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Umbilical Cord Stem Cell Treatment For Type 2 Diabetes

New Diabetes Treatment Teaches Rogue Immune Cells To Behave

New Diabetes Treatment Teaches Rogue Immune Cells To Behave

New diabetes treatment teaches rogue immune cells to behave In a recent study, some patients with Type 1 diabetes didnt need insulin for years after receiving stem cell educator therapy. In a recent study, some patients with Type 1 diabetes didnt need insulin for years after receiving stem cell educator therapy. A treatment targeting wayward immune cells in people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes may help even years later, a new study finds. For the treatment, researchers take blood from a person with diabetes and separate out the immune system cells (lymphocytes). They briefly expose those cells to stem cells from umbilical cord blood from an unrelated infant. Then they return the lymphocytes to the patient's body. The researchers have dubbed this treatment "stem cell educator therapy," because when exposed to the stem cells, the errant lymphocytes seem to re-learn how they should behave. "Stem cell educator therapy is a safe approach" with long-term effectiveness, said the study's lead author, Dr. Yong Zhao, an associate scientist at Hackensack University Medical Center in New Jersey. Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease, occurs when the body's immune system cells mistakenly attack the insulin-producing (beta) cells in the pancreas. This leaves people with Type 1 diabetes with little to no insulin. They need insulin injections to survive. Researchers have long thought that any cure for Type 1 diabetes would have to stop the autoimmune attack, while regenerating or transplanting beta cells. But Zhao and his team developed a new approach to the problem educating the immune cells that had been destroying beta cells so they stop attacking. In Type 2 diabetes, Zhao said immune cell dysfunction is responsible for chronic inflammation that causes insulin resistance. When so Continue reading >>

What Stem Cells Can Do Today Opens Doorways To Even More, Tomorrow…

What Stem Cells Can Do Today Opens Doorways To Even More, Tomorrow…

Diabetes refers to a family of diseases where the body is unable to effectively produce or use insulin, the hormone required to convert food into energy. The cause of diabetes is not known, and so far there is no cure. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States today. According to the American Diabetes Association, "there are 23.6 million children and adults in the United States, or 7.8% of the population, who have diabetes. While an estimated 17.9 million have been diagnosed with diabetes, unfortunately, 5.7 million people (or nearly one quarter) are unaware that they have the disease." There are three main types of Diabetes: Type 1 - an auto-immune disease Type 2 - associated with hereditary and lifestyle risk factors Gestational Diabetes - occurring during pregnancy Type 1 Diabetes is characterized by the body’s inability to produce insulin and therefore necessitates daily injections of insulin. Because it most often develops in children, it is often referred to as "juvenile diabetes." The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) reports that as many as three million Americans may have type 1 diabetes and an average of 40 children each day (more than 15,000 per year) are diagnosed. There are clinical trials underway to treat diabetes with stem cells in general, as well as with cord blood stem cells specifically. Researchers at the University of Florida Health say they have found a way to expand certain preserved cord blood cells that could potentially serve as a long-term treatment for type 1 diabetes. The cells are called thymic regulatory T cells, or tTregs for short. They are a type of white blood cell that helps prevent autoimmune responses, which is when a person’s immune system attacks him- or herself. A clinical trial conducted Continue reading >>

Diabetes Stem Cell Clinical Trials And Their Potential

Diabetes Stem Cell Clinical Trials And Their Potential

Read about the current state of stem cell-based diabetes treatments. Stem cell and regenerative medicine technologies have the potential to cure diabetes, although we are certainly far from such a cure. Studies on rodents indicate that curative stem cell therapy of diabetes is possible, but experimental human trials applying non-myeloablative autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or autologous umbilical cord blood infusions to patients with type 1 diabetes show mixed results. There have been some noteworthy recent studies on stem cell educator therapy and the transplantation of human beta cells containing a bioreactor to a patient with type 1 diabetes without the need for immunosuppression. Profil Germany has a positive attitude to approaches to diabetes therapy based on stem cells and regenerative medicine provided that they meet the highest ethical standards and have the clear potential to overcome the limitations inherent in current insulin therapies. The latter include: under-insulinization of the liver and pancreas accompanied by over-insulinization of peripheral tissues; impaired glucagon suppression by the beta cells leading to glycemic volatility; and an imperfect match of basal and meal-related insulin requirements. Moreover, with current therapies, the natural pulsatility of insulin exposure is not restored so there is no de facto cure of diabetes. On the other hand, the relative success of recent insulin therapies has set high standards and made any therapy with significant negative side effects, such as long-term immunosuppression, unacceptable. Profil Germany have been involved in various pharmaceutical and treatment development projects that focused on patients endogenous repair potential. Drugs that protect beta cells from death and/or stimu Continue reading >>

