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Uncontrolled Diabetes

4 Common Dangers Of Uncontrolled Diabetes

4 Common Dangers Of Uncontrolled Diabetes

Diabetes should not be taken lightly. It is, in fact, extremely dangerous. This might seem like a bold statement, but uncontrolled diabetes can cause serious problems. It can range from something as small as constantly feeling thirsty, all the way to kidney failure. Eye Problems Diabetes is the leading cause of new blindness among adults. It can cause a number of eye problems, some of which can lead to blindness if not properly taken care of. The eye disorders include: Glaucoma Cataracts Diabetic retinopathy Kidney Problems Diabetes is the main cause of kidney failure in adults. Almost 45% of new cases are due to diabetes. This is because the kidneys cannot process all the excess sugar in the blood during diabetes. Nerve Problems Over time, high blood sugar levels can harm the nerves. This can lead to pain or numbness in the feet. About 70% of people with diabetes have some form of nerve damage. Diabetes-related nerve damage can also cause pain in the legs, arms, and hands. It can lead to problems with digestion, going to the bathroom, or having sex. Teeth Problems People with diabetes are at high risk for gum disease. Keeping your diabetes under control, seeing your dentist regularly, and taking good daily care of your teeth can prevent gum disease and tooth loss. What are the symptoms of diabetes problems? Symptoms vary depending on the diabetes complication that you have. You may have: Vision problems. Vision loss or pain in your eye is common if you have diabetic eye disease. No visual symptoms if you have early diabetes-related kidney disease. Swelling of the legs and feet occur in more advanced stages of kidney failure. Tingling, numbness, burning or shooting or stabbing pain in the limbs when you have nerve problems. Brittle, sensitive, or discoloured teeth and g Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Print Overview High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) affects people who have diabetes. Several factors can contribute to hyperglycemia in people with diabetes, including food and physical activity choices, illness, nondiabetes medications, or skipping or not taking enough glucose-lowering medication. It's important to treat hyperglycemia, because if left untreated, hyperglycemia can become severe and lead to serious complications requiring emergency care, such as a diabetic coma. In the long term, persistent hyperglycemia, even if not severe, can lead to complications affecting your eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. Symptoms Hyperglycemia doesn't cause symptoms until glucose values are significantly elevated — above 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 11 millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Symptoms of hyperglycemia develop slowly over several days or weeks. The longer blood sugar levels stay high, the more serious the symptoms become. However, some people who've had type 2 diabetes for a long time may not show any symptoms despite elevated blood sugars. Early signs and symptoms Recognizing early symptoms of hyperglycemia can help you treat the condition promptly. Watch for: Frequent urination Increased thirst Blurred vision Fatigue Headache Later signs and symptoms If hyperglycemia goes untreated, it can cause toxic acids (ketones) to build up in your blood and urine (ketoacidosis). Signs and symptoms include: Fruity-smelling breath Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Dry mouth Weakness Confusion Coma Abdominal pain When to see a doctor Call 911 or emergency medical assistance if: You're sick and can't keep any food or fluids down, and Your blood glucose levels are persistently above 240 mg/dL (13 mmol/L) and you have ketones in your urine Make an appointment with your Continue reading >>

12 Signs Of Uncontrolled Diabetes

12 Signs Of Uncontrolled Diabetes

12 Signs of Uncontrolled Diabetes Blood tests tell you and your doctor when your glucose levels are too high. But signs of uncontrolled diabetes can appear all over your body. High blood glucose can damage nerves, blood vessels, and organs, resulting in a wide array of symptoms. Talk with your doctor if you spot any of them, so you can stay in control of your diabetes and improve your quality of life. © 2016 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement. You Might Also Like Continue reading >>

