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V8 Fusion Diabetes

V8 Vegetable Juice - Twice The Salt Of Mcd's French Fries

V8 Vegetable Juice - Twice The Salt Of Mcd's French Fries

V8 Vegetable Juice - Twice the Salt of McD's French Fries From Fooducate reader Luke: "My question has to do with V8 (the original, or the spicy hot version of the original). Avoid? OK to buy? Please help!" We certainly can understand the confusion. Just take a look at V8's marketing messages on each and every bottle: "Essential Antioxidants" "Heart Healthy" Heart Check Endorsement from the American Heart Association "100% Vegetable Juice" Reads as if we should be drinking gallons a day... What you need to know: Let's begin with V8's claims that it is "100% Vegetable Juice". Too bad their website does not include the ingredient list. Is there something to hide? We found the ingredient elsewhere, and reading it, one can see that, true, all the juice is from vegetables, but there are added ingredients. Here's the list: Tomato Juice From Concentrate (Water, Tomato Concentrate), Reconstituted Vegetable Juice Blend (Water and Concentrated Juices of Carrots, Celery, Beets, Parsley, Lettuce, Watercress, Spinach), Salt, Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid), Flavoring, Citric Acid. The number 1 addition is water! Notice that V8 is from concentrate. This means that the veggies were at one point juiced, but for logistical purposes, the water content was removed. (Same thing happens with orange juice). So you're not getting freshly juiced vegetables. For all we know the veggies have been stored in refrigerated vats as concentrate for months. Interesting addition to the list are the salt, vitamin C, and flavorings. A single glass of V8 contains 480mg of sodium, or 20% (!!!) of the daily maximum. Compare to 135mg for a small McDonald's French Fries, or 290mg for a medium. Why so much salt you ask? Because it tastes good. There's a low sodium option with only 140mg, and after you taste it, you'l Continue reading >>

Tomato Juice Or Mixed Vegetable V8 Drinks Ok For Diabetic Patients?

Tomato Juice Or Mixed Vegetable V8 Drinks Ok For Diabetic Patients?

Diabetes Forum • The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community » Tomato Juice or Mixed vegetable V8 drinks OK for diabetic patients? Because sweet is no good for diabetic patients, instead of drinking fruit juices, I take always tomato juices or V8 (mixed vegetable juices) . Any comments/ opinions whether these have any bad effect on blood sugar ? You will have to be careful with V8 drinks "If you are a diabetic or are pre-diabetic with fluctuating blood glucose levels, you need to take into consideration that V8 contains added sugar. Regular V8 only has around 8 g of sugar per 8 oz serving; however, the berry blend has 18 g. While it may not be a lot of added sugar per serving, if you drink multiple servings throughout the day, blood glucose levels could rise or fluctuate, making diabetes more challenging to keep under control." It is better to make up your own juices, as you can make a better judgement what goes in the mix. There is all types of tomato juice out there ,best read the small print. Check this veg out as it should be a great additive to your mix. Continue reading >>

Is V8 Good For You?

Is V8 Good For You?

Vegetable juices have become big business these days, and V8 is perhaps the best-known brand of vegetable juice. It’s portable, comes in all sorts of flavors, and is touted as being able to help you meet your daily vegetable quota. You’ve likely heard the brand’s slogan: “Could’ve had a V8,” but the question is, should you? While it contains nutrients from all sorts of vegetables, V8 should not take the place of eating vegetables. Nutrients are lost and most of the fiber is removed during processing of vegetable juices like V8. They also have added components that are of questionable nutritional value. Purported Benefits of V8 From soda to fruit-flavored juices, an array of clearly unhealthy drinks is available on the market. V8 is made from vegetables, and contains many of the same nutrients you’d find in whole vegetables. According to the company’s official website, V8 contains the juice of eight vegetables: beets carrots celery lettuce parsley tomatoes spinach watercress Due to the types of vegetables used, V8 is considered a source of vitamins A, C, and E. The juice also is considered low in cholesterol and fat. Given this nutritional information, many people seek out the convenience of V8 as an alternative to eating plain vegetables. The Pitfalls of Vegetable Juice Drinking V8 certainly isn’t as bad as drinking non-nutritive drinks like soda, but the juice may have some surprising drawbacks. The pureeing process used to juice the vegetables removes a large portion of their fiber content. Fiber, found in vegetables and other foods, is extremely important because it: keeps you full prevents weight gain caused by overeating regulates blood sugar prevents constipation protects against heart disease Whole raw, as well as cooked, vegetables offer a vari Continue reading >>

