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Va Disability Rating For Diabetes Type 1

Veterans And Diabetes

Veterans And Diabetes

The VAs focus on diabetes care, research, and training When diabetes advocates talk about groups of people at higher risk for the disease, they usually mention certain racial and ethnic groups. They might bring up age or obesity as risk factors. But veterans span all demographics and, as a group, nearly a quarter live with diabetes. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) reports that nearly one in four men and women (24 percent) who served their country have diabetes. Thats much higher than the 9 percent of all Americans who have diabetes. There are a few theories as to why diabetes disproportionately affects veterans. For one, they have a higher rate of overweight and obesity than the general population: More than 70 percent of patients in VA facilities are overweight or obese. VA patients also tend to be older, have lower incomes, and have limited access to high-quality, healthy foodsocial disparities that can lead to greater diabetes risk, says Linda Kinsinger, MD, MPH, chief consultant for preventive medicine at the Veterans Health Administrations National Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. And the VA has been examining suspected links between type 2 diabetes and herbicides such as Agent Orange, which was used during warfare by U.S. troops in the Vietnam War, as well as other aspects of war that could increase veterans risks for developing diabetes. Nearly 23 million veterans currently live in the United States, and 9 million are enrolled in the Veterans Health Administration, or VHA, with about 6.5 million seen each year. The VA offers medical facilities across the country to care for veterans, as well as education and other benefit programs that touch nearly every American family. The VHA is the largest health care system in the country, av Continue reading >>

Va Diabetes Ratings | Veterans Resources

Va Diabetes Ratings | Veterans Resources

Discussion in ' Diabetes ' started by stumpy , Jun 26, 2004 . Requiring more than one daily injection of insulin, restricted 100 diet, and regulation of activities (avoidance of strenuous occupational and recreational activities) with episodes of ketoacidosis or hypoglycemic reactions requiring at least three hospitalizations per year or weekly visits to a diabetic care provider, plus either progressive loss of weight and strength or complications that would be compensable if separately evaluated.......................... Requiring insulin, restricted diet, and regulation of 60 activities with episodes of ketoacidosis or hypoglycemic reactions requiring one or two hospitalizations per year or twice a month visits to a diabetic care provider, plus complications that would not be compensable if separately evaluated.................................................... Requiring insulin, restricted diet, and regulation of 40 activities................................................... Requiring insulin and restricted diet, or; oral hypoglycemic 20 agent and restricted diet.................................... Manageable by restricted diet only............................ 10 Note (1): Evaluate compensable complications of diabetes separately unless they are part of the criteria used to support a 100 percent evaluation. Noncompensable complications are considered part of the diabetic process Note (2): When diabetes mellitus has been conclusively diagnosed, do not request a glucose tolerance test solely for I have no idea what you mean by a D&C unless you are having female problems . You must mean Compensation & Pension (C&P) exam. Is that right? The normal procedure is to file a claim for compensation due to service connected (SC) disabilities with the nearest Veterans Admini Continue reading >>

New Strict Standard For Va Diabetes Ratings | Veterans Disability Attorney Blog

New Strict Standard For Va Diabetes Ratings | Veterans Disability Attorney Blog

VA Diabetes Ratings: Under VA's rating code , a veteran is entitled to a 40% rating for diabetes "[r]equiring insulin, restricted diet, and regulation of activities." A 20% rating shall be assigned for diabetes "[r]equiring insulin and restricted diet, or; oral hypoglycemic agent and restricted diet." A new decision from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit clarifies that "insulin," as it is used in VA's rating code, means insulin administered exogenously, or from the outside of the body. In Middleton v. Shinseki, No. 2013-7014, slip op. 10-11 (Fed. Cir. Aug. 15, 2013), the Federal Circuit determined that a veteran could not receive a 40% disability rating for his diabetes where his diabetes required restricted diet, regulation of activities, and the use of a drug that produced insulin endogenously (meaning that the drug caused the body to produce insulin). The Federal Circuit also reiterated the longstanding rule that, to meet the requirement for a 40% disability rating, a veteran had to meet all three of the requirements listed in the rating code. One judge dissented. Circuit Judge Plager said that the rating code should be treated more of a guide and not as a hard and fast code. Circuit Judge Plager also highlighted that, where the veteran's disability more nearly approximates the higher disability rating than the lower rating, the higher disability rating should be awarded. If you or someone you care about is currently looking to file or appeal a claim for VA disability benefits including a claim filed on the basis of diabetes contact a veterans disability attorney from Bosley & Bratch to learn more about your case and how our firm can help. Continue reading >>

