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Uncontrolled Diabetes And Body Odor

Body Odor & Diabetes: Does Diabetes Cause Body Odor?

Body Odor & Diabetes: Does Diabetes Cause Body Odor?

Are you diabetic? Does your body emanate bad breath which it has never done before? Do not worry. You are not the only one experiencing something of this sort. The high level of blood glucose combined with many complications in diabetes tends to cause body odor in the patients. In this article, we shall analyze the reasons and the relationship between diabetes and body odor. Join in for the article Body Odor and Diabetes: Does Diabetes Cause Body Odor?” What is Diabetes Body Odor? Diabetes body odor refers to the sudden change of smell that you experience due to diabetes. There are several reasons why diabetes might lead to bad odor in the patients. There are two main types of sweat one of which could be responsible for the bad body odor in a diabetes patient. One of these sweats is called eccrine which is essentially odorless and is mainly responsible for controlling the temperature of the body. The second of these sweats is known as the apocrine. This is the sweat you generally get under your armpits and is secreted by the apocrine gland. This is the one which is mainly responsible for producing bad odor as when it gets hit by bacteria, there is an unpleasant smell that is emitted. The following paragraph explains in detail the causes of bad odor in diabetes patients. Causes of Body Odor in Diabetes There are several reasons and ways in which diabetes can cause body odor in the patients. These reasons and causes of the same are explained in the following points: People with diabetes are known to be affected by a number of complications in the body. One such complication is the infection that can be caused in the urinary tract of the patient. This may very much lead to a fruity smell in the diabetes patients. Another reason for the bad odor could be the high levels o Continue reading >>

Embarrassing Body Problems You Need To Know About

Embarrassing Body Problems You Need To Know About

Got bad breath? Toenail fungus? Problems in the bedroom? You're not alone—and these could be signs of more serious issues Continue reading >>

Body Odour

Body Odour

Body odour is the unpleasant smell produced by bacteria on the skin that break down the acids in your sweat. The medical term is bromhidrosis. Anyone who has reached puberty can produce body odour, as this is when the apocrine sweat glands develop, which produce the sweat that bacteria can quickly break down. Men are more likely to have body odour, because they tend to sweat more than women. Things that can make body odour worse include: being overweight consuming rich or spicy food and drink – such as garlic, spices and alcohol certain medical conditions – a fruity smell can sometimes be a sign of diabetes, while a bleach-like smell may indicate liver or kidney disease Excessive sweating Hyperhidrosis is a condition where a person sweats excessively and much more than the body needs to regulate temperature. If you have hyperhidrosis, you may also have smelly feet (bromodosis). Smelly feet are caused by wearing shoes and socks that prevent sweat evaporating or being absorbed, which attracts bacteria. When to see your GP See your GP if: your sweating or body odour is causing you distress you notice a change in your body odour you suddenly begin to sweat much more than usual Managing body odour Excessive sweating and body odour is an unpleasant problem that can affect a person's confidence and self-esteem. A body odour problem can usually be managed by getting rid of excess skin bacteria – which are responsible for the smell – and keeping the skin in the affected area (usually the armpits) clean and dry. Self-care advice Your armpits contain a large number of apocrine glands, which are responsible for producing body odour. Keeping your armpits clean and free of bacteria will help keep odour under control. Following the below advice can help you achieve this: take Continue reading >>

What Does Bad Breath Have To Do With Diabetes?

What Does Bad Breath Have To Do With Diabetes?

Your breath has an interesting ability to provide clues to your overall health. A sweet, fruity odor can be a sign of ketoacidosis, an acute complication of diabetes. An odor of ammonia is associated with kidney disease. Similarly, a very foul, fruity odor may be a sign of anorexia nervosa. Other diseases, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, and liver disease, also can cause distinct odors on the breath. Bad breath, also called halitosis, can be so telling that doctors may even be able to use it to identify diabetes. Recently, researchers have found that infrared breath analyzers can be effective in identifying prediabetes or early-stage diabetes. Diabetes-related halitosis has two main causes: periodontal disease and high levels of ketones in the blood. Periodontal diseases Periodontal diseases, also called gum diseases, include gingivitis, mild periodontitis, and advanced periodontitis. In these inflammatory diseases, bacteria attack the tissues and bone that support your teeth. Inflammation can affect metabolism and increase your blood sugar, which worsens diabetes. While diabetes can lead to periodontal diseases, these diseases can also create further problems for people with diabetes. According to a report in IOSR Journal of Dental and Medical Sciences, an estimated one in three people with diabetes will also experience periodontal diseases. Heart disease and stroke, which can be complications of diabetes, are also linked to periodontal disease. Diabetes can damage blood vessels, which can reduce blood flow throughout your body, including your gums. If your gums and teeth aren’t receiving a proper supply of blood, they may become weak and more prone to infection. Diabetes may also raise glucose levels in your mouth, promoting bacteria growth, infection, Continue reading >>