There Might Be Dead Animal Parts In Your V8! & Homemade V8 Juice Recipe

There Might Be Dead Animal Parts In Your V8! & Homemade V8 Juice Recipe

That might be okay for you because you eat meat but for those that dont, its not okay. Its hard enough to shop vegetarian without labels downright lying about what they contain., I simply appreciate the FACT that someone is opening this can of worms so that we ALL may make choices, and investigate further if desired. Also, the FACT is, taking the time to read the originators research before critiquing it would be a smart move. I, for one, do not have the time to do all this research/investigating, so I really and truly appreciate the time and efforts to get this out to the public! I went to the V8 facebook page and made a comment that I didnt want to use Campbell products if they couldnt even get their story straight,or try to be more healthy. I was attacked by a few people and that were very vile. They attacked me for a spelling error and a grammar mistake and just made crazy statements against me and Food Babe, especially. This leads me to believe these people are just crazy or they are probably being paid or compensated somehow to ward off Food Babes army. I am shocked if it was real, because I dont want to believe society breeds such ignorant people! There are more authorities on our food chain , then just Food Babe.. many, many and it just doesnt make sense for people to be so nasty. I never want to see a Campbells product ever again in my life! You DO realize that making this comparison is poor rhetoric, right? Its called a non-sequitur. Since the food industry in America is selling us poisons on a grand scale (poisons they are not allowed to sell anywhere else), I think it is important that someone put this in the mainstream. There is a reason that childhood obesity, diabetes, and high cholesterol have become endemic in this country. What Vani talks about is not Continue reading >>

According To A Doctor, You Shouldn't Have Had A V8

According To A Doctor, You Shouldn't Have Had A V8

If you've ever found yourself wondering when you last ate a real fruit or vegetable (and no, you can't survive on mimosas and avocado toast alone), listen up. The USDA recommends between the ages of 19 and 30, women have 2 1/2 cups and men have 3 cups of fruits and vegetables per day. But between school and work and going out for pizza with friends, it's not always possible to get all your fruits and veggies in. To make up for the missing nutrients, some people are quick to reach for vitamins or supplements, and juices like V8. However, like the commercial says, could you really just have had a V8? To get to the bottom of this, I asked my mom, who happens to be a family medicine doctor, and Annette Washington, a recent Masters of Nutrition graduate on the path to becoming a Registered Dietitian. Apparently everyone is trying to go the juice route, because both my mother and Annette said it was a very common question. My mother laughed when I asked her if drinking a V8 is healthy and said, "Compared to what? A Venti Frappacino from Starbucks? Yes. Whole fruits and vegetables? Definitely not." So, it's not exactly unhealthy, but there's definitely some pros and cons. Con: Sugar Content and Added Flavors "The problem with V8 is that when you juice fruits and vegetables, you are losing some of the "good stuff" like fiber, and with bottled juices, you end up getting extra things like added sugars and sodium," Washington says. You see, fruit is full of carbs — natural sugars and fiber. When they're blended or juiced, the sugars are released, which removes the insoluble fiber. When eating fruit, the fiber slows down the body's absorption of fructose (sugar), which is processed by your liver. But when it's juiced, the broken down fiber allows our body to quickly absorb the fr Continue reading >>

Should I Have A V8 Fusion Energy Drink?

