diabetestalk.net

Understanding Diabetes Made Simple

Diabetes Made Simple

Diabetes Made Simple

The ultimate diabetes guide for your Palm PDA If you have diabetes, or help care for someone with diabetes, this is the program you’ve been waiting for! Empower yourself with the understanding and knowledge of diabetes you need and deserve. Learn, review, and reference everything from the basics of understanding diabetes to the very latest in treatment, including the newest medications. Best of all, learn with all of the benefits of modern technology and your PDA; this program is "hyperlinked", organized into chapters, bookmarked, indexed, and searchable, not to mention portable! Topics covered include: "What is Diabetes" Explains what's happening inside your body and what complications diabetes can cause. "Why Control Diabetes" Explains why it's important to control diabetes and how much of a difference it makes. "Monitoring Diabetes" Explains how you and your medical team monitor your diabetes, at home and at the medical office, including checking your sugar, blood pressure, blood tests, etc. Explains complicated tests in simple terms! "Diabetes Treatment" Covers important lifestyle changes and detailed information on how to control your blood sugars, blood pressure, and cholesterol. Details include discussions of all major types of diabetes medications, including the very newest! Understand how your treatment and medications work in layman's terms! Also discusses how to prevent most diabetes complications. "Index / glossary" All major topics and medications are indexed for your convenient access! Now you can find the diabetes information you’re looking for and the answers to your diabetes questions in seconds -- with just taps of your stylus, anytime, anyplace! This program was written by a family physician with a special interest in diabetes. The program’s use Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes?

What Is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a serious complex condition which can affect the entire body. Diabetes requires daily self care and if complications develop, diabetes can have a significant impact on quality of life and can reduce life expectancy. While there is currently no cure for diabetes, you can live an enjoyable life by learning about the condition and effectively managing it. There are different types of diabetes; all types are complex and serious. The three main types of diabetes are type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes. How does diabetes affect the body? When someone has diabetes, their body can’t maintain healthy levels of glucose in the blood. Glucose is a form of sugar which is the main source of energy for our bodies. Unhealthy levels of glucose in the blood can lead to long term and short term health complications. For our bodies to work properly we need to convert glucose (sugar) from food into energy. A hormone called insulin is essential for the conversion of glucose into energy. In people with diabetes, insulin is no longer produced or not produced in sufficient amounts by the body. When people with diabetes eat glucose, which is in foods such as breads, cereals, fruit and starchy vegetables, legumes, milk, yoghurt and sweets, it can’t be converted into energy. Instead of being turned into energy the glucose stays in the blood resulting in high blood glucose levels. After eating, the glucose is carried around your body in your blood. Your blood glucose level is called glycaemia. Blood glucose levels can be monitored and managed through self care and treatment. Three things you need to know about diabetes: It is not one condition- there are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes All types of diabetes are complex and require daily care Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

Maybe a kid you know always eats a snack during a soccer game or goesto the school nurse before lunch to get a shot. If you have a friend or a classmate like this or this sounds just like you you're not alone. Thousands of kids all over the world do stuff like this every day because they have type 1 diabetes (say: dye-uh-BEE-tees). What is it? Let's find out. Diabetes is a disease that affects how the body uses glucose (say: GLOO-kose), a sugar that is the body's main source of fuel. Your body needs glucose to keep running. Here's how it should work: Glucose from the food gets into your bloodstream. Your pancreas makes a hormone called insulin (say: IN-suh-lin). Insulin helps the glucose get into the body's cells. The pancreas is a long, flat gland in your belly that helps your body digest food. It also makes insulin. Insulin is kind of like a key that opens the doors to the cells of the body. It lets the glucose in. Then the glucose can move out of the blood and into the cells. But if someone has diabetes, the body either can't make insulin or the insulin doesn't work in the body like it should. The glucose can't get into the cells normally, so the blood sugar level gets too high. Lots of sugar in the blood makes people sick if they don't get treatment. The two major types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2. In type 1 diabetes (which used to be called insulin-dependent diabetes or juvenile diabetes), the pancreas can't make insulin. The body can still get glucose from food but the glucose can't get into the cells where it's needed. Glucose stays in the blood, which makes the blood sugar level very high and causes health problems. To fix the problem, someone with type 1 diabetes needs to take insulin through regular shots or an insulin pump . Type 2 diabetes is differen Continue reading >>

