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Vaccine For Diabetes Type 1

Could A Vaccine Be The End Of Type 1 Diabetes?

Could A Vaccine Be The End Of Type 1 Diabetes?

Could a Vaccine Be the End of Type 1 Diabetes? A doctor at City of Hope in Duarte is working on a revolutionary cure If the human body were like the economy, your blood sugar would be the local currency. Its value should be stable like the dollar, but type 1 diabetes makes it boomerang like Bitcoin. Sugar too high? You could go into a coma. Too low and you could die in your sleep. Its a horrible disease, says Dutch immunologist Bart Roep. The symptoms often manifest in childhood, and if you are diagnosed before age five, your prognosis is worse than if you had leukemia, he adds. Determined to improve those odds, Roep left the Netherlands to join City of Hope hospital in Duarte in 2016 and now leads a project with the goal of curing type 1 diabetes (T1D) in six years. Such a tight timetable may sound, at best, ambitious, but City of Hope backs it with a $50 million grant and plenty of academic street cred. Although better known for its cancer treatment, the institution benefits from a legacy of pioneering diabetes research dating to the 1970s, when two of its scientists helped develop the first synthetic human insulin, the protein that regulates blood sugar. That insulin, which T1D patients must administer daily via syringes or pumps, has saved millions of lives, but it sheds no light on the diseases origins. An autoimmune disorder, T1D arises when the immune system lays siege to the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. (This is quite different from type 2 diabetes, which usually appears later in life, doesnt involve the immune system, and is linked to lifestyle issues like obesity.) About 1.5 million Americans are affected by T1D, and the search for the root cause has turned up a skein of possible hereditary and environmental factors. For example, although more tha Continue reading >>

Fact Check: Finnish Researchers Set To Start Type 1 Diabetes Vaccine Trials?

Fact Check: Finnish Researchers Set To Start Type 1 Diabetes Vaccine Trials?

Finnish Researchers Set to Start Type 1 Diabetes Vaccine Trials? Scientists at Finnish universities are targeting a strand of viruses linked to Type 1 diabetes, and human trials for a vaccine will begin in 2018. In July 2017, it was announced that Finnish researchers would begin human trials of a Type 1 diabetes vaccine in 2018. On 19 July 2017, the Finnish news web site Yle reported that a group of Finnish researchers had developed a vaccine for Type 1 diabetes, and that human trials were set to begin in 2018: A vaccine for type 1 diabetes developed by Finnish researchers will be tested on mainly Finnish human subjects in late 2018, researchers announced on Tuesday.The scientists first found that the prototype works effectively and safely on mice, and now saythat the vaccine could be in mainstream use within eight years if the coming rounds of tests prove successful. One skeptical reader asked us to check out the story. Yle is Finlands public broadcasting corporation (akin to NPR or the BBC). T he names of the lead researchers and their universities are real, the announcement of vaccine trials is real, and the story is true. On 18 July 2017, the University of Tampere in Finland announced that Professor of Virology Heikki Hyty and his team of researchers had identified a particular strand of enteroviruses (viruses transmitted through the intestines) linked to Type 1 diabetes, and developed a vaccine against them. Already now it is known that the vaccine is effective and safe on mice, Hyty said. The developing process has now taken a significant leap forward as the next phase is to study the vaccine in humans. In the first clinical phase, the vaccine will be studied in a small group of adults to ensure the safety of the vaccine. In the second phase, the vaccine will be Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Vaccine To Be Tested In 2018

