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Vaccines Cause Type 1 Diabetes

Can Vaccinations Increase Or Decrease Risk For Type 1 Diabetes?

Can Vaccinations Increase Or Decrease Risk For Type 1 Diabetes?

Home / Specialties / Pediatrics / Can Vaccinations Increase Or Decrease Risk for Type 1 Diabetes? Can Vaccinations Increase Or Decrease Risk for Type 1 Diabetes? Flu shot, Pandemrix, might reduce diabetes risk in children, study found. Type 1 diabetes results from autoimmune destruction of pancreatic islet -cells. Although the cause is unknown, genetic and environmental factors are believed to be involved. Polymorphisms of class II HLA genes encoding DQ and DR, by far, is the strongest predictor of type 1 diabetes risk. Vaccinations are among the environmental factors that have been studied. It has been suspected that childhood vaccinations may alter the immune system, thereby increasing the risk of autoimmune reactions. However, previous studies have not found any evidence to support the association between vaccination and an increased risk of type 1 diabetes. During the influenza A H1N1 pandemic in 2009, mass vaccination with Pandemrix, a vaccine containing the squalene-based adjuvant ASO3, was done for children and adults in Sweden and Finland. A few months after the vaccination, the incidence of new narcolepsy diagnoses increased in both countries, especially in children and young adults. The mechanism of this effects is not fully understood, but it seems that Pandemrix could contribute to the induction of orexin-specific autoimmunity. As such, researchers hypothesized that this vaccine may not only induce autoimmunity to orexin-producing cells but also to islet autoantigens. A recent observational study, the Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY), was done to investigate whether the risk of islet autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes is increased in children who have been vaccinated with Pandemrix. A population of 8,676 children was recruited for t Continue reading >>

Vaccines And Diabetes

Vaccines And Diabetes

The relationship between vaccines and diabetes has been the subject of several excellent studies. The hypothesis that the timing of vaccines either causes or prevents diabetes was tested in 21,421 children who received the Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine between 1988 and 1990 in the United States. These children were followed for 10 years after receiving the Hib vaccine. The risk of diabetes was indistinguishable from a group of 22,557 children who did not receive the Hib vaccine. Another excellent study evaluating the relationship between vaccines and diabetes was performed using data from the Vaccine Safety DataLink. Four large health management organizations (HMOs) were used to identify children with diabetes born between 1988 and 1997. All four HMOs maintained registries of children with diabetes and cases were confirmed by means of medical records. Investigators compared 252 cases of diabetes with 768 matched controls. Children who received whole-cell pertussis , MMR , Hib , hepatitis B or varicella vaccines were not at greater risk for diabetes than children who did not receive those vaccines. In accord with the Vaccine Safety DataLink study, several other well-controlled retrospective studies found that immunizations were not associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes. In 2011 the Institute of Medicine reviewed studies of adverse events related to vaccines. One of the associations studied was whether the tetanus component of the DTaP vaccine caused type 1 diabetes. The committee concluded that development of type 1 diabetes was not caused by receipt of this vaccine. In another study, investigators followed individuals born in 1974 for 20 years who had or had not received the BCG vaccine and found that receipt of vaccine did no Continue reading >>

