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Untreated Gestational Diabetes

Ceira's Story - Undiagnosed V's Diagnosed Gestational Diabetes

Ceira's Story - Undiagnosed V's Diagnosed Gestational Diabetes

Ceiras story undiagnosed vs diagnosed GD Ceira's story - undiagnosed v's diagnosed gestational diabetes Ceira's story shows her two very different pregnancies, her first where gestational diabetes was not screened or diagnosed, compared to her second pregnancy where gestational diabetes was diagnosed, monitored and controlled. I went into hospital on Friday the 7th of February for an induction as my blood pressure was creeping up and had been put onLabetalolat 38 weeks, so I had midwives coming to the house every other day. I was induced at 40+8 days. I was given the pessary in the afternoon. Started contracting about four hours later but they weren't consistent. Hardly any sleep that night with the pains getting closer and stronger they decided to take me over to the labour ward that morning and I had to wait for a bed. As soon as I went there, around 11am they popped my waters and put me on a drip straight away. Contractions were really close now and everything was all a kind of a blur. At around 6pm I was fully dilated andwas allowed to push. I was pushing so hard but no sign of baby although the midwives said they could see the baby. After two hours they said I would need some help as I was getting tired now. I had to sign to go to theatre and the doctor would decide if I was to have forceps,ventouse, or a caesarean section. I went in, had a spinal block and got examined by the doctor and he decided that the forceps was the best option. I had lots of people around me and my husband at the side, my legs were in stirrups. The midwife was telling me when to push as I had no feeling. Then the midwives started putting pressure on my belly. I had no idea what was going on. The room started to fill with people. No one would tell me what was going on I could tell by their Continue reading >>

Understanding The Risks Associated With Gestational Diabetes

Understanding The Risks Associated With Gestational Diabetes

Understanding the Risks Associated with Gestational Diabetes If you are nearing the second half of your pregnancy, you may have heard your OB or midwife mention the infamous glucose test. Youve probably heard tales of the syrupy orange drink that you have to consume before your blood is drawn and even more intimidating, the dreaded three hour test required if you dont pass the initial screening. But what is gestational diabetes exactly? And how does it affect your baby? Is there any way to prevent gestational diabetes? These are all questions that you may be wondering with your Glucose Challenge Screening approaching. Here are the answers to some of your questions! To best understand gestational diabetes, it is helpful to understand how pregnancy impacts the bodys ability to process glucose (or sugar). In a healthy human body, the pancreas produces the hormone insulin which aids in moving glucose from your blood to the bodys cells where it is then used as energy. During pregnancy however, the placenta actually produces high levels of hormones that interfere with the process of insulin turning the glucose to energy, creating higher than normal blood sugar levels. As you progress in your pregnancy and your baby grows, your body produces more and more of these insulin blocking hormones. When your blood sugar rises to a level that is dangerous to mom and baby,this is considered gestational diabetes. What Are the Risks Associated with Gestational Diabetes? If left untreated, gestational diabetes poses serious risks for both mom and baby.Health risks for your baby include: Preterm labor or birth and respiratory distress syndrome Macrosomia: This is when your baby is born too large (over 9 pounds) and is more likely to experience complications or injuries in the birth canal. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Q And A

Gestational Diabetes: Q And A

Q. What is gestational diabetes? A. Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes that develops during pregnancy. It is different from having known diabetes before pregnancy and then getting pregnant. Gestational diabetes is generally diagnosed in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, and usually goes away after the baby is born. Gestational diabetes can cause problems for the mother and baby, but treatment and regular check-ups mean most women have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. Q. Am I at risk of gestational diabetes? A. Gestational diabetes affects between 10 and 15 per cent of pregnancies in Australia. Women of certain ethnic backgrounds — Australian Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, Indian, Asian, Middle Eastern, African, Maori and Pacific Islander — are more at risk of developing gestational diabetes than women of Anglo-Celtic backgrounds. Other factors can also increase your risk, including: being overweight; having a family history of diabetes; having had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy; being 40 years or older; having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS); taking medicines that can affect blood sugar levels (such as corticosteroids and antipsychotic medicines); and previously having a very large baby (more than 4.5 kg). Q. How would I know if I had gestational diabetes? A. Gestational diabetes does not usually give rise to symptoms. For this reason it is important to be tested during pregnancy, usually between 24 and 28 weeks. Women with risk factors for diabetes may be offered testing earlier than this – sometimes at the first antenatal visit, which is often at around 10 weeks. Women who do develop symptoms may experience: extreme tiredness; being thirsty all the time; symptoms of recurrent infections (such as thrush); and needi Continue reading >>

What Are The Risks Of Gestational Diabetes?

