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Vanadium Diabetes Treatment

Vanadium Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes: A View To The Future

Vanadium Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes: A View To The Future

Abstract 3-Hydroxy-2-methyl-4-pyrone and 2-ethyl-3-hydroxy-4-pyrone (maltol and ethyl maltol, respectively) have proven especially suitable as ligands for vanadyl ions, in potential insulin enhancing agents for diabetes mellitus. Both bis(maltolato)oxovanadium(IV) (BMOV), and the ethylmaltol analog, bis(ethylmaltolato)oxovanadium(IV) (BEOV), have the desired intermediate stability for pro-drug use, and have undergone extensive pre-clinical testing for safety and efficacy. Pharmacokinetic evaluation indicates a pattern of biodistribution consistent with fairly rapid dissociation and uptake, binding to serum transferrin for systemic circulation and transport to tissues, with preferential uptake in bone. These bis-ligand oxovanadium(IV) (VOL2) compounds have a clear advantage over inorganic vanadyl sulfate in terms of bioavailability and pharmaceutical efficacy. BEOV has now completed Phase I and has advanced to Phase II clinical trials. In the Phase I trial, a range of doses from 10 mg to 90 mg BEOV, given orally to non-diabetic volunteers, resulted in no adverse effects; all biochemical parameters remained within normal limits. In the Phase IIa trial, BEOV (AKP-020), 20 mg, daily for 28 days, per os, in seven type 2 diabetic subjects, was associated with reductions in fasting blood glucose and %HbA1c; improved responses to oral glucose tolerance testing, versus the observed worsening of diabetic symptoms in the two placebo controls. Continue reading >>

Review Vanadium Compounds For The Treatment Of Human Diabetes Mellitus: A Scientific Curiosity? A Review Of Thirty Years Of Research

Review Vanadium Compounds For The Treatment Of Human Diabetes Mellitus: A Scientific Curiosity? A Review Of Thirty Years Of Research

Highlights • The current-state-of-the-art on the use of vanadium in the treatment of human diabetes is here reviewed. • Studies on human patients, with positive results, administered vanadium compounds during very short periods. • Vanadium for diabetes treatment would require a continued administration, which would mean vanadium accumulation and toxicity. • The use vanadium compounds for the treatment of diabetes mellitus is rather a scientific curiosity. Abstract In the second part of the 1980s, and in the 1990s, a number of investigators demonstrated –mainly in streptozotocin-induced (STZ) diabetic rats-that the vanadate and vanadyl forms of vanadium possessed a number of insulin-like effects in various cells. It was hypothesized that oral vanadium could be an alternative treatment to parenteral insulin in the therapy of diabetes mellitus. However, the long-term and/or chronic administration of vanadium compounds should also mean tissue vanadium accumulation and risks of toxicity. The purpose of this review was to revise the current-state-of-the-art on the use of vanadium in the treatment of human diabetes. It has been conducted more than three decades after the first report on the beneficial insulin-mimetic effects of oral vanadium administration in STZ-diabetic rats. Although the antidiabetic effects of vanadium in STZ-diabetic rodents are well supported, in the few studies on human patients with positive results, that are available in the literature, vanadium compounds were administered during very short periods. We conclude that vanadium administration for the treatment of human diabetes is misplaced. Continue reading >>