Cord Blood Used To ‘switch Off’ Type 1 Diabetes

Cord Blood Used To ‘switch Off’ Type 1 Diabetes

Australian toddler Lucy Hinchion is already a medical pioneer. Aged just 20 months, Lucy became the youngest ever recipient of an infusion of her own umbilical cord blood cells to “switch off” type 1 diabetes. How can cord blood treat type 1 diabetes? Cord blood is rich in regulatory T cells, which keep the immune system functioning properly. In diabetes type 1, the immune system attacks insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Doctors are optimistic that Lucy’s cord blood infusion will prevent her from developing type 1 diabetes at all. Researchers hope that stored umbilical cord blood will become a groundbreaking type 1 diabetes treatment. Lucy’s operation is part of a five-year study at The Children’s Hospital in Sydney. “We’re using the cord blood to switch off the immune process that has already commenced in Lucy and set her on the pathway to type-1 diabetes,” said Professor Maria Craig who is running the trial. “We believe the right strategy is to get in very early at this young age, when we have the greatest chance of success at resetting her immune system.” Why store umbilical cord blood? Lucy’s mother decided to store her daughter’s umbilical cord blood with the aim of one day helping her seven-year-old sister, Ava, who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes aged three. Because the family had no history of diabetes, Ms Hinchin hadn’t stored Ava’s cord blood. However, when Lucy recently tested positive for two antibodies that indicate type 1 diabetes development, all of her frozen cord blood was used in a 20-minute procedure at the Children’s Hospital. It might not be used today or tomorrow but it’s got a long shelf life. It can be stored for 18-24 years, I think. That’s a long time in science. Ms Hinchion, Lucy’s mother, say Continue reading >>

Stem Cells And Their Potential To Help Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Stem Cells And Their Potential To Help Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Stem Cells and Their Potential to Help Treat Type 2 Diabetes Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) Often associated with the obesity epidemic, Type 2 Diabetes, is estimated to affect over 26 million adults and children in the United States. If trends continue, 1 in 3 American adults will have diabetes by 2050. For decades, researchers have been searching for better ways to treat this chronic blood condition. Type 2 Diabetes is caused by the bodys low production of (or resistance to) the hormone insulin, which prevents glucose (the bodys fuel) from getting to cells for energy and storage. Over time, Type 2 Diabetes can begin to affect many other parts of the body, such as the eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. A promising new stem cell research study may point to a better way to treat this disease. Through IV infusion or direct delivery into the pancreas, Chinese scientists used umbilical cord tissue derived stem cells for 22 patients with Type 2 Diabetes. In the 12 months following the transplant procedure, patients blood glucose declined and their beta cells ability to store and release insulin increased. 17 of the patients were able to gradually reduce their insulin therapy requirements for an average of two months, and seven of those 17 were able to stop insulin treatments entirely for an average of nine months, with no adverse side effects. In total, five of the 17 patients had a more than 50% reduction in their insulin treatment, and in the five others the dosage of insulin decreased to different degrees. More research is needed to confirm these preliminary findings, but the study suggests the potential for using stem cells as a monthly or yearly treatment to help replace the burden of daily insulin therapy for millions of patients. The use of cord blood i Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Reversed With Stem Cells From Cord Blood

Type 1 Diabetes Reversed With Stem Cells From Cord Blood

Type 1 Diabetes Reversed With Stem Cells From Cord Blood Stem cells from cord blood "re-educated" the immune system T cells of people with type 1 diabetes so their pancreas started producing insulin again, thereby reducing the amount of insulin they needed to inject. These are the findings of a study led by Dr Yong Zhao, from University of Illinois at Chicago that were published online on Tuesday in the open access journal BMC Medicine. Type 1 diabetes develops when the body's own immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing islet beta cells in the pancreas. As a result, the body can't make insulin, causing blood glucose to reach dangerous levels and damage all the organs in the body. In their background information, the researchers note that tests on mice and cells of patients with diabetes have shown that multipotent cells derived from cord blood "can control autoimmune responses by altering regulatory T cells (Tregs) and human islet beta cell-specific T cell clones". Cord blood is blood that is collected from the placenta and umbilical cord after childbirth. It is a rich source of stem cells that can treat a range of blood and genetic disorders. In their paper the researchers describe how they developed a procedure they called "Stem Cell Educator therapy" where the diabetic patient's blood is circulated through a closed-loop system that separates lymphocytes (a class of immune cell that includes T cells) from the whole blood and co-cultures them with cord blood stem cells from healthy donors for two to three hours before returning the "re-educated lymphocytes" to the patient's circulation. For this small, open-label, phase1/phase 2 study they recruited 15 patients with type 1 diabetes aged from 15 to 41 years (median 29) with a diabetic history ranging f Continue reading >>