What Are The Risks Of Gestational Diabetes?

A risk means there is a chance that something might happen. With every pregnancy there are some risks, but if you have gestational diabetes your risks of some things will be increased. Managing your blood sugar level brings these risks right down again though and most women with gestational diabetes have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. These things are very unlikely to happen to you, but understanding the risks may help you see why it is important that you follow your healthcare team’s advice. The risks linked to gestational diabetes are caused by blood glucose levels being too high. If you can keep your blood glucose as close as possible to the ideal level, your risks will be reduced. Risk of having a large baby (macrosomia) If your blood glucose level is high, it can cause high blood glucose levels in your baby. Your baby will produce more insulin in response, just like you do. This can make your baby grow larger than normal. This is called macrosomia. Babies weighing more than 4kg (8lb 8oz) at birth are called macrosomic. Macrosomia increases the risk of: Birth trauma - either the mother or baby can be affected when it is difficult for the baby to be born. Trauma may include physical symptoms, such as bone fractures or nerve damage for the baby, or tearing and severe bleeding for the mother as well as psychological distress. Shoulder dystocia - where the baby’s shoulder is stuck in your pelvis once the head has been born. This can squash the umbilical cord, so the team need to use additional interventions to deliver the baby quickly and safely. It means you may have labour induced early or to have a caesarean section so that your baby is born safely. Your baby's weight will be monitored carefully in pregnancy to see whether these interventions are needed. Continue reading >>

Failure To Diagnose Gestational Diabetes Lawyer In Bucks County

Failure To Diagnose Gestational Diabetes Lawyer In Bucks County

Home Practice Areas Birth Injury Lawyer in Bucks County Failure To Diagnose Gestational Diabetes Lawyer in Bucks County Failure To Diagnose Gestational Diabetes Lawyer in Bucks County Gestational diabetes affects the way the body handles sugar during pregnancy. It causes high blood sugar and may or may not produce symptoms. Up to 9 percent of women have gestational diabetes, estimate the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And because the condition can have serious implications for both the mother and the baby, early diagnosis, close monitoring and proper treatment are essential. Failure to diagnose gestational diabetes can cause serious health complications. Your OB-GYN should assess the risk of diabetes during pregnancy; its a standard component of prenatal care . If there are risk factors or symptoms, your doctor will recommend a screening for diabetes, which begins with a glucose test. If the initial test shows high blood sugar, you likely will then undergo a glucose tolerance test. Its important for physicians to stay alert to any symptoms that may indicate gestational diabetes. The most common symptoms are increased thirst and urination. However, the majority of women with gestational diabetes are asymptomatic, making routine screening an essential part of a prenatal program. When doctors carefully assess risk factors and provide adequate screening, gestational diabetes can be addressed early on, and there will be less risk of harm to the baby. Undiagnosed, mismanaged and untreated gestational diabetes can have serious ramifications. Below are some of the outcomes for which an infant is at risk when its mother has untreated diabetes. High birth weight Babies weighing more than 9 pounds are not uncommon in women with diabetes. This can be problematic for b Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: The Consequences Of Not Treating.

Gestational Diabetes: The Consequences Of Not Treating.

Abstract OBJECTIVE: Untreated gestational diabetes mellitus carries significant risks of perinatal morbidity at all severity levels; treatment will enhance outcome. STUDY DESIGN: A matched control of 555 gravidas, gestational diabetes mellitus diagnosed after 37 weeks, were compared with 1110 subjects treated for gestational diabetes mellitus and 1110 nondiabetic subjects matched from the same delivery year for obesity, parity, ethnicity, and gestational age at delivery. The nondiabetic subjects and those not treated for gestational diabetes mellitus were matched for prenatal visits. RESULTS: A composite adverse outcome was 59% for untreated, 18% for treated, and 11% for nondiabetic subjects. A 2- to 4-fold increase in metabolic complications and macrosomia/large for gestational age was found in the untreated group with no difference between nondiabetic and treated subjects. Comparison of maternal size, parity, and disease severity revealed a 2- to 3-fold higher morbidity rate for the untreated groups, compared with the other groups. CONCLUSION: Untreated gestational diabetes mellitus carries significant risks for perinatal morbidity in all disease severity levels. Timely and effective treatment may substantially improve outcome. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