Should I Have A V8 Fusion Energy Drink?

By TanyaJolliffe , SparkPeople Blogger 7/4/2011 Popular energy drinks like Monster, Full Throttle, and Red Bull have helped create a $7.6 billion United States industry over the last decade. Continued growth is expected with an anticipated growth to $19.7 billion in sales by 2013. These drinks typically contain the stimulant caffeine as well as other ingredients such as taurine, guarana and B vitamins all claiming to provide energy. The term "energy drinks" was created by beverage industry companies but is not a category currently recognized by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) . There is limited evidence that these drinks improve physical or mental performance, improve mental fatigue or alertness. It is also unclear in the literature whether any improvements were the result of caffeine, the other herbal ingredients, sugar present in some drinks, or some combination of these ingredients. Now two new energy drinks tempt us with the appeal of 100 percent vegetable and fruit juice in the new V8 Fusion Energy and V8 Energy Shot drinks. Offered in tempting flavor combinations such as pomegranate/blueberry or peach/mango some are already on shelves in over 2,400 Wal-Mart stores. Is the new mix of well-known vegetable juice with caffeine, vitamins, and green tea a source of energy packed fruit and vegetables servings you should including in your healthy eating plan? The new My Plate icon reminds us that half our meals should consist of healthy fruits and vegetables to ensure we are getting key nutrients such as folate, potassium, vitamins A, C and K as well as dietary fiber. Including fruits and vegetables in meals and snacks also help people meet weight goals and reduce risks of chronic disease. One way Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Drinking V8 Juice

Side Effects Of Drinking V8 Juice

The V8 brand of vegetable beverages includes a variety of products, including vegetable juices, veggie blends, fusion and energy drinks, and infused waters. V8 beverages are promoted as a way to help consumers increase their consumption of vegetables. Only 13 percent of American adults meet recommended vegetable intake, according to a July 2015 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. V8 products contain a number of healthful vegetable-derived nutrients. The nutrient profiles differ, however, depending on the specific V8 beverage. V8 is generally considered a healthful beverage option, but there are possible side effects for people who consume large quantities or have specific health concerns. Video of the Day Loose stools are a possible side effect from drinking V8 juice. This side effect is not likely with the original V8 drinks, which contain only vegetable juices. It is more likely -- although still uncommon -- with the veggie blend and fusion drinks, which contain a mixture of vegetable and fruit juices. The sugars in fruit juices can cause loose stools or diarrhea, especially when consumed in large amounts and in the absence of solid foods. People who have an underlying intestinal disorder, such as irritable bowel syndrome or inflammatory bowel disease, might be more sensitive to developing loose stools or diarrhea in response to drinking vegetable and fruit juices, not just V8. Too much dietary sodium can play a role in the development or worsening of high blood pressure, or hypertension. Some V8 drinks are relatively high in sodium, which could contribute to going over the recommended intake of less than 2,300 mg daily. However, there are a a number of low-sodium V8 juice drinks. Some examples of the sodium content of an 8-ounce serving of var Continue reading >>

