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Urinary Incontinence And Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes Incontinence: What You Should Know

Diabetes Incontinence: What You Should Know

Oftentimes, having one condition can increase your risk for other issues. This is true for diabetes and incontinence, or the accidental release of urine or fecal matter. Incontinence can also be a symptom of an overactive bladder (OAB), which is the sudden urge to urinate. One Norwegian study found that incontinence affected 39 percent of women with diabetes and 26 percent of women without diabetes. Another review suggested that type 2 diabetes may affect incontinence, but more research is needed. In general, lots of people deal with various types of incontinence and levels of severity. The common types include: stress, leakage is due to pressure on the bladder urge, uncontrolled leakage due to a need to void overflow, leakage due to full bladder functional, nerve, or muscle damage causes leakage transient incontinence, a temporary side effect from a condition or medication Read on to learn how diabetes contributes to incontinence and what you can to do manage the condition. The exact link between diabetes and incontinence is unknown. The four possible ways that diabetes can contribute to incontinence are: obesity puts pressure on your bladder nerve damage affects the nerves that control the bowel and the bladder a compromised immune system increases the risk for urinary tract infections (UTIs), which can cause incontinence diabetes medication may cause diarrhea Also, high blood sugar levels seen with diabetes can cause you to become thirstier and urinate more. The excess sugar in your blood triggers thirst, which then leads to more frequent urination. Other factors that may increase your risk include: being female, as women have a higher risk for incontinence than men childbirth older age other health conditions such as prostate cancer or multiple sclerosis obstruction Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition where your body resists the effects of insulin (or does not produce enough insulin) to maintain a normal glucose level in your body. Type 2 is the most common form of diabetes, with about 95% of all people with diabetes in the USA having this form. Type 2 diabetes increases your risk and severity for both urinary and fecal incontinence. One of the main reasons for this is that an unhealthy weight, often associated with Type 2 diabetes, can cause incontinence from the increased weight placed on the pelvic floor muscles. Recent studies have shown that a healthy weight loss done under the guidance of a healthcare professional may reduce incontinence. Who Has Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is more common in adults, but we are now seeing children, teenagers, and young adults being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Diabetes occurs when you have too much glucose (also called blood sugar) in your blood. Too much glucose will damage your body over time. When left untreated, Type 2 diabetes can be life threatening. There is no cure for diabetes, but Type 2 can be managed with the help of your healthcare professional through diet, exercise and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise do not bring your blood sugar into a healthy range, your healthcare professional will discuss the need for medications or insulin therapy with you. Symptoms of Diabetes One of the common symptoms of diabetes (there are many others), is frequent urination. This is because excess glucose that is building up in your blood stream causes fluid to be pulled from your tissues, leaving you thirsty. As a result, you drink more and more fluids in an attempt to quench your thirst, making you urinate more than normal. In addition, your body is also trying to get rid Continue reading >>

Let’s Talk About Incontinence And Diabetes

Let’s Talk About Incontinence And Diabetes

People with diabetes are more prone to incontinence. The first step in successful treatment is to discuss the issue out loud. If you are dealing with incontinence, you’re not alone. A study by the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) suggests that over half of older Americans experience incontinence at some point. There is a known connection between diabetes and incontinence. One of the most common complications of diabetes is nerve damage, or neuropathy, which is caused by high blood sugar levels. According to the Simon Foundation for Continence, your body has a network of autonomic nerves that run from your heart to your bladder, which can be affected by diabetic neuropathy, including nerves in the bladder and the bowel. More often than not, incontinence is caused by damage to these nerves and muscles. Neuropathy also affects the legs and hands, which can indirectly lead to issues of incontinence since people who have decreased mobility, or experience pain with movement, may have trouble making it to the bathroom quickly enough. There are other ways a diabetes diagnosis can raise the risk of incontinence. Those who have gestational diabetes during pregnancy, for instance, have a higher than average chance of giving birth to larger baby. These deliveries increase the risk of damaging the muscles surrounding the birth canal, including muscles that control the bladder. Obesity can cause similar damage to your bladder muscles. Certain medications and heart problems may also cause urinary incontinence. According to the HHS study, it costs over $4,000 a year, on average, to manage incontinence. Treatment usually involves improving control of blood sugar and weight, and treating hypertension and high cholesterol, as well as avoiding food and drinks known to tri Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Messing With Your Bladder And Sex Life?

Is Diabetes Messing With Your Bladder And Sex Life?