The Military And Type 1 Diabetes More Of A Connection Than We Think

The Military And Type 1 Diabetes More Of A Connection Than We Think

The military and Type 1 diabetes more of a connection than we think Happy Friday folks, I know Im in desperate need of a weekend! Im usually pretty lighthearted on Friday posts, but this time I need to turn your attention to a very specific sub-group of people with Type 1 diabetes. Do you know anyone who was serving in the military and diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes during or shortly after deployment? If so, they are not alone. Turns out this pattern of developing diabetes in conjunction with serving in the military is very common enough that some doctors, scientists, and concerned veterans are starting to explore this phenomenon in hopes that it leads to more information about why anyone develop Type 1 diabetes. A friend of mine started a Facebook group for folks in this sub-group of people with Type 1, and if you or someone you know was diagnosed during or after serving in the armed forces, Id recommend you join in on the discussion. In addition to exploring the mystery of the military-diabetes connection, this group could be influential in changing the resources available to people with diabetes in the military. And I am all for anything that helps folks with the betes. Click here for the info. On that noteis it happy hour yet? Its five oclock somewhere right? Continue reading >>

The Endocrine System

The Endocrine System

Topics: Diabetes Thyroid Conditions Parathyroid Conditions Pituitary Conditions Adrenal Conditions Multiple-Gland Conditions Cancer and Tumors of the Endocrine System Other Endocrine Conditions DBQs for Endocrine Conditions Principles that Apply --The VA changed the codes and ratings for Endocrine Conditions on December 10, 2017. See the Historic VASRDs page for all codes and ratings from before this date. Not all codes were changed, so if the code cannot be found on the Historic VASRDs page, the ratings did not change.-- Reminder: The VA will give a Military Disability Rating for each service-connected condition a service member has, but the DoD will only rate service-connected conditions that make a service member Unfit for Duty. The endocrine system is a network of glands that create hormones to help regulate the body. These hormones control the growth of new cells and metabolism. Some organs, like the kidney, also help in producing hormones. The endocrine system is made up of the hypothalamus, thymus, pituitary gland, thyroid gland, parathyroid glands, adrenal glands, pineal gland, reproductive glands (ovaries or testes), and the pancreas. All these parts work together to keep the body in balance. Diabetes Code 7913: Diabetes mellitus is the condition that most of us think of as just diabetes. It occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin (Type 1), or when the cells do not respond properly to insulin (Type 2). Type 3 diabetes can occur during pregnancy, but this condition resolves after the birth and is not ratable. Diabetes can affect many different organs including the heart, eyes, and kidneys. It can cause strokes, loss of blood flow to the arms and legs, and nerve dysfunction. It usually takes 10 to 20 years for these secondary conditions to Continue reading >>

Understanding Va Disability Ratings For Diabetes

Understanding Va Disability Ratings For Diabetes

Understanding VA Disability Ratings for Diabetes Posted in Uncategorized on November 14, 2017 Diabetes mellitus also known as Type II or adult onset diabetes is a growing health issue among U.S. veterans. In fact, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) recently listed type II diabetes as the number 9 most-prevalent disability claim among compensation recipients, with more than 431,000 veterans receiving some level of disability support while suffering from the condition. Like other VA disabilities, to receive disability compensation, a veterans diabetes type II diagnosis must be proven to be connected to his or her service in the Armed Forces, via a letter or nexus from an expert or physician citing that the condition is more likely than not connected to military service. If the diabetes is diagnosed while on active duty, or within a year of his or her Expiration of Term of Service (ETS), it may be easier to make the connection. Personal records may be sufficient to determine the diagnosis of diabetes; otherwise, It may require a VA examination. It is important, when making a claim, that a veteran provide detailed records or evidence of the ongoing condition, symptoms, required treatments, hospitalizations and physical complications related to the diabetes. You will also be required to include dates and details on your service periods, as they relate to your diagnosis. The one major exception to having to prove that diabetes mellitus is service-connected is if the veteran served in Vietnam and was exposed to Agent Orange. In this case, the VA automatically presumes an existing connection between this service and the diagnosis. To be eligible for diabetes mellitus disability benefits in this situation, the veteran must have physically served or visited the Republi Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Disability Rating Question