Starbucks Espresso And Steamed Milk

Starbucks Espresso And Steamed Milk

Filed Under: diabetes lifestyle development Roizen at [emailprotected] Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (also known as peripheral diabetes insipidus) diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus are two separate conditions. Starbucks Espresso And Steamed Milk recipes and good housekeeping cookbook Lot of recipes for cooking shark steaks good housekeeping cookbook numbered usd el bulli vtg betty crockers cookbook General pathology exam question book Sample 1 answers IF MEDICAL SCHOOL WERE EASYYOUR DEGREE WOULD BE WORTHLESS. However some people with type 2 diabetes do have to use insulin. Auf die richtigen Kohlenhydrate kommt es besonders fr Diabetiker an. Urinary Tract Infection was common among those who had prolong duration of diabetes (P=0.039) and among those receiving insulin as compared to calories in one slice of bacon those under oral medications (P=0.08). El cientfico Habib Zaghouani ha desarrollado una posible cura para la diabetes tipo 1 healthiest energy drink at gas station combinando clulas madre con un nuevo frmaco. Community-based weight loss program aids diabetes management. Risk factors include obesity (Obesity in these mothers is defined as having a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30kg/m or above) age (>30) genetic background or family history of diabetes and Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Research Papers probe into the different tests to determine diabetes. V8 Fusion (Label Readers Needed) your risk of heart disease and diabetes and is the key to came across a bottle of Pomegranate Blueberry V8 V-Fusion. evidence based practice center. Only your health care provider can treat urinary tract infections. Superfoods For Diabetics Well we hope you are duly impressed with just this little Medications causing Dry mouth. Please contact your health care professional ab Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Juice Boxes For Your Kids Lunchbox

The Best And Worst Juice Boxes For Your Kids Lunchbox

The best and worst juice boxes for your kids lunchbox Published September 13, 2012 The juice box has been a lunchbox staple for a long time, providing kids with the hydration and nutrition necessary to get through the school day or so parents thought. Recent studies on the dangers of drinking too many high-sugar, high-calorie beverages have helped to steer parents away from the mighty boxes. As kids head back to school and parents look for quick ways to pack their child a healthy lunch, its time to reconsider the juice box. There are more types than ever on the market today, promising everything from great flavor to great nutrition, all wrapped up in a sensible serving size. Yet sensationalist claims scream at you from the box, making it difficult to figure out which ones offer real nutrition and which dont. Then, of course, there is the matter of taste. Just because a drink with carrots and berries is appealing to Mom or Dad, doesnt mean a kid is going to like it. When choosing a juice box, its helpful to remember a few juice guidelines, as suggested by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Infants less than a year old should not be drinking any fruit juice, kids ages 1 to 6 years old shouldnt exceed 6 ounces of fruit juice per day, and older children from ages 7 to 18 shouldnt consume more than 8 or 12 ounces per day, ideally divided into two servings. Along with causing weight gain, excessive juice consumption can lead to cavities, malnutrition, and diarrhea. If you have more concerns about your child and fruit juice, its best to talk to a pediatrician who knows you child and their specific case. In order to figure out the tastiest, the sweetest, and the weirdest options out there, The Daily Meal editors taste-tested 10 different brands. For this test, we looked at fr Continue reading >>

V8 V-fusion 100% Juice, Peach Mango : Publix.com

V8 V-fusion 100% Juice, Peach Mango : Publix.com

Sign up for Publix Digital Coupons and save instantly at checkout by simply entering your phone number. 2000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice, but calorie needs vary. Additional nutrition information available upon request. (Go to product detail page for each product.) The products listed are available in the Publix store you selected but may be out of stock and may not be available in other Publix, Publix GreenWise Market or Publix Sabor stores. The information listed originates from the manufacturer or government publications and reflects the most recent information provided by such entities. Product packaging, labeling, formulations and ingredient sourcing can change at any time and Publix may not receive up-to-date information regarding such changes; thus, Publix cannot guarantee the accuracy of the information provided and you should not rely on this information. Rather, you are encouraged to read the product labels to obtain the most accurate and up-to-date information. Any prices shown are effective as of today and are subject to change on a day by day basis. Neither Publix, its content provider nor the manufacturers assume any liability for inaccuracies, misstatements or omissions. Continue reading >>

Juice Vs. Fruit: What’s Better For Diabetes?

Juice Vs. Fruit: What’s Better For Diabetes?