The Progress Of Stem Cells In The Treatment Of Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 | Progress In Stem Cell

The Progress Of Stem Cells In The Treatment Of Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 | Progress In Stem Cell

University of Science, Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh city, Vietnam University of Science, Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh city, Vietnam University of Science, Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh city, Vietnam If you would like to automatically receive newletters and alerts from the BioMedPress, please fill in the form below Policies on Conflict of Interest, Human and animal rights, and Informed Consent Progress in Stem Cell (PSC) (ISSN 2199-4633) is the best Open Access journal that acts as a forum for translational research into stem cell therapies. PSC is scientific journal that overlays the study of Cancer stem cells, Stem cell therapy, Stem-cell transplantation, human embryonic stem cells, Neural stem cells, Murine Embryonic Stem Cells, Adult stem cell, Pancreatic stem cells, etc. PSC is a peer-reviewed journal that focuses on the areas of established and emerging concepts in stem cell research and their assorted disease therapies. It provides an opportunity to share the scientific information among the clinical & medical scientists and researchers. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Stem Cell Therapy: A Review

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Stem Cell Therapy: A Review

Home Diabetes Articles Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Stem Cell Therapy: A Review Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Stem Cell Therapy: A Review 1. Hematology Department, The Lebanese Canadian Hospital, Sin El-Fil, Lebanon; Notre Dame University Hospital, Jounieh, Lebanon 2. Saint George Hospital, University Medical Center, Balamand Medical School, Beirut, Lebanon The authors have declared no conflicts of interest. The authors would like to thank all diabetic patients who contributed to these studies. Each article is made available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial 4.0 License . Most public health statistics outline the rapidly exploding burden of Type 2 diabetes mellitus as a chronic endemic disease related to sedentary lifestyle and obesity. Tremendous efforts and resources are being invested in finding new medical treatments and alternative therapies through cell-based replacement strategies among other methods. Several types of cells continue to be under active research, including autologous islet cells, allogeneic cadaveric islet cells, embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, bone marrow-derived hematopoietic and mononuclear cells, and mesenchymal stem cells of different sources. The objective of this review is to bring the reader up to speed on the efforts being spent in this field with a clear and critical approach to the difficult and sometimes futile methodology undermining the results obtained. Over the past decade, the potential of stem cells has been explored with amazement, myths, and many more questions than answers. The dream was that we might be able to repair almost any malfunction inflicting our bodies. The promise of taking off-the-shelf cells or even body parts, making better targeted pharmaceutical agents, and even de Continue reading >>

Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus 2Department of Molecular Biology, Institute of Basic Medicine, College of Life Science, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, 100853 China 2Department of Molecular Biology, Institute of Basic Medicine, College of Life Science, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, 100853 China 2Department of Molecular Biology, Institute of Basic Medicine, College of Life Science, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, 100853 China 1Department of Endocrinology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, 100853 China 2Department of Molecular Biology, Institute of Basic Medicine, College of Life Science, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, 100853 China Received 2017 Feb 17; Accepted 2017 May 5. Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( ) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), which is characterized by the combination of relative insulin deficiency and insulin resistance, cannot be reversed with existing therapeutic strategies. Transplantation of insulin-producing cells (IPCs) was once thought to be the most promising strategy for treating diabetes, but the pace from the laboratory to clinical application has been obstructed due to its drawbacks. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) harbor differentiation potential, immunosuppressive properties, an Continue reading >>

Enhanced Stem Cells For Treating Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 & 2

Enhanced Stem Cells For Treating Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 & 2

