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Undiagnosed Gestational Diabetes After Birth

Undiagnosed Gestational Diabetes Can Haunt Mother And Child

Undiagnosed Gestational Diabetes Can Haunt Mother And Child

Protecting Injured Clients Across Massachusetts Undiagnosed gestational diabetes can haunt mother and child On behalf of Barry D. Lang, M.D. & Associates posted in Pregnancy-Related Injuries on Friday, February 17, 2017. While chubby babies are tremendously cute, a chubby newborn is a sign that the mother suffered from gestational diabetesand that's a serious problem. If the disease goes undetected, the consequences can be devastating. In 2011, the American Diabetes Association gave obstetricians new screening and diagnostic guidelines in order to catch lower levels of gestational diabetes. According to the National Institute of Health, as many as 18 percent of pregnant women could be suffering from gestational diabetes. That means nearly 1 out of very 5 pregnancies poses a substantial risk to the mother and the child. One of the immediate problems of undiagnosed gestational diabetes is an overly-large newborn. That can create significant complications during labor and delivery. An infant that's too large can become stuck in the birth canal and suffer permanent nerve damage in one's shoulders and arms due to the use of forceps or vacuum delivery. An emergency C-section might be necessary, especially if the baby can't breathe. If the oxygen deprivation goes on too long, the baby can end up with brain damage or other complications. The newborn may also experience a dangerous drop in his or her blood glucose levels after birth and require injections of a sugar solution to prevent more complications. A baby with low blood glucose levels may have trouble feeding, is more likely to develop jaundice, and can develop breathing problems and seizures. That infant is also at greater risk of developing diabetes later in life, along with other problems like metabolic syndrome (a cl Continue reading >>

Late Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes…

Late Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes…

Well: this gestational diabetes thing has thrown a right spanner in the old works, I can tell you! (Photo above taken in last pregnancy, by the way, after I had polished off two whole desserts. I thought it was brilliantly inappropriate.) I just feel as though I’ve been diagnosed (my blood sugar readings, though not horrific, definitely indicate GD) and then left just to get on with things. No real advice, no explanations as to how the condition could affect the baby, or (more my concern) how my rampantly out-of-control blood sugar levels prior to diagnosis might have affected the baby… So it has been a crazy week or so of intense Google research, and speaking to my Dad and Uncle about how they keep their Type 2 Diabetes in check, and chatting to my oldest friend Tasha about how she coped during her two pregnancies with her Type 1 Diabetes. I’d like to say that it has all been very interesting, and it has to a certain extent, but overall my one word to describe the situation would be: STRESSFUL. Mainly, I think, because the diagnosis has been made so late. (I’m 38 weeks.) And wouldn’t have been made at all had I not sought a second opinion about baby size from a private obstetrician. (Always trust your instincts, people.) So I’m slightly consumed with low-level fury about the fact that I wasn’t given a fasting blood sugar test, despite the fact that my last baby was big and I have an immediate relative with diabetes, but I’m also frustrated and confused because keeping blood sugar under control is actually quite the learning curve, and I’ve been given approximately 14 days altogether to achieve it. In case you are wondering what the hell I’m on about, Gestational Diabetes is a specific kind of diabetes that affects pregnant women only and it usually Continue reading >>

Longer Term Implications Of Gestational Diabetes

Longer Term Implications Of Gestational Diabetes

If you become pregnant again If you become pregnant again, you are at higher risk of having gestational diabetes again. For this reason, talk to your doctor when you are planning your next pregnancy. You should be screened for diabetes before becoming pregnant again to make sure that your blood glucose is at a safe level, and as soon as you become pregnant you will need to monitor your blood glucose levels. "The second time round I didn’t eat chocolate, and getting out and walking was easier because I had a child. Worrying about it added a lot of anxiety to my pregnancy but I didn’t have gestational diabetes that time round." Prisha, mum of two Increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes You are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes in later life. This risk is highest in the four-to-five years after your gestational diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a serious condition, which, if left untreated, can lead to sight loss, foot numbness and heart disease, as well as the risks associated with having a hypo. But there is a lot you can do to reduce these risks. Gestational diabetes is a warning sign to show what could develop in later life if you don’t take action. Have a chat with your GP about what you can do to reduce your risk. It is also worth knowing the warning signs (shown below). Visit your GP if you are worried at all. Signs of diabetes Feeling more thirsty than usual Needing to wee more often – especially at night Frequent thrush infections Weight loss Slow-healing wounds Feeling unusually tired Blurred vision There is lots you can do to reduce your risk, by making changes to your lifestyle. Even if you develop type 2 diabetes, you may find you can manage it through diet and exercise. So, whichever way you look at it, these changes can make all the differ Continue reading >>