This past week, results of a European study, published in the International Journal of Food Science and Nutrition in 2006, made the news. This study was actually a comprehensive review of the literature on fruit and vegetable juices. And while it may not sound like an exciting paper to read, this study does raise an interesting point. Here’s the crux of the study, according to the authors: “When considering cancer and coronary heart disease prevention, there is no evidence that pure fruit and vegetable juices are less beneficial than whole fruit and vegetables.” Dietitians may find this study to be a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it’s good news. For people who dislike eating fruits or vegetables, downing a glass of grape juice or carrot juice is an easy way to get the vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants they need to help prevent heart disease and cancer. And we need all the help we can get when it comes to battling these two diseases. But, on the other hand, the issue of calories and carbohydrate surfaces when it comes to folks who are trying to watch their weight and/or who have diabetes. If you’ve ever met with a dietitian for your diabetes, chances are you’ve been advised to limit fruit juices. Why? Well, a 4-ounce glass of orange juice, for example, contains about 60 calories and 15 grams of carbohydrate. In the carbohydrate counting method of diabetes meal planning, this is considered “one carb choice.” What’s 15 grams of carbohydrate, you might argue? It’s not a lot of carbohydrate, all things considered. But, if you’re pouring yourself a glass of freshly squeezed orange juice, do you really measure out just 4 ounces? If you honestly do, great. Most people don’t, though, and end up drinking more like 8 or 12 ounces, since 4 ounces a Continue reading >>

V8 V-fusion Is Healthy, But Light Is Not

V8 V-fusion Is Healthy, But Light Is Not

Here is another reliable product from the Campbell Soup Company, V8 V-Fusion which has NO dangerous food additives. This is a balanced blend of 10 vegetable and fruit juices reconstituted from the concentrates. NO sugar or High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) Added; NO artificial colors, flavors or preservatives. Bravo! DyeDiet RECOMMENDED It’s a pleasure to look at the DyeDiet risk diagram this time: it’s mostly green (13 nutrients) with only 3 harmless food additives (yellow segments)! Clarified banana juice is simply filtered banana juice. On the Campbell’s website you can read: “V8 V-Fusion is a breakthrough juice that gives your patrons a full serving of vegetables plus a full serving of fruit in every 8-ounce glass.* The result is a nutrition-packed beverage made of 100% juice that’s also delicious and refreshing. Get the Veggies, Taste The Fruit.” Yes, this is all true. The beverage is also loaded with Vitamin C (100% Reference Daily Intake, RDA), Vitamin E (15% RDA) and Vitamin A (70% RDA). This is good too, however, to me, the today’s America “vitamins rush” seems to be another extreme and, perhaps, potentially dangerous swing: the human body doesn’t need extra vitamins (please be patient, the link is a little slow). In fact, too much vitamins can make you sick. Furthermore, Vitamin E pills may raise risk of prostate cancer, not reduce. We need to take serious care about consumption of Vitamin A too. Sugar content: Stop blaming sugar, blame YOURSELF! V8 V-Fusion is rather high in sugar: 25 g per 8 OZ (240 ml) serving, that is close to 55 g sugar in Coca-Cola Classic, 20 FL OZ (591 ml). But as always, the solution is simple: Don’t drink Fusion in place of water, consider it as a treat. Recently a video “Sugar Is Toxic” has been spread in the Continue reading >>

V8 Juice - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

V8 Juice - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Does anyone know if drinking a v8 juice daily really accounts for the vegetable servings? I know to watch the sodium but since I don't always eat enough vegetables this would help take care of it. Gabby, V8 seems to lower my BS. I love the taste, and use it instead of orange juice, which is really hard on my BS. Guess this is something I should try....I always figured it would taste like "cold soup" which sounds yucky to me! I would think that it being tomato juice and other juices, that it would rise your BS a bit. I don't like it so never and will never be able to test that theory. Anybody game? 10g carb in 8oz. It should be BG friendly. I prefer tomato juice with some worcestershire and tabasco. Maybe V8 works as a substitute for fresh veggies - maybe there's no such thing as a good substitute for fresh fruits and veggies, I don't know... V8 is probably not unhealthy so if you like it - go ahead. There is another product that I know of that claims to give you a lot of what you would get form fresh fruits and veggies - wheatgrass juice is packed with phytochemicals . Click here for a chart that shows a comparison of wheatgrass to actual veggies. I've found it to be fairly BG friendly. I often have a small can of it for my PM snack at work. I would think the only thing missing with juice instead of actual veges would be the fiber maybe? Could taking fiber tabs fix that?I do eat veges just not enough to have 5 servings aday. I would think the only thing missing with juice instead of actual veges would be the fiber maybe? Could taking fiber tabs fix that?I do eat veges just not enough to h Continue reading >>

