diabetestalk.net

Va Compensation For Diabetes 2

The Endocrine System

The Endocrine System

Topics: Diabetes Thyroid Conditions Parathyroid Conditions Pituitary Conditions Adrenal Conditions Multiple-Gland Conditions Cancer and Tumors of the Endocrine System Other Endocrine Conditions DBQs for Endocrine Conditions Principles that Apply --The VA changed the codes and ratings for Endocrine Conditions on December 10, 2017. See the Historic VASRDs page for all codes and ratings from before this date. Not all codes were changed, so if the code cannot be found on the Historic VASRDs page, the ratings did not change.-- Reminder: The VA will give a Military Disability Rating for each service-connected condition a service member has, but the DoD will only rate service-connected conditions that make a service member Unfit for Duty. The endocrine system is a network of glands that create hormones to help regulate the body. These hormones control the growth of new cells and metabolism. Some organs, like the kidney, also help in producing hormones. The endocrine system is made up of the hypothalamus, thymus, pituitary gland, thyroid gland, parathyroid glands, adrenal glands, pineal gland, reproductive glands (ovaries or testes), and the pancreas. All these parts work together to keep the body in balance. Diabetes Code 7913: Diabetes mellitus is the condition that most of us think of as just diabetes. It occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin (Type 1), or when the cells do not respond properly to insulin (Type 2). Type 3 diabetes can occur during pregnancy, but this condition resolves after the birth and is not ratable. Diabetes can affect many different organs including the heart, eyes, and kidneys. It can cause strokes, loss of blood flow to the arms and legs, and nerve dysfunction. It usually takes 10 to 20 years for these secondary conditions to Continue reading >>

Agent Orange Worries: Diabetes Now Tops Vietnam Veterans' Disability Claims

Agent Orange Worries: Diabetes Now Tops Vietnam Veterans' Disability Claims

MIKE BAKER, Associated Press Writer RALEIGH, North Carolina -- By his own reckoning, a Navy electrician spent just eight hours in Vietnam, during a layover on his flight back to the U.S. in 1966. He bought some cigarettes and snapped a few photos. The jaunt didn't make for much of a war story, and there is no record it ever happened. But the man successfully argued that he may have been exposed to Agent Orange during his stopover and that it might have caused his diabetes -- even though decades of research into the defoliant have failed to find more than a possibility that it causes the disease. Because of worries about Agent Orange, about 270,000 Vietnam veterans -- more than one-quarter of the 1 million receiving disability checks -- are getting compensation for diabetes, according to Department of Veterans Affairs records obtained by The Associated Press through the Freedom of Information Act. More Vietnam veterans are being compensated for diabetes than for any other malady, including post-traumatic stress disorder, hearing loss or general wounds. Tens of thousands of other claims for common ailments of age -- erectile dysfunction among them -- are getting paid as well because of a possible link, direct or indirect, to Agent Orange. And the taxpayers may soon be responsible for even more: The VA said Monday that it will add heart disease, Parkinson's disease and certain types of leukemia to the list of conditions that might be connected to Agent Orange. The agency estimates that the new rules, which will go into effect in two months unless Congress intervenes, will cost $42 billion over the next 10 years. Lawmakers and federal officials who have reservations about the spending are loath to criticize a program that helps servicemen. They have largely ignored a 2008 r Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Va Disability Benefits