What Diseases Cause Body Odor?

What Diseases Cause Body Odor?

What America Eats At Home: 3 Great Recipes Using Avocados QUESTION: What diseases do body odors reflect? ANSWER: Even your closest friends may not tell you that you smell bad, but they may try to avoid being close to you. Unpleasant body odors (bromhidrosis) can be due to poor personal hygiene, but foul breath is often a signal of an underlying health problem. Such breath often originates in the mouth as the result of infected teeth or gums, a coated tongue or dry mouth. These conditions usually can be corrected. Odor also can be a sign that theres trouble in the respiratory tract (nose, throat, windpipe, lungs). Chronic bronchitis and sinusitis can produce malodorous breath, as can a lung abscess or infection. A less common culprit is the stomach. Foods such as raw onions, curry (or cumin), and garlic cause bad breath, not from the stomach, but from the lungs. After these foods are eaten, their enzymes are absorbed into the bloodstream and pass into the lungs from which they are expelled in the breath. Other possible sources of an unpleasant smell: Stale sweat, whether under normal circumstances or due to excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis). Sweat alone does not emit an odor. Perspiration is water and salts released by the sweat glands to regulate body temperature. Bacteria on your skin can combine with the sweat and produce a stench. Infection anywhere, including vaginal (especially yeast), urinary and skin infections. Benign and malignant tumors anywherein the mouth, stomach cervix or uterus. These often have a distinctive smell, which can be more pronounced if there is any associated discharge. Liver and kidney failure, as well as uncontrolled diabetes. Certain inborn errors of metabolism, such as aminoaciduria (these are often noted in childhood). Various chemicals Continue reading >>

All The Smells Associated With Uncontrolled Diabetes

All The Smells Associated With Uncontrolled Diabetes

All the Smells Associated with Uncontrolled Diabetes There are different ways that uncontrolled diabetes can make your body smell, and these odors are not the same, depending on where in your body they are coming from. Breath can smell due to chemical changes, says Susan L. Besser, MD, with Mercy Medical Center , Baltimore, and Diplomate American Board of Obesity Medicine and board certified by the American Board of Family Medicine. Uncontrolled diabetes causes the bodys pH to be off (usually more basic than acidic) which can cause unusual breath smells, says Dr. Besser. When blood sugar rises to unacceptable levels, the body is forced to break down fat for energy more fat than what the body normally breaks down. The body also breaks down muscle (catabolism) which it is never supposed to do. The bodys preferred fuel source is glucose (blood sugar). When the supply runs out, the breakdown of fat and muscle causes the blood to become acidic due to chemicals called ketones in the blood. These ketones can make the breath have a chemical odor because the body is trying to rid the ketones via exhalation. The chemical odor resembles nail polish remover because the compound in nail polish remover is acetone. However, the breath may also smell somewhat fruity or sweet. Urine odor can be sweet because of the large amount of sugar in the urine, says Dr. Besser. During menstruation, a sweet or unusual odor may arise due to the pH being off with uncontrolled diabetes. Additionally, uncontrolled diabetics can develop yeast infections either vaginally or on skin due to the pH changes and higher sugar concentration in menstrual fluids and sweat, says Dr. Besser. Yeast thrives in that environment. Dr. Besser adds that she is not aware of any way that uncontrolled diabetes can affect th Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Cause Body Odor?

Does Diabetes Cause Body Odor?