Type 1 Diabetes Disability Rating Question

My husband has been in the national guard for 16 years and AGR for 5 years. He was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes during a period of active duty and he recieved his PEB result yesterday. They are offering him 20%. I am wondering if there is somewhere I can read how they decide what rating to give you and if we would be able to get a higher rating due to other complications associated with the diabetes. [font=&]Here is the VASRD criteria for rating diabetes. Were the results from an informal PEB? [font=&] Requiring more than one daily injection of insulin, restricted [/font] [font=&] diet, and regulation of activities (avoidance of strenuous[/font] [font=&] occupational and recreational activities) with episodes of[/font] [font=&] ketoacidosis or hypoglycemic reactions requiring at least[/font] [font=&] three hospitalizations per year or weekly visits to a[/font] [font=&] diabetic care provider, plus either progressive loss of[/font] [font=&] weight and strength or complications that would be[/font] [font=&] compensable if separately evaluated.....................100%[/font] [font=&] Requiring insulin, restricted diet, and regulation of [/font][font=&] activities with episodes of ketoacidosis or hypoglycemic[/font] [font=&] reactions requiring one or two hospitalizations per year or[/font] [font=&] twice a month visits to a diabetic care provider, plus[/font] [font=&] complications that would not be compensable if separately[/font] [font=&] evaluated................................................60%[/font] [font=&] Requiring insulin, restricted diet, and regulation of activities................................................40%[/font] [font=&] Requiring insulin and restricted diet, or; oral hypoglycemic [/font] [font= Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Va Disability Benefits

Diabetes And Va Disability Benefits

Can I obtain VA disability benefits for diabetes? Yes, VA disability benefits for your diabetes may be available. You will need to prove that (a) you were in the military, (b) your diabetes originated or was aggravated while you were on active duty, (c) you were continuously treated for your diabetes since leaving the service (unless you are filing your disability claim within one year of leaving the service or your condition has been chronic), and (d) you are currently disabled by your diabetes. About diabetes and disability The complete name for diabetes is diabetes mellitus. Also known as “sugar” diabetes, diabetes mellitus is a hormonal disorder. The cells of the body need a form of sugar called glucose for energy. The body breaks down various carbohydrates in the diet to glucose. Glucose then circulates to the body’s tissues through the blood. But glucose cannot get from the blood to the inside of the cells where the cells can use it, unless the hormone insulin is also present. Insulin permits passage of glucose through the cell membrane. Insulin is secreted by the pancreas. The pancreas is an elongated organ located behind the stomach. Special cells, known as the Islets of Langerhans, are spread throughout it. These cells produce insulin that is released into the blood. Diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not produce any or enough insulin or when the body is unable to use effectively the insulin that is produced. High blood sugar results as glucose accumulates in the blood because it cannot get into the cells of the body. Diabetes mellitus affects the entire body, and may be mild, moderate, or severe. Diabetes is a major cause of illness, disability, and death. The number of cases of diabetes is increasing markedly in the U.S. as a result of obesity, inad Continue reading >>

Type In The Military And The Meb Process | Diabetic Connect

Type In The Military And The Meb Process | Diabetic Connect

Hi, just read you story and had to comment. I am in the air force and was a year into CSO/ NAV school when I was diagnosed type 1 and have now been sitting on MED hold for a year. My case is up at the MEB and should be going to the PEB soon. What was the time line like for you in all of this? I saw you said you got rated 60%! That's amazing from everything that I have been reading, hope the same works out for me. I am completely insulin dependent and take 4 injections a day, any help in the process would be awesome! Thanks for posting! Final update (maybe): I have been given a retirement date at the end of June. I chose to drop the appeal after being told it may be detrimental to my retirement status. I am married and currently looking for a follow on job so I can't risk losing what I have. I hope anyone finding themselves in this process will contact me for any questions. This process was far from clear and I found myself surprised by new information entirely too many times. Good luck all, see you on the civilian side. I just met with a major in the medical unit and he said that I will begin the process of early retirement and will have no benefits because type 1 is only technical. Ok, it has been a while since I have updated anything. In November, I went through all the VA medical screenings while my PEB was processing. I have continued to maintain excellent physical condition and have continued to take insulin. Its seems like sometimes my insulin requirements change so I guess my pancreas still sputters on and off every now and then. I did not hear anything back until last week. I was given a 60% disability rating from the VA and 60% from the PEB with the recommendation that I be medically retired. Neither the PEBLO nor I have ever heard of such a high rating for ty Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Your Claim For Va Benefits