Ceira's Story - Undiagnosed V's Diagnosed Gestational Diabetes

Ceira's Story - Undiagnosed V's Diagnosed Gestational Diabetes

Ceiras story undiagnosed vs diagnosed GD Ceira's story - undiagnosed v's diagnosed gestational diabetes Ceira's story shows her two very different pregnancies, her first where gestational diabetes was not screened or diagnosed, compared to her second pregnancy where gestational diabetes was diagnosed, monitored and controlled. I went into hospital on Friday the 7th of February for an induction as my blood pressure was creeping up and had been put onLabetalolat 38 weeks, so I had midwives coming to the house every other day. I was induced at 40+8 days. I was given the pessary in the afternoon. Started contracting about four hours later but they weren't consistent. Hardly any sleep that night with the pains getting closer and stronger they decided to take me over to the labour ward that morning and I had to wait for a bed. As soon as I went there, around 11am they popped my waters and put me on a drip straight away. Contractions were really close now and everything was all a kind of a blur. At around 6pm I was fully dilated andwas allowed to push. I was pushing so hard but no sign of baby although the midwives said they could see the baby. After two hours they said I would need some help as I was getting tired now. I had to sign to go to theatre and the doctor would decide if I was to have forceps,ventouse, or a caesarean section. I went in, had a spinal block and got examined by the doctor and he decided that the forceps was the best option. I had lots of people around me and my husband at the side, my legs were in stirrups. The midwife was telling me when to push as I had no feeling. Then the midwives started putting pressure on my belly. I had no idea what was going on. The room started to fill with people. No one would tell me what was going on I could tell by their Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes -- The Basics

Gestational Diabetes -- The Basics

Gestational diabetes -- diabetes that develops during pregnancy -- is a relatively common complication of pregnancy, affecting about 6% of all pregnant women. You may have a greater risk of developing gestational diabetes if you: Are obese when you become pregnant Have high blood pressure or other medical complications Have given birth to a large (greater than 9 pounds) baby before Have given birth to a baby that was stillborn or suffering from certain birth defects Have had gestational diabetes in previous pregnancies Have a family history of diabetes Come from certain ethnic backgrounds, including African, Hispanic, Asian, Native American, or Pacific Islander Are older than 30 But half of women who develop gestational diabetes have no risk factors. If left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause serious complications for your newborn. For example, babies of untreated mothers with gestational diabetes may grow too large (called macrosomia), increasing the risk of problems during delivery, such as injuries to the baby's shoulders and arms and nerves in these areas. Having a very large baby may also increase your risk for requiring a cesarean section or other assistance during delivery (such as a forceps or vacuum delivery). Your baby may also experience a sudden drop in blood sugar after birth, requiring treatment with a sugar solution given through a needle in the vein. Your newborn baby may also have a higher risk of developing jaundice (a condition that causes yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes) and breathing problems. The risk of birth defects in infants whose mothers have gestational diabetes is very low because most pregnant women develop gestational diabetes after the 20th week of pregnancy, when the fetus has already fully developed. The risk of birt Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: The Overlooked Form Of Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes: The Overlooked Form Of Diabetes

Did you know you could have diabetes and not realize it? Out of the almost 30 million Americans suffering from diabetes, over eight million cases are undiagnosed, and almost 1.5 million new cases of diabetes appear every year. As the onset of type 2 diabetes reaches epic proportions in American families, health experts continue to build awareness of the risks and rally for prevention. But what about gestational diabetes? Although it’s easy to shrug off this form of diabetes that targets a specific portion of the community—and often remedies itself after giving birth—the temporary condition, if left untreated, can produce permanent damage. What is Gestational Diabetes Mellitus? This form of diabetes occurs exclusively in women—pregnant women, to be exact. Women can be diagnosed with gestational diabetes having no history of diabetes at all. Doctors don’t understand why it occurs in some women, but they know it’s affected by the hormones that support the unborn baby in the placenta. These essential hormones help in the baby’s development, but they also contribute to insulin resistance in the mother. Without regular access to insulin, the mother’s glucose cannot be converted to energy, so it builds up in the blood to dangerous levels. This is called hyperglycemia. What are common symptoms and factors that may increase the risk of developing GDM? You’ll need to examine both your family and personal medical history. Some factors that increase your chances of developing GDM include a family history of diabetes and high blood pressure, obesity prior to pregnancy, and a personal history of giving birth to larger babies. Symptoms often mirror those of normal pregnancy. But many mothers note extreme fatigue and nausea (especially after eating sugary foods), freq Continue reading >>

