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V8 Juice And Diabetes

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Tomato Juice Reduces Clotting In Diabetics

Tomato Juice Reduces Clotting In Diabetics

For people with type 2 diabetes, tomato juice may help stave off the heart troubles that often complicate the disease. Researchers have found that drinking tomato juice for three weeks had a blood-thinning effect in people with the disease. The juice reduced "platelet aggregation" — the blood’s ability to clot. If corroborated by larger studies, the finding may one day also help "individuals with increased clotting tendency such as smokers, long-distance air travelers (deep vein thrombosis), etcetera," said Manohar L. Garg, one of the authors of the letter detailing the results. Garg is an associate professor of nutrition and dietetics at the University of Newcastle in Australia. "When platelets aggregate, they form the plug that clots the vessels," explained Dr. Stuart Weiss, a clinical assistant professor of medicine at New York University School of Medicine. "In diabetes patients, platelets are more sticky." Platelets are responsible for the blood’s ability to clot which, in the case of an injury, is a good thing. Clotting can go too far, however, and cause strokes, heart attacks and other life-threatening problems. As a result of this excessive "stickiness," for instance, people with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular problems, such as heart attack and stroke. Anti-clotting medications have been shown to reduce this risk. "In diabetes, there are a lot of pro-inflammatory markers that contribute to increasing platelet aggregation, so if there’s something we can do that can reverse or limit that, that would be a very positive thing," Weiss added. Consumption of tomato products has been shown to reduce the incidence of various heart ailments, so the researchers behind the research letter decided to test the hypothesis i Continue reading >>

Juices That Are Good For Type 2 Diabetics

Juices That Are Good For Type 2 Diabetics

Living with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) involves limiting foods that could raise blood sugar to high levels. Juice can be a part of an overall healthy diet in limited amounts. Keeping serving sizes to 4 ounces or less -- about 1/2 cup -- limits the carbohydrate load. Fruit juice is sometimes helpful to treat low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, due to the fast absorption of the sugar. The nutrient quality of juices varies, so it's helpful to know which juices are healthier choices. There are also alternatives to drinking plain juice that can help limit your carbohydrate intake. Video of the Day Vegetable juice is a lower-carbohydrate alternative to fruit juice. For example, a 4-ounce glass of a tomato-based vegetable juice contains 5.5 g of carbohydrate. However, a 4-ounce serving of a similar vegetable-fruit juice blend typically has 13.7 g of carbohydrate. Low-level inflammation is a contributing factor to insulin resistance and T2DM, particularly in people who are overweight. The authors of a June 2013 "British Journal of Nutrition" study report found that overweight and obese women experienced reduced inflammation after drinking about 1.5 cups of tomato juice daily for 3 weeks. These findings suggest that tomato-based vegetable juice and tomato juice can be good, low-carbohydrate juice options -- and might assist in reducing inflammation. When choosing a fruit juice, the American Diabetes Association recommends 100 percent fruit juice with no added sugar. Pomegranate, cranberry and grape juice all contain a high concentration of antioxidants, according to research published in January 2010 in "Nutrition Journal." Foods rich in antioxidants might help prevent or limit damage caused by an overabundance of free radicals, chemicals that can injure cells. Excess accumulation of Continue reading >>

Tomato Juice As Bedtime Snack In Diabetes

Tomato Juice As Bedtime Snack In Diabetes

Figuring out how to adapt what you eat and when is a big challenge for people who have been recently diagnosed with diabetes. Once you find something that works well, it makes sense to stick with it, as this reader did. Switching to Tomato Juice: Q. I used to eat yogurt, apples or oranges before I went to bed. I am a type 2 diabetic. Recently I changed to drinking tomato juice before bed. My morning blood sugar has been below 100 ever since. Before that, it was usually around 120. Could tomato juice be lowering my blood sugar? Less Sugar Before Bed: A. We are delighted to learn of your success with tomato juice. It might be due to less sugar in the juice compared to your previous bedtime snacks. A cup of yogurt, an apple and an orange each contain between 15 and 18 grams of carbohydrate, while 8 ounces of tomato juice contains about 10 grams. The few studies that have been done showed no effect of tomato juice or raw tomatoes on blood sugar (Diabetes Care, June, 2000; International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, May, 2011). What Else Can You Use to Manage Your Blood Sugar? There are many other non-drug approaches that can be valuable for people with type 2 diabetes, including a number of foods and spices. We are sending you our Guide to Managing Diabetes with our 10 key steps for keeping blood sugar in check. Bitter melon (Momordica charantia) is an Indian vegetable that lowers blood sugar. Tomatoes can be used in a tasty sauce that makes bitter melon much more appealing (Nutrition Journal, July 28, 2011). Learn more about bitter melon, cinnamon, vinegar, nopal cactus and fenugreek for helping control blood sugar in our Guide to Managing Diabetes. You will also get the straight and skinny on the best veggies for blood sugar control and the pros and cons of popu Continue reading >>

Is V8 Good For You?