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding diabetes is the first step toward managing it. Learn what diabetes is and how it affects your body, what kind of diabetes you have, and how to manage your health. Understanding diabetes is the first step toward managing it. So what do you need to know? First, you need to know what diabetes is and how it affects your body. And you’ll need to know what kind of diabetes you have. Next you have to know how to maintain your health, treat your diabetes, know when your treatment is successful and what to do when it’s not. This section will take you through the answers to these first questions, and give you important information that will help you live a healthy life with diabetes. In this section you will learn: What is type 2 diabetes?: Information about how people develop type 2 diabetes and who gets type 2 diabetes How The Body Processes Sugar: Information about the natural control of blood sugar, and what is different when you have diabetes Continue reading >>

Definition: Diabetes Mellitus

Definition: Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus (sometimes called "sugar diabetes") is a condition that occurs when the body can't use glucose (a type of sugar) normally. Glucose is the main source of energy for the body's cells. The levels of glucose in the blood are controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is made by the pancreas. Insulin helps glucose enter the cells. In diabetes, the pancreas does not make enough insulin ( type 1 diabetes ) or the body can't respond normally to the insulin that is made ( type 2 diabetes ). This causes glucose levels in the blood to rise, leading to symptoms such as increased urination, extreme thirst, and unexplained weight loss. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Hypoglycemia Video Classroom

Diabetes And Hypoglycemia Video Classroom

Diabetes Overview Beginning Signs of Diabetes Pathophysiology of Diabetic Nephropathy Glucose Insulin and Diabetes (Kahn) Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Animation about Diabetes Subtle Warning Signs of Diabetes Diabetes Animation Diabetes Made Simple A Day Living with Diabetes Pathophysiology of Diabetes Mellitus Be Diabetes Prepared Health and Science in Diabetes Role of Insulin in Body Living with Diabetes: Documentary What is Diabetes? Diabetes Type 2: Animation Diabetes Symptoms in Men Glucose Animation Diabetes Emergencies 1 Managing Diabetes Insulin Resistence Diabetes: Foot Care Complications of Diabetes Diabetes Emergencies 2 Type 1 Diabetes Medical Science on Type 2 Diabetes Exercise in Diabetics Type 1 Diabetes Animation Diabetes Emergencies 3 Type 2 Diabetes Board Review: Type 1 and 2 Diabetes Diabetes: Excercise: Reverse Resistence 2 Diabetes Animation Treating Hypoglycemia Quickly What is Type 1 Diabetes Management of Diabetes Diabetes: Excercise as Medicine Metformin Medication Hypoglycemia Pathophysiology of Diabetes Pathophysiology of Diabetes 2 Made Easy Diabetes Animation Metformin for Diabetes Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetes: Progress in Stem Cell Research Diabetic Nephropathy for the Non-Nephrologist Diabetes Education Diabetes Medications Diabetic DKA Embryonic Stem Cell Diabetes Research Diabetic Retinopathy Insulin, Glucose and You Metformin Still the Best! Inpatient Diabetes Management Diabetes Basics Diabetic Eye Disease Insulin: Synthesis and Secretion 1 Understanding Diabetes Type 2 Hyperglycemic Crises: Part 1 Diabetes Symptoms Obesity and Diabetes Insulin: Synthesis and Secretion 2 Diabetes Update 2010 Hyperglycemic Crises: Part 2 Diabetes: Complications Metabolism and Nutrition: Diabetes Insulin: Synthesis and Secretion 3 Juvenile Dia Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Take Control Of Your Diabetes