Trying To Control The Uncontrollable

Trying To Control The Uncontrollable

“OK,” my endocrinologist—or endo—said at my July visit when he read the results of my HbA1c test, “What do we need to change?” My HbA1c (a measure of blood glucose control over the past 2–3 months), which had hovered close to 6% seemingly forever, had gone up into the 9th percentile, been wrestled down into the 7th percentile, and had popped back up to 8.4% for that visit. I hadn’t bothered to have my labs done, I hadn’t written down a list of my medicines, and I didn’t have any kind of blood glucose log with me. “My attitude?” I asked. I tired of having diabetes a long time ago. After an initial burst of perfection—possibly driven by fear, possibly by depression, or more likely, by a combination of the two—I slipped back into complacency. Or was it diabetes burnout? In a presentation given at the American Association of Diabetes Educators’ (AADE) Annual Meeting in San Antonio, Texas, on September 22, 1982, and printed in the Fall 1983 edition of the AADE’s official journal The Diabetes Educator, Joan Williams Hoover addressed “Patient Burnout and Other Reasons for Noncompliance.” “From the moment a person develops diabetes,” she wrote, “for 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, for the rest of his life, he is responsible for managing the unmanageable, controlling the uncontrollable, and coping with the incurable—his diabetes.” But the usual recommendations for dealing with burnout, she notes, are not applicable to somebody with diabetes. The “usual recommendations,” Hoover writes, are: Cut back on the stressful tasks. Lessen the care and concern. Avoid the people who are causing the stress (perhaps a health-care professional). Take a vacation from the work. As we all are aware, those recommendations for avoiding stress just Continue reading >>

Symptoms

Symptoms

Print Overview Diabetes mellitus refers to a group of diseases that affect how your body uses blood sugar (glucose). Glucose is vital to your health because it's an important source of energy for the cells that make up your muscles and tissues. It's also your brain's main source of fuel. If you have diabetes, no matter what type, it means you have too much glucose in your blood, although the causes may differ. Too much glucose can lead to serious health problems. Chronic diabetes conditions include type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Potentially reversible diabetes conditions include prediabetes — when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes — and gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but may resolve after the baby is delivered. Diabetes symptoms vary depending on how much your blood sugar is elevated. Some people, especially those with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, may not experience symptoms initially. In type 1 diabetes, symptoms tend to come on quickly and be more severe. Some of the signs and symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are: Increased thirst Frequent urination Extreme hunger Unexplained weight loss Presence of ketones in the urine (ketones are a byproduct of the breakdown of muscle and fat that happens when there's not enough available insulin) Fatigue Irritability Blurred vision Slow-healing sores Frequent infections, such as gums or skin infections and vaginal infections Although type 1 diabetes can develop at any age, it typically appears during childhood or adolescence. Type 2 diabetes, the more common type, can develop at any age, though it's more common in people older than 40. When to see a doctor If you suspect you or your child may have diabetes. If you notice any poss Continue reading >>

A 48-year-old Man With Uncontrolled Diabetes

A 48-year-old Man With Uncontrolled Diabetes

A 48-year-old white man who has had diabetes mellitus for 6 years presents to the outpatient clinic because his blood sugar levels have been rising for the past week. Both his parents had diabetes, and at the time of his diagnosis he weighed 278 pounds, all of which supported a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. His disease was initially managed with diet, exercise, and metformin (Glucophage). Four months later, with weight loss and exercise, his blood sugar levels were consistently under 100 mg/dL, and metformin was discontinued. He did well until 1 week ago, when he noted polyuria, polydipsia, and rising fingerstick glucose values, higher than 200 mg/dL. He has been eating well, with no nausea, vomiting, or symptoms of dehydration. He denies having any fever, chills, cough, nasal congestion, chest pain, abdominal pain, or dysuria. In addition to his type 2 diabetes, he has hypertension, for which he takes losartan (Cozaar); hyperlipidemia, for which he takes atorvastatin (Lipitor); and gout, for which he takes allopurinol (Zyloprim). His blood pressure is 148/70 mm Hg, pulse 100, and weight 273 pounds, and he is afebrile. On examination, his skin, head, eyes, ears, nose, throat, lungs, heart, and abdomen are normal. Urinalysis in the clinic shows large amounts of glucose and ketones. WHAT IS THE LEAST LIKELY CAUSE OF HIS POOR CONTROL? 1. Which of the following is the least likely cause of his poorly controlled diabetes? Occult infection Poor adherence to diet and exercise Diabetic ketoacidosis Pancreatitis Until 1 week ago, this patient’s diabetes had been well controlled for several years. Pancreatitis is the least likely cause of his uncontrolled diabetes, because he has no history of pancreatitis and has none of the symptoms of acute pancreatitis (fever, vomi Continue reading >>