Alternative Treatments For Diabetes

Alternative Treatments For Diabetes

Treatments for diabetes can include many options. In addition to conventional treatments there are certain claims made about various complementary and alternative treatments for diabetes. Complementary and alternative medicine includes health treatments that are not part of standard Western medical practice. The category encompasses a variety of disciplines that include everything from diet and exercise to mental conditioning and lifestyle changes. But are the claims about various products and therapies accurate? Here are some important things you should know about diabetes and alternative treatments that involve diets and supplements. Chromium has been widely publicized as therapy to improve diabetes control. Although there are several studies that support a role for chromium as beneficial in diabetes, other studies do not confirm this. Currently there are no recommendations for its use in diabetes management. Magnesium has been studied for years as a form of therapy to improve blood sugar control in people with diabetes. A lack of magnesium has been associated with insulin secretion abnormalities and has been associated with diabetes complications. Vanadium is derived from plant sources and has been shown in a few studies to increase a person's sensitivity to insulin. Thus far, no recommendations exist for supplementation to be given to people with diabetes. Plant Foods The following plant foods have been found to help people with type 2 diabetes. Brewer's yeast Buckwheat Broccoli and other related greens Okra Peas Fenugreek seeds Sage Most plant foods are rich in fiber, which is beneficial for helping control blood sugar levels. There are few or no clinical trials with promising results for many of the other herbs being proposed for diabetes, such as garlic, ginger, Continue reading >>

Vanadium Effectiveness, How It Works, And Drug Interactions On Emedicinehealth

Vanadium Effectiveness, How It Works, And Drug Interactions On Emedicinehealth

Atomic number 23, Metavanadate, Mtavanadate, Orthovanadate, Pentoxyde de Vanadium, Sulfate de Vanadyl, V, Vanadate, Vanadio, Vanadium Pentoxide, Vanadyl, Vanadyl Nicotinate, Vanadyl Sulfate, Vanadyl Sulphate. Vanadium is a mineral . It was named for the Norse goddess of beauty, Vanadis, because of its beautiful colors. Vanadium supplements are used as medicine. Vanadium is used for treating diabetes , low blood sugar , high cholesterol , heart disease , tuberculosis , syphilis , a form of " tired blood " ( anemia ), and water retention ( edema ); for improving athletic performance in weight training; and for preventing cancer . More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of vanadium for these uses. There is some evidence that vanadium might act like insulin, or help to increase the effects of insulin. Vanadium is LIKELY SAFE in adults, if less than 1.8 mg per day is taken. At higher doses, such as those used to treat diabetes, vanadium frequently causes unwanted side effects including abdominal discomfort, diarrhea , nausea , and gas . It can also cause a greenish tongue, loss of energy, and problems with the nervous system . Vanadium is UNSAFE when used in large amounts and for a long time. This increases the risk of serious side effects including kidney damage. Vanadium might lower blood sugar . People with diabetes should check their blood sugar carefully and watch for signs of low blood sugar ( hypoglycemia ). Vanadium is LIKELY SAFE in children when taken in amounts found in foods. Don't give children supplements . Not enough is known about the safety of these larger doses in children. Pregnancy and breast -feeding: If you are pregnant or breast-feeding, limit your intake of vanadium to the amount found in food. Not enough is known about the safety of taking Continue reading >>

Vanadium: Diabetes Therapy

Vanadium: Diabetes Therapy

Vanadium is normally mined as a silvery metal. It is useful in non-medical situations because it does not corrode easily. About eighty percent of vanadium mined is used as part of a steel additive. Alloys containing vanadium are extremely touch and are used for various kinds of tools, crankshafts, piston rods, axles, and armor plating. Vanadium alloys are also used in nuclear reactors because the substance absorbs neutrons at a very low rate. Vanadium is found to be an essential nutrient in some species of animals, including humans; however, the research on vanadium in humans is lacking. It is known that humans need very little vanadium for biological purposes. The usual amount of vanadium taken in per day is about 0.01 milligrams daily, which seems to suffice for most biochemical processes found in humans. Too much vanadium has been found to be toxic. Vanadium Use in Animal Studies Vanadium tungstate was given in one animal studies to young male Zucker diabetic fatty rats, which are rats that showed moderate hyperglycemia as part of their pathophysiology. When given to these diabetic rats, vanadium tungstate was found to lower the glucose level to normal levels after taking the substance for about ten days. After the substance was drawn, the glucose levels in these rats were found have elevated glucose levels again, although the glucose levels didn’t rise to the level they were before taking the vanadium tungstate. Rats who were not treated with vanadium tungstate had increasing blood glucose levels throughout the study, reaching levels of up to 450 mg/dL. This high level of glucose was maintained throughout the study. In addition, tolerance to being given glucose into the peritoneum improved in rats given vanadium tungstate but not in those who were untreated. The t Continue reading >>