Childhood Vaccines Can Cause Diabetes And Metabolic Syndrome, Research Confirms

Childhood Vaccines Can Cause Diabetes And Metabolic Syndrome, Research Confirms

Childhood vaccines can cause diabetes and metabolic syndrome, research confirms Sunday, October 13, 2013 by: Jonathan Benson, staff writer (NaturalNews) Comprehensive research compiled by expert immunologist Dr. J. "Bart" Classen has uncovered the disturbing fact that childhood vaccines are a common cause of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, as well as the barrage of chronic illness symptoms typically associated with metabolic syndrome. Because they tend to overstimulate the immune system, vaccines have the potential to either inhibit the proper production of insulin, resulting in the development of type 1 diabetes, or spur the production of too much insulin, resulting in the development of type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, as many people are already aware, is an autoimmune condition whereby the body attacks the pancreas and destroys the pancreatic cells responsible for producing insulin, a detrimental situation in which the body must be artificially injected with insulin. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, is actually a chronic inflammatory condition marked by the pancreas producing too much insulin, and the body being unable to properly absorb it. According to Dr. Classen, most of the people who develop type 2 diabetes, although often overweight or obese, are not typically responsible for triggering the onset of this potentially deadly condition. Particularly in children, there is clearly another factor involved in the development of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and one that available science on the subject seems to confirm is related to childhood vaccines. "Not only are vaccines causing an epidemic of autoimmunity including type 1 diabetes, but they are causing an epidemic of metabolic syndrome as the immune system acts to suppress the inflammation and autoimmun Continue reading >>

Vaccines Cause Diabetes Another Myth Refuted And Debunked

Vaccines Cause Diabetes Another Myth Refuted And Debunked

Vaccines cause diabetes another myth refuted and debunked If you cruise around the internet, engaging with the antivaccination cult (not recommended), you will pick up on their standard tropes, lies, and other anti-science commentaries. One that has always bothered me, not because that it was a lie, but because I had enough evidence floating in my brain that I was wondering if it were truethat vaccines cause diabetes, especially the Type 1 version. A lot of the vaccine deniers believe that vaccines cause a lot of everything and several claims that vaccines cause Type 1 diabetes (or here ), based on little evidence.As far as I can tell, this myth is based on the research fromJ. Barthelow Classen, M.D., who has pushed the idea that vaccines cause type 1 diabetes, through some magical process that has never been supported by other independent evidence . In another example of the antivaccination worlds cherry picking evidence to support their a priori conclusions, they ignore the utter lack of plausibility supporting any link between vaccines and Type 1 diabetes. At best, Classenhas cherry-picked statistics to support his predetermined conclusions, comparing apples to oranges with health data from different countries, and misrepresenting studies to back his claim . Moreover, Classen seems to come to his beliefs based on population-wide correlations that rely on post hoc fallacies , rather than actually showing causality between vaccines and diabetes. Its like finding that a 5% increase in consumption of Big Macs is correlated with Republican wins in elections. They may happen at the same time, but it would take a laughable series events to show any relationship. Its going to get a bit science-y in this section. Sorry about that, but diabetes is complicated, it never can be Continue reading >>

Vaccines Not Linked To Childhood Diabetes

Vaccines Not Linked To Childhood Diabetes

Vaccines Not Linked to Childhood Diabetes Critics of childhood vaccination programs have proposed links between vaccines and increasing incidences of autism and type 1 diabetes mellitus in children. Strong scientific evidence has accumulated against any association of vaccinations with autism (see Journal Watch Infectious Diseases Dec 12 2003 and Oct 10 2003). Now, using a registry of all children born in Denmark from 1990 through 2000, a national vaccine registry, and a national hospital registry that identified diabetes diagnoses, investigators have performed a longitudinal study of vaccinations and type 1 diabetes. The researchers identified 681 cases of type 1 diabetes among 739,694 children during 4,720,517 person-years of follow-up. Comparison of diabetes rate ratios among unvaccinated children and children who received at least one dose of vaccine (Haemophilus influenzae type b; diphtheria, tetanus, and inactivated poliovirus; diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis, and inactivated poliovirus; whole-cell pertussis; measles, mumps, and rubella; or oral poliovirus) showed no association between vaccination and disease. Rate ratios did not change with succeeding doses of vaccines, with greater total numbers of vaccinations, or in the 2 to 4 years after receipt of any vaccine. Vaccinations were not associated with development of type 1 diabetes in siblings of diabetic children. Findings from this elegant epidemiologic study should refute claims that vaccinations cause type 1 diabetes mellitus in children. The study design eliminated potential selection and recall biases. Setting the record straight on vaccinations and diabetes is in the best interest of public health. Hviid A et al. Childhood vaccination and type 1 diabetes.N Engl J Med2004 Apr 1; 350:1398-404. Cl Continue reading >>