Updated November 22, 2017 – In the unfortunate event you or perhaps a family member are coping with diabetes you should be aware of its consequences on the body and mind. Diabetes is usually termed the “silent killer” mainly because it strikes the body slowly and without warning. Newly diagnosed diabetic patients are usually not worried about it since their symptoms are often no more severe than recurrent urination and increased thirst. A number of other individuals have no symptoms at all. Treating Diabetics With Stem Cells As time goes by however, the effects of both kinds of diabetes become increasingly serious and may lead to death. These symptoms include heart disease, eye issues, kidney failure, nerve damage and erectile dysfunction, to name a few. Hypoglycemia (acute low blood sugar) and hyperglycemia (high level of blood sugar) are the key contributors to the effects of diabetes. According to recent research, some of the oral diabetes medications can also help contribute to heart malfunction.(Kao and Chen 2012)* That is exactly why it’s important that women and men who are clinically diagnosed as “diabetic” immediately seek treatment to relieve hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. These conditions often trigger the more harmful, degenerative ailments. The regeneration center can help treat DM with our innovative enriched and expanded Mesenchymal cells treatment for Diabetes safely and without any artificial medicines or need for regular insulin dependency.(Yong Zhao et al. 2013)* Reverse Hyperglycemia with Insulin Producing Beta-Cells Stem Cell treatments for diabetes fights the disease at its origins in the pancreas. Decreasing hyperglycemia as well as associated complications (see above). According to recent research, it can also relieve hypoglycemia or Continue reading >>

Stem Cell Educator Therapy In Type 2 Diabetes

Stem Cell Educator Therapy In Type 2 Diabetes

You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Stem Cell Educator Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01415726 Jinan Tianhe Stem Cell Biotechnologies Co Ltd Top of Page Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes has been markedly increased in recent years. More and more children and young adults develop this devastating disease. Despite of multiple factors (e.g., food, environmental, and genetic factors) contributing to the developing of diabetes, increasing evidence demonstrated that chronic inflammation and/or atuoimmunity are common issues and play key roles in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes, leading to the insulin resistance and the shortage of insulin-producing islet beta cells. Thus, anti-inflammation is becoming a novel approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Evidence that multipotent stem cells derived from human cord blood (CB-SCs) can control inflammation and autoimmune responses by altering regulatory T cells (Tregs) and human islet beta cell-specific T cell clone in type 1 diabetes offers promise for a new approach to treat type 2 diabetes. Here, the investigators develop a novel Stem Cell Educator therapy by using CB-SC and explore the therapeutic effectiveness of Stem Cell Educator therapy in T2D patients. Patients were screened for enrollment in the study if both Continue reading >>

Stem Cell Therapy To Prevent Type 1 Diabetes

Stem Cell Therapy To Prevent Type 1 Diabetes

Stem Cell Therapy to Prevent Type 1 Diabetes Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases affecting humans - the WHO estimates that around 350 million people have diabetes globally. Approximately 10% have type 1 diabetes - a disease that is often diagnosed during childhood or adolescence. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make enough of the hormone insulin that keeps blood sugar levels in the normal range. People with type 1 diabetes must frequently take finger prick tests of their blood sugar level and receive multiple daily injections of insulin or wear an implanted insulin pump. While the cause of type 1 diabetes is not fully understood, the immune system plays a major role in causing the damage to the insulin producing cells in the pancreas. There is currently no prevention or cure for type 1 diabetes - but stem cells may be a promising new approach. Stem cells are basic cells that have the capacity to multiply - either into specialized cells or to regenerate themselves. Cord blood stem cells are particularly unique because they not only have the capacity to develop into other cell types, but are also immune tolerant - that is they are less likely to provoke an immune response. They also contain greater numbers of regulatory T cells - a particular type of white blood cell that helps to keep the immune system in balance. This makes cord blood stem cells potentially useful for treating diseases where the immune system has 'gone astray' - such as type 1 diabetes. Can stem cells prevent or cure type 1 diabetes? To date no studies have shown that stem cells can prevent type 1 diabetes in humans, but cord blood has been able to prevent and also cure type 1 diabetes in mice. The first study that used cord blood to treat children with type 1 diabetes was per Continue reading >>