This pregnancy complication is more common than you might think. Learn who's at risk for it, how it's detected, and what can be done to treat it. For years, doctors believed that gestational diabetes affected three to five percent of all pregnancies, but new, more rigorous diagnostic criteria puts the number closer to 18 percent. The condition, which can strike any pregnant woman, usually develops in the second trimester, between weeks 24 and 28, and typically resolves after baby is born. If gestational diabetes is treated and well-managed throughout your pregnancy, "There's no reason you can't deliver a very healthy baby," says Patricia Devine, M.D., perinatologist at New York-Presbyterian Hospital in New York City. But gestational diabetes that goes untreated, or isn't carefully monitored, can be harmful for both mother and baby. Consult our guide for risk factors, signs of gestational diabetes, and treatment options. What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes, or diabetes that is diagnosed during pregnancy in a woman who previously did not have diabetes, occurs when the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar efficiently. "A hormone produced by the placenta makes a woman essentially resistant to her own insulin," Dr. Devine explains. How does gestational diabetes differ from type 1 or 2 diabetes? Gestational diabetes affects only pregnant women. People who have type 1 diabetes, sometimes referred to as juvenile diabetes, are generally born with it. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 95 percent of all cases of diabetes in the U.S.; it occurs in adulthood, and is triggered by lifestyle factors such as obesity and lack of physical activity. What causes it? It's unclear why some women develop gestational diabetes while others do not. Doctors th Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational diabetes has become one of the most common pregnancy complications in the US, with about 7 percent of pregnant women developing the condition. But just because it’s more widespread doesn’t mean it comes without risks. So what is gestational diabetes—and how can you minimize your chances of getting it? In this article What is gestational diabetes? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes symptoms Gestational diabetes treatment How to prevent gestational diabetes What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes means your body can’t properly regulate your blood sugar levels while you’re pregnant—either because you don’t produce enough insulin or your body can’t properly use the insulin it does produce. That causes your blood sugar levels to spike when you eat, leading to a condition called hyperglycemia. Most moms-to-be diagnosed with gestational diabetes experience diabetes only during pregnancy, and the condition clears up soon after birth. But 5 to 10 percent of women continue to have type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, and those whose diabetes clears up after childbirth are still at a 20 to 50 percent risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 years. So why are doctors so concerned about this condition? “Gestational diabetes puts the mom and baby at increased risk for pregnancy complications,” says Sherry A. Ross, MD, a Santa Monica, California-based ob-gyn and author of She-ology: The Definitive Guide to Women’s Intimate Health. Period. For moms, those include: High blood pressure Preeclampsia Preterm labor C-section Gestational diabetes effects on baby can increase the risk of: Higher birth weight Shoulder dystocia (when the shoulders get stuck in the birth canal) Congenital malformations (such as abnormal sp Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Overview Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy (gestation). Like other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes affects how your cells use sugar (glucose). Gestational diabetes causes high blood sugar that can affect your pregnancy and your baby's health. Any pregnancy complication is concerning, but there's good news. Expectant women can help control gestational diabetes by eating healthy foods, exercising and, if necessary, taking medication. Controlling blood sugar can prevent a difficult birth and keep you and your baby healthy. In gestational diabetes, blood sugar usually returns to normal soon after delivery. But if you've had gestational diabetes, you're at risk for type 2 diabetes. You'll continue working with your health care team to monitor and manage your blood sugar. Symptoms For most women, gestational diabetes doesn't cause noticeable signs or symptoms. When to see a doctor If possible, seek health care early — when you first think about trying to get pregnant — so your doctor can evaluate your risk of gestational diabetes as part of your overall childbearing wellness plan. Once you're pregnant, your doctor will check you for gestational diabetes as part of your prenatal care. If you develop gestational diabetes, you may need more-frequent checkups. These are most likely to occur during the last three months of pregnancy, when your doctor will monitor your blood sugar level and your baby's health. Your doctor may refer you to additional health professionals who specialize in diabetes, such as an endocrinologist, a registered dietitian or a diabetes educator. They can help you learn to manage your blood sugar level during your pregnancy. To make sure your blood sugar level has returned to normal after your baby is born, your health care team wil Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Baby Death Increased At Full Term