Is V8 Good For You?

Vegetable juices have become big business these days, and V8 is perhaps the best-known brand of vegetable juice. It’s portable, comes in all sorts of flavors, and is touted as being able to help you meet your daily vegetable quota. You’ve likely heard the brand’s slogan: “Could’ve had a V8,” but the question is, should you? While it contains nutrients from all sorts of vegetables, V8 should not take the place of eating vegetables. Nutrients are lost and most of the fiber is removed during processing of vegetable juices like V8. They also have added components that are of questionable nutritional value. Purported Benefits of V8 From soda to fruit-flavored juices, an array of clearly unhealthy drinks is available on the market. V8 is made from vegetables, and contains many of the same nutrients you’d find in whole vegetables. According to the company’s official website, V8 contains the juice of eight vegetables: beets carrots celery lettuce parsley tomatoes spinach watercress Due to the types of vegetables used, V8 is considered a source of vitamins A, C, and E. The juice also is considered low in cholesterol and fat. Given this nutritional information, many people seek out the convenience of V8 as an alternative to eating plain vegetables. The Pitfalls of Vegetable Juice Drinking V8 certainly isn’t as bad as drinking non-nutritive drinks like soda, but the juice may have some surprising drawbacks. The pureeing process used to juice the vegetables removes a large portion of their fiber content. Fiber, found in vegetables and other foods, is extremely important because it: keeps you full prevents weight gain caused by overeating regulates blood sugar prevents constipation protects against heart disease Whole raw, as well as cooked, vegetables offer a vari Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Drinking V8 Juice

Side Effects Of Drinking V8 Juice

The V8 brand of vegetable beverages includes a variety of products, including vegetable juices, veggie blends, fusion and energy drinks, and infused waters. V8 beverages are promoted as a way to help consumers increase their consumption of vegetables. Only 13 percent of American adults meet recommended vegetable intake, according to a July 2015 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. V8 products contain a number of healthful vegetable-derived nutrients. The nutrient profiles differ, however, depending on the specific V8 beverage. V8 is generally considered a healthful beverage option, but there are possible side effects for people who consume large quantities or have specific health concerns. Video of the Day Loose stools are a possible side effect from drinking V8 juice. This side effect is not likely with the original V8 drinks, which contain only vegetable juices. It is more likely -- although still uncommon -- with the veggie blend and fusion drinks, which contain a mixture of vegetable and fruit juices. The sugars in fruit juices can cause loose stools or diarrhea, especially when consumed in large amounts and in the absence of solid foods. People who have an underlying intestinal disorder, such as irritable bowel syndrome or inflammatory bowel disease, might be more sensitive to developing loose stools or diarrhea in response to drinking vegetable and fruit juices, not just V8. Too much dietary sodium can play a role in the development or worsening of high blood pressure, or hypertension. Some V8 drinks are relatively high in sodium, which could contribute to going over the recommended intake of less than 2,300 mg daily. However, there are a a number of low-sodium V8 juice drinks. Some examples of the sodium content of an 8-ounce serving of var Continue reading >>

What To Drink With Diabetes?

What To Drink With Diabetes?