Type 1 Diabetes Vaccine To Be Tested In 2018

Type 1 diabetes vaccine to be tested in 2018 Type 1 diabetes vaccine to be tested in 2018 Researchers urge celiac disease screenings for children with type 1 diabetes 05 July 2017 Scientists behind a prototype vaccine to prevent children from getting type 1 diabetes are looking to test it on humans next year, it has been announced. For 20 years, a team of researchers from Finland's University of Tampere have been working on a drug which aims to protect the body against a virus which triggers type 1 diabetes . Now, following successful tests on mice, they are planning to start clinical trials in 2018, although no results of significance are expected for eight years. The treatment would not cure type 1 diabetes , but potentially stop it from developing in children who get a certain virus. Researchers from across the world have so far failed to understand why insulin-producing beta cells are firstly identified and then destroyed, which characterises the development of the condition. However, genetics could hold the key in creating different types of 'ID tags' known as human leukocyte markers, which flag up the beta cells. Professor Heikki Hyty, from the university's School of Medicine, has developed a theory behind one of the ways this process is started, involving an infection by a type of enterovirus. This group of viruses can also cause polio, hepatitis and meningitis as well as hand, foot and mouth disease. The Finnish team has already established a link between a strand of enterovirus known as coxsackievirus B1 and the reaction that sparks the body into attacking beta cells. In 2014, Professor Hyty found that six strands of the B group of coxsackieviruses were linked to type 1 diabetes in children . Also, data from American suggests that, in 2007, a quarter of the 44 Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Reversal May Be Possible With Tb Vaccine

Type 1 Diabetes Reversal May Be Possible With Tb Vaccine

Type 1 Diabetes Reversal May Be Possible with TB Vaccine BCG therapy may change current methods to restoring and enhancing immune response This article is part of MPR's coverage of the American Diabetes Association's 77th Scientific Sessions (ADA 2017) , taking place in San Diego, CA. Our staff will report on medical research and technological advances in diabetes and diabetes education, conducted by experts in the field. Check back regularly for more news from ADA 2017 . According to data from a recent Phase 1 trial directed by the Massachusetts General Hospital Immunobiology Laboratory, the vaccine bacillus Calmette-Gurin (BCG) may have the potential to reverse type 1 diabetes. This interim report was presented at the 2017 American Diabetes Association 77th Scientific Session, San Diego, CA, by Denise Faustman, MD, PhD and her teamthe first to document the reversal in mice. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease presenting as an overall loss of pancreatic islets which are responsible for the endocrine activity of the pancreas. Autoreactive T cells are not adequately controlled by regulatory T (Treg) cells, and destroy glucose-sensitive beta cells which produce insulin. The approach to reversing autoimmune irregularity has been theorized and in development in previous studies. "We and other global efforts have known for some time that restoring beneficial Treg cells might halt the abnormal self-reactivity in type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune diseases, but therapies to restore this immune balance have not achieved long-lasting results, stated Dr. Faustman. Similar A1C Reductions, Less Hypoglycemia with Xultophy Compared to Basal-Bolus Tx BCG therapy may change current methods to restoring and enhancing immune response. In international studies, repeat vaccinations Continue reading >>

Fact Check: Diabetes Vaccine Announced?

Fact Check: Diabetes Vaccine Announced?

On 18 September 2016, the English-language clickbait web site called Time for You shared an article reporting that The vaccine against diabetes promises to be the solution for the advance of the illness and even reverses its effects. The story cited work of two supposed Mexican scientists, Salvador Chacn Ramrez, president of the Live Your Diabetes Foundation, and Lucila Zrate Ortega, of the Mexican Association for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Autoimmune Diseases, along with Doctor Jorge Gonzlez Ramrez, using a therapy called auto-chemotherapy. According to the Time for You article (which appeared to rely on a bad auto-translation), the procedure for immunizing against diabetes works as follows: About 5 cm of blood were extracted from each patient and then they were injected with 55 milliliters of blood solution. It is refrigerated at five degrees centigrade. When the temperature changes to 37 grades, since it goes out of the body to a new temperature, a shock happens takes place and what was a problem turns into the solution inside the bottle, in such a way that the genetic and metabolic flaw is corrected or inmunometabolised in the vaccine. The vaccine lasts for 60 days and the treatment is about one year. This vaccine is much more than a medicine; it is a medical practice that has turned into an alternative, a possible solution to stop the complications that are chronically degenerative: embolism, loss of ear; amputation, renal insufficiency and blindness, etc. The article referred to events in Mexico that transpired in November 2015. According to the Spanish-language daily newspaper, La Jornada , the organization Live Your Diabetes held a press conference announcing their alleged discovery on 25 November 2015, but they were shut down by the Mexican government with Continue reading >>