The human body produces two different types of sweat. Eccrine is the first type, and it is an odorless, clear sweat. Eccrine is secreted all over the human body by the eccrine glands, which regulate body temperature. The second type of sweat is apocrine, which is a thicker sweat secreted in the underarm and groin regions by the apocrine glands. Effects of Diabetes on Body Odor Sweat is odorless until it reacts with lingering bacteria on the skin's surface, which creates body odor. A foreign element, defect in the human body, or poor hygiene can be a factor in bacteria build-up. Diabetes can change the way body odor smells. Diabetics often produce a sweet-smelling, somewhat fruity body odor. The scent is very distinctive. Insulin used to treat diabetes can also cause an acetone-like smell. Ketoacidosis When diabetes isn't controlled or corrected, it can lead to ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis occurs when sugar, also known as glucose, is not available as a fuel source by the body. When this happens, fat is used instead. At this point, byproducts of fat called ketones emerge. The ketones then build up in the body. When this occurs, the skin of a diabetic patient may taste sweet and produce a detectable odor. Often times the odor can be detected in the mouth, with fruity breath. What to Try Taking medicine regularly, eating properly, and maintaining good hygiene habits may help with odor associated with diabetes. A diabetic should ask his health care provider how much fat, protein, and carbohydrates are required in his daily diet. A registered dietician or nutritionist can help with dietary needs as well. Amber Taylor attended American Broadcasting School and East Central University, but her writing days began in high school as a reporter for her high school newspaper. Amber's w Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

As fat is broken down, acids called ketones build up in the blood and urine. In high levels, ketones are poisonous. This condition is known as ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is sometimes the first sign of type 1 diabetes in people who have not yet been diagnosed. It can also occur in someone who has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Infection, injury, a serious illness, missing doses of insulin shots, or surgery can lead to DKA in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can also develop DKA, but it is less common. It is usually triggered by uncontrolled blood sugar, missing doses of medicines, or a severe illness. Continue reading >>

11 Weird Body Odors That Might Be A Sign Of A Health Problem

11 Weird Body Odors That Might Be A Sign Of A Health Problem

If you wake up with bad breath, or get smelly armpits after working out, then consider yourself normal. These odors are nothing to worry about, and are usually cleared up with a quick toothbrushing or swipe of deodorant. But some body odors can be a sign of a health problem, and therefore shouldn't be passed off as "normal," or ignored. If you notice a smell that is stronger than usual, or seems to have come out of nowhere, it's a good idea to let your doctor know. "When the body is out of balance ... we lose our natural ability to fight odors," Dr. Harold Katz, the developer of TheraBreath, tells Bustle. "You are not supposed to stink." If you do, it could mean something in your body isn't right. I'm talking about infections, like some STDs, and even diseases that present themselves in the form of bad breath or body odor, like diabetes. Read on below for more prime examples, so you'll know just what to point out the next time visit your doctor. Because, while some odors are totally normal, others can be a sign of an underlying health problem — and possibly one that needs to be treated ASAP. 1. Fruity Odor On Your Breath Morning breath is one thing. But if your breath smells fruity or sweet, that could be a sign of a problem. "If you notice a fruity odor on your breath, this symptom cannot be ignored," attending physician Nesochi Okeke-Igbokwe, MD, of the NYU Langone Medical Center, tells Bustle. "It may be indicative of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a metabolic condition that has the potential to be deadly and may arise as a complication of uncontrolled diabetes." 2. A "Fishy" Vaginal Odor While odor in your vaginal area is totally normal, you should be checked by a doctor if the smell becomes strong or fishy. "A 'fishy' odor coming from the vagina can be a sign of ba Continue reading >>

Type 2 - I Think My Body/sweat Smells Of Urine | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Type 2 - I Think My Body/sweat Smells Of Urine | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Type 2 I think my body/sweat smells of urine Over the last week I have notice a urine like smell on my body (even after my daily shower). I do have 'ops' moments and wear pads which I change through out the day so thought they might be the smell source. But I don't think it is that. I also still have hot flushes a couple of times a day and hot weather doesn't help. I think I have a general body odour now. On separate occasions different friends have commented. Saying oh it smells like a cat has pissed in here and there is a real fish smell. These were not directed at me but I fear when I see them again they will see that is me smelling. Does anyone know if this is a Diabetes symptom or what I might do to stop this? Art Of Flowers I reversed my Type 2 Well-Known Member It may be ketones. See I had a similar problem years ago..went to East Timor for 4 weeks as part of a uni program for social justice but the diet was rice rice and more rice. My skin took on a perculiar odor which inretrospect may have been ketones. I'm type 2 diabetic, didn't take a glucometer and obviously didn't think it through re diet as I was not on meds at that time. Hope things improve of you. If I get ketosis or ketones you get that sorted of small sent or a sent of berries but it is only for a few days when you go to hospital and get meds sent through you which is normally insulin and antibiotics and glucose via a drip and if you don't get it sorted out you can do a lot of damage to your body and organs as it happened to me a couple of months ago and I was really ill with it and I could have died with it if I hadn't seen a doctor in the hospital and I was back to normal within Continue reading >>

