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Type 3 Diabetes Definition

What Is Type 3 Diabetes?

What Is Type 3 Diabetes?

Most people do not even know that there is a type 3 diabetes let alone what the symptoms are. Before we look at the symptoms let us take a closer look at type 3 diabetes. Type 3 Diabetes During a study done by the Rhode Island Hospital and Brown Medical School, the researchers discovered that the hormone insulin was not only released from the pancreas but from the brain as well. This discovery is how diabetes and Alzheimer’s became linked. When the brain does not produce enough insulin, the cells begin to die. Type 3 diabetes is known as a hybrid form of diabetes. A person must first have type 1 or type 2 diabetes to develop type 3 diabetes. Many researchers believe the key to avoided the double dose of diabetes is to maintain a healthy weight. Obesity seems to plan a large role in the double diagnoses and women seem to be hit the hardest by this double diabetes phenomenon. The Cause of Type 3 Diabetes Many researchers believe that type 3 diabetes is caused by electropullution. Electropollution is term that refers to exposure to electrical pollution from computers, cell phones, cordless phones, televisions, Ipods, and even fluorescent light bulbs. People who are extra sensitive to electronic devices are at a high risk for developing type 3 diabetes. To read more about electropullution and type 3 diabetes visit this site. The Symptoms of Type 3 Diabetes Because type 3 diabetes was only discovered in 2005, there is not a long list of symptoms like there is with type 1 and 2 diabetes. In fact, there are very few symptoms of type 3 diabetes. Memory loss, confusion and dementia are the only known symptoms at this point and those symptoms were derived from the newly discovered link to Alzheimers. The diagnosis of type 3 diabetes is done by a functional MRI scan of the brain Continue reading >>

Other Types Of Diabetes Mellitus

Other Types Of Diabetes Mellitus

In most cases of diabetes, referred to as type 1 and type 2, no specific cause can be identified. This is referred to as primary or idiopathic diabetes. A small minority of cases, estimated at about 2%, arise as the consequence of some other well-defined disease or predisposing factor such as pancreatitis or steroid excess. This is called 'secondary diabetes'. Secondary diabetes can be sub-divided into single-gene disorders affecting insulin secretion or resistance, damage to the exocrine pancreas, other endocrine disease, drug-induced diabetes, uncommon manifestations of autoimmune diabetes, and genetic syndromes associated with diabetes. Gestational diabetes (diabetes arising for the first time in pregnancy) has a diagnostic category all to itself, but is included in this section for convenience. Secondary diabetes is often (but not always) associated with a relatively mild metabolic disturbance, but may nonetheless result in typical long-term complications such as retinopathy. Although it is relatively uncommon, the possibility of secondary diabetes should always be considered, since it may be a pointer to other disease, often requires a different approach to therapy, and is sometimes reversible. Background The common denominator of all the forms of diabetes discussed here is that something sets them apart from type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Since type 2 diabetes is hard to define, this implies that for most forms of diabetes in this category there is a pointer to a different pathophysiological explanation! The current WHO classification of diabetes, adopted and regularly updated by the American Diabetes Association, identifies four main categories of diabetes, and secondary diabetes is clssified under 'other specific types' (see figures). The common categories of secon Continue reading >>

Alzheimer's: Type 3 Diabetes?

Alzheimer's: Type 3 Diabetes?

In 2005, while testing the effects of impaired insulin signaling on the brain, Suzanne de la Monte at Brown University and her colleagues observed several unexpected phenomena in her experimental mice. Hallmarks of neurodegenerative disease had surfaced: oxidative stress, amyloid fibrils, and cell loss. "It was the craziest thing," de la Monte says. Glucose metabolism and Alzheimer's had been linked previously, says de la Monte, and perhaps her findings explained why. Looking in the brains of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, de la Monte found reductions in insulin, insulin-like growth factor, and downstream elements such as tau, insulin receptor substrate, and kinases.1 Type 1 diabetes is a deficiency in insulin production, and type 2 is a resistance to insulin, where there is plenty of insulin but cells don't respond to it. Her group coined the term "type 3 diabetes" to explain their observations. "In Alzheimer's you have both things going on. That's why we called [what we saw] type 3, because it resembles both of them," de la Monte says. De la Monte's findings made a splash in the media, appearing in the BBC and numerous Alzheimer's news outlets. However, in the scientific community, "I wouldn't say that the term type 3 diabetes has caught on," says Greg Cole at the University of California, Los Angeles. The term might not be popular because what is happening in the brain is still unclear. Cole says accumulated evidence suggests that insulin and insulin-like growth factor signaling is impaired in patients with Alzheimer's disease. "It looks like in Alzheimer's disease you end up having a defect in these kinds of pathways, which are similar to the pathways for insulin-resistant diabetes," says Cole. But, it's unknown as to which comes first, the disease or Continue reading >>

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 1 and type 2 diabetes share the problem of high levels of blood sugar. The inability to control blood sugar causes the symptoms and the complications of both types of diabetes. But type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are two different diseases in many ways. According to the latest (2014) estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people, or 9.3 percent of the U.S. population, have diabetes. Type 1 diabetes affects just 5 percent of those adults, with type 2 diabetes affecting up to 95 percent. Here’s what else you need to know to be health-savvy in the age of the diabetes epidemic. What Causes Diabetes? "Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease — the body's immune system attacks the cells in the pancreas that make insulin," a hormone, says Andjela Drincic, MD, associate professor of internal medicine in the division of diabetes, endocrinology, and metabolism at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. The exact cause is not known, but it's probably a combination of the genes a person is born with and something in the environment that triggers the genes to become active. "The cause of type 2 diabetes is multifactorial," says Dr. Drincic. "People inherit genes that make them susceptible to type 2, but lifestyle factors, like obesity and inactivity, are also important. In type 2 diabetes, at least in the early stages, there is enough insulin, but the body becomes resistant to it." Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include a family history of the disease, a poor diet, a sedentary lifestyle, and obesity. African-Americans, Latin Americans, and certain Native American groups have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes than Caucasian Americans. Juvenile or Adult-Onset: When Does Diabetes Start? Usually, type 1 diabetes in dia Continue reading >>