Diabetes And Va Disability Benefits

Can I obtain VA disability benefits for diabetes? Yes, VA disability benefits for your diabetes may be available. You will need to prove that (a) you were in the military, (b) your diabetes originated or was aggravated while you were on active duty, (c) you were continuously treated for your diabetes since leaving the service (unless you are filing your disability claim within one year of leaving the service or your condition has been chronic), and (d) you are currently disabled by your diabetes. About diabetes and disability The complete name for diabetes is diabetes mellitus. Also known as “sugar” diabetes, diabetes mellitus is a hormonal disorder. The cells of the body need a form of sugar called glucose for energy. The body breaks down various carbohydrates in the diet to glucose. Glucose then circulates to the body’s tissues through the blood. But glucose cannot get from the blood to the inside of the cells where the cells can use it, unless the hormone insulin is also present. Insulin permits passage of glucose through the cell membrane. Insulin is secreted by the pancreas. The pancreas is an elongated organ located behind the stomach. Special cells, known as the Islets of Langerhans, are spread throughout it. These cells produce insulin that is released into the blood. Diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not produce any or enough insulin or when the body is unable to use effectively the insulin that is produced. High blood sugar results as glucose accumulates in the blood because it cannot get into the cells of the body. Diabetes mellitus affects the entire body, and may be mild, moderate, or severe. Diabetes is a major cause of illness, disability, and death. The number of cases of diabetes is increasing markedly in the U.S. as a result of obesity, inad Continue reading >>

Will I Qualify For Veteran’s Disability Benefits If I Have Type 2 Diabetes?

Will I Qualify For Veteran’s Disability Benefits If I Have Type 2 Diabetes?

If you have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and believe that your condition was caused by or made worse by your service in the military, you could be eligible for veterans’ disability benefits. In fiscal year 2015 (the most recent year for which statistics are available), diabetes was the 9th most common disability among all veterans’ disability recipients. In that year, 431,166 veterans received benefits because of their type 2 diabetes. How They Qualified There is more than one way to qualify for veterans’ disability benefits if you have type 2 diabetes. Specifically, you may qualify for benefits if: You can prove that your diabetes was caused by your active duty in the military or by a condition that you suffered because of your active duty in the military. You served in Vietnam between January 9, 1962 and May 7, 1975. If you set foot on soil in Vietnam, the Department of Veterans Affairs presumes that you were exposed to Agent Orange, a toxic herbicide used during the Vietnam War that medical professionals have connected to a variety of illnesses, including type 2 diabetes. Vietnam veterans who can prove that they were not dishonorably discharged and that they have type 2 diabetes may qualify for disability compensation. When you apply for benefits, it is important to describe all of the conditions associated with your type 2 diabetes. For example, you should make sure that information about all related conditions is included with your applications, including: Vision problems Heart problems Stomach, gallbladder, or kidney problems Any other health impairments Don’t assume that you will get benefits simply because you are a veteran with type 2 diabetes. Instead, make sure that the Department of Veterans Affairs has all of the information it needs to make Continue reading >>

Disability Compensation For Secondary Conditions Caused By Diabetes

Disability Compensation For Secondary Conditions Caused By Diabetes

DISABILITY COMPENSATION FOR SECONDARY CONDITIONS CAUSED BY DIABETES by edfarmer | Oct 2, 2017 | Uncategorized | 0 comments If you are a Vietnam Era Veteran, you probably already know about the special VA rules that presume certain conditions are caused by Agent Orange exposure. One of these conditions is Type 2 Diabetes. What you may not be aware of is that you may be entitled to additional compensation for secondary conditions caused by your service-connected diabetes. Service-connected disability compensation is available for almost any disability that is the result of another service-connected condition. This legal theory is called secondary service connection. Secondary service connection can be established both where a service-connected condition contributes to the creation of a new disability and where a service-connected disability aggravates (worsens) a non-service-connected condition. It does not matter how long after service a secondary disability manifests itself, as long as there is sufficient medical evidence to establish that it is a result of a service connected condition. What Do I Need to Show to Establish Secondary Service Connection? Medical opinions are crucial in claims for secondary service connection and veterans should seriously consider obtaining a medical opinion from a private doctor. The medical opinion should state whether it is as likely as not (50% probability), or more likely than not (probable) that the claimed disability was caused or aggravated by the service-connected condition. The doctors statement should refer to a recognized medical text and supported with a medical rationale. Veterans should not give up on a claim for secondary service connection that is denied based solely on an opinion from a VA physician. Because the VA must Continue reading >>