Gestational Diabetes: Baby Death Increased At Full Term

Gestational Diabetes: Baby Death Increased at Full Term MUNICH Risk of perinatal death was increased by 30%, compared with the risk in nondiabetic mothers, in mothers with gestational diabetes who gave birth after 37 weeks, a large new cohort study from France shows. This higher risk of the baby dying was the same regardless of whether the woman was treated with insulin for the gestational diabetes or not. However, it was still lower than the risk of perinatal death in mothers with either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, reported Sophie Jacqueminet, MD, senior investigator from Hpital Piti-Salptrire, Paris, France, presenting the results at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) 2016 Annual Meeting . She highlighted the significance of this finding for women with gestational diabetes. "This increase in perinatal death, particularly in women with untreated gestational diabetes that we see here, is new. It is often thought that those with untreated gestational diabetes are less severe and might have lower risk of poor perinatal outcome," she said. "It's also important to know the risk at the end of pregnancy, because the recommendation regarding induction of labor at this time is unclear." However, Dr Jacqueminet also highlighted that it would be important to determine whether the effect seen was secondary to obesity, poor glycemic control, lack of appropriate care, and/or long-term exposure to hyperglycemia. Chairing the session, Elisabeth Mathiesen, MD, from the University Hospital of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, pointed out that the study is likely to be the first that has investigated the risk associated with gestational diabetes in pregnancy continuing beyond week 37. "I like the way you have explored your data and presented this very c Continue reading >>

Failure To Diagnose: Gestational Diabetes | Birth Injury Guide

Failure To Diagnose: Gestational Diabetes | Birth Injury Guide

Gestational diabetes is unfortunately a common occurrence in pregnancy, affecting thousandsof pregnant women in the United States each year. If left undiagnosed and untreated, it can lead to a myriad of medical issues for bother mother and baby. Gestational Diabetes Statistics and Facts According to the American Diabetes Association,gestational diabetes has increased significantly over the past 20 years. The increase has happened for several reasons, including: In many cases, there are no symptoms at all. Some women may go back to a normal blood sugar within a few weeks after delivery. However, other pregnant women may experience: How Does Gestational Diabetes Affect Infants? If gestational diabetes is untreated or even treated poorly, infants are at risk for several health issues. When gestational diabetes develops, the pancreas must work overtime in order to produce the insulin needed for your body. When this occurs, it not only gives an infanthigh blood glucose levels, but the infants pancreas also creates extra insulin in an attempt to rid the additional blood glucose passed down from the mother. Extra insulin and high blood glucose levels can cause infants to develop fetal macrosomia , also known as fat baby syndrome, a condition marked by excessive fetal weight and size. An unusually large infant is at risk for a plethora of birth injuries, including brachial plexus injuries, shoulder dystocia, and more. Additionally, infants are at risk for excessive weight gain later in life. Additionally, if you have high blood sugar during pregnancy, the risk of early labor and delivery significantly increases. Early labor and delivery comes with its own set of risks, including infant respiratory distress syndrome, a health disorder marked by difficulties in breathing. Its im Continue reading >>

I Have Gestational Diabetes. How Will It Affect My Baby?

I Have Gestational Diabetes. How Will It Affect My Baby?

Will gestational diabetes hurt my baby? Most women who develop diabetes during pregnancy go on to have a healthy baby. Dietary changes and exercise may be enough to keep blood sugar (glucose) levels under control, though sometimes you may also need to take medication. But untreated gestational diabetes can cause serious problems. If blood sugar levels remain elevated, too much glucose ends up in the baby's blood. When that happens, the baby's pancreas needs to produce more insulin to process the extra sugar. Too much blood sugar and insulin can make a baby put on extra weight, which is stored as fat. This can make the baby grow very large (macrosomia). Also, high blood sugar levels during pregnancy and labor increase the risk of a baby developing low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) after delivery. That's because the baby's body produces extra insulin in response to the mother's excess glucose. Insulin lowers the amount of sugar in the blood. The signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia in an infant include: jitteriness weak or high-pitched cry floppiness lethargy or sleepiness breathing problems skin that looks blue trouble feeding eye rolling seizures A baby may also be at higher risk for breathing problems at birth, especially if blood sugar levels aren't well controlled or the baby is delivered early. (If you have gestational diabetes, your baby's lungs tend to mature a bit later). The risk of newborn jaundice is higher too. If your blood sugar control is especially poor, the baby's heart function could be affected as well, which can contribute to breathing problems. Gestational diabetes sometimes thickens a baby's heart muscle (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy), causing the baby to breathe rapidly and not be able to get enough oxygen from her blood. It's understandable to feel anxi Continue reading >>