How Can I Treat Chronic Body Odor?

How Can I Treat Chronic Body Odor?

Home > Health > How can I treat chronic body odor? Nov 1, 2007 Kelly Davidson | Delicious Living Three expertsa medical doctor, naturopath and organic chemistdish on body odor: its root causes and how to treat it naturally. Medical doctor: Robert T. Brodell, MD, professor of internal medicine, Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine, Rootstown, Ohio Most patients with body odor have a problem with bacterial overgrowth on their skin . These bacteria produce odor by breaking down the skin's sebum (oil). People who don't bathe regularly are particularly at risk because folds of skin in the groin and armpits are the moist, warm, favored places for bacterial growth. Wear loose cotton clothing that breathes well, and light-colored clothing to reflect light and heat. Attempting to cover up odor with perfumes doesn't work because perfumes don't kill the odor-causing bacteria. Even worse, adding perfumes to the odor often forms a perfumed-body-odor scenta combination that will never make it to the fragrance counter. Eating large amounts of foods such as asparagus and garlic can also lead to body odor. Avoid such foods for 48 hours to test whether they are the culprits. One other trick: If you bathe daily and still find odor a problem, use deodorant soap or an antiperspirant-free deodorant. If you still notice odor, it may be that the odor is locked in your clothing from a previous wear. Every time you sweat, the wet clothing releases the odor even though the bacteria are no longer present. Naturopathic doctor: Cynthia Bye, ND, Journey to Wellness, Vancouver, Wash. Remember that the skin is the body's largest detoxification organ . Assuming normal hygiene, one thing I investigate is a person's toxic load. Body odor generally results from internal toxins forming faster Continue reading >>

What Medical Conditions Cause Body Odor?

What Medical Conditions Cause Body Odor?

There are certain things that we do in every day life that cause us to smell. Excessive sweating while exercising, poor hygiene and some of the foods we eat can give us some pretty bad body odor (B.O. for short). But body odor can sometimes be attributed to more than just the occasional workout or a clove of garlic. Video of the Day Diabetes is one of the more common causes of body odor. When someone who has diabetes fails to monitor and take care of his blood sugar, he can develop a condition called ketoacidosis. With ketoacidosis, not only does the person suffer from breath that is best described as fruity, a pungent body odor is also present. Ketoacidosis is a serious issue and needs to be addressed by a doctor immediately. An overactive thyroid gland is another cause of body odor. The thyroid gland causes us to sweat. When it's working overtime, as with hyperthyroidism, the body excretes an excessive amount of sweat even with little or no exertion. The thyroid should be checked for proper functioning once every year or two. Hyperthyroidism is treatable. If you notice an unnatural amount of sweat and the body odor that comes with it, see a doctor. Bad body odor can also be caused by dysfunction in the kidneys and liver. The kidneys and the liver help to remove toxins from our system through waste product. When they don't do their jobs, toxins can build up in the blood and digestive tract, which in turn creates an odor. This could be a product of either liver or kidney disease. A simple blood test can tell if there is a problem with either of these two vital organs. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Body Odor–what Is It?

Diabetes Body Odor–what Is It?