If you've noticed your sex life isn't what it used to be, and your bladder doesn't have the staying power that it once did, it may be time to talk to your doctor. A growing body of research finds that those with diabetes are more prone to urologic and sexual problems than those without the diagnosis. The good news: these problems can be treated and improved, or even eliminated. Paying attention to good lifestyle habits may also help, experts say. Both urologic and sexual problems are more common with age, but having diabetes, by itself, boosts the risk of both, says Aruna V. Sarma, MD, research associate professor of urology and epidemiology at the University of Michigan. She and two other experts talked about the issues at the recent annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association. Dr. Sarma conducted a study to tease out the effects of age versus the effects of diabetes on how likely men and women would be to develop urologic and sexual problems. "We know now with our data that the burden of these [complications] is greater in those with diabetes, and their diabetes affects the complications." Among the findings from her research and that of others: • If men report type 2 diabetes, they have almost twice the risk of urinary problems as men without the diagnosis. Urinary problems include infections, incontinence, and bladder cancer. • Having type 2 diabetes increases the risk of getting bladder cancer by about 70%, especially in those who have been diagnosed less than five years, some research finds. Almost 50% of men with diabetes have erectile dysfunction, or ED (those with type 1 are even more likely, about 62%), while the overall percent among those men without diabetes is about 25%. • While about 15% of women in one study who did not have type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Symptoms And Incontinence

Diabetes, Symptoms And Incontinence

Diabetes is a metabolic syndrome where the blood sugar levels become higher than normal, which can cause a range of symptoms. It occurs when the pancreas fails to produce enough or any insulin to move glucose into the cells in our body. This causes a buildup of sugars in the blood. It can be separated into several conditions Prediabetes – characterised by slightly raised blood sugar levels. This condition can be reversed by adopting a healthy lifestyle Type 1 diabetes – is an autoimmune disease where the body fails to produce insulin, insulin replacement therapy is needed Type 2 diabetes – or diabetes mellitus is a metabolic condition where the body struggles to produce enough insulin. Adopting a low sugar and low carb lifestyle can help to keep the condition in check This is a condition that is on the rise. It is thought that the high levels of obesity is contributing to the issue with many being diagnosed prediabetes or with type 2 diabetes as a result. It is estimated that there are around 2.9 million sufferers in the UK. This condition can lead to other serious conditions such as heart disease, kidney disease and blindness. Some people can also experience issues with bladder and/ or bowel continence issues, which may cause embarrassment. Diabetes Symptoms There are some key diabetes symptoms that are common including:- Increased thirst Needing to urinate more often Increased hunger Weight loss Fatigue Dizziness Nausea There are also some symptoms that are specific to your type and vary greatly from person to person. Why might a person become incontinent? Bladder problems can be experienced by people with diabetes. This can be caused by a neurogenic bladder, which is caused by nerve damage (neuropathy) that can happen if blood sugar levels are not bought under Continue reading >>

Sex, Urinary, And Bladder Problems Of Diabetes

Sex, Urinary, And Bladder Problems Of Diabetes

What sexual problems can occur in men with diabetes? Erectile Dysfunction Erectile dysfunction is a consistent inability to have an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. The condition includes the total inability to have an erection and the inability to sustain an erection. Estimates of the prevalence of erectile dysfunction in men with diabetes vary widely, ranging from 20 to 75 percent. Men who have diabetes are two to three times more likely to have erectile dysfunction than men who do not have diabetes. Among men with erectile dysfunction, those with diabetes may experience the problem as much as 10 to 15 years earlier than men without diabetes. Research suggests that erectile dysfunction may be an early marker of diabetes, particularly in men ages 45 and younger. In addition to diabetes, other major causes of erectile dysfunction include high blood pressure, kidney disease, alcohol abuse, and blood vessel disease. Erectile dysfunction may also occur because of the side effects of medications, psychological factors, smoking, and hormonal deficiencies. Men who experience erectile dysfunction should consider talking with a health care provider. The health care provider may ask about the patient's medical history, the type and frequency of sexual problems, medications, smoking and drinking habits, and other health conditions. A physical exam and laboratory tests may help pinpoint causes of sexual problems. The health care provider will check blood glucose control and hormone levels and may ask the patient to do a test at home that checks for erections that occur during sleep. The health care provider may also ask whether the patient is depressed or has recently experienced upsetting changes in his life. Treatments for erectile dysfunction caused by nerve damage, Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