Vaccine Therapies For The Prevention Of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

Vaccine Therapies For The Prevention Of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

Vaccine therapies for the prevention of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Autoimmunity Research Unit, The Canberra Hospital, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia and John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia. [email protected] Type 1 diabetes mellitus results from immune-mediated destruction of pancreatic beta-cells, leading to loss of insulin production. Strategies to prevent or reverse diabetes development include beta-cell protection, regeneration, or replacement. Recent advances in our understanding of the autoimmune process leading to diabetes has generated interest in the potential use of immunomodulatory agents that may collectively be termed vaccines, to prevent type 1 diabetes. Vaccines may work in various ways, including changing the immune response from a destructive (e.g. Th1) to a more benign (e.g. Th2) response, inducing antigen-specific regulatory T cells, deleting autoreactive T cells, or preventing immune cell interaction. To date, most diabetes vaccine development has been in animal models, with relatively few human trials having been completed. A major finding of animal models such as the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is that they are extremely sensitive to diabetes protection, such that many interventions that protect mice are not successful in humans. This is particularly evident for human insulin tolerance studies, including the Diabetes Prevention Trial-1, where no human protection was seen from insulin despite positive NOD results. Further challenges are posed by the need to translate protective vaccine doses in mice to effective human doses. Despite such problems, some promising human vaccine data are beginning to emerge. Recent pilot studies have s Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Vaccine Moving To Human Trials In Finland

Type 1 Diabetes Vaccine Moving To Human Trials In Finland

It has long been hypothesized that viral infections play a significant role in the development of type 1 diabetes. Researchers in Finland have been investigating this connection for over 25 years and now believe they have targeted the particular virus group that can trigger the disease. After developing a prototype vaccine the team is now moving to human clinical trials in 2018. Though not as common as type 2 diabetes, type 1 diabetes it still affects millions of people worldwide. The disease generally begins in childhood and an estimated 80,000 new cases are diagnosed worldwide every year. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the immune system destroys insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Recent research suggests that enteroviruses could play a strong role in the onset of type 1 diabetes, with several studies showing that the presence of an enteroviral infection significantly increases the chance of a person developing the disease. The causal relationship between an enteroviral infection and type 1 diabetes is still unknown, but one study suggests it could act as "a critical trigger to push an already dysfunctional metabolic equilibrium over the brink." A research group at the University of Tampere initially looked at the more than 100 different enterovirus types found in humans. After pinpointing six specific viral strains that could be associated with type 1 diabetes they ultimately identified the one type that held the biggest risk. A prototype vaccine was then produced and successfully tested on animals. "Already now it is known that the vaccine is effective and safe on mice," says Heikki Hyöty, Professor of Virology and lead on the research. "The developing process has now taken a significant leap forward as the next phase is to study the vaccine in humans." Thre Continue reading >>

Human Study Re-ignites Debate Over Controversial Diabetes

Human Study Re-ignites Debate Over Controversial Diabetes "cure"