Study: Mmr Vaccine Linked To Type 1 Diabetes

Study: Mmr Vaccine Linked To Type 1 Diabetes

Study: MMR Vaccine Linked to Type 1 Diabetes Bioinformatics analysis links type 1 diabetes to vaccines contaminated with animalproteins and autoreactive T cells express skin homing receptors consistent withinjected vaccines as causal agent Autoimmunity against glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) has been associated with type 1 diabetes. GAD65 (65kDa) and GAD67 (67kDa, to a lesser extent) are involved in type 1 diabetes. Following an anecdotal report of type 1 diabetes diagnosis a few weeks after measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine administration, MMR vaccine contents were examined. Major proteins in the vaccine apart from the measles, mumps and rubella live viruses were chicken embryo cell culture proteins. GAD65 and GAD67 are expressed during chicken embryogenesis. GAD65 Gallus gallus (chicken) protein sequence was obtained from Uniprot. BLASTP was used to determine homology to human GAD65. GAD65 protein comparison between human and chicken reveals 95% sequence homology as shown below. The results above provide strong evidence that chicken embryo cell culture proteins in the MMR vaccine can cause the development of antibodies against chicken GAD65 which cross-react with human GAD65 protein to cause type 1 diabetes. This is very similar to the Pandemrix vaccine causing narcolepsy. Vaccine design and safety processes have fundamental problems that need to be immediately addressedto avoid such devastating consequences. Comment on this article at VaccineImpact.com. Big Pharma and government health authorities are trying to pass laws mandating vaccines for all children, and even adults. Show your opposition to forced vaccinations and support the cause of Vaccine Impact , part of the Health Impact News network . Leaving a lucrative career as a nephrologist (kidney doctor), D Continue reading >>

Causes Of Type 1 Diabetes

Causes Of Type 1 Diabetes

Tweet Type 1 diabetes belongs to a group of conditions known as autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune diseases are when the body incorrectly identifies its own useful cells as an attacking organism. In type 1 diabetes, it is the beta cells in the pancreas which produce insulin that are wrongfully targeted and killed off by specific antibodies created by the body’s immune system. Researchers have been investigating what may cause the immune system to act in this way but to date researchers have theories but no concrete proof. Genetic predisposition Researchers have uncovered a number of genetic regions that are linked closely with type 1 diabetes. Each of these is denoted with a name such as IDDM1. At least 18 different regions have been discovered and some of the genetic areas include an increased susceptibility for other autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and coeliac disease. Whilst genetics offers clues as to why some people are more susceptible to type 1 diabetes, it doesn’t explain why some people with these genes develop type 1 diabetes and why others with these genes don’t. For example, having an identical twin with type 1 diabetes gives you a statistically higher risk but it doesn’t necessarily mean you will develop the condition. Genetics does not explain either why people will develop type 1 diabetes at different ages. Type 1 diabetes is most commonly diagnosed in 10 to 14 year olds but can be diagnosed at any age. Read more on diabetes and genetics Type 1 diabetes triggers Researchers have hypothesised that whilst some people are have a genetic predisposition to type 1 diabetes, there is likely to be an environmental factor that triggers the initial development of type 1 diabetes. Some of the possible triggers that have been suggested include: Continue reading >>