Vanadium Uses And Health Benefits

Vanadium Uses And Health Benefits

Dill seeds (pictured) are a food source of vanadium.Helena Wahlman/Maskot/Getty Images Vanadium is a trace metal found in certain foods and sold in dietary supplement form. Although it's thought that humans may need small quantities of vanadium for certain biological functions, scientists have yet to determine whether vanadium should be considered an essential nutrient. In alternative medicine, vanadium supplements are touted as a natural remedy for a number of health conditions, including: In addition, some proponents of alternative medicine claim that vanadium can treat hangovers, enhance exercise performance, and prevent cancer. Although research on the health effects of vanadium is limited and dated, there's some evidence that vanadium may offer certain health benefits. Here's a look at several key study findings: Preliminary research suggests that vanadate (a vanadium compound) may help improve the body's metabolism of blood sugar (also known as "glucose"). Additionally, some preliminary studies indicate that vanadate and other vanadium compounds may promote the movement of glucose into cells (where glucose is broken down and used for energy). So far, very few clinical trials have tested the use of vanadium in the treatment of diabetes. However, one of the few human-based studies found that vanadyl sulfate (a form of vanadium) had some beneficial effects on patients with type 2 diabetes. Published in the journal Metabolism in 2000, the study involved 16 diabetes patients. After six weeks of treatment with vanadyl sulfate, some patients showed improvements in glucose metabolism and cholesterol levels. Still, vanadyl sulfate did not appear to fight insulin resistance or help regulate blood sugar levels. Vanadium shows promise for cancer treatment, according to a 200 Continue reading >>

Triple Threat Against Diabetes: Alpha Lipoic Acid, Chromium & Vanadium

Triple Threat Against Diabetes: Alpha Lipoic Acid, Chromium & Vanadium

If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you know there are multiple approaches to managing your health and improving how your body uses insulin. Our staff of naturopathic physicians can help educate you aboutnatures own triple threat to diabetes the powerful supplements called alpha-lipoic acid, chromium, and vanadium. Heres a brief summary of what these powerful supplements can do for you Within the body, alpha-lipoic acid is found in every cell, where it helps turn glucose into energy. People with type-2 diabetes take ALA supplements to help their body use insulin more efficiently, as well as protect against cell damage and diabetic neuropathy. Liver, lean red meat, spinach, broccoli, and potatoes are all high in ALA. Chromium helps cells make efficient use of glucose. Without chromium, insulins action is blocked and glucose levels increase. Chromium deficiency may be a factor in the number of Americans who have diabetes. A chromium supplement can lower fasting blood glucose levels, improve glucose tolerance, decrease insulin resistance, and decrease total cholesterol and triglyceride levels while increasing HDL-cholesterol levels. Good places to find high levels of chromium include meat, fish and fruits. Vanadium supports the bodys use of carbohydrates by improving how cells respond to insulin. Prior to the discovery of insulin in 1922, vanadium was used to control blood glucose. While modern conventional medicine does not recognize vanadium as an essential element in diabetes treatment, available studies suggest that the supplement does have a positive effect on blood glucose levels. Vanadium can be found naturally inmushrooms, shellfish, parsley, dill weed, unfiltered extra virgin olive oil, and grain products. Here, at Heart of Wellness , wefocus on seeing the Continue reading >>