5 Ways To Take Control Of Your Diabetes

November is Diabetes Awareness Month and today we’re talking about 5 Ways to Take Control of Your Diabetes. We’ve heard so many patients and clients say that their lives are over now that they have diabetes. But if you are one of the 30 million Americans with diabetes or 80 million with pre-diabetes, know that you have the power right at your fingertips to take control your diabetes. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a condition in which sugar and starch are not properly used by the body, which then causes sugar levels in the blood to rise beyond normal ranges. There are two major types of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 diabetes is an auto-immune condition where the body is not able to produce enough insulin (a hormone produced in the pancreas that helps to regulate our blood sugar). People with type 1 diabetes typically need to take insulin for life. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, is the most common form of diabetes. This type of diabetes often happens when you develop insulin resistance — meaning, you are making insulin, but your body doesn’t use it properly. Now that we have an overview, let’s get into the 5 ways you can take control, now! 1. Food Diabetes is usually associated with carbohydrate restriction but that shouldn’t be the case! All foods have their place in a healthy, balanced diet as long as we have an understanding of which foods impact our blood sugar. Our top nutrition tip for diabetes is to eat regularly and consistently each day. When we eat regularly, our blood sugar remains leveled throughout the day. This in turn, helps with avoiding spikes and drops in blood sugar, especially if you’re on certain diabetes medications. We also recommend understanding which foods contain carbohydrates, as carbohydrates raise our blood sugar leve Continue reading >>

Progress Report In Diabetes Research

Progress Report In Diabetes Research

With dozens of journals coming out with new studies each month, there is no doubt that diabetes research is advancing rapidly. One journal, Diabetes Care, published a special issue devoted to diabetes and heart disease. The findings are encouraging and emphasize the importance of managing blood pressure, cholesterol, and weight in addition to blood glucose. Here are the highlights. Progress Report in Diabetes Research The Good News 1. Type 2 diabetes can be reversible for up to 2 and one half years (30 months) following very acute weight loss. About 40% of participants who lost weight (starting from an average weight of 220 and dropping to 190, or a 15% weight loss) became non-diabetic and remained non-diabetic for a period of 2 ½ years. The highest likelihood of reversing diabetes was in people with relatively short duration of diabetes, and with higher levels of their own insulin. 2. Tight control of glucose levels in people with Type 1 diabetes for a period of 6.5 years, instituted shortly after development of diabetes, has long term beneficial effects on the risk of cardiovascular disease for as long as 30 years! The DCCT was the first study (first reported in 1993) that showed the benefits of tight glucose control. Now, 30 years later, those people are still showing the benefit despite the fact that they have been in only moderate glucose control for the following 24 years. The difference between the conventional treatment group and the intensive treatment group continues to this day. This is called “Metabolic Memory” –something happened during that initial 6.5 years of intensive treatment that carried over for another 24 years. 3. One of the newer types of medication for diabetes, empagliflozin, can result in a 38% reduction in cardiovascular death, 35% red Continue reading >>

Sickly Sweet: Understanding Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Sickly Sweet: Understanding Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life threatening condition that can occur to people with diabetes. It is observed primarily in people with type 1 diabetes (insulin dependent), but it can occur in type 2 diabetes (non-insulin dependent) under certain circumstances. The reason for why it is not often seen in people with type 2 diabetes is because their body is still able to produce insulin, so the pathophysiology explained in the flowchart below is not as dramatic as compared to people with type 1 diabetes who do not make any insulin at all. There are various symptoms associated with DKA including: Hyperglycaemia Polyphagia (increased appetite and hunger) Polydipsia (increased thirst) Polyuria (increased urination) Glycosuria (glucose in the urine) Ketonuria (ketones in urine) Ketones in blood Sweet, fruity breath Tachypnoea leading to Kussmaul breathing (deep and laboured breathing pattern) The body tries to compensate for the ketone bodies (acid) by eliminating carbon dioxide (also an acid) thereby attempting to make the body more alkalotic to normalise the pH The compensation between the metabolic and respiratory system can be read about in this article Decreased bicarbonate The body tries to use the available bicarbonate (base) to buffer the ketone bodies (acid) in order to improve the metabolic ketoacidosis This actually worsens the situation the lower the bicarbonate becomes with a continual production of ketones Increased drowsiness/decreased level of consciousness As the pH decreases and becomes more acidotic, it has a direct effect on decreasing the level of consciousness in a person Increased urea Electrolyte disturbances Tachycardia and other cardiac arrhythmias Tachycardia is often a compensatory mechanism for the hypotension Cardiac arrhythmias a Continue reading >>