Type 2 Diabetes And Your Claim For Va Benefits

Diabetes mellitus refers to a group of conditions, including type 1 and type 2 diabetes, that affect how your body uses blood sugar, also known as glucose. Diabetes can affect many different organs, including the heart, eyes, and kidneys. Symptoms of diabetes can vary, but often include extreme thirst, frequent urination, unexplained weight loss, and blurred vision. Type 2 diabetes is more common than type 1 and is more common among people over 40. The cause of diabetes is only partially understood, but it is believed that genetic and environmental factors play a role. Being overweight is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Over 431,000 veterans receive disability benefits for diabetes, as of the 2015 fiscal year. It may seem difficult to prove that your diabetes is connected to your military service because the cause of this disease is not fully understood. However, there are some circumstances where a veteran will receive a presumptive service connection for diabetes. Presumptive Service-Connection for Diabetes Mellitus, type II If your type 2 diabetes became at least 10 percent disabling within one year of discharge from the military, you may be eligible for presumptive service-connection. You will only need to provide evidence that your condition manifested within one year of discharge and that it is at least 10 percent disabling. Veterans who were exposed to Agent Orangein Vietnam also receive a presumption service-connection for type 2 diabetes, along with many other diseases. The diabetes can manifest at any time, even years after discharge from military service. Diabetes does not qualify as a medically unexplained illness for Gulf War veterans, because the cause is partially understood. Diabetes will be assigned a rating based on the severity of symptoms, varying Continue reading >>

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Citation Nr: 1546790 Decision Date: 11/04/15 Archive Date: 11/10/15 DOCKET NO. 11-26 446A ) DATE ) ) On appeal from the Department of Veterans Affairs Regional Office in Chicago, Illinois THE ISSUE Entitlement to service connection for type 1 diabetes mellitus, claimed as secondary to service-connected posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). REPRESENTATION Appellant represented by: Illinois Department of Veterans Affairs WITNESS AT HEARING ON APPEAL Appellant ATTORNEY FOR THE BOARD M. Carsten, Counsel INTRODUCTION The Veteran had active service as a member of the National Guard from September 1990 to March 1991; January 1995 to November 1995; and January 2003 to September 2003. This matter comes before the Board of Veterans' Appeals (Board) on appeal from a June 2009 rating decision of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Regional Office (RO) in Chicago, Illinois, which in pertinent part, denied service connection for type 1 diabetes mellitus. In April 2014, a hearing was held before the undersigned Veterans Law Judge (VLJ) sitting at the RO. In September 2014, the Board remanded the appeal for further development. In August 2015, the Board requested a medical opinion from the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). See 38 C.F.R. § 20.901 (2015). The opinion was received in September 2015. The Board acknowledges that the Veteran was not provided a copy of the opinion and given an opportunity to respond. Considering the favorable decision herein, the Veteran is not prejudiced by any lack of notification. See Bernard v. Brown, 4 Vet. App. 384 (1993). This is a paperless appeal and the Veterans Benefits Management System (VBMS) and Virtual VA folders have been reviewed. FINDING OF FACT The preponderance of the evidence shows that it is at least as likely as not that the Ve Continue reading >>

St. Petersburg Law Firm, John V. Tucker | Diabetes And Va Disability Ratings

St. Petersburg Law Firm, John V. Tucker | Diabetes And Va Disability Ratings

Home / Blog / VA Service Connected Compensation / Diabetes and VA Disability Ratings VA Ratings for Diabetes as a Service Connected Disability As with any other condition, a veteran has to demonstrate that diabetes is a service connected condition. When that is done, the question becomes what percentage disability rating the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs will assign to the veterans diabetes. Diabetes is typically rated under VA Diagnostic Code 7913, coded as Diabetes Mellitus Type II. See 38 CFR 4.119 . Type II Diabetes is also called Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes and Adult Onset Diabetes. Typically, insulin is present, but the amount of insulin available is less than the individual requires. It is also common that a person with Type II Diabetes has something called Insulin Resistance, a situation where the insulin they do have does not do what it should in the body. Treatment may include proper diet, activity/exercise, and pills, and sometimes insulin is necessary. Most people who have Diabetes Mellitus, Type II Diabetes. The VA disability percentage rating a veteran receives depends on the symptoms they are experiencing and what their doctors record in their medical records. Diagnostic Code 7913 assigns the following percentage ratings: Requiring more than one daily injection of insulin, restricted diet, and regulation of activities (avoidance of strenuous occupational and recreational activities) with episodes of ketoacidosis or hypoglycemic reactions requiring at least three hospitalizations per year or weekly visits to a diabetic care provider, plus either progressive loss of weight and strength or complications that would be compensable if separately evaluated Requiring insulin, restricted diet, and regulation of activities with episodes of ketoacidosis or Continue reading >>