Diabetes Alternative Treatments

Diabetes Alternative Treatments

What are alternative treatments for diabetes? Maintaining blood sugar levels is part of managing diabetes. Doctors often prescribe traditional treatments, like insulin injections to keep blood sugar levels normal. Some people with diabetes also use complementary and alternative therapies (CAM). These therapies aim to treat the body and the mind. Alternative treatments for diabetes include: herbs supplements diet exercise relaxation techniques There is little evidence whether some CAM therapies work. Supplements may be considered “all natural.” But that doesn’t mean they won’t interfere with traditional medications. In fact, there’s no legal definition of “all natural.” Most of us don’t think of diet and exercise as “alternative medicine.” But they do fall under this category. Diet and exercise are important in treating diabetes. What you eat and how active you are impacts your blood sugar level and health. Having a healthy diet and staying active have a positive impact on diabetes. Having an exercise regimen is a standard recommendation for people with diabetes. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends doing resistance exercises twice per week for people without activity restrictions. Examples could be lifting free weights or using resistance bands. Those with type 2 diabetes should also aim for at least 150 minutes of moderate to intense aerobic activity every week. The World Journal of Diabetes published a review of studies about type 2 diabetes and exercise. The review found physical activity is one of the best treatments to control type 2 diabetes. Exercise can reduce blood pressure, improve glucose tolerance, and reduce too-high blood sugar levels. The ADA makes the same recommendations for those with type 1 diabetes. But people with t Continue reading >>

Is Vanadium Safe?

Is Vanadium Safe?

What are the benefits of vanadium, which is included in your daily vitamin/mineral supplement? I’ve read about potential toxicity even at low doses and also that high blood levels of vanadium are noted in people who have manic episodes or suffer from depression. Should I avoid taking this as a supplement as I already suffer from mild depression? Vanadium is a micronutrient found naturally in mushrooms, shellfish, black pepper, parsley, dill, grain and grain products. It exists as both vanadyl sulfate, the form most commonly used in supplements, and vanadate. We’re not sure exactly how much vanadium the body needs; the typical diet provides less than 30 micrograms daily. In the past, vanadium was promoted as a cure for various illnesses at doses ranging from 15 to 100 mg of vanadyl sulfate daily – that’s 1,000 times the dietary dose, but no scientific evidence supports the use of these large amounts, which may be toxic. The small amounts contained in most multivitamin/mineral products – 10 micrograms in my formula – are too low to raise concern about toxicity. A few small studies have indicated that higher doses of vanadium can improve insulin sensitivity and reduce blood sugar in people with diabetes; however, the dosage and long-term safety of this strategy has not been established. Some animal studies have suggested that vanadyl sulfate may help lower blood pressure, but no human studies have been done. Unless a benefit is proved, I see no reason to take vanadium for this purpose. Nor is there any evidence demonstrating that vanadium can improve athletic performance and increase muscle mass, even though vanadium supplements are widely used for these reasons. As far as manic depression (bipolar disorder) is concerned, some evidence suggests that blood level Continue reading >>

Vanadium Supplementation In The Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Vanadium Supplementation In The Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Home Vanadium Supplementation in the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Vanadium Supplementation in the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Vanadium Supplementation in the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus More than 10 million Americans have diabetes mellitus, and close to a million new cases are diagnosed each year.1 More than 90% of these cases are of Type 2 diabetes. Dietary changes are essential to control diabetic symptoms and to avoid the many secondary complications, such as atherosclerosis, cataracts, hypertension, and renal failure. As obesity and sedentary lifestyles proliferate and the population ages, some researchers are warning that diabetes has now reached epidemic proportions.1 Vanadium is an element named after Vanadis, the Scandinavian goddess of beauty, youth, and luster. Vanadium usually is not alleged to bring such blessings, but it has generated interest as a dietary supplement to prevent or treat Type 2 diabetes. Some athletes take vanadium as a performance-enhancing agent, though controlled research does not supported these claims.2 Vanadium is found in many foods, particularly in mushrooms, parsley, dill, and black pepper.3 Vanadium also occurs in many ores and crude petroleum from the Middle East and the Gulf of Mexico, from which it is extracted and purified.4 Animal research generated much enthusiasm about vanadiums potential in treating diabetes mellitus, but the results from human studies have not been as encouraging. Vanadium is one of several elements found in ultratrace amounts in humans. Although distributed throughout the body, adults on average have approximately 100 mcg.5 Vanadium exists predominantly in ionic form, with various charges ranging from -1 to +5. The most common form found to have biological activity is the +4 Continue reading >>

Feeling Fatigued Or Irritable? There's A 1 In 4 Chance You Suffer From Diabetes...