Tb Vaccine Linked To Better Type 1 Diabetes Control

Tb Vaccine Linked To Better Type 1 Diabetes Control

TB Vaccine Linked to Better Type 1 Diabetes Control THURSDAY, June 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Could a vaccine from the early 1900s be the key to preventing serious diabetes complications? Maybe, say researchers from Harvard University and Massachusetts General Hospital. A little more than three years after getting two tuberculosis shots four weeks apart, about 50 people with type 1 diabetes saw their long-term average blood sugar levels drop significantly -- and for at least five years. "The gold standard in treating diabetes is to lower blood sugar. Lowering blood sugar changes quality of life and reduces the risk of complications," said the study's senior author, Dr. Denise Faustman. "After 3.5 years we saw a pretty sharp drop in blood sugar to near normal, and it stayed down," said Faustman, director of Mass General's immunobiology laboratory. "We're not claiming anyone will be insulin-free, but we lowered average blood sugar by more than 10 percent consistently for more than five years. And it's affordable," she added. Plus, the people in the study were adults with long-standing type 1 diabetes -- for at least 10 years, Faustman said. The vaccine has U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval. It's officially known as the bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. It has been used against tuberculosis for about 100 years, Faustman said. The researchers used a measure called hemoglobin A1C that estimates blood sugar levels over two to three months. To prevent complications, the American Diabetes Association recommends most healthy people keep A1C at 7 percent or lower. The treatment arm of the study focused on 12 people with type 1 diabetes -- nine were placed in the BCG group, while three more received a placebo. At the start of the study, the average A1C for the va Continue reading >>

Childhood Vaccinations, Vaccination Timing, And Risk Of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

Childhood Vaccinations, Vaccination Timing, And Risk Of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

Childhood vaccinations, vaccination timing, and risk of type 1 diabetes mellitus. National Immunization Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30341-3724, USA. [email protected] To evaluate suggested associations between childhood vaccinations, particularly against hepatitis B and Haemophilus influenzae type b, and risk of developing type 1 diabetes; and to determine whether timing of vaccination influences risk. We conducted a case-control study within 4 health maintenance organizations (HMOs) that participate in the Vaccine Safety Datalink project of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Study eligibility was restricted to children who met the following criteria: 1) born during 1988 through 1997; 2) HMO member since birth; 3) continuously enrolled for first 6 months of life; and 4) at least 12 months of HMO membership before diabetes incidence date (or index date for controls) unless incidence date was before 12 months of age. All 4 HMOs maintain registries of their members who have diabetes, and we used the registries to identify potential cases of diabetes. We conducted chart reviews to verify that potential cases met the World Health Organization epidemiologic case definition for type 1 diabetes mellitus (ie, a physician's diagnosis of diabetes plus treatment with daily insulin injections). We defined the incidence date of diabetes as the first date that the child received a diagnosis of diabetes. We attempted to match 3 controls to each case. Controls had the same eligibility criteria as cases and were matched to individual cases on HMO, sex, date of birth (within 7 days), and length of health plan enrollment (up to the incidence or index date). The index date for controls was defined as the incidence date of the case to Continue reading >>

Vaccine Safety Do Vaccines Cause Diabetes?

Vaccine Safety Do Vaccines Cause Diabetes?

The 2012 report by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) [1], now called the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), described a number of studies with sufficient validity and precision that all reported a lack of an association between MMR, DTaP or Tdap vaccines and type 1 diabetes [2-7]. Studies published since this report also reported a null, or in some cases even protective, association between vaccination and type 1 diabetes [8-12]. Studies examining inactivated seasonal influenza vaccination in pregnancy reported either no association with, or even a possible protective effect against, gestational diabetes [13, 14]. Persons with chronic illnesses such as type 1 or type 2 diabetes have high morbidity and mortality associated with common infectious diseases such as influenza, hepatitis b, and pneumococcal disease. Thus, routine vaccination per current ACIP recommendations is also strongly recommended for all persons with diabetes by the American Diabetes Association [15, 16]. In addition, the ACIP recommends the administration of hepatitis b vaccine to all unvaccinated adults with diabetes mellitus aged 19 through 59 [17]. Mechanisms that may induce type 1 diabetes include activation of the complement system, in which a cascade of proteolysis and successive release of cytokines functions to amplify the immune response but can damage host cells if not properly regulated, as well as molecular mimicry, which refers to the possibility that similar epitopes shared between self-peptides and foreign peptides (introduced via infection or immunization) inadvertently cause the activation of autoreactive T or B cells, leading to autoimmunity. However, the IOM concluded that there was no mechanistic evidence for an association between vaccination and type 1 diabetes, as the publication Continue reading >>