* TB vaccine seen attacking disease-caused autoimmunity * Long-term type 1 diabetes patients produce insulin again * Effect lasts for a week, further trials to boost dosing NEW YORK, Aug 8 (Reuters) - A controversial experimental cure for type 1 diabetes, using a tuberculosis vaccine invented a century ago, appears to temporarily vanquish the disease, according to a study in a handful of patients led by a scientist long criticized by her peers. There is no guarantee the results from this early-stage trial, published on Wednesday in the journal PLoS One, will stand up in larger studies, which are now under way. Other diabetes researchers criticized it for going beyond the evidence in its claims about what caused the observed effects. If the findings do hold up, however, they would mean that the generic bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine, in use since 1921, can regenerate insulin-secreting cells in the pancreas, whose loss causes the disease. "We think we're seeing early evidence of effectiveness," said immunology researcher Denise Faustman of Massachusetts General Hospital, who led the trial. "This simple, inexpensive vaccine attacks the autoimmunity underlying type 1 diabetes." That autoimmunity, in which the immune system turns on the body's own cells rather than invaders, destroys insulin-producing "islet" cells in the pancreas. As a result, patients have to regularly inject themselves with insulin to control their blood sugar, or glucose. Also known as juvenile diabetes, the disease affects as many as 3 million Americans, estimates JDRF (formerly the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation). Another 30,000 people in the United States, half of them adults, are diagnosed every year with the disease, which has long been considered incurable. "We found that even low do Continue reading >>

Vaccine Against Type 1 Diabetes 'shows Promise'

Vaccine Against Type 1 Diabetes 'shows Promise'

News of a successful trial of a vaccine for type 1 diabetes has been covered by BBC News, who reported that, “It may be possible to reverse type 1 diabetes by training a patient’s own immune system to stop attacking their body.” Type 1 diabetes is a condition where the body’s immune system destroys the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. This means people with the condition require lifelong insulin treatment. It’s possible to block the effects of the immune system by using immunosuppressants, but this would make people more vulnerable to infections. An ideal type 1 diabetes treatment would block the immune cells attacking the pancreas while leaving the rest of the immune system untouched. New research suggests that this could be possible. A trial of a new vaccine compared its effects against placebo in just 80 people. The vaccine improved the function of the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas, but its effects seemed temporary as beta cell functioning declined soon after the regular vaccine injections were stopped. This suggests that regular vaccine injections might be required for it to work long-term, but this was not tested directly. There are thought to be many different substances that are recognised by, and possibly trigger, immune cells to attack the beta cells of the pancreas. This vaccine is quite specific in preventing just one such pathway. This means the vaccine may lead to an improvement in symptoms, but not a complete cure for the condition. Nonetheless, these are positive results and are likely to spur on larger and longer term studies. If all goes well, it could provide the basis for a new treatment approach for type 1 diabetes. Where did the story come from? The study was carried out by researchers from Europe, the US and Au Continue reading >>

Bcg Vaccine Could Restore Proper Immune Response In Type 1 Diabetes

Bcg Vaccine Could Restore Proper Immune Response In Type 1 Diabetes

The results of a new clinical trial testing a type 1 diabetes vaccine have been presented at the 75th Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association. The genetic vaccine bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been shown to reverse advanced type 1 diabetes in mice, and could help to restore proper immune response to insulin-producing beta cells. The findings of this FDA-approved clinical trial were presented by principal investigator Dr Denise Faustman, PhD, director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Immunobiology Laboratory. The BCG vaccine is based on a harmless strain of bacteria related to one that causes tuberculosis. It is also approved by the FDA for treatment of bladder cancer. Faustman explained the BCG could induce a permanent gene expression that restores regulatory T cells (Tregs), helping to prevent the immune system attack which characterises type 1 diabetes. "BCG is interesting because it brings into play so many areas of immunology that we as a community have been looking at for decades, including Tregs and the hygiene hypothesis," said Faustman. "Repeat BCG vaccination appears to permanently turn on signature Treg genes, and the vaccine's beneficial effect on host immune response recapitulates decades of human co-evolution with myocbacteria, a relationship that has been lost with modern eating and living habits." Researchers worldwide have been examining the benefits of Tregs, but Faustman said that existing therapies have struggled to achieve long-term results. However, with BCG able to restore Tregs, this provides a clearer picture as to how vaccination works to reset the immune system within type 1 diabetes. Faustman's team was the first to document type 1 diabetes reversal in mice and in a subsequent phase I trial demonstrated successful hu Continue reading >>