What Form Do I Need For A Va Disability Comp Claim For Diabetes

What Form Do I Need For A Va Disability Comp Claim For Diabetes

If you are filing your VA disability compensation claim using private health care options, you can use a DBQ form, Disability Benefits Questionnaire, to evaluate your disability. To file a VA disability compensation claim for diabetes mellitus you need to add claims for all applicable conditions associated with your diabetes mellitus. No matter how controlled, diabetes mellitus is a progressive disease. Diabetes Mellitus affects all systems, organs, and functions of the body and causes other conditions. You will need your Private Physician or Physicians to complete a DBQ’s for the diabetes mellitus and each related condition. The DBQ’s for diabetes mellitus and related conditions can be viewed, filled for printing, downloaded or printed for your Doctor at website: Or, VA DBQ Forms can be viewed, filled for printing, downloaded or printed for your Doctor at website: The following is a list of some of the DBQ Forms related to Diabetes Mellitus. If you have another condition related that is not listed, go to the websites above and obtain the VA DBQ form associated with your condition or conditions. VA-21-0960E-1 – Diabetes Mellitus VA-21-0960C-4 – Diabetic Sensory-Motor Peripheral Neuropathy VA-21-0960A-4 – Heart Conditions (diabetic heart disease) VA-21-0960A-3 – Hypertension VA-21-0960A-2 – Artery and Vein Conditions (diabetic vascular disease) VA-21-0960M-1 – Amputations (diabetic vascular disease) VA-21-0960G-1 – Esophageal Conditions (diabetic reflux) VA-21-0960G-7 – Stomach and Duodenal Conditions (diabetic changes) VA-21-0960J-1 – Kidney Conditions (diabetic kidney impairment) VA-21-0960M-6 – Foot Conditions (diabetic foot drop) VA-21-0960F-2 – Skin Conditions (diabetic dermatitis) VA-21-0960J-2 – Male Reproductive Organ Conditions (diabe Continue reading >>

Diabetes From Agent Orange Exposure In Vietnam

Diabetes From Agent Orange Exposure In Vietnam

Diabetes from Agent Orange Exposure in Vietnam Almost everyone is familiar with the herbicide Agent Orange that was used in Vietnam. Agent Orange was sprayed across Vietnam. The chemicals used in Agent Orange are toxic. VA has acknowledged that exposure to those chemicals increases the risk of developing many different diseases even decades after the exposure. One of the diseases caused by Agent Orange exposure is Type 2diabetes (also known as Type 2 diabetes mellitus). People suffering from Type 2 diabetes cannot adequately process the sugar in their blood. Without proper treatment, people suffering from Type 2 diabetes will likely suffer damage to their eyes, kidneys, and hearts. Presumption that diabetes was caused by Agent Orange exposure Because of special rules put in place by VA, veterans who served in Vietnam are almost always presumed to have been exposed to Agent Orange during their service . If a Vietnam veteran develops Type 2 diabetes, VA should also presume that the diabetes was caused by this exposure to Agent Orange. If you are a Vietnam veteran who develops Type 2 diabetes, you should file a claim for disability benefits with VA for your diabetes. Service-connection for Type 2 diabetes from Agent Orange exposure Since Type 2 diabetes is on the list of conditions that are presumed to have been caused by Agent Orange, VA should determine that your Type 2 diabetes is a service-connected disability. If they do not, then you are probably going to need to file a notice of disagreement to appeal your denial of service connection. If VA grants service connection, they should issue a rating decision giving VAs opinion on the amount of your disability. How is the disability rating for diabetes calculated? The disability rating given by VA in the rating decision Continue reading >>