The 18 Worst 'healthy' Juices

The 18 Worst 'healthy' Juices

1/17 SLIDES Provided by Eat This, Not That! Just because fruit is healthy doesn't make fruit juice a waistline-friendly pick. Sure, theyre natural and overflowing with vitamin C, but fruit juices aren't as healthy as they seem. The difference between the beverage and its produce companion is the presence of fiber . This digestion-slowing, belly-filling macronutrient is key when it comes to minimizing spikes in blood sugar and keeping your energy levels from tanking soon after you finish sipping a glass. The proof is in the pudding: According to Harvard researchers, when participants swapped out three glasses of fruit juice with three servings of whole fruit a week, it was associated with a 7 percent reduction in risk of type 2 diabetes. And yes, juices sound like they could be better for you because they contain natural sugars, but unfortunately, your body cant tell the difference. These carbs are treated the same way as added sugars in your body; and thats extra bad news since some of these drinks contain more sweet stuff than a soda. Yikes. Because juices are often touted as a health food, it makes them all the more dangerous. Studies have shown that when people perceive a food as healthier we tend to eator drinkmore of it. Thats why weve searched through grocery store shelves to find the worst healthy juices that are really diet blunders in disguise. Cut out these sugary concoctions and blend yourself one of these fiber-rich 56 Smoothies for Weight Loss instead. 2/17 SLIDES Provided by Eat This, Not That! Per 8 fl oz: 150 calories, 0 g fat, 20 mg sodium, 41 g carbs (3 g fiber, 36 g sugar), 1 g protein How can a sugary, but healthy, food like fruit go from being healthy to unhealthy? Easy: strip it of its benefits. Fruit may contain sugar, but it also contains water Continue reading >>

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5 "healthy" Energy Drinks...that Aren't Healthy At All | Well+good

When it comes to being smart about the beverages you sip in the name of energy and hydration, there are the basics that pretty much everyone knows. Red Bull = not so awesome for your body. And ditto for full-of-nothing-but-sugar juices and sports drinks. But many a discerning consumer has been duped by faux healthy energy-enhancing drinksyou know, those bottled beverages that seem to provide wellness benefits, but really justdont. Its not your fault. Its summer, and youre thirsty, but thats all the more reason not to be lured by suspect ingredients and vague health claims.Here, Dana James, MS, a triple board certified nutritionist and founder of Food Coach , helps us make sense of the beverages youll want to skip, and why. People think G2Gatorades lower-cal cousinis a healthier option, because it has half the carbs and calories of the classic.But sugar is still the second ingredient on G2s nutrition label,and, according to experts, theres just no reason for most of us to be loading up on what is essentially sweetened water, even if it is lower-calorie sweetened water. (Excess sugar, of course, is one of the main culprits in everything from mood swings to diabetes. ) Unlessyoure a competitive athlete or exercising for 90 minutes-plus, they shouldnt be your go-to-beverage, James says. Drinks like G2 do, however, complement intense exercise, because the sugar allows for rapid hydration and replenishes glycogen levels that have been depleted, James says, so if youre really going for it workout-wise, theyre an OK option. Fails the faux sugar test: Powerade Zero , V8 V-Fusion + Energy Just because Powerade Zero doesnt have sugar (which again, is geared specifically for athletesa big hint that its not intended to be mindlessly sipped while you sit at your desk), doesnt mean i Continue reading >>

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