Is there anything good for diabetes you can buy in a bottle and drink? If not, what can you drink that’s healthy? Beverages to avoid First off, do not drink bottled fruit juice. Health author Joy Bauer rated fruit juice the number one worst food for diabetes. Most bottled juice is not 100% juice and has additional sugar added. But according to Bauer, “Fruit juices, even 100% fruit juices, are chock-full of fruit sugar and cause a sharp spike in blood sugar.” Juice has a very high glycemic index, which means the sugar gets into your blood very fast. According to diabetes.co.uk, unsweetened orange juice has a glycemic index between 66 and 76, higher than most chocolate cake. People with diabetes do not have enough insulin to keep up with such a fast surge of sugar. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) agrees. “Avoid sugary drinks like regular soda, fruit punch, fruit drinks, energy drinks, sports drinks, or sweet tea. They can provide several hundred calories in just one serving. ADA advises tea, coffee, water, or milk instead. They do say that less than 4 ounces of juice at a meal might be manageable for some people with diabetes. There are other problems with juice besides the sugar. Compared to whole fruits and vegetables, juice has almost no fiber. Bottled juice is usually stored in massive oxygen-depleted holding tanks for up to a year before it is packaged. Then lost flavor iss restored with “flavor packs.” Recent studies, however, have shown that juice does have some benefits. It helps prevent cancer and heart disease as well as whole fruits. It has more nutritional benefits than sodas, even if the sugar spike is just as bad. Dietitian Amy Campbell says vegetable juices such as V8 are healthier can be drunk in larger amounts than the sweeter juices. Continue reading >>

Tomato Juice Or Mixed Vegetable V8 Drinks Ok For Diabetic Patients?

Tomato Juice Or Mixed Vegetable V8 Drinks Ok For Diabetic Patients?

Diabetes Forum • The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community » Tomato Juice or Mixed vegetable V8 drinks OK for diabetic patients? Because sweet is no good for diabetic patients, instead of drinking fruit juices, I take always tomato juices or V8 (mixed vegetable juices) . Any comments/ opinions whether these have any bad effect on blood sugar ? You will have to be careful with V8 drinks "If you are a diabetic or are pre-diabetic with fluctuating blood glucose levels, you need to take into consideration that V8 contains added sugar. Regular V8 only has around 8 g of sugar per 8 oz serving; however, the berry blend has 18 g. While it may not be a lot of added sugar per serving, if you drink multiple servings throughout the day, blood glucose levels could rise or fluctuate, making diabetes more challenging to keep under control." It is better to make up your own juices, as you can make a better judgement what goes in the mix. There is all types of tomato juice out there ,best read the small print. Check this veg out as it should be a great additive to your mix. Continue reading >>

What Fruit Juice Can People With Diabetes Drink?

What Fruit Juice Can People With Diabetes Drink?

Tweet Fruit juice has, until recently, been considered a great way to get your five a day. people with diabetes need to moderate their fruit juice intake as larger glasses of juice can substantially raise blood sugar levels. The key is to In addition, more recently, regular consumption of fruit juice has been linked with an increase in type 2 diabetes risk. What's in fruit juice? Aside from vitamin C and calcium, fruit juice contains: Calories - 250ml glass of unsweetened orange juice typically contains around 100 calories, compared to the 60 calories in an actual orange Fructose (a form of sugar) - half a pint of fruit juice contains more sugar than the World Health Organisation recommends ideally having in a day (30g of sugar for men, 24g for women) A lack of fibre - juice always contains less fibre than whole fruit and highly processed juices may not contain any fibre How does this affect my diabetes? Badly, is the short answer. Sugar levels in fruit juice can cause a significant spike in blood sugar levels, increasing the risk of hyperglycemia. The glycemic index, which is used to reflect the impact on blood sugar levels of individual foods, places orange juice between 66 and 76 on a scale of 100. Compared to whole fruits and vegetables, juice doesn't offer much fibre. (it's stripped away in the juicing process). Fibre is a kind of carbohydrate that, because the body doesn't break it down, is calorie-free, so it doesn't affect your blood sugar, making it important for people with diabetes. Soluble fibre can help lower your cholesterol levels and improve blood glucose control if eaten in large amounts. Apples, oranges, and pears all contain soluble fibre, but not when juiced. Is fruit juice all bad for people with diabetes? Fruit juice has some benefits for people wi Continue reading >>

What Drinks Are Good And Bad For People With Diabetes?

What Drinks Are Good And Bad For People With Diabetes?