Relationship Of Measles, Mumps, And Rubella And Type 1 Diabetes

Relationship Of Measles, Mumps, And Rubella And Type 1 Diabetes

Relationship of Measles, Mumps, and Rubella and Type 1 Diabetes Several studies have shown that type 1 diabetes in childhood often coincides with an increase in viral infections such as measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR). In a study, Italian researchers aimed to confirm these findings in the Pavia district of Italy. The research team looked at the link between any new cases of type 1 diabetes as well as new cases of measles, mumps, and rubella between 1996 and 2001. Researchers analyzed data of children who were newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Children who participated in this study were between 0 and 14 years old, and they were enrolled in the Italian Insulin-dependent Diabetes Registry (RIDI) during those same years. The results of their study were published online in early December 2011in the article Type 1 diabetes and measles, mumps and rubella childhood infections within the Italian Insulin-dependent Diabetes Registry. The article will appear soon in Diabetic Medicine. The measles, mumps, and rubella infection rates were calculated using the estimated population at risk as the denominator. This was represented by the number of study participants who did not have the MMR vaccination. Spearmans rank correlation was used to examine the connection between type 1 diabetes incidence and measles, mumps, and rubella. At first, the analysis of the data from all of the registries did not show any statistical significance between age-standardized type 1 diabetes incidence and estimated rates of MMR. But when researchers excluded the data from the Sardinia Registry, they found a significant link between type 1 diabetes incidence and mumps (p=0.034) as well as rubella (p=0.014). However, there was no statistical significance between incidence of measles and diabetes rate Continue reading >>

Vaccines And Diabetes

Vaccines And Diabetes

The relationship between vaccines and diabetes has been the subject of several excellent studies. The hypothesis that the timing of vaccines either causes or prevents diabetes was tested in 21,421 children who received the Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine between 1988 and 1990 in the United States. These children were followed for 10 years after receiving the Hib vaccine. The risk of diabetes was indistinguishable from a group of 22,557 children who did not receive the Hib vaccine. Another excellent study evaluating the relationship between vaccines and diabetes was performed using data from the Vaccine Safety DataLink. Four large health management organizations (HMOs) were used to identify children with diabetes born between 1988 and 1997. All four HMOs maintained registries of children with diabetes and cases were confirmed by means of medical records. Investigators compared 252 cases of diabetes with 768 matched controls. Children who received whole-cell pertussis , MMR , Hib , hepatitis B or varicella vaccines were not at greater risk for diabetes than children who did not receive those vaccines. In accord with the Vaccine Safety DataLink study, several other well-controlled retrospective studies found that immunizations were not associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes. In 2011 the Institute of Medicine reviewed studies of adverse events related to vaccines. One of the associations studied was whether the tetanus component of the DTaP vaccine caused type 1 diabetes. The committee concluded that development of type 1 diabetes was not caused by receipt of this vaccine. In another study, investigators followed individuals born in 1974 for 20 years who had or had not received the BCG vaccine and found that receipt of vaccine did no Continue reading >>

Review Of Vaccine Induced Immune Overload And The Resulting Epidemics Oftype 1 Diabetes And Metabolic Syndrome, Emphasis On Explaining The Recentaccelerations In The Risk Of Prediabetes And Other Immune Mediated Diseases

Review Of Vaccine Induced Immune Overload And The Resulting Epidemics Oftype 1 Diabetes And Metabolic Syndrome, Emphasis On Explaining The Recentaccelerations In The Risk Of Prediabetes And Other Immune Mediated Diseases