People with diabetes commonly experience problems with controlling their bladder and bowel. This can involve accidental leakage, incomplete emptying, passing urine frequently (frequency) or feeling the need to rush to the toilet (urgency). Common causes of incontinence There are four main ways that diabetes may cause problems with bladder and bowel control: Obesity: This is a key factor in people developing Type 2 (non-insulin dependant) diabetes and it is also a major risk factor for developing incontinence. The pelvic floor muscles support most of your body weight. Any excess weight further strains these muscles, weakening them. Weak pelvic floor muscles do not support the bladder and bowel as it should. If this happens you may notice leakage when coughing and sneezing (also known as stress incontinence) or the need to frequently or urgently visit the toilet. Nerve damage: Poorly controlled or long-term diabetes may cause damage to the nerves, (neuropathy) and commonly occurs in the feet. Similarly, it may affect the bladder and bowel. Nerve damage to the bladder and bowel causes loss of sensation so there may be little warning of needing to go to the toilet or lack of awareness of the bladder filling. The bladder and bowel may not empty well, increasing the risk of developing urinary tract infections, kidney damage or constipation. Reduced immunity - Diabetes interferes with the immune system increasing the risk to infections. A common infection experienced by people with diabetes is urinary tract infection (UTI). It is the combination of the immune system changes and the poor bladder emptying that causes these infections and often they keep reoccurring. Treatment includes antibiotics and strategies to promote bladder emptying. In addition personal hygiene is particu Continue reading >>

Urinary Incontinence

Urinary Incontinence

Tweet Incontinence is defined as the loss of ability to control when you pass urine. Urinary incontinence is relatively common and affects about 5% and 13% of men and women respectively. There are a number of types of treatments which can be used to control incontinence. Types of incontinence There are a number of different forms of urinary incontinence, of which stress incontinence and urge incontinence are the most common. Stress incontinence can result from activities that can put the bladder under increased pressure, which includes laughing, sneezing, exercise or heavy lifting. Urge incontinence is when you leak urine and get a sudden urge to urinate giving you little time to respond to the urge before you empty your bladder. Needing to urinate often at night is an example of urge incontinence. Symptoms of incontinence The main symptom of incontinence is a loss of control of your bladder. This may be present in the form of leaking of small amounts of urine or needing to suddenly pass large amounts of urine. Causes of urinary incontinence Causes of incontinence may include the following: High blood glucose levels Urinary tract infections Autonomic neuropathy Certain medications An enlarged prostate gland Post menopausal changes in the bladder muscles Medications which may lead to incontinence include blood pressure medications, diuretics, hormone replacement therapy treatments, sedatives and some medications for Alzheimer's disease. Diagnosing urinary incontinence If you feel you may have incontinence, speak to your doctor. Incontinence is a common condition which you needn't feel embarrassed about. To help diagnose incontinence, your GP will ask you a number of questions and may ask you to complete a bladder diary for a number of days. Tests for incontinence may als Continue reading >>

A Study Of Bladder Dysfunction In Women With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

A Study Of Bladder Dysfunction In Women With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

A study of bladder dysfunction in women with type 2 diabetes mellitus Department of Medicine, Era's Lucknow Medical College, Sarfarazganj, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India 1Department of Surgery (Urology), Era's Lucknow Medical College, Sarfarazganj, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India Corresponding Author: Dr. Ritu Karoli, Department of Medicine, Era's Lucknow Medical College, Sarfarazganj, Hardoi Road, Lucknow - 226 003, Uttar Pradesh, India. E-mail: [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright : Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Diabetes mellitus has been associated with an earlier onset and increased severity of urologic diseases that often result in debilitating urologic complications. Diabetic bladder dysfunction refers to a group of bladder symptoms occurring in patients with diabetes mellitus ranging from bladder over activity to impaired bladder contractility. Bladder dysfunction is an under evaluated issue in women with diabetes. Aim of our study was to investigate prevalence of bladder dysfunction and its relation with other chronic complications of diabetes in women with type 2 diabetes. In a hospital-based cross sectional study, a cohort of women with type 2 diabetes mellitus who had lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) were enrolled. We used the American Urological Association Symptom Index (AUA-SI) to assess the severity of LUTS and the Indevus Urgency Severity Scale (IUSS) to assess prese Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Make You Urinate So Much?

Why Does Diabetes Make You Urinate So Much?