Failure To Diagnose: Gestational Diabetes | Birth Injury Guide

Failure To Diagnose: Gestational Diabetes | Birth Injury Guide

Gestational diabetes is unfortunately a common occurrence in pregnancy, affecting thousandsof pregnant women in the United States each year. If left undiagnosed and untreated, it can lead to a myriad of medical issues for bother mother and baby. Gestational Diabetes Statistics and Facts According to the American Diabetes Association,gestational diabetes has increased significantly over the past 20 years. The increase has happened for several reasons, including: In many cases, there are no symptoms at all. Some women may go back to a normal blood sugar within a few weeks after delivery. However, other pregnant women may experience: How Does Gestational Diabetes Affect Infants? If gestational diabetes is untreated or even treated poorly, infants are at risk for several health issues. When gestational diabetes develops, the pancreas must work overtime in order to produce the insulin needed for your body. When this occurs, it not only gives an infanthigh blood glucose levels, but the infants pancreas also creates extra insulin in an attempt to rid the additional blood glucose passed down from the mother. Extra insulin and high blood glucose levels can cause infants to develop fetal macrosomia , also known as fat baby syndrome, a condition marked by excessive fetal weight and size. An unusually large infant is at risk for a plethora of birth injuries, including brachial plexus injuries, shoulder dystocia, and more. Additionally, infants are at risk for excessive weight gain later in life. Additionally, if you have high blood sugar during pregnancy, the risk of early labor and delivery significantly increases. Early labor and delivery comes with its own set of risks, including infant respiratory distress syndrome, a health disorder marked by difficulties in breathing. Its im Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Baby Death Increased At Full Term

Gestational Diabetes: Baby Death Increased At Full Term

Gestational Diabetes: Baby Death Increased at Full Term MUNICH Risk of perinatal death was increased by 30%, compared with the risk in nondiabetic mothers, in mothers with gestational diabetes who gave birth after 37 weeks, a large new cohort study from France shows. This higher risk of the baby dying was the same regardless of whether the woman was treated with insulin for the gestational diabetes or not. However, it was still lower than the risk of perinatal death in mothers with either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, reported Sophie Jacqueminet, MD, senior investigator from Hpital Piti-Salptrire, Paris, France, presenting the results at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) 2016 Annual Meeting . She highlighted the significance of this finding for women with gestational diabetes. "This increase in perinatal death, particularly in women with untreated gestational diabetes that we see here, is new. It is often thought that those with untreated gestational diabetes are less severe and might have lower risk of poor perinatal outcome," she said. "It's also important to know the risk at the end of pregnancy, because the recommendation regarding induction of labor at this time is unclear." However, Dr Jacqueminet also highlighted that it would be important to determine whether the effect seen was secondary to obesity, poor glycemic control, lack of appropriate care, and/or long-term exposure to hyperglycemia. Chairing the session, Elisabeth Mathiesen, MD, from the University Hospital of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, pointed out that the study is likely to be the first that has investigated the risk associated with gestational diabetes in pregnancy continuing beyond week 37. "I like the way you have explored your data and presented this very c Continue reading >>

Babies Born To Mothers With Gestational Diabetes Are At High Risk Of Poor Outcomes

Babies Born To Mothers With Gestational Diabetes Are At High Risk Of Poor Outcomes

New study in Diabetologia examines over 700,000 births in a large national cohort New research1 published in Diabetologia2 shows an increased risk of adverse outcomes in babies born to mothers with gestational diabetes, when compared to non-diabetic mothers. The study is by Dr Sophie Jacqueminet, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital,Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), France; Professor Delphine Mitanchez, Armand Trousseau Hospital, AP-HP, Paris, France; and Cécile Billionnet, French National Health Insurance, Paris, France, and colleagues. The proportion of women who are overweight or obese is increasing in almost all countries worldwide, and this is being accompanied by an increased risk of developing both type 2 diabetes (T2D) (whether pregnant or not) and gestational diabetes (GDM), a particular form of diabetes experienced only during pregnancy. While other studies have analysed the links between GDM and adverse outcomes in babies, very large studies that draw on an entire national database, such as that used in this French study, are rare. In this new research, all 796,346 deliveries taking place after 22 weeks in France in 2012 were included by extracting data from the hospital discharge database and the national health insurance system. The diabetic status of mothers was determined by the use of diabetes drugs or insulin to lower blood sugar, and by hospital diagnosis. Outcomes were analysed according to the type of diabetes and, in the GDM group, whether or not diabetes was insulin-treated. In high-income countries, although most women with GDM are treated with diet at first, around 1 in 4 women has GDM so serious or difficult to control that it needs to be insulin-treated. The remaining 75% of women with GDM continue to be treated with diet only. The co Continue reading >>

What Are The Risks Of Gestational Diabetes?