Received date: December 17, 2013; Accepted date: February 17, 2014; Published date: February 19, 2014 Citation: Classen JB (2014) Review of Vaccine Induced Immune Overload and the Resulting Epidemics of Type 1 Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome, Emphasis on Explaining the Recent Accelerations in the Risk of Prediabetes and other Immune Mediated Diseases. J Mol Genet Med S1:025. doi: 10.4172/1747-0862.S1-025 Copyright: 2014 Classen JB. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. There has been an epidemic of inflammatory diseases that has paralleled the epidemic on iatrogenic immune stimulation with vaccines. Extensive evidence links vaccine induced immune over load with the epidemic of type 1 diabetes. More recent data indicates that obesity, type 2 diabetes and other components of metabolic syndrome are highly associated with immunization and may be manifestations of the negative feedback loop of the immune system reacting to the immune overload. The epidemic of diabetes/prediabetes appears to be accelerating at a time when the prevalence of obesity has stabilized, indicating that the negative feedback system of the immune system has been over whelmed. The theory of vaccine induced immune overload can explain the key observations that have confounded many competing hypothesis. The current paper reviews the evidence that vaccine induced immune overload explains the disconnect between the increase in prediabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver at a time when the obesity epidemic is waning in children. Twenty years ago it was predicted that a massive increase in immunization would result Continue reading >>

Vaccine In Sight For Type 1 Diabetes? - Ausmed

Vaccine In Sight For Type 1 Diabetes? - Ausmed

And unfounded beliefs such as insulin causing organ damage Research has been conducted for a number of decades into alternative treatment types for replacing the lost insulin, such as insulin pumps, however they still rely on patients being compliant with treatment. In some cases, insulin pumps are only available to a minority of sufferers such as young children who may not be able to comply with an injection regime. An ideal alternative would be to block the immune cells from attacking the pancreas, whilst leaving the rest of the immune system untouched but immunosuppressants would leave sufferers more vulnerable to infection. A vaccine seems to be the most promising solution and something a number of research teams have been working on. Although vaccine research and development is taking place around the world, and has been for quite a while, so far there have been mixed results. The Pre-Point early vaccination entered its second clinical trial in October 2016. The vaccine took the form of powdered insulin administered orally with food, to children aged between two and seven. Believing that T1DMmay be prevented by sensitising the immune system to insulin (which is often the first target of the autoimmune response causing the condition), the trial administers the vaccine to children identified as having high risk of developing diabetes, and a positive immune response had been observed in the first stage. Another promising vaccine study lies with the research funded by Bayhill Therapeutics. This study was carried out by a team of researchers from Europe, the US, and Australia, looking into improving the function of the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. Rather than looking at the auto-immune response as a whole, they believe that targeting one of the pathway Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mystery: Why Are Type 1 Cases Surging?

Diabetes Mystery: Why Are Type 1 Cases Surging?

When public health officials fret about the soaring incidence of diabetes in the U.S. and worldwide, they are generally referring to type 2 diabetes. About 90 percent of the nearly 350 million people around the world who have diabetes suffer from the type 2 form of the illness, which mostly starts causing problems in the 40s and 50s and is tied to the stress that extra pounds place on the body’s ability to regulate blood glucose. About 25 million people in the U.S. have type 2 diabetes, and another million have type 1 diabetes, which typically strikes in childhood and can be controlled only with daily doses of insulin. For reasons that are completely mysterious, however, the incidence of type 1 diabetes has been increasing throughout the globe at rates that range from 3 to 5 percent a year. Although the second trend is less well publicized, it is still deeply troubling, because this form of the illness has the potential to disable or kill people so much earlier in their lives. No one knows exactly why type 1 diabetes is rising. Solving that mystery—and, if possible, reducing or reversing the trend—has become an urgent problem for public health researchers everywhere. So far they feel they have only one solid clue. “Increases such as the ones that have been reported cannot be explained by a change in genes in such a short period,” says Giuseppina Imperatore, who leads a team of epidemiologists in the Division of Diabetes Translation at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “So environmental factors are probably major players in this increase.” A Challenge of Counting Type 1 and type 2 diabetes share the same underlying defect—an inability to deploy insulin in a manner that keeps blood sugar from rising too high—but they arise out of almos Continue reading >>

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