More than 29 million Americans have diabetes, but more than a quarter of them don’t know it. Frequent urination may be one of the first signs that you have high blood sugar, a hallmark sign of diabetes. When you have diabetes, your body is unable to regulate blood sugar levels. Excess sugar causes more fluids to pass through the kidneys and increases urinary frequency, known as polyuria. “There are other reasons that people with type 2 diabetes can have increased urinary frequency and incontinence,” says Noah Bloomgarden, MD, assistant professor of medicine-endocrinology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and clinical endocrinologist in the division of endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism at the Montefiore Health System in the Bronx, New York. “But the most common cause is hyperglycemia [high blood sugar], or uncontrolled diabetes.” Polyuria is not as serious as many other complications commonly associated with diabetes, such as blindness, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputation, and premature death. But it can be a sign that your blood sugar is elevated, so it’s something you should address with your doctor. Frequent urination is not the only bladder problem that occurs in people with diabetes. They may experience a frequent urge to urinate (even if only a small amount of urine comes out), a loss of bladder control that results in leaking urine, and urinary tract or fungal infections. Such infections can also lead to an increase in urinary frequency and incontinence, especially in the elderly. “It really depends on the point a person is at in developing diabetes, and what level of [blood sugar] control they have,” says Dr. Bloomgarden. If diabetes goes untreated or if it has been poorly controlled for a long time, you can develop se Continue reading >>

Risk Of Urinary Incontinence Higher In Diabetics

Risk Of Urinary Incontinence Higher In Diabetics

Home / Specialties / Geriatric Medicine / Risk of Urinary Incontinence Higher in Diabetics Risk of Urinary Incontinence Higher in Diabetics Women with type 2 diabetes face an increased risk of urinary urge incontinence, but 17 percent of incontinence of any quantity and nearly 15 percent of severe incontinence can be avoided with the prevention of diabetes. "Because many studies have shown that women often do not mention their incontinence to physicians, medical evaluation of patients with diabetes might include screening for incontinence, along with discussion of diagnostic and treatment options," the authors suggest. Limited previous research suggests that diabetes contributes to urinary problems, Dr. Karen L. Lifford from Harvard Medical School, Boston and colleagues explain in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. To further investigate this relationship, the team used data from the Nurses Health Study to compare the risk of urinary incontinence in women with type 2 diabetes with that in women without diabetes. Between 1996 and 2000, the rate of incontinence was 10.5 percent in women with diabetes and 7.0 percent in those without diabetes, the authors report. After accounting for age as a potentially contributing factor, women with diabetes had a 28-percent greater risk of being incontinent than women without diabetes, and a 21-percent increased risk of developing incontinence. This risk was more pronounced for larger quantities of leakage, the results indicate. Longer duration of diabetes increased the risk of incontinence further, the researchers note, so that women who had diabetes for more than 10 years had nearly a 50-percent greater risk of developing incontinence. Moreover, women whose diabetes affected the small blood vessels had more than double Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Risk Of Stress, Urge And Mixed Urinary Incontinence - Sciencedirect

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Risk Of Stress, Urge And Mixed Urinary Incontinence - Sciencedirect

Volume 181, Issue 1 , January 2009, Pages 193-197 Author links open overlay panel Kim N.Danfortha Mary K.Townsendac Get rights and content To improve the understanding of the etiological relation between type 2 diabetes and urinary incontinence, we examined associations between diabetes and urinary incontinence type in 71,650 women 37 to 79 years old in the Nurses' Health Study and the Nurses' Health Study II. From 1976 to 2000 in the Nurses' Health Study and 1989 to 2001 in the Nurses' Health Study II participants reported diagnoses of type 2 diabetes. Women with incident urinary incontinence at least weekly were identified from 2000 to 2002 in the Nurses' Health Study and 2001 to 2003 in the Nurses' Health Study II. We pooled data from the 2 cohorts, and estimated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals using multivariable logistic regression adjusting for age, parity, body mass index, smoking, hysterectomy, functional limitations, menopausal status, postmenopausal hormone use, incontinence promoting medications and study cohort. The incidence of at least weekly urinary incontinence was 5.3% (3,612 of 67,984) among women without type 2 diabetes and 8.7% (318 of 3,666) among women with diabetes. Overall the multivariable adjusted odds of incident urinary incontinence were increased 20% (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.01.3, p = 0.01) among women with vs without type 2 diabetes. This increase appeared largely explained by significantly greater odds of urge urinary incontinence (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.01.9, p = 0.03). There was no apparent association between diabetes and stress (p = 0.3) or mixed (p = 0.6) urinary incontinence, although confidence intervals were somewhat wide. Our findings suggest that type 2 diabetes may especially influence urge urinary incontinence. Further research is Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Bladder And Bowel Control