The Vaccine For Type-1 Diabetes Is Moving Forward

The Vaccine For Type-1 Diabetes Is Moving Forward

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. A promising vaccine that has the potential to reverse the symptoms of type I diabetes—an autoimmune disease often diagnosed in childhood—is heading on to a phase II trial, which will test the vaccine on humans with the chronic disease. The vaccine, called bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has succeed in reversing type 1 diabetes in a trial among mice and in a phase I trial in 103 humans. The new trial, which the researchers announced on Sunday at the Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association, will last for five years and will test the effect of the vaccine on people with type 1 diabetes among adults between ages 18 to 60. The vaccine may be able to improve the disease in people who have small but detectable levels of insulin coming from their pancreas. Lead researcher Dr. Denise Faustman, director of immunobiology at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), estimates that about one million people with type 1 diabetes still produce some insulin. BCG is already FDA-approved as a vaccine for tuberculosis and as a bladder cancer treatment. Researchers have shown that the vaccine can eliminates problematic white blood cells that lead to type 1 diabetes by destroying the beta cells that make and release insulin into the blood. Previously, the study authors showed they were able to temporarily eliminate the abnormal white blood cells and provide a small return of insulin. The new trial will provide more frequent doses of the vaccine over a five year periods in 150 adults with the disease. The researchers hope that the vaccine will produce better blood sugar control and could be used to treat advanced disease. “Type 1 diabetics are a pretty skeptical audience,” says Faustman. “There’s been a lot of disappointment [f Continue reading >>

Could Future Vaccines Cure Type 1 Diabetes?

Could Future Vaccines Cure Type 1 Diabetes?

For years there has been talk about developing a vaccine for type 1 diabetes, but is it actually possible? While an effective vaccine to cure or even treat type 1 diabetes still remains out of reach, researchers believe that we are not far off from developing one. Many researchers would urge you to remain cautiously optimistic about a vaccine becoming available anytime soon. However, some studies, being conducted around the world, are showing promise for the development of a diabetes vaccine. You may be wondering, why a vaccine? To understand why diabetes researchers are looking to develop a vaccine, it may be best to examine what we know about type 1 diabetes first. What is Type 1 Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes, unlike type 2 diabetes, is an autoimmune disease. Also known as juvenile diabetes because it tends to develop in childhood, type 1 diabetes causes the body to attack itself. In the case of autoimmune diseases, the body’s immune system, designed to protect our body from foreign invaders, malfunctions and attacks our own cells. While there are many forms of autoimmune disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, type 1 diabetes is one of the most common. In the U.S. alone it is estimated around 1.25 million people have type 1 diabetes. This condition occurs when beta cells are mistaken for invaders and attacked by the immune system. Beta cells are cells in the pancreas responsible for producing insulin. As more and more beta cells are eliminated, the body begins to lose the capacity to produce insulin. Although type 1 diabetes can be treated through regular insulin injections, the injections can be painful and inconvenient. Researchers hope that a vaccine will be able to reduce the need for regular injections or cure the disease altogether. How a Vaccine Would W Continue reading >>

