The sample comprised of 1038 randomly selected adult AIs in seven US sites. Prevalence and metabolic syndrome was estimated, and obesity was calculated using the WHO Asian criteria. Multivariate analysis included multinomial logistic regression. The mean age and length of residency in the US were 47 and 18.5 years, respectively. The Continue reading >>

Healthy Plant-based Diet Linked With Substantially Lower Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Healthy Plant-based Diet Linked With Substantially Lower Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Boston, MA Consuming a plant-based dietespecially one rich in high-quality plant foods such as whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts, and legumesis linked with substantially lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes , according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. This study highlights that even moderate dietary changes in the direction of a healthful plant-based diet can play a significant role in the prevention of type 2 diabetes, said Ambika Satija, postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Nutrition , lead author of the study. These findings provide further evidence to support current dietary recommendations for chronic disease prevention. The study was published online June 14, 2016 in PLOS Medicine. While previous studies have found links between vegetarian diets and improved health outcomes, including reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, this new study is the first to make distinctions between healthy plant-based diets and less healthy ones that include things like sweetened foods and beverages, which may be detrimental for health. The study also considered the effect of including some animal foods in the diet. The researchers followed more than 200,000 male and female health professionals across the U.S. for more than 20 years who had regularly filled out questionnaires on their diet, lifestyle, medical history, and new disease diagnoses as part of three large long-term studies. The researchers evaluated participants diets using a plant-based diet index in which they assigned plant-derived foods higher scores and animal-derived foods lower scores. The study found that high adherence to a plant-based diet that was low in animal foods was associated with a 20% reduced risk of type 2 diabetes compared Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Anti-diabetes Diet

The Ultimate Anti-diabetes Diet

One of America's most common killer diseases, type 2 diabetes, jeopardizes the health, quality of life, and longevity of nearly 24 million Americans, according to the American Diabetes Association, and that number continues to rise. New cases have doubled over the past 30 years, and because the disease occurs gradually and often with no obvious symptoms, many people don't even know they have it. People who are overweight are at higher risk because fat interferes with the body's ability to use insulin, the crux of the disease. But a solution to the problem is within reach: a groundbreaking eating plan not only helps prevent this chronic disease, but actually reverses it while also promoting weight loss. Focusing on plant-based meals,the revolutionary plan was developed by Vegetarian Times former Ask the Doc columnist, Neal Barnard, MD, and is backed by the results of his long-term study. Your doctor may not tell you about this diet: dietitians generally counsel overweight diabetics to cut calories, reduce serving sizes, and avoid starchy carbohydrates that raise blood sugar levels. But Barnard's team at the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine and scientists at George Washington University and the University of Toronto thought this might be the wrong approach, considering that carbohydrate-rich rice, legumes, and root vegetables are staples throughout Asia and Africa, where most people are thin and diabetes rates are low. Barnard and his team studied a group of diabetics, comparing the effects of a diet based on standard recommendations versus a vegan-style diet with no limits on calories, carbs, or portions, and just three rules: eliminate meat, dairy, and eggs; minimize fat and oil; and favor low-glycemic foods (such as beans, vegetables, brown rice, and oatme Continue reading >>

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