Va Is Changing Diabetes Care For Veterans

Va Is Changing Diabetes Care For Veterans

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. Happy Memorial Day Monday. We're still in a military mindset here at the 'Mine, with a look today at what's happening with diabetes benefits for the men and women who've served our country. To hear the Veterans Administration (VA) tell it, they're the global leader in diabetes care. Uh... wait a minute... is this the same VA that's been the lightning rod for the ire of American veterans for generations? Yep. It's the same VA, but today's VA is a far cry from the one your grandfather went to. They've now got a cutting-edge diabetes playbook that's proving itself with real-world results that are outpacing the rest of American healthcare. The organizations that represent vets are happy, and so too, it seems, are the vets themselves. Is this a healthcare paradise? Not quite, but you could say that things are better with a capital B... Forget about aging multi-story 400-bed hospitals. The new face of the VA is the community clinic. 1,400 of them, so far. Following a major revamping between 1995 and 2000, the VA changed its focus to "universal primary care." It's paying attention to a wide variety of health conditions, and has been an early adopter of electronic medical records (EMR), which many other clinics and hospitals have struggled to implement. And you think your family is big? The VA provides health benefits to 1.45 million vets who have diabetes (!). This number has risen sharply over the last decade, more than doubling since the year 2000. That means the VA is responsible for the healthcare of around 6% of Persons With Diabetes (PWDs) in the United States more than their fair share. The prevalence of diabetes amongs Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes (recieved Proposed Rating Va??)

Type 1 Diabetes (recieved Proposed Rating Va??)

Type 1 Diabetes (Recieved Proposed Rating VA??) I recieved my proposed VA rating today via mail for type 1 diabetes, and the VA proposed 20%. Now i know this is fairly common but in my disposition and recommendations my endocrinologist states "must avoid strenuous and occupational and recreational activities in order to prevent hypoglycemic episodes and must restrict diet in order to help control blood glucose levels" this is exactly how it is stated.. And in the VAs explanation it says " a proposed higher evaluation of 40% is NOT warranted unless there is restriction of activties" My question is isnt that exactly what my endo put?? I feel as though i have all the criteria to recieve 40%.. I DO NOT UNDERSTAND?? Any info or opinions would be helpful I recieved my proposed VA rating today via mail for type 1 diabetes, and the VA proposed 20%. Now i know this is fairly common but in my disposition and recommendations my endocrinologist states "must avoid strenuous and occupational and recreational activities in order to prevent hypoglycemic episodes and must restrict diet in order to help control blood glucose levels" this is exactly how it is stated.. And in the VAs explanation it says " a proposed higher evaluation of 40% is NOT warranted unless there is restriction of activties" My question is isnt that exactly what my endo put?? I feel as though i have all the criteria to recieve 40%.. I DO NOT UNDERSTAND?? Any info or opinions would be helpful You need to gather your paper work, go to your VA and request a medical release of information, if your endocrinologist said what your saying, go and refile through the DAV, or your states veterans rep. I was in the same boat as you were. I have my paper work to show you when mine went up to 40%, I will leave my email address, Continue reading >>

The Va Diabetes Claim: How Many Ways To Service Connect?

The Va Diabetes Claim: How Many Ways To Service Connect?

In a VA Diabetes Claim, how many ways can the Veteran show that his/her diabetes is related to military service? There are several, and which one you use will be driven largely by how your Diabetes presents itself in your unique medical picture. Let’s start from the top. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a metabolic disease. For diabetics, the body does not produce or properly use insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches, and other food into energy needed for daily living. Diabetes is not – as commonly believed – something that only fat people get. Common Problems in the VA Diabetes Claim. Veterans seeking disability compensation benefits in a VA diabetes claim are likely to see the same “canned” responses from the VA Regional Office. Typically, RO will conclude that diabetes — or symptoms of diabetes — did not appear to a compensable degree within one year of discharge from the military. Another common error occurs when the VA Rater – or the BVA – relies solely on a medical opinion from a VA Medical Center Doctor who concludes that it would be pure speculation whether the present diagnosis of diabetes was caused by or connected to military service. Service Connection in the VA Diabetes Claim. For Veterans who are trying to establish service connection for Diabetes, there are at many ways to skin the proverbial cat. Here are 4: #1: Direct Service Connection. The most common way to Direct Service Connection. service connect diabetes to military service is to use “chronicity” and “continuity of symptomatology”: 1) Get a copy of your C-File: I can’t stress this enough. Without a copy of your C-File, you are battling the VA with blindfolds on. 2) Locate all references to the early symptomatology of diabetes in the milit Continue reading >>

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