A Vaccine For Type 1 Diabetes Is Headed For Human Trials In 2018

A Vaccine For Type 1 Diabetes Is Headed For Human Trials In 2018

After 25 years of dedicated research, a potential vaccine for Type 1 Diabetes developed in Finland is headed for human clinical trials. Type 1 Diabetes By the year 2050, it’s anticipated that in the U.S. alone, 5 million people will be diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D). This autoimmune disease, which affects children and adults, is currently unable to be prevented or cured. In order to manage T1D, people with the condition must constantly monitor their blood glucose levels, and manage those levels through insulin injection, activity, and diet in order to avoid life-threatening complications. It has been suggested, for quite some time now, that T1D could be related to viral infection, which has lead some to propose the possibility of creating a vaccine for the disease. In Finland, researchers have been exploring this connection and potential vaccine for approximately 25 years. After such a laborious scientific journey, they believe they’ve found the viral group that can trigger T1D. The hard work seems to have paid off — as the team has created a prototype vaccine which will move into human clinical trials by 2018. The Future of T1D While it’s unlikely that the vaccine would become an immediate cure-all T1D, if the trials prove successful, it will dramatically shift the future of the disease. Up until this point, patients with T1D have been required to vigilantly self-manage. Complications of the disease, which can result when it goes undiagnosed or is ineffectively managed, can range from heart attack to stroke, amputation, kidney failure, and even blindness. The threat of these complications constantly hangs over the heads of those with T1D. Unfortunately, as the team notes, this vaccine would not be a cure for T1D, but if it proves successful in preventing Continue reading >>

Vaccine Information For Adults

Vaccine Information For Adults

Each year thousands of adults in the United States get sick from diseases that could be prevented by vaccines — some people are hospitalized, and some even die. People with diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) are at higher risk for serious problems from certain vaccine-preventable diseases. Getting vaccinated is an important step in staying healthy. If you have diabetes, talk with your doctor about getting your vaccinations up-to-date. Why Vaccines are Important for You Diabetes, even if well managed, can make it harder for your immune system to fight infections, so you may be at risk for more serious complications from an illness compared to people without diabetes. Some illnesses, like influenza, can raise your blood glucose to dangerously high levels. People with diabetes have higher rates of hepatitis B than the rest of the population. Outbreaks of hepatitis B associated with blood glucose monitoring procedures have happened among people with diabetes. People with diabetes are at increased risk for death from pneumonia (lung infection), bacteremia (blood infection) and meningitis (infection of the lining of the brain and spinal cord). Immunization provides the best protection against vaccine-preventable diseases. Vaccines are one of the safest ways for you to protect your health, even if you are taking prescription medications. Vaccine side effects are usually mild and go away on their own. Severe side effects are very rare. Vaccines You Need There may be other vaccines recommended for you based on your lifestyle, travel habits, and other factors. Take the Adult Vaccine Quiz and talk with your healthcare professional about which vaccines are right for you. Getting Vaccinated You regularly see your provider for diabetes care, and that is a great place to start! If yo Continue reading >>

Juvenile Diabetes And Vaccination: New Evidence For A Connection

Juvenile Diabetes And Vaccination: New Evidence For A Connection

In the fall of 1997, the Centers for Disease Control confirmed that the number of Americans living with diabetes has skyrocketed in the past 40 years with a record sixfold increase in this chronic disease since 1958. It is estimated that nearly 16 million Americans are suffering with diabetes and 5 million more may have it but not know it. Over the past four decades, intensive national mass vaccination campaigns have dramatically increased vaccination rates among American children who now are getting 34 doses of 10 different viral and bacterial vaccines before they enter kindergarten. Recent published data in the medical literature suggest increasing numbers of childhood vaccines may be playing a role in the big jump in the number of cases of juvenile diabetes. The most frequent kind of diabetes is diabetes mellitus, a chronic degenerative disease caused when the pancreas either fails to produce a protein hormone called insulin or the body's cells are resistant to the action of insulin. Without insulin, the body cannot process and use glucose, a blood sugar which is a chief source of energy for living organisms and is found in certain foods like fruit. If the body's cells have become resistant to insulin, glucose cannot be moved from the blood to cells in order to be transformed into energy. There are two types of diabetes mellitus: Type I, called insulin-dependent juvenile diabetes, and Type II, called adult-onset diabetes. Type I Diabetes - Type I diabetes, also called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), occurs mostly in children and young adults. Five to 10 percent of those diagnosed with diabetes are Type I diabetics. In Type I diabetes, the body cannot produce insulin. This causes glucose to build up in the bloodstream and be secreted from the body in the Continue reading >>

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