Complications Of Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes

Complications Of Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes

To lower your risk of skin conditions, follow your recommended diabetes treatment plan and practice good skin care. A good skin care routine may include keeping your skin clean and moisturized, and checking for signs of injury. If you develop symptoms of a skin condition, make an appointment with your doctor. Uncontrolled diabetes increases your chances of developing several eye conditions, including: glaucoma , which happens when pressure builds up in your eye cataracts , which occur when the lens of your eye becomes cloudy retinopathy , which develops when blood vessels in the back of your eye become damaged Over time, these conditions can cause vision loss. Fortunately, early diagnosis and treatment can help you maintain your eyesight. In addition to following your recommended diabetes treatment plan, make sure to schedule regular eye exams. If you notice changes in your vision, make an appointment with your eye doctor. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) , about half of people with diabetes have nerve damage, known as diabetic neuropathy . Several types of neuropathy can develop as a result of diabetes. Peripheral neuropathy can affect your feet and legs, as well as your hands and arms. Potential symptoms include: increased or decreased sensitivity to touch or temperature Other types of neuropathy can affect your joints, face, eyes, or torso. To lower your risk of neuropathy, keep your blood glucose levels under control. If you develop symptoms of neuropathy, make an appointment with your doctor. They might order tests to check your nerve function. They should also conduct regular foot exams to check for signs of neuropathy. High blood glucose levels increase the strain on your kidneys. Over time, this can lead to kidney disease. Early-stage kidney Continue reading >>

What Is Uncontrolled Diabetes?

What Is Uncontrolled Diabetes?

ByAparna Mir , Onlymyhealth editorial team Sugar levels 100mg/dl or higher is known as uncontrolled diabetes. It can affect nearly every organ in the body. The condition may eventually lead to death. Diabetes can be kept under control with proper medication. Uncontrolled diabetes is a severe form of diabetes which is completely incurable or it is not treated adequately enough possibly due to lack of information. It causes blood sugar levels to rise abruptly in patients leading to serious health problems. A high level of blood sugar (100mg/dL) can affect nearly every organ in the body including heart, kidneys, eyes, nerves, gums and teeth. If allowed to persist, this condition can cause serious medical complications, eventually leading to death, usually due to cardiovascular disease or stroke. Diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough of the hormone insulin, an important metabolic hormone that is necessary to carry sugar from the bloodstream into the cells. Generally insulin injections are prescribed to control the sugar level in the body. But consistently high blood glucose levels, as in uncontrolled diabetes, causes damage to many organs leading to multiple organ failure. The kidneys become overloaded and the heart and lungs get stressed. Increased blood flow through nerves damages the blood vessels. Patients with uncontrolled diabetes can develop vision problems as a result of injuries to the retina or optic nerve. They may also develop seizures, can relapse into coma, and eventually die. There are many complications related to uncontrolled diabetes such as: Leg cramps, changes in skin colour, and decreased sensation. Vision problems, vision loss, and pain in the eye. It can further lead to cataract, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. If nerves get af Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine. Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable. Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus. Slow-healing sores o Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Complications