Feeling Fatigued Or Irritable? There's A 1 In 4 Chance You Suffer From Diabetes...

Type 2 diabetes, which involves loss of insulin and leptin sensitivity, is easily preventable, and nearly 100 percent reversible without drugs. About eight percent of the US population have type 2 diabetes, and nearly 26 percent of U.S. adults over the age of 20 and more than 35 percent of seniors are pre-diabetic (insulin-resistant) Type 1 diabetes, also called insulin-dependent diabetes or juvenile-onset diabetes, involves lack of insulin and is relatively uncommon One of the driving forces behind obesity and type 2 diabetes is excessive dietary fructose, which has adverse metabolic effects on your leptin, insulin, triglycerides, and ghrelin (the “hunger hormone”) Diabetes drugs fail to address the underlying problem, and many, like Avandia, can have dangerous side effects. Avandia is linked to 43 percent increased risk of heart attack and 64 percent higher risk of cardiovascular death, compared with other treatments Important lifestyle factors to help prevent insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes include exercise, avoiding fructose, and optimizing your vitamin D levels and gut flora By Dr. Mercola Much of what you have probably heard about diabetes from your health care provider may be incorrect. There is an enormous amount of misinformation circulating from seemingly knowledgeable sources about this epidemic disease. The vast majority of diabetics are clueless about how to reverse it, and many don't even realize that they can. They believe their fate has been sealed and all they can do now is "control" it. More than 50 percent of type 2 diabetics are also not even aware they have diabetes. Diabetes rates for both adults and children are climbing out of control and one in four Americans either have diabetes or pre-diabetes. Unfortunately, by following convention Continue reading >>

Vanadium: Side Effects, Dosages, Treatment, Interactions, Warnings

Vanadium: Side Effects, Dosages, Treatment, Interactions, Warnings

Vanadium is an over-the-counter mineral used for treating diabetes , low blood sugar , high cholesterol , heart disease , tuberculosis , syphilis , anemia , and water retention ( edema ); for improving athletic performance in weight training; and for preventing cancer . Potential health benefits of vanadium: May improve sensitivity to insulin in type 1 and 2 diabetes; may also lower cholesterol levels and blood pressure . There is not enough safety information available about the risks of vanadium to be recommended as a safe supplement. Dosage Considerations Should be Given as Follows: If your doctor has directed you to use this medication , your doctor or pharmacist may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for them. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with your doctor, health care provider or pharmacist first. Vanadium has no known severe interactions with other drugs. Vanadium has no known serious interactions with other drugs. Vanadium has no known moderate interactions with other drugs. Vanadium has mild interactions with at least 26 different drugs. This information does not contain all possible interactions or adverse effects. Therefore, before using this product, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all the products you use. Keep a list of all your medications with you, and share this information with your doctor and pharmacist. Check with your health care professional or doctor for additional medical advice, or if you have health questions, concerns or for more information about this medicine. What Are Warnings and Precautions for Vanadium? This medication contains vanadium. Do not take it if you are allergic to vanadium or any ingredients contained in this drug. Keep out of reach of chil Continue reading >>

Vanadium And Diabetes

Vanadium And Diabetes

, Volume 188, Issue12 , pp 7380 | Cite as We demonstrated in 1985 that vanadium administered in the drinking water to streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats restored elevated blood glucose to normal. Subsequent studies have shown that vanadyl sulfate can lower elevated blood glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides in a variety of diabetic models including the STZ diabetic rat, the Zucker fatty rat and the Zucker diabetic fatty rat. Long-term studies of up to one year did not show toxicity in control or STZ rats administered vanadyl sulfate in doses that lowered elevated blood glucose. In the BB diabetic rat, a model of insulin-dependent diabetes, vanadyl sulfate lowered the insulin requirement by up to 75%. Vanadyl sulfate is effective orally when administered by either single dose or chronic doses. It is also effective by the intraperitoneal route. We have also been able to demonstrate marked long-terrn effects of vanadyl sulfate in diabetic animals following treatment and withdrawal of vanadyl sulfate. Because vanadyl sulfate is not well absorbed we have synthesized and tested a number of organic vanaditun compounds. One of these, bismaltolato-oxovanadiurn IV (BMOV), has shown promise as a therapeutic agent. BMOV is 2-3x more potent than vanadyl sulfate and has shown less toxicity. Recent studies from our laboratory have shown that the effects of vanadium are not due to a decrease in food intake and that while vanadium is deposited in bone it does not appear to affect bone strength or architecture. The mechanism of action of vanadium is currently under investigation. Several studies indicate that vanadiun is a phosphatase inhibitor and that vanadium can activate serine/threonine kineses distal to tbe insulin receptor presumably by preventing dephosphorylation due to inhib Continue reading >>