When a person has diabetes, insulin, a hormone that helps cells absorb glucose, is either nonexistent or in short supply. A person with diabetes is unable to use insulin properly, which causes sugars to build up in the blood. Diabetes can be dangerous if it is not properly managed. Different drinks can affect blood sugar levels in a number of ways. Contents of this article: The best drinks for people with diabetes The following drinks are good choices for people with diabetes. Things to look out for when choosing a drink Many drinks contain lots of sugars and carbohydrates. Paying attention to food labels and nutritional facts can provide important information. Labels should state the serving size and carbohydrate content of any drink. People with diabetes have different bodily needs, so there are no exact dietary rules. However, some tips can help. To make it easier to control blood sugar, it is important to: eat a balanced diet and manage the amount of carbohydrate consumed keep carbohydrate levels consistent from day to day consume managed amounts of carbohydrate, because the brain and body need some carbohydrate to function. Paying attention to food labels and nutritional facts can provide important information. Labels should state the serving size and carbohydrate content of any drink. The worst drinks for people with diabetes The following drinks are bad choices for people with diabetes. Soda and energy drinks Sodas and other sugar-sweetened beverages can increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. For people who already have diabetes, this type of drink provides large amounts of sugar and requires little digestion. Drinking sodas without healthy food can lead to large spikes in blood sugar levels. As it is important to spread carbohydrate intake out evenly, it would be Continue reading >>

Can You Drink Vegetable Juice With Type 2 Diabetes?

Can You Drink Vegetable Juice With Type 2 Diabetes?

Juicing – both fruit juice and vegetable juice – is a popular health trend that claims to offer valuable benefits. After all, you're running whole fruits and vegetables through a juice machine. This liquefies the produce and removes most of the pulp and fiber, creating a smooth beverage that makes it easy for you to drink your nutrients. But, is juicing as healthy as it sounds? Particularly if you have type 2 diabetes? Well, the answer mostly depends on what you put in your juice! For instance, if you use only apples in your recipe, then your juice won’t really be diabetic friendly because apples are high in carbs and you'll be chugging down straight sugar. We've written previously on fruit juicing over here – and that's not something we recommend for you as a diabetic. But, if you purchase or make a juice that is heavy in leafy greens and other non starchy vegetables, and contains a small portion of low carb fruits, then you’ve got a great supplement to drink on the odd occasion. Drinking vegetable juice can be a good way to get in those daily vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants… just as long as you do it the right way! Store bought vs. homemade juice comparison Thankfully, juicing has become so common that you can walk into almost any grocery store and find juice made of vegetables, fruits, or a mixture of both. Health food stores and specialty stores may have fresh juice made in house, which is usually located in the refrigerator section. Or you can find a can or bottle of juice like V8 pretty much anywhere, even at convenience stores! So, is store bought juice any less healthy for you than homemade juice? The answer: not really. In theory, fresh juice is better for you, but you can buy a premade juice that contains just as much nutrition – if you choo Continue reading >>

Beverage Dos And Don'ts For Diabetes

Beverage Dos And Don'ts For Diabetes

To successfully manage type 2 diabetes, plan your beverages as carefully as you plan your food choices. That typically means taking sugary drinks — such as soda, sweet tea, and even juice — off the table. You might be surprised at how much a single drink can affect you when you have type 2 diabetes. Drinking just one soda a day is associated with developing type 2 diabetes, according to 2013 research in the journal PLoS One. When you are faced with so many new constraints on sugar and other carbs after a diabetes diagnosis, you may be left asking, “What can I still drink?” Fortunately, there’s a variety of refreshing, flavorful beverages you can enjoy, says Katherine Basbaum, RD, a clinical dietitian in the Cardiology and Cardiac Rehabilitation departments at the University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville. Before you take your next sip, here are the top drinking dos and don’ts for those with diabetes. Do Drink: Water Water is one of the few beverages you can drink without worry throughout the day and a great way to stay hydrated. If you often forget to drink as much water as you should, Basbaum has a suggestion for increasing your intake: Drink one 8-ounce glass of water for every other beverage you drink that contains sugar substitutes or caffeine. Shake things up with sparkling water or by squeezing lemon or lime juice into your glass. Do Drink: Skim Milk “Skim or low-fat milk is also a good beverage option, but it must be counted toward your carb total for a particular meal or snack,” Basbaum says. Cow’s milk also provides protein and calcium. Be aware that non-dairy options, such as almond milk, may have added sweeteners and flavorings. Don’t Drink: Sugar-Sweetened Soda or Tea “Sugar-sweetened drinks are absorbed into your bloodstr Continue reading >>