Va Diabetes Ratings | Veterans Resources

Va Diabetes Ratings | Veterans Resources

Discussion in ' Diabetes ' started by stumpy , Jun 26, 2004 . Requiring more than one daily injection of insulin, restricted 100 diet, and regulation of activities (avoidance of strenuous occupational and recreational activities) with episodes of ketoacidosis or hypoglycemic reactions requiring at least three hospitalizations per year or weekly visits to a diabetic care provider, plus either progressive loss of weight and strength or complications that would be compensable if separately evaluated.......................... Requiring insulin, restricted diet, and regulation of 60 activities with episodes of ketoacidosis or hypoglycemic reactions requiring one or two hospitalizations per year or twice a month visits to a diabetic care provider, plus complications that would not be compensable if separately evaluated.................................................... Requiring insulin, restricted diet, and regulation of 40 activities................................................... Requiring insulin and restricted diet, or; oral hypoglycemic 20 agent and restricted diet.................................... Manageable by restricted diet only............................ 10 Note (1): Evaluate compensable complications of diabetes separately unless they are part of the criteria used to support a 100 percent evaluation. Noncompensable complications are considered part of the diabetic process Note (2): When diabetes mellitus has been conclusively diagnosed, do not request a glucose tolerance test solely for I have no idea what you mean by a D&C unless you are having female problems . You must mean Compensation & Pension (C&P) exam. Is that right? The normal procedure is to file a claim for compensation due to service connected (SC) disabilities with the nearest Veterans Admini Continue reading >>

Understanding Va Disability Ratings For Diabetes

Understanding Va Disability Ratings For Diabetes

Understanding VA Disability Ratings for Diabetes Posted in Uncategorized on November 14, 2017 Diabetes mellitus also known as Type II or adult onset diabetes is a growing health issue among U.S. veterans. In fact, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) recently listed type II diabetes as the number 9 most-prevalent disability claim among compensation recipients, with more than 431,000 veterans receiving some level of disability support while suffering from the condition. Like other VA disabilities, to receive disability compensation, a veterans diabetes type II diagnosis must be proven to be connected to his or her service in the Armed Forces, via a letter or nexus from an expert or physician citing that the condition is more likely than not connected to military service. If the diabetes is diagnosed while on active duty, or within a year of his or her Expiration of Term of Service (ETS), it may be easier to make the connection. Personal records may be sufficient to determine the diagnosis of diabetes; otherwise, It may require a VA examination. It is important, when making a claim, that a veteran provide detailed records or evidence of the ongoing condition, symptoms, required treatments, hospitalizations and physical complications related to the diabetes. You will also be required to include dates and details on your service periods, as they relate to your diagnosis. The one major exception to having to prove that diabetes mellitus is service-connected is if the veteran served in Vietnam and was exposed to Agent Orange. In this case, the VA automatically presumes an existing connection between this service and the diagnosis. To be eligible for diabetes mellitus disability benefits in this situation, the veteran must have physically served or visited the Republi Continue reading >>

4 Ways That Military Veterans Can Service Connect Diabetes.

4 Ways That Military Veterans Can Service Connect Diabetes.

Direct Service Connection A Veteran can directly service connect Diabetes by combing their C-File and medical records (both in-service and post-service medical records) for any evidence of symptomatology of diabetes. For Type I Diabetes, the Veteran should look for common symptomatology that includes (but is certainly not limited to): indications of blood sugar levels which are consistent with a diagnosis of diabetes or that approach diabetic levels; frequent urination; unusual thirst; extreme hunger; unusual weight loss; and/or extreme fatigue and irritability. For Type I Diabetes, the Veteran should look for common symptomatology that includes (but is certainly not limited to): for any of the Type I symptomatology, and also frequent infections, blurred vision, cuts/bruises that a cuts/bruises that are slow to heal, tingling or numbness in the extremities, and/or recurring skin, gum or bladder infections. With Type II Diabetes, it is important to note that a Veteran may experience no symptomatology. Secondary Service Connection This is a very rare and unusual way to service connect diabetes - if your diabetes is the result of another service-connected condition, then this is the method of service connection that you will want to pursue. Secondary Service Connection often requires an independent medical opinion. In such circumstances the Independent Medical Examiner should follow these steps: 1) Review the Veteran's entire Claims File (or C-File) - and state in the opinion that the Medical Expert reviewed this document. 2) Fully explain all factors that play into the etiology of the Veteran's diabetes 3) Explain the reasons and bases for the Medical Expert's belief that the Diabetes was caused by, or secondary to, the primary service-connected condition 4) A statement t Continue reading >>

The Va Diabetes Claim: How Many Ways To Service Connect?