This article shows that the three causes of body odor are associated with diabetes. These conditions and diseases are more likely to cause body odor to the patient with diabetes, at risk of diabetes, or has a family history of diabetes. Diabetes could produce a body smell which is much more unusual than what you have been used to. It’s never been a good thing to get an unexpected change in body smell unless you have changed your diet or you have been taking foods like eggs, garlic, onions, liver, red meat, fish, processed foods, legumes, fried foods, curry, or spicy foods too much. If you have not changed your diet, but you suddenly developed body odor, consult your physician immediately. Body odor is commonly described as the smell of perspiration; however, this is not true. In fact, sweat has no smell. Our body produces 2 types of sweat. First one is the eccrine. This is a clear, odorless sweat that is secreted by our body through the eccrine gland. It regulates the temperature of the body. The second one is the apocrine described as a thicker sweat secreted in the armpit and groin parts by the apocrine gland. This sweat is odorless but when it reacts to bacteria on the surface of the skin, it produces unpleasant odor we all try get rid of. People also develop bad odor due to poor hygiene or heredity. Diabetes could as well change how your body smells. Sometimes people with diabetes and urinary tract infections can have an unusual kind of body odor. It is like a fruity body smell. Full blown and not treated diabetes may lead to a condition called ketoacidosis. When this happens, the patient’s skin will taste sweet and produce an instantly recognizable pungent odor. Diabetes may also cause the patient to smell like acetone. This is because of the insulin taken to c Continue reading >>

7 Surprising Body Odor Causes

7 Surprising Body Odor Causes

SVGiles via Getty Images We’re going to assume you bathe, at least somewhat regularly. And yet, somehow, you still find yourself wondering... IS THAT ME?! Turns out, there are the occasional smells that no amount of scrubbing or brushing or deodorant-applying can deter. Here are a few of the most surprising. You’re Stressed Believe it or not, there are different types of sweat, chemically speaking. And the stinkiest sweat of all is stress sweat. That’s because it’s produced from a category of sweat glands called apocrine glands. Aprocrine glands produce a less-watery sweat, and bacteria go crazy for the fats and proteins in the mix. That feeding frenzy is what releases the odor, according to the Mayo Clinic. Sweat from your workouts or just because it’s too dang hot outside, on the other hand, is composed mostly of water and electrolytes, according to YouBeauty. You’ve Been “Blessed” With Stinky Feet That same all-you-can-eat buffet for bacteria happens with the sweat on your feet. And since your tootsies are tucked away in a dark, warm, moist environment, they really nurture bacteria — especially if you’re sans socks. But about 10 to 15 percent of people have extra-sweaty feet just by the luck of the genetic draw. Those ultra-moist dogs can then become home to a specific type of bacterium called Micrococcus sedentarius, which produces truly awful smelling sulfur compounds. Lucky you. You Have Too Few Favorite Bras Ladies: ‘fess up. How often do you wash your favorite bra? Yep, we thought so. “Many women overwear — and consequently underwash — bras because they have too few that fit properly,” bra expert (really!) Susan Nethero told Prevention. Because that lacy number is probably made of odor-trapping fabrics and definitely touches skin in Continue reading >>

10 Sources Of Body Odor That Aren't Just Sweat

10 Sources Of Body Odor That Aren't Just Sweat

Sometimes, diabetes can be a cause of body odor. When untreated, this disease can cause a condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. Without enough insulin to regulate the metabolism, the body starts to break down fat for fuel. This causes a sickeningly sweet aroma comparable to decomposing apples. It's most obvious on a person's breath, but it's also given off by the body as well [source: Liddell]. That's why when a patient seeks treatment for body odor, physicians may order blood or urine tests to determine if there is an underlying medical condition such as diabetes [source: Mayo Clinic]. Do you smell baking? According to a 1976 medical journal article, patients afflicted with typhoid fever "emit a smell comparable to freshly baked brown bread" [source: Liddell]. That may actually sound kind of pleasant, but rest assured that typhoid fever is anything but. Patients with this disease usually develop a sustained fever as high as 103 to 104 degrees F (39 to 40 degrees C), and suffer stomach pains and headaches, as well as weakness. In some cases, they also experience a rash of flat, rose-colored spots. About 21.5 million people die from typhoid fever each year, mostly in developing countries. It's spread by eating food or drinking water handled by someone who already has the disease and is shedding the Salmonella Typhi bacteria [source: CDC]. As we've mentioned before, infectious diseases often cause changes in body odor. But immunizations, interestingly, can have similar effects. In an animal study published in 2014 in the journal Physiology and Behavior, researchers from the Monell Chemical Senses Center and the U.S. Department of Agriculture demonstrated that immunization can trigger a distinct change in scent. Scientists believe that humans and other animals may give o Continue reading >>

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