The Best Diabetes Videos Of The Year

The Best Diabetes Videos Of The Year

We’ve carefully selected these videos because they’re actively working to educate, inspire, and empower their viewers with personal stories and high-quality information. Nominate your favorite video by emailing us at [email protected]! Diabetes is a chronic disease caused by improper insulin function. This leads to overly high blood sugar. The three types of diabetes include type 1, type 2, or gestational diabetes. Prediabetes, where blood sugar is high but not over the diabetic threshold, increases your risk for type 2 diabetes. People of all ages, ethnicities and sizes can get diabetes. Nearly 50 percent of U.S. adults have diabetes or prediabetes, according to a 2015 study. This includes people living with diabetes who haven’t yet received an official diagnosis. Receiving a diabetes diagnosis can feel shocking or overwhelming. The illness has some serious potential complications, such as blindness and amputation. And it’s the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Treatment often requires immediate and significant lifestyle adjustments. However, with careful management, you can still enjoy a varied diet and active lifestyle. There are plenty of people out there who refuse to let diabetes stop them from thriving. If you’re seeking some inspiration or information, look no further than these videos. 7 Best Superfoods for Diabetes - Saturday Strategy A healthy diet plays a huge role in managing diabetes. Drew Canole, CEO of fitlife.tv, shares insights into superfoods that help keep diabetes in check. Canole says these superfoods will help you regulate glucose levels and lower insulin levels. One such superfood is the Moringa leaf. He says studies have indicated it lowers blood sugar levels by up to 29 percent. Why not give his diabetes-bu Continue reading >>

Diabetes Basics

Diabetes Basics

Diabetes is a number of diseases that involve problems with the hormone insulin. Normally, the pancreas (an organ behind the stomach) releases insulin to help your body store and use the sugar and fat from the food you eat. Diabetes occurs when one of the following occurs: When the pancreas does not produce any insulin When the pancreas produces very little insulin When the body does not respond appropriately to insulin, a condition called "insulin resistance" Diabetes is a lifelong disease. Approximately 18.2 million Americans have the disease and almost one third (or approximately 5.2 million) are unaware that they have it. An additional 41 million people have pre-diabetes. As yet, there is no cure. People with diabetes need to manage their disease to stay healthy. To understand why insulin is important in diabetes, it helps to know more about how the body uses food for energy. Your body is made up of millions of cells. To make energy, these cells need food in a very simple form. When you eat or drink, much of your food is broken down into a simple sugar called "glucose." Then, glucose is transported through the bloodstream to the cells of your body where it can be used to provide some of the energy your body needs for daily activities. The amount of glucose in your bloodstream is tightly regulated by the hormone insulin. Insulin is always being released in small amounts by the pancreas. When the amount of glucose in your blood rises to a certain level, the pancreas will release more insulin to push more glucose into the cells. This causes the glucose levels in your blood (blood glucose levels) to drop. To keep your blood glucose levels from getting too low (hypoglycemia or low blood sugar), your body signals you to eat and releases some glucose from storage kept in t Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Child

Diabetes And Your Child

Understand the difference in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes and the warning signs to watch for in your child. In the past, diabetes has mainly been associated with adults, but it is actually one of the most common diseases found in school-age children. In 2010, about 215,000 people under the age of 20 had diabetes. Predicting who will get the disease is not easy, but knowing the symptoms and understanding your child’s risk can help you plan for the treatment he or she needs before the disease inflicts any serious harm. There are two forms of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 is much more common in children than Type 2, especially in children under age 10. In that age group, only 2 percent of those diagnosed have Type 2, which used to be referred to as adult-onset diabetes. The numbers undergo a shift in the adolescent and teen years, when it is estimated that up to 31 percent of children with diabetes develop the Type 2 variety. Pediatric endocrinologists began recognizing this changing trend in children during the early 1990’s. The challenge was determining how much the incidence has actually increased over the past two decades, versus simply recognizing diabetes as Type 2 rather than the assumed Type 1. Understanding Type 1 diabetes The immune system, meant to protect the body from dangerous bacteria and viruses, goes haywire in children with Type 1. Instead of targeting only outside invaders, the immune system starts attacking healthy insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, making it difficult for the body to regulate its glucose (blood sugar) levels. Because its signs mimic those of other diseases such as the flu and can be slow to progress over months or years, Type 1 diabetes may be overlooked as a diagnosis or difficult for parents to recognize. Typically, the Continue reading >>