Diabetes: Complications

People with diabetes are at risk for long-term problems affecting the eyes, kidneys, heart, brain, feet, and nerves. The best way to prevent or delay these problems is to control your blood sugar and take good care of yourself. Eyes It is recommended that people with diabetes see an eye doctor every year for a dilated eye exam. Eye problems that can occur with diabetes include: Cataracts: a clouding of the lens of the eyes. Glaucoma: increased pressure in the eye. Retinopathy: eye changes with the retina in the back of the eye. Symptoms of eye problems include Blurred vision. Spots or lines in your vision. Watery eyes. Eye discomfort. Loss of vision. If you have any changes in your vision, call your healthcare provider. Have your urine checked for protein at least once a year. Protein in the urine is a sign of kidney disease. High blood pressure might also lead to kidney disease. Your blood pressure should be checked when you see your healthcare provider. Symptoms of a kidney problem include: Swelling of the hands, feet, and face. Weight gain from edema. Itching and/or drowsiness. (This can occur with end stage kidney disease.) Prompt treatment may slow the changes with kidney disease. All people with diabetes have an increased chance for heart disease and strokes. Heart disease is the major cause of death in people with diabetes. It is important to control other risks such as high blood pressure and high fats (cholesterol), as well as blood sugar. Symptoms of a heart attack include: Feeling faint. Feeling dizzy. Sweating. Chest pain or pressure. Pain in the shoulders, jaw, and left arm. Warning signs of a stroke include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, usually on one side of the body. Sudden nausea. Vomiting. Difficulty speaking or understanding w Continue reading >>

The Treatment Of Severely Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus.

The Treatment Of Severely Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus.

Abstract Patients with severely uncontrolled diabetes mellitus must be cared for by physicians and nurses who understand the pathophysiology of ketoacidosis and nonketotic hyperglycemia, who carefully seek and treat precipitating or underlying illnesses, and who can provide the patients with continuous clinical attention and laboratory monitoring. Most patients with diabetic ketoacidosis survive the acute metabolic disorder; the infrequent deaths are usually due to serious underlying illnesses. The latter are more common in patients with nonketotic hyperglycemia, who are usually older than those with ketoacidosis and who usually also have serious underlying chronic diseases. The essential features of treatment for either of the foregoing acute metabolic disorders are administration of insulin (especially gingerly in the older patients with nonketotic hyperglycemia, despite their commonly remarkable hyperglycemia); rehydration with NaCl solutions; and IV administration of K+, usually not until after a few hours of treatment with insulin and NaCl solutions. Administration of NaHCO3 is usually not necessary except in patients with a blood pH less than 7.1. Administration of phosphate has been recommended as part of the treatment for ketoacidosis, but its need is uncertain. Although patients with nonketotic hyperglycemia are often more severely dehydrated and hyperglycemic than those with ketoacidosis, they usually should be given smaller amounts of insulin, NaCl solutions, and K+, and less rapidly. Continue reading >>

Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus In Adults: Experience In Treating Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperosmolar Nonketotic Coma With Low-dose Insulin And A Uniform Treatment Regimen

Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus In Adults: Experience In Treating Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperosmolar Nonketotic Coma With Low-dose Insulin And A Uniform Treatment Regimen

A number of changes in therapy of uncontrolled diabetes have occurred in recent years. These include low-dose insulin regimens, often routine phosphate repletion, more cautious bicarbonate replacement, infusion of larger fluid volumes, the use of hypotonic solutions in hyperosmolar states, and recently magnesium repletion. These modalities (with the exception of routine magnesium repletion) have been employed at North Central Bronx Hospital since its opening in 1976. Through this retrospective analysis of 275 cases of uncontrolled diabetes we have tried to answer the following questions: What is the outcome of all episodes of uncontrolled diabetes in a municipal hospital population with a uniform treatment protocol? What are the results of treatment with new modalities in various age groups? Are the causes of death different from those tabulated in previous reports? Our results indicate a good outcome in those under the age of 50 yr regardless of the diagnosis of hyperosmolar nonketotic coma (HNC) or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Mortality from DKA was 2% in those under age 50 yr and 26% in the older age group. Surprising was the low mortality in the hyperosmolar group with 0% mortality under age 50 yr and 14% in patients over this age. The major categories of causes of death in the series included sepsis, adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), metabolic, cardiovascular, and shock. With the exception of ARDS, these categories were not different from other reported series. There were few thromboembolic events in this series. We conclude that the newer therapeutic approaches are effective in the treatment of uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, both ketoacidotic and hyperosmolar, and that they can be used safely and effectively in managing these metabolic derangements in d Continue reading >>