Cord Blood Stem Cells Improved Metabolic Control In Type 1 Diabetes

Cord Blood Stem Cells Improved Metabolic Control In Type 1 Diabetes

Cord blood stem cells improved metabolic control in type 1 diabetes Umbilical cord blood stem cells have been successful in the treatment of type 1 diabetes, according to a press release from Cord Blood America Inc. The stem cells have been used to re-instruct T cells so that the pancreas will begin producing insulin again, thereby reducing the amount of injected insulin needed. According to the release, the treatment was successful in long-time diabetes patients believed to have no insulin-producing ability. Results from a phase 1/phase 2, open-label clinical trial published in the January issue of BMC Medicine demonstrated that Stem Cell Educator, an in vivo cord blood stem cell treatment, reversed autoimmunity and promoted the regeneration of islet beta cells in patients with type 1 diabetes. Successful immune modulation by cord blood stem cells and the resulting clinical improvement in patient status may have important implications for other autoimmune and inflammation-related diseases without the safety and ethical concerns associated with conventional stem cell-based approaches, the researchers wrote. The study, conducted in China, included 15 patients at a median age of 29 years and a median diabetic history of 8 years. The procedure circulated patients blood through a closed-loop system that separates lymphocytes from whole blood and briefly co-cultures them with adherent cord blood stem cells before returning them to the patients circulation, according to the researchers. Patients were randomly assigned to a single treatment (n=12) or a single treatment without adherent cord blood stem cells (sham therapy; n=3). The primary endpoints were feasibility of therapy, safety through 12 weeks of post-treatment and preliminary efficacy evaluation for the improvement o Continue reading >>

Human Peripheral Blood Stem Cells Can Be A Solution To Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 A Preliminary Study On 14 Patients

Human Peripheral Blood Stem Cells Can Be A Solution To Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 A Preliminary Study On 14 Patients

Received Date: July 26, 2016; Accepted Date: August 12, 2016; Published Date: August 19, 2016 Citation: Gargiulo C, Pham VH, Thao HD, Trieu VLH, Kieu NCD, et al. (2016) Human Peripheral Blood Stem Cells can be a Solution to DiabetesMellitus Type 2 a Preliminary Study on 14 Patients. J Stem Cell Res Ther 6:354. doi: 10.4172/2157-7633.1000354 Copyright: 2016 Gargiulo C, et al. This is an open-access article distributedunder the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permitsunrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided theoriginal author and source are credited. Background: The use of autologous peripheral stem cell (PB-SCs) in Diabetes Mellitus type 1 (type 1 DM) was described in 2007 with promising conclusion. However a similar treatment with a positive outcome on type 2 diabetes mellitus patients (type 2 DM) has not been yet reported. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of autologous PB-SCs transplantation in treatment of DM2 patient. Methods: Current study involved 14 patients with type 2 DM (aged 48 to 84 years) during a period of 180 days in our facility. Clinical variables (duration of DM, oral hypoglycemic drugs, time free from oral drugs) and laboratory variables (HbA1c, blood pressure, weight, cholesterol), mononuclear cells infused were assessed. Purified PB SCs were infused into major systemic vein (upper limbs or lower limbs) and subcutaneously in the abdomen. Follow-up is performed weekly after infusion during a period of 6 months. Results: Mean HbA1c values showed a significant reduction during follow-up in all patients after autologous PB-SCs. After the treatment with stem cells the HbA1c level dropped by at least one unit relative to the HbA1c level in the medication phase, with stem cells patien Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Your Family, And How Stem Cells Could Help The Problem In The Middle East

Diabetes, Your Family, And How Stem Cells Could Help The Problem In The Middle East

Diabetes, your family, and how stem cells could help the problem in the Middle East Home Diabetes, your family, and how stem cells could help the problem in the Middle East Diabetes is the 21st centurys leading health care challenge. If its not an issue for you, then it will certainly be an issue for your children. A staggering 31% of all deaths in the UAE are caused by diabetes and correlated cardiovascular disease. And by 2035, the number of people with type 2 diabetes in the UAE is projected to increase by 96.2%. As ongoing research and successful clinical trials continue to reveal, stem cell therapy could hold the key to solving this global health problem in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. By storing your childs stem cells, you have acquired an insurance policy for the future, when the research were going to discuss today may become commonplace across the world in treating sufferers of diabetes. So lets look at what this means for you and your family. Out of the estimated total of 445 million people living with diabetes worldwide, the majority suffer from type 2 diabetes, the form of the disease where the pancreas produces insufficient insulin or the body becomes resistant to its effects. As the body becomes insulin-resistant, the resulting high glucose levels can cause complications, which can severely damage the eyes, kidneys and nervous system. Type 2 diabetes is also associated with an increased risk of dementia, can double the risk of heart attack and stroke, and can lead to digestive problems. As the body becomes insulin-resistant, the resulting high glucose levels can cause complications, which can severely damage the eyes, kidneys and nervous system. The rapid increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes, which develops slowly, often going unnoticed for y Continue reading >>

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