The Va Diabetes Claim: How Many Ways To Service Connect?

In a VA Diabetes Claim, how many ways can the Veteran show that his/her diabetes is related to military service? There are several, and which one you use will be driven largely by how your Diabetes presents itself in your unique medical picture. Let’s start from the top. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a metabolic disease. For diabetics, the body does not produce or properly use insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches, and other food into energy needed for daily living. Diabetes is not – as commonly believed – something that only fat people get. Common Problems in the VA Diabetes Claim. Veterans seeking disability compensation benefits in a VA diabetes claim are likely to see the same “canned” responses from the VA Regional Office. Typically, RO will conclude that diabetes — or symptoms of diabetes — did not appear to a compensable degree within one year of discharge from the military. Another common error occurs when the VA Rater – or the BVA – relies solely on a medical opinion from a VA Medical Center Doctor who concludes that it would be pure speculation whether the present diagnosis of diabetes was caused by or connected to military service. Service Connection in the VA Diabetes Claim. For Veterans who are trying to establish service connection for Diabetes, there are at many ways to skin the proverbial cat. Here are 4: #1: Direct Service Connection. The most common way to Direct Service Connection. service connect diabetes to military service is to use “chronicity” and “continuity of symptomatology”: 1) Get a copy of your C-File: I can’t stress this enough. Without a copy of your C-File, you are battling the VA with blindfolds on. 2) Locate all references to the early symptomatology of diabetes in the milit Continue reading >>

Rating Schedule For Diabetes Type 2

Rating Schedule For Diabetes Type 2

Where can I find the VA compensation rating schedule for presumptive diabetes type 2 and secondary conditions evolving from the diabetes. I know that DM2 controlled by diet and exercise is 10% and that oral medication and/or insulin ups it to 20%, but what about other conditons, like peripheral neuropathy, diabetic retinopathy, erectile dysfunction, etc. Where can I find the schedule for these? I used to think that I was indecisive, but now I'm not sure. Where can I find the VA compensation rating schedule for presumptive diabetes type 2 and secondary conditions evolving from the diabetes. I know that DM2 controlled by diet and exercise is 10% and that oral medication and/or insulin ups it to 20%, but what about other conditons, like peripheral neuropathy, diabetic retinopathy, erectile dysfunction, etc. Where can I find the schedule for these? Schedule of Rating Disability (SRD) Links requested: 1) Diabetes Mellitis Type II - VA diagnostic code 7913: 38 CFR 4.119 2) Peripheral Neuropathy - VA diagnostic code based on nerve group affected (typically 8510-8540): 38 CFR 4.124a 3) Diabetic Retinopathy - VA diagnostic code typically 6006 or 6026 or 6030 but could be others in 6000 series: 38 CFR 4.79 4) Diabetic Nephropathy - Typically rated as renal dysfunction under VA diagnostic code 7500 series: 38 CFR 4.115a AND 38 CFR 4.115b 5) Erectile Dysfunction - SMC K award: 38 CFR 3.350 and "rater rules" and 38 U.S.C. 1114 ---------------------------------------------------------------------- I believe in the latter half of the "Give the person a fish...teach a person to fish..." philosophy ---------------------------------------------------------------------- ...every day on this side of the "dirtnap" is a good day! ------------------------------------------------------------- Continue reading >>