Systematic Review Of Vanadium Oral Supplements For Glycaemic Control In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus | Qjm: An International Journal Of Medicine | Oxford Academic

Systematic Review Of Vanadium Oral Supplements For Glycaemic Control In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus | Qjm: An International Journal Of Medicine | Oxford Academic

Objective: To assess the effectiveness of oral vanadium supplementation for glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes by conducting a systematic review of the literature. Design and Methods: Eligible studies were identified by searching 14 databases using standardized terms. Experts, study authors and manufacturers were also contacted. Hand-searching was not undertaken. Selection criteria for inclusion in the review were controlled human trials of vanadium vs. placebo in adults with type 2 diabetes of minimum 2 months duration, and a minimum of 10 subjects per arm. Data extraction, assessment of study quality and outcome analysis were undertaken by two independent reviewers. Results: One hundred and fifty one studies were found but none met the inclusion criteria. We proceeded to summarize the state of existing evidence and plan for a future clinical trial by applying revised, less restrictive criteria to our search, for clinical trials of 30150 mg daily oral vanadium supplementation in diabetic humans. Only five were identified. These demonstrated significant treatment-effects, but due to poor study quality, must be interpreted with caution. Treatment with vanadium often results in gastrointestinal side-effects. Conclusion: There is no rigorous evidence that oral vanadium supplementation improves glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes. The routine use of vanadium for this purpose cannot be recommended. A large-scale randomized controlled trial is needed to address this clinical question. The importance of maintaining rigorous glycaemic control to prevent the chronic complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus is well established. 1 The global prevalence of diabetes mellitus is estimated at 246 million, 2 most of whom have the type 2 form and live in areas of the world where ex Continue reading >>

Vanadium & Diabetes, Benefit Or Harm?

Vanadium & Diabetes, Benefit Or Harm?

Author of Pumping Insulin and Using Insulin "I've read several web sites that claim that Vanadyl Sulfate (Vanadium) has a significant effect on lowering blood glucose levels. One web site claims that Vanadyl Sulfate actually mimics insulin and that after five months some people have been cured completely of their diabetes. Is there any support to these claims in the medical arena that you know of? This sounds too good to be true!" Richard Watkins, via the Internet Answer: "Too good to be true" is a great way to summarize today's claims about vanadium. Since 1980 when research first showed this trace mineral could lower blood sugars, tantalizing results have been found in studies of rodents and in a limited number of human studies. Unfortunately, no one has been "cured" while very serious concerns have been raised about the potential damage this mineral might create. Vanadium, along with its heavier cousins, molybdenum and tungsten, can mimic insulin. In other words, in research done with cells, these minerals have literally been able to replace insulin. But read further before coming to any quick decisions on this trace mineral. The positive effects of vanadium at first appeared promising. Vanadium can improve sensitivity to insulin in both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. It has been shown in human studies to have some ability to lower cholesterol levels and blood pressure. Areas of the world where vanadium (and selenium) levels are high in the soil have lower rates of heart disease. After oral intake, effects of the mineral are seen weeks to months later due to its accumulation in tissues like the kidneys and bone. Vanadium has been shown to lower growth of human prostate cancer cells in tissue cultures, and to reduce bone cancer and liver cancer in animals. These widespre Continue reading >>

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