What It’s Like To Have Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes

What It’s Like To Have Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes

One of the greatest dangers of type 2 diabetes is that it can be slow and silent. Many people with the condition don’t experience any symptoms at all, even though their unbalanced blood sugar is already affecting their cells and tissue. You might be one of those people. How can you tell if you're at risk for developing type 2 diabetes? You may be more likely to develop the condition if you: Are overweight, with a body mass index (BMI) of 25 or higher Are inactive Are age 45 or older Have a family history of type 2 diabetes Are African-American, Hispanic, American Indian, Asian-American, or a Pacific Islander Have low levels of HDL, or the “good” cholesterol Have high levels of triglycerides (a type of fat) in your blood Although the telltale signs of type 2 diabetes may develop slowly over many years, the condition will cause symptoms for many people. Do any of these sound familiar? Increased thirst Frequent urination Increased hunger Unexplained weight loss Extreme fatigue Irritability Blurred vision Sores that are slow to heal Skin, bladder, or gum infections Whether you're experiencing any of these symptoms or not, uncontrolled levels of high blood sugar over time can lead to tissue damage throughout your body, from your eyes to your toes. Uncontrolled Diabetes Is Scary — and Even Deadly Type 2 diabetes damages essential systems in your body: your blood vessels, nerves, or both. The consequences of uncontrolled diabetes can be very serious, and some can eventually be fatal. They include: Infections Amputations due to infections in the feet These complications sound scary — and they are. Fortunately, controlling your blood-glucose levels can help prevent many of these secondary problems, or at least manage them if they have already developed. Take Action Tod Continue reading >>

7 Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Out Of Control

7 Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Out Of Control

Thinkstock A Silent Danger When you have type 2 diabetes, your main goal should be controlling your blood sugar. Without adequate blood sugar control, your risk for serious health complications — stroke, heart disease, nerve damage, blindness, and more — skyrockets. But here’s the tricky part: You might not even know your blood sugar levels are out of control. “Not everyone will have the same symptoms, and some individuals have no symptoms at all,” says Lori Zanini, RD, CDE, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Because proper blood sugar maintenance is vital to your overall health with type 2 diabetes, you need to take action if you think your levels may be out of control. “Since symptoms of uncontrolled diabetes may not appear until prolonged hyperglycemia has been present, it’s important for individuals with diabetes to monitor their glucose and adjust their medication based on the results,” explains Mary Ann Emanuele, MD, an endocrinologist, professor, and medical director of Inpatient Diabetes at Loyola University Medical Center in Mayfield, Illinois. Here are signs of uncontrolled blood sugar to look for: Continue reading >>

Ten Signs Of Uncontrolled Diabetes

Ten Signs Of Uncontrolled Diabetes

Uncontrolled diabetes can be fatal. It can also lower quality of life. In 2010, diabetes and its complications were responsible for 12 percent of deaths worldwide. Many of these deaths were avoidable. Although diabetes is a chronic condition, it can be managed with lifestyle changes and the right medication. People who do not manage the condition well may develop uncontrolled diabetes, which causes dangerously high blood glucose. This can trigger a cascade of symptoms, ranging from mood changes to organ damage. People with type 1 diabetes, a disease that causes the body to attack insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, are diagnosed, typically, in childhood. However, as many as a third of adults with the most common type 2 diabetes variant of the disorder, do not know they have it. Without taking measures to treat it, these people can develop uncontrolled diabetes. The following 10 symptoms are signs of uncontrolled diabetes. Anyone experiencing them should consult a doctor promptly. Contents of this article: High blood glucose readings High blood glucose readings are the most obvious symptom of uncontrolled diabetes. As diabetes raises blood sugar levels, many people with diabetes think it is normal to have high blood glucose. Normally, however, diabetes medication and lifestyle changes should bring blood glucose within target ranges. If blood glucose is still uncontrolled, or if it is steadily rising, it may be time for an individual to review their management plan. Frequent infections Diabetes can harm the immune system, making people more prone to infections. A person with diabetes who suddenly gets more infections, or who takes longer to heal from an infection they have had before, should see a doctor. Some of the most common infections associated with diabetes in Continue reading >>

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