Untreated Gestational Diabetes

Untreated Gestational Diabetes

Hi ladies I was diagnosed with GD late (at 37 weeks) I am being induced in 4 days at 39 weeks but what I am worried about now is that my baby may have been harmed. Especially seen as google seems to focus on all the horrid things that can happen and all I can focus on is that everywhere keeps saying that babies can die in labour or shortly after. Can anyone put my mind at rest as with 4 days to go I am not sleeping and feeling so stressed and panicking my baby will have all sorts of problems x the only slight concern will be after birth where they will want to monitor baby's blood sugar every few hours to make sure it doesn't drop too low. All you have to make sure is that you keep feeding your baby (if you're breastfeeding do not worry that baby isn't getting enough etc they are fine even if you feel your milk hasn't come in they will be getting something) . They might want to keep you in for an extra day and once all the readings are ok and feeding is coming along then you can go home. I hope they're not inducing you because of the gd as it's unnecessary. Hope that you feel better soon and try not to worry xxx Hi Kim thank.you so much for your lovely reply. I am being induced because of gd but I'll be glad of it I'm really uncomfortable now so sooner better. I just want my little bunny to be ok xx Honestly the complications are so rare though. It would be more of a worry if they discovered the gd after the birth so at least they are prepared and everyone will be on standby ready just in case. A lot of the time women control their gd through their diet anyway so it's not like you've missed out on any medication or anything good luck with your new baby and try and rest up for the next couple of weeks as you'll need all the energy you can get when lo arrives xXx I am su Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes -- The Basics

Gestational Diabetes -- The Basics

Gestational diabetes -- diabetes that develops during pregnancy -- is a relatively common complication of pregnancy, affecting about 6% of all pregnant women. You may have a greater risk of developing gestational diabetes if you: Are obese when you become pregnant Have high blood pressure or other medical complications Have given birth to a large (greater than 9 pounds) baby before Have given birth to a baby that was stillborn or suffering from certain birth defects Have had gestational diabetes in previous pregnancies Have a family history of diabetes Come from certain ethnic backgrounds, including African, Hispanic, Asian, Native American, or Pacific Islander Are older than 30 But half of women who develop gestational diabetes have no risk factors. If left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause serious complications for your newborn. For example, babies of untreated mothers with gestational diabetes may grow too large (called macrosomia), increasing the risk of problems during delivery, such as injuries to the baby's shoulders and arms and nerves in these areas. Having a very large baby may also increase your risk for requiring a cesarean section or other assistance during delivery (such as a forceps or vacuum delivery). Your baby may also experience a sudden drop in blood sugar after birth, requiring treatment with a sugar solution given through a needle in the vein. Your newborn baby may also have a higher risk of developing jaundice (a condition that causes yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes) and breathing problems. The risk of birth defects in infants whose mothers have gestational diabetes is very low because most pregnant women develop gestational diabetes after the 20th week of pregnancy, when the fetus has already fully developed. The risk of birt Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes (GDM) is a common medical complication of pregnancy and is defined as diabetes with onset or first recognition during pregnancy. Paul Terranova, in xPharm: The Comprehensive Pharmacology Reference , 2007 While the incidence of gestational diabetes is approximate 0.5%, it affects 4% of pregnant women. It is estimated that 135,000 cases of gestational diabetes are diagnosed in the United States each year. Although gestational diabetes usually dissipates after pregnancy, it typically recurs during subsequent pregnancies. In some cases, pregnancy reveals the patient has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. It is uncertain whether these women have gestational diabetes or whether the diabetes coincidentally began during pregnancy. In either case, they are likely to require treatment after pregnancy. Some women with gestational diabetes develop type 2 diabetes, suggesting a possible link between the two conditions. Peter Hornnes, Jeannet Lauenborg, in Obesity , 2013 Gestational diabetes is an asymptomatic condition associated with adverse outcome for mother and child. Overweight and obesity confer a higher risk of gestational diabetes up to 11-fold. Health care providers of pregnant women should ensure that a strategy for screening gestational diabetes is in place. Either general screening programmes or selective screening programmes may be employed. Women with gestational diabetes should be monitored and treated vigorously. After delivery, glucose metabolism is most often normalised, but women with previous gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type-2 diabetes in later years. Therefore, they should be counselled about healthy lifestyles and offered exanimations for diabetes or pre-diabetes with 13 year intervals. Christopher Federico, Gabriella Continue reading >>

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