What Are The Risks Of Gestational Diabetes?

A risk means there is a chance that something might happen. With every pregnancy there are some risks, but if you have gestational diabetes your risks of some things will be increased. Managing your blood sugar level brings these risks right down again though and most women with gestational diabetes have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. These things are very unlikely to happen to you, but understanding the risks may help you see why it is important that you follow your healthcare team’s advice. The risks linked to gestational diabetes are caused by blood glucose levels being too high. If you can keep your blood glucose as close as possible to the ideal level, your risks will be reduced. Risk of having a large baby (macrosomia) If your blood glucose level is high, it can cause high blood glucose levels in your baby. Your baby will produce more insulin in response, just like you do. This can make your baby grow larger than normal. This is called macrosomia. Babies weighing more than 4kg (8lb 8oz) at birth are called macrosomic. Macrosomia increases the risk of: Birth trauma - either the mother or baby can be affected when it is difficult for the baby to be born. Trauma may include physical symptoms, such as bone fractures or nerve damage for the baby, or tearing and severe bleeding for the mother as well as psychological distress. Shoulder dystocia - where the baby’s shoulder is stuck in your pelvis once the head has been born. This can squash the umbilical cord, so the team need to use additional interventions to deliver the baby quickly and safely. It means you may have labour induced early or to have a caesarean section so that your baby is born safely. Your baby's weight will be monitored carefully in pregnancy to see whether these interventions are needed. Continue reading >>

Undiagnosed Gestational Diabetes

Undiagnosed Gestational Diabetes

08.24.2017 by Matthew Dolman + | Birth Injuries Helping Mothers and Children After Injuries Caused by Undiagnosed Gestational Diabetes While many pregnancies go smoothly with few issues, some expectant mothers are diagnosed with medical conditions that arise. One of the most commonly diagnosed medical conditions related to pregnancy is gestational diabetes. This condition can develop even if the mother has no history of diabetes or related health issues. Gestational diabetes can be controlled and treated to help avoid any complications during pregnancy or birth related to this diagnosis. However, if a doctor fails to properly diagnose and treat this condition, it can worsen and cause numerous complications and birth injuries . Because of the prevalence of gestational diabetes, there is no excuse for a doctor providing prenatal care to miss the warning signs and symptoms of a mother with gestational diabetes. Unfortunately, sometimes a woman is not diagnosed as she should be, causing unnecessary injury to her, her baby, or both. If a doctor makes a serious error in judgment by not testing you for gestational diabetes and it results in a birth injury, Florida law gives you the right to hold the doctor accountable for any losses you experience. The birth injury attorneys at Dolman Law Group know how to protect your rights and hold doctors liable for their harmful mistak es. If a birth injury has occurred, please call our office to discuss a possible case today. Recent years have brought a rise in diagnoses of gestational diabetes because of the increase in risk factors among women who become pregnant. Some of these risk factors include the following: Having a history of diabetes in the family Other common risk factors include being a race other than Caucasian or having ex Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Q And A

Gestational Diabetes: Q And A

Q. What is gestational diabetes? A. Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes that develops during pregnancy. It is different from having known diabetes before pregnancy and then getting pregnant. Gestational diabetes is generally diagnosed in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, and usually goes away after the baby is born. Gestational diabetes can cause problems for the mother and baby, but treatment and regular check-ups mean most women have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. Q. Am I at risk of gestational diabetes? A. Gestational diabetes affects between 10 and 15 per cent of pregnancies in Australia. Women of certain ethnic backgrounds — Australian Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, Indian, Asian, Middle Eastern, African, Maori and Pacific Islander — are more at risk of developing gestational diabetes than women of Anglo-Celtic backgrounds. Other factors can also increase your risk, including: being overweight; having a family history of diabetes; having had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy; being 40 years or older; having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS); taking medicines that can affect blood sugar levels (such as corticosteroids and antipsychotic medicines); and previously having a very large baby (more than 4.5 kg). Q. How would I know if I had gestational diabetes? A. Gestational diabetes does not usually give rise to symptoms. For this reason it is important to be tested during pregnancy, usually between 24 and 28 weeks. Women with risk factors for diabetes may be offered testing earlier than this – sometimes at the first antenatal visit, which is often at around 10 weeks. Women who do develop symptoms may experience: extreme tiredness; being thirsty all the time; symptoms of recurrent infections (such as thrush); and needi Continue reading >>

Undiagnosed Gestational Diabetes??