Simple Steps For Eating And Living Better With Diabetes

Simple Steps For Eating And Living Better With Diabetes

Simple Steps for Eating and Living Better with Diabetes Simple Steps for Eating and Living Better with Diabetes Simple Steps for Eating and Living Better with Diabetes By FoodChannel Editor January 16, 2008 10:50 pm Registered dietitian Jackie Newgent, author of the newly-released The All-Natural Diabetes Cookbook , provides simple steps that people with diabetes (and everyone who wants to make positive lifestyle changes) can take to manage calories, lose weight and follow a balanced eating plan. Her steps are below; you can also get a free booklet from the Amercian Diabetes Association (ADA) by clicking the link below. Veg Out! The ADA recommends increasing vegetable intake, which can even include drinking your veggies! Research suggests that people who eat more vegetables do so in place of higher calorie foods, which can help spur weight loss. Here are ways to get more vegetables: Choose a rainbow of colorful vegetables and fruits to add variety and enjoyment while maximizing nutrient consumption. Go for non-starchy vegetables like leafy greens, carrots, broccoli or tomatoes. Move veggies from the side to the center of the plate as the main entre. Pile sandwiches high with your favorite fresh or grilled varieties. Drink your vegetables with V8 100% vegetable juice each 8-ounce glass provides two full servings (one cup) of veggies! If youre cutting back on sodium, try the Low Sodium V8 100% vegetable juice. Join the Breakfast Club. Research suggests that people who regularly eat breakfast tend to be leaner compared to those who miss their morning meals. Go for a bowl of whole grain cereal like oatmeal topped with fruit and low-fat milk or, if youre in a hurry, toast some whole grain bread, spread with 2 tablespoons of peanut butter and grab a 12-ounce bottle of Low So Continue reading >>

V8 Juice - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

V8 Juice - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Does anyone know if drinking a v8 juice daily really accounts for the vegetable servings? I know to watch the sodium but since I don't always eat enough vegetables this would help take care of it. Gabby, V8 seems to lower my BS. I love the taste, and use it instead of orange juice, which is really hard on my BS. Guess this is something I should try....I always figured it would taste like "cold soup" which sounds yucky to me! I would think that it being tomato juice and other juices, that it would rise your BS a bit. I don't like it so never and will never be able to test that theory. Anybody game? 10g carb in 8oz. It should be BG friendly. I prefer tomato juice with some worcestershire and tabasco. Maybe V8 works as a substitute for fresh veggies - maybe there's no such thing as a good substitute for fresh fruits and veggies, I don't know... V8 is probably not unhealthy so if you like it - go ahead. There is another product that I know of that claims to give you a lot of what you would get form fresh fruits and veggies - wheatgrass juice is packed with phytochemicals . Click here for a chart that shows a comparison of wheatgrass to actual veggies. I've found it to be fairly BG friendly. I often have a small can of it for my PM snack at work. I would think the only thing missing with juice instead of actual veges would be the fiber maybe? Could taking fiber tabs fix that?I do eat veges just not enough to have 5 servings aday. I would think the only thing missing with juice instead of actual veges would be the fiber maybe? Could taking fiber tabs fix that?I do eat veges just not enough to h Continue reading >>

V8 100% Vegetable Juice Aids In Weight Loss And Lowers Blood Pressure

V8 100% Vegetable Juice Aids In Weight Loss And Lowers Blood Pressure

Decades of studies have documented the link between eating a diet rich in vegetables and multiple health benefits, yet nearly eight out of 10 people worldwide fall short of the daily recommendation. Research presented at the International Symposium on Human Health Effects of Fruits and Vegetables suggests the best approach may be to focus on the factors that are often behind this vegetable gap: convenience and enjoyment. Two studies presented at the symposium found that the addition of vegetable juice in people's diets was a successful strategy to help them reach the vegetable guidelines (at least 4 servings per day). In fact, the addition of a portable drink, such as V8- 100% vegetable juice, was more successful than an approach that focused solely on nutrition education, or offering dietary counseling on ways to increase vegetable intake. Researchers at the University of California-Davis conducted a 12-week study among adults ages 40-65 years. All of the people in the study who drank at least two cups of vegetable juice met daily vegetable recommendations, yet only seven percent of the non-juice drinkers met the goal. The participants in the study with borderline high blood pressure who drank one to two servings of V8 juice lowered their blood pressure significantly. According to the research, the vegetable juice drinkers said they enjoyed the juice and felt like they were doing something good for themselves by drinking it. "Enjoyment is so critical to developing eating habits you can stick with for the long-term," said study co-author Carl Keen, PhD, Professor of Nutrition and Internal Medicine at the University of California-Davis. "Health and nutrition professionals must help people find simple ways for people to get their vegetables or they simply won't do it, and Continue reading >>

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