Diabetes And Bladder And Bowel Control

This fact sheet has been developed to assist people looking for more information about diabetes and bladder and control People with diabetes commonly experience problems with controlling their bladder and bowel. The incontinence refers to bladder and bowel control problems. This can involve accidental leakage, incomplete emptying, passing urine frequently (frequency) or feeling the need to rush to the toilet (urgency). Poor control of the bladder and bowel is an important health problem. It can interfere with work, social activities or sexual and personal relationships. It is important that you seek help because these problems can be cured, treated or better managed. Talk to your doctor or call the Continence Helpline 0800 650 659. Normal bladder and bowel control Knowing how the bladder and bowel normally work will help you understand the problems you may be experiencing. The bladder and bowel store and expel body waste. The bladder stores and passes urine (wee) regularly throughout the day. On average we should pass urine 4-6 times during the day and once over night. This will vary depending upon how much you drink, what you drink and how much you exercise and perspire. Your bladder should easily hold 350 – 500 mls. When it is around about half full you will start to become aware of your bladder filling. You should not go to the toilet at this point but put it off until the urge is stronger but not yet urgent. The lower bowel stores and expels faeces (poo). The normal range for bowel movements is anywhere from 3 times per day to 3 times per week. The faeces you pass should be soft formed and easily passed with no straining. The pelvic floor muscles play an essential role in giving us control over the bladder and bowel. When we hold on to go to the toilet we are rely Continue reading >>

Developing Incontinence With Diabetes

Developing Incontinence With Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes, is a lifelong disease characterized by high levels of glucose in the blood. Those experiencing this disease face many additional challenges beyond diabetes itself. One of these challenges is the increased occurrence and severity of both fecal and urinary incontinence. There are several aspects that connect diabetes and incontinence, but the increased incidence of obesity in diabetics can be considered the main cause. Increased weight, especially in the abdomen, places excessive strain on the muscles of the pelvic floor that control bladder function. This strain or pressure causes involuntary urine leakage, and this type of urinary incontinence is called stress incontinence. Any movements that increase pressure in the abdominal area such as coughing, sneezing, laughing, physical activity, etc. will cause the leakage of small amounts of urine. Another factor linking diabetes to urinary incontinence is the effect diabetes may have on nerve function in the bladder. Damaged nerves can cause overactive bladder or urge incontinence. Urge incontinence is when the muscular wall in the bladder has a sudden contraction causing the urge to urinate and sometimes the loss of urine. Fast movements and activities likes sitting and standing can trigger urge incontinence. Nerve damage caused by diabetes may also cause a loss of bladder sensation and weakened pelvic floor muscles creating the inability to completely empty the bladder. If a diabetic's muscles and nerves become too damaged and fail to ever cause bladder contractions, overflow incontinence will occur. With overflow incontinence the bladder never empties and continuously leaks. An early warning sign of the onset of overflow incontinence is a slow or timid stream of urine whil Continue reading >>

Urinary Incontinence In Individuals With Diabetes Mellitus

Urinary Incontinence In Individuals With Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Spectrum Volume 11 Number 4, 1998, Pages 241-247 These pages are best viewed with Netscape version 3.0 or higher or Internet Explorer version 3.0 or higher. When viewed with other browsers, some characters or attributes may not be rendered correctly. Adeline M.Yerkes, BSN, MPH In Brief Urinary incontinence, a common and costly symptom, is a problem many health care providers will encounter among their caseload of people with diabetes. Dysfunctions of urination have long been known as a problem associated with diabetes, although the literature on the subject is limited. The neurogenic bladder is more commonly discussed in the literature as an issue related to such chronic conditions and diseases as spinal cord lesions, muscular dystrophy, and multiple sclerosis. Also called cystopathy, the neurogenic bladder is considered a form of autonomic neuropathy. It begins with selective damage to autonomic afferent nerves, leaving motor function intact but impairing the sensation of bladder fullness and, therefore, resulting in decreased urinary frequency. As this neuropathy progresses, autonomic efferent nerves become involved, leading to incomplete bladder emptying, urinary dribbling, and overflow incontinence. This article will focus on the diagnosis and management of urinary incontinence. Although less than 1% of all neuropathies are related to the neurogenic bladder,1 due to the prevalence of diabetes, the prevalence of obesity (a risk factor for urinary incontinence) among patients with type 2 diabetes, and the overall prevalence of urinary incontinence (especially among women), most health care practitioners are likely to encounter patients with urinary incontinence. URINARY CONTINENCE AND MICTURITION Urinary continence is the storage of urine, and micturition is Continue reading >>

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