Understanding Diabetes

Understanding Diabetes

Reviewed by Taylor Wolfram, MS, RDN, LDN Published November 1, 2016 A condition that affects how your body uses energy in the form of glucose from food, diabetes can be successfully managed through proper self-monitoring, medication and lifestyle changes. People with diabetes have a high level of glucose in their blood, which can be caused by either too little insulin being produced by the pancreas or the body not accepting or using the insulin it produces, or a combination of both. People with diabetes need to keep their blood sugar levels within a healthy range. Blood sugar levels are controlled through diet, physical activity and, for some people, a combination of medication and insulin injections. Insulin is a hormone your cells need to store and use energy from food, and it is responsible for getting glucose into your cells. If you have diabetes, insulin is not able to do its job. Meaning, glucose is unable to get into cells, which causes it to build up in your blood. High levels of glucose then circulate through the body, damaging cells along the way. Type 1 Diabetes: An autoimmune disease in which the pancreas cannot make insulin or makes very little. Type 1 diabetes often begins in childhood (it was previously known as "juvenile diabetes"), and the onset is sudden. People with Type 1 diabetes need daily insulin injections or an insulin pump. Just 5% of people with diabetes have Type 1 diabetes, which cannot be prevented through diet or lifestyle. Type 2 Diabetes: A chronic disease in which the pancreas makes insulin, but it does not make enough or the body doesn't use the insulin it makes and usually develops slowly. Eight in 10 people with this type of diabetes are overweight. In fact, Type 2 diabetes is becoming more common in children and teenagers because o Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes?

What Is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a condition that prevents the body from properly using energy from food. It occurs when the pancreas does not produce insulin, or when the pancreas produces insulin, but it is resisted by the body. Diabetes explained in simple words Many people have heard of diabetes, but most people don't know exactly what diabetes really is. When we eat food, it is broken down in glucose or sugar. Even though many health experts harp on not having too much sugar in the diet, you do need some glucose to help regulate your metabolism and give you energy. During digestion, glucose moves through the body through the bloodstream to feed your cells. To be able to transfer the Blood sugar into the cells, your body needs insulin, which is made by the Pancreas and released into the bloodstream. The problem happens when you have too much blood sugar in your body compared to the amount of insulin your pancreas is providing. If you're body is not making enough insulin to keep up with the amount of sugar in your bloodstream, or if your body is having trouble making insulin, the glucose in the blood remains there and causes your blood sugar levels to elevate. If it continues, even after monitoring your diet, you will develop diabetes. Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes?

What Is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Blood glucose is your main source of energy and comes from the food you eat. Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas, helps glucose from food get into your cells to be used for energy. Sometimes your body doesn’t make enough—or any—insulin or doesn’t use insulin well. Glucose then stays in your blood and doesn’t reach your cells. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause health problems. Although diabetes has no cure, you can take steps to manage your diabetes and stay healthy. Sometimes people call diabetes “a touch of sugar” or “borderline diabetes.” These terms suggest that someone doesn’t really have diabetes or has a less serious case, but every case of diabetes is serious. What are the different types of diabetes? The most common types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes If you have type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. Your immune system attacks and destroys the cells in your pancreas that make insulin. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, although it can appear at any age. People with type 1 diabetes need to take insulin every day to stay alive. Type 2 diabetes If you have type 2 diabetes, your body does not make or use insulin well. You can develop type 2 diabetes at any age, even during childhood. However, this type of diabetes occurs most often in middle-aged and older people. Type 2 is the most common type of diabetes. Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes develops in some women when they are pregnant. Most of the time, this type of diabetes goes away after the baby is born. However, if you’ve had gestational diabetes, you have a greater chan Continue reading >>

More in diabetes