Undiagnosed Gestational Diabetes??

I am 37weeks and my baby has always been measuring 2-3weeks bigger at every ultrasound but they never seemed worried.. I also have been at L&D for problems such as dizzy spells and headaches, which they couldnt understand because my blood pressure was normal etc. They didnt bother checking blood sugars. At my last appointment my obs scheduled me for a glucose test at 38weeks..I was horrified..Why wait this long??? I'm worried now that because I have reached full term without knowing then what harmful affects could this have had on my baby? Or has anyone had undiagnosed gestational diabetes and gave birth to a healthy baby? When I first found out I was pregnant I was slightly worried I could have GD's cause on my mothers side of the family they seem to all have it but her and now unfortunately they've all passed but I was tested at 9 weeks on even though my urine samples have been ok. Plus im on the curvy side. I did test positive, but thankfully I've never had a sweet tooth and not experienced any cravings and I'm 35 weeks pregnant today. I saw my doctor every two weeks from that 9 week test and now I see him twice a week, and he measures my fluid every week. Even though I haven't had a single sweet, my doctor says even if you have wonderful numbers you can still end up having a large baby. He also told me, if I were to put on loads of weight the chances are he'd be bigger. But I've only put 7 pounds on so far and last Thursday I had a scan and was told with all that he looked large with chubby cheeks. Bless him! But they refuse to do a growth scan as they are grossly inaccurate. But I'm a firm believer allot as to do with genetics as well. I myself was a smallish baby at 6 pounds and my husband was 2 months permie. But had he gone to full term he may of been large. My Continue reading >>

Problems Caused By Undiagnosed Gestational Diabetes | Tavss Fletcher

Problems Caused By Undiagnosed Gestational Diabetes | Tavss Fletcher

Gestational diabeteshigh blood sugar levels during pregnancyaffects up to ten percent of all pregnant women and is typically void of any symptoms, which can lead to big problems for you and your baby. If your obstetrician doesnt conduct the proper tests to diagnose elevated blood sugar levels, you could unknowingly have the condition. Unfortunately, even the best doctors and midwives working out of places like the DePaul Center for Birth and Sentara Norfolk General Hospital can make mistakes, which can affect the health of both you and your unborn child. If you did not receive a glucose-screening test between weeks 24 and 28 and gave birth to a baby whose birth weight exceeded 9 pounds 15 ounces, you may have had undiagnosed gestational diabetes. Undetected Gestational Diabetes Can Lead to a Dangerous Delivery High blood sugar levels that are not addressed can cause serious problems that can harm you and your baby now and in the future. These issues can increase delivery risks and also create a stressful start to the childs life. These risks include: Macrosomia.Babies can grow too large in the womb when gestational diabetes isnt treated. As a result, injuries to the babys shoulders and head, as well as nerves in the area during delivery are possible. A large baby also increases the chances of having a cesarean section or other assistance during delivery, such as forceps or a vacuum, which is often harder on the mother and the baby. Low blood sugar after birth. Your baby may experience a dramatic drop in his blood sugar levels once born since he is removed from the high-sugar environment. Treatment for the low levels often includes giving a sugar solution in the babys vein. Jaundice.Newborns born from mothers with undiagnosed gestational diabetes are also at risk for ex Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Overview Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy (gestation). Like other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes affects how your cells use sugar (glucose). Gestational diabetes causes high blood sugar that can affect your pregnancy and your baby's health. Any pregnancy complication is concerning, but there's good news. Expectant women can help control gestational diabetes by eating healthy foods, exercising and, if necessary, taking medication. Controlling blood sugar can prevent a difficult birth and keep you and your baby healthy. In gestational diabetes, blood sugar usually returns to normal soon after delivery. But if you've had gestational diabetes, you're at risk for type 2 diabetes. You'll continue working with your health care team to monitor and manage your blood sugar. Symptoms For most women, gestational diabetes doesn't cause noticeable signs or symptoms. When to see a doctor If possible, seek health care early — when you first think about trying to get pregnant — so your doctor can evaluate your risk of gestational diabetes as part of your overall childbearing wellness plan. Once you're pregnant, your doctor will check you for gestational diabetes as part of your prenatal care. If you develop gestational diabetes, you may need more-frequent checkups. These are most likely to occur during the last three months of pregnancy, when your doctor will monitor your blood sugar level and your baby's health. Your doctor may refer you to additional health professionals who specialize in diabetes, such as an endocrinologist, a registered dietitian or a diabetes educator. They can help you learn to manage your blood sugar level during your pregnancy. To make sure your blood sugar level has returned to normal after your baby is born, your health care team wil Continue reading >>

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