New Strict Standard For Va Diabetes Ratings | Veterans Disability Attorney Blog

New Strict Standard For Va Diabetes Ratings | Veterans Disability Attorney Blog

VA Diabetes Ratings: Under VA's rating code , a veteran is entitled to a 40% rating for diabetes "[r]equiring insulin, restricted diet, and regulation of activities." A 20% rating shall be assigned for diabetes "[r]equiring insulin and restricted diet, or; oral hypoglycemic agent and restricted diet." A new decision from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit clarifies that "insulin," as it is used in VA's rating code, means insulin administered exogenously, or from the outside of the body. In Middleton v. Shinseki, No. 2013-7014, slip op. 10-11 (Fed. Cir. Aug. 15, 2013), the Federal Circuit determined that a veteran could not receive a 40% disability rating for his diabetes where his diabetes required restricted diet, regulation of activities, and the use of a drug that produced insulin endogenously (meaning that the drug caused the body to produce insulin). The Federal Circuit also reiterated the longstanding rule that, to meet the requirement for a 40% disability rating, a veteran had to meet all three of the requirements listed in the rating code. One judge dissented. Circuit Judge Plager said that the rating code should be treated more of a guide and not as a hard and fast code. Circuit Judge Plager also highlighted that, where the veteran's disability more nearly approximates the higher disability rating than the lower rating, the higher disability rating should be awarded. If you or someone you care about is currently looking to file or appeal a claim for VA disability benefits including a claim filed on the basis of diabetes contact a veterans disability attorney from Bosley & Bratch to learn more about your case and how our firm can help. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Your Claim For Va Benefits

Type 2 Diabetes And Your Claim For Va Benefits

Diabetes mellitus refers to a group of conditions, including type 1 and type 2 diabetes, that affect how your body uses blood sugar, also known as glucose. Diabetes can affect many different organs, including the heart, eyes, and kidneys. Symptoms of diabetes can vary, but often include extreme thirst, frequent urination, unexplained weight loss, and blurred vision. Type 2 diabetes is more common than type 1 and is more common among people over 40. The cause of diabetes is only partially understood, but it is believed that genetic and environmental factors play a role. Being overweight is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Over 431,000 veterans receive disability benefits for diabetes, as of the 2015 fiscal year. It may seem difficult to prove that your diabetes is connected to your military service because the cause of this disease is not fully understood. However, there are some circumstances where a veteran will receive a presumptive service connection for diabetes. Presumptive Service-Connection for Diabetes Mellitus, type II If your type 2 diabetes became at least 10 percent disabling within one year of discharge from the military, you may be eligible for presumptive service-connection. You will only need to provide evidence that your condition manifested within one year of discharge and that it is at least 10 percent disabling. Veterans who were exposed to Agent Orangein Vietnam also receive a presumption service-connection for type 2 diabetes, along with many other diseases. The diabetes can manifest at any time, even years after discharge from military service. Diabetes does not qualify as a medically unexplained illness for Gulf War veterans, because the cause is partially understood. Diabetes will be assigned a rating based on the severity of symptoms, varying Continue reading >>

Va Won't Recognize Diabetes As Service Connected Unless There Is Evidence That Military Service Caused It | Stateside Legal

Va Won't Recognize Diabetes As Service Connected Unless There Is Evidence That Military Service Caused It | Stateside Legal

VA won't recognize diabetes as service connected unless there is evidence that military service caused it Question: My husband retired in 1996 and since has developed Diabetes, there is not a family history. How can we tell if this is service connected or not? He served in the USCG from 1974 to 1996. Also is there any connection with asthma and Trichloroethylene? The only diabetes that is automatically (presumptively) service connected is for Vietnam veterans who served with boots on the ground and were exposed to agent orange. There are some limited cases elsewhere, such as in Korea. If diabetes is diagnosed on active duty or within the first year after ETS, that may also be service connected. Adult onset diabetes is a very common disease in America that affects many men as they get older. VA won't recognize it as service connected unless there is evidence that military service caused it. To prove that any health condition is service connected requires evidence of that fact. For example, to try to show that asthma is caused by TCE would require an expert (usually a physician) to write a nexus letter that clearly says that the asthma is "more likely than not" caused by exposure to TCE. Even before you can do that though, the veteran must prove he was exposed to TCE and document when, where and how much. Vets can't simple tell VA that they were exposed, they have to prove it. Of course, we were all exposed to TCE. I used the stuff all through my time in the Army. If I had to prove that today, I don't know how I would do it. But...there are many successful claims for TCE and many diseases. Those claims are usually finalized at the BVA. You can research successful claims here Choose a year to query and then enter key words like and review the cases tha Continue reading >>

More in diabetes