Researchers Link Alzheimer’s Gene To Type 3 Diabetes

Researchers Link Alzheimer’s Gene To Type 3 Diabetes

Researchers have known for several years that being overweight and having Type 2 diabetes can increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. But they’re now beginning to talk about another form of diabetes: Type 3 diabetes. This form of diabetes is associated with Alzheimer's disease. Type 3 diabetes occurs when neurons in the brain become unable to respond to insulin, which is essential for basic tasks, including memory and learning. Some researchers believe insulin deficiency is central to the cognitive decline of Alzheimer’s disease. Mayo Clinic’s Florida and Rochester campuses recently participated in a multi-institution clinical study, testing whether a new insulin nasal spray can improve Alzheimer’s symptoms. The results of that study are forthcoming. But how is this tied to the Alzheimer’s gene APOE? A new study from Guojun Bu, Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic neuroscientist and Mary Lowell Leary Professor of Medicine, found that the culprit is the variant of the Alzheimer’s gene known as APOE4. The team found that APOE4, which is present in approximately 20 percent of the general population and more than half of Alzheimer’s cases, is responsible for interrupting how the brain processes insulin. Mice with the APOE4 gene showed insulin impairment, particularly in old age. Also, a high-fat diet could accelerate the process in middle-aged mice with the gene. “The gene and the peripheral insulin resistance caused by the high-fat diet together induced insulin resistance in the brain,” Dr. Bu says. Their findings are published in Neuron. Journalists: Broadcast-quality sound bites with Dr. Bu are in the downloads. The team went on to describe how it all works in the neurons. They found that the APOE4 protein produced by the gene, can bind more aggressively Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes – where the body's immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin type 2 diabetes – where the body doesn't produce enough insulin, or the body's cells don't react to insulin Type 2 diabetes is far more common than type 1. In the UK, around 90% of all adults with diabetes have type 2. During pregnancy, some women have such high levels of blood glucose that their body is unable to produce enough insulin to absorb it all. This is known as gestational diabetes. Pre-diabetes Many more people have blood sugar levels above the normal range, but not high enough to be diagnosed as having diabetes. This is sometimes known as pre-diabetes. If your blood sugar level is above the normal range, your risk of developing full-blown diabetes is increased. It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as early as possible because it will get progressively worse if left untreated. When to see a doctor Visit your GP as soon as possible if you experience the main symptoms of diabetes, which include: urinating more frequently than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk cuts or wounds that heal slowly blurred vision Type 1 diabetes can develop quickly over weeks or even days. Many people have type 2 diabetes for years without realising because the early symptoms tend to be general. Causes of diabetes The amount of sugar in the blood is controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is produced by the pancreas (a gland behind the stomach). When food is digested and enters your bloodstream, insulin moves glucose out of the blood and into cells, where it's broken down to produce ene Continue reading >>

Alzheimer’s = Type 3 Diabetes

Alzheimer’s = Type 3 Diabetes

“My parents are getting older and I want to do everything I can to help them prevent Alzheimer’s, considering both my grandmothers had this disease, and I am worried about getting it too.” writes this week’s house call. “What can we do to prevent dementia?” The truth is, dementia is a very big problem that’s becoming bigger every day. Statistics are grim. 10 percent of 65-year-olds, 25 percent of 75-year-olds, and 50 percent of 85-year-olds will develop dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. And the fastest growing segment of our population is the 85-year-olds. Researchers predict Alzheimer’s will affect 106 million people by 2050. It’s now the seventh leading cause of death. Scientists now call Alzheimer’s disease “Type 3 diabetes.” What’s the link between Alzheimer’s and diabetes? Well, new research shows insulin resistance, or what I call diabesity (from eating too many carbs and sugar and not enough fat) is one of the major factors that starts the brain-damage cascade, which robs the memory of over half the people in their 80s, leading to a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. But don’t think too much insulin affects only older folks’ memories. It doesn’t just suddenly occur once you’re older. Dementia actually begins when you’re younger and takes decades to develop and worsen. Here’s the bad news/good news. Eating sugar and refined carbs can cause pre-dementia and dementia. But cutting out the sugar and refined carbs and adding lots of fat can prevent, and even reverse, pre-dementia and early dementia. More recent studies show people with diabetes have a four-fold risk for developing Alzheimer’s. People with pre-diabetes or metabolic syndrome have an increased risk for having pre-dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). You Continue reading >>

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

By some estimates, diabetes cases have increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years. One in four Americans now have either diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose) Type 2 diabetes is completely preventable and virtually 100 percent reversible, simply by implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle changes, one of the most important of which is eliminating sugar (especially fructose) and grains from your diet Diabetes is NOT a disease of blood sugar, but rather a disorder of insulin and leptin signaling. Elevated insulin levels are not only symptoms of diabetes, but also heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, and obesity Diabetes drugs are not the answer – most type 2 diabetes medications either raise insulin or lower blood sugar (failing to address the root cause) and many can cause serious side effects Sun exposure shows promise in treating and preventing diabetes, with studies revealing a significant link between high vitamin D levels and a lowered risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome By Dr. Mercola There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes — and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes aren’t aware of their circumstances, either. Diabetes: Symptoms of an Epidemic The latest diabetes statistics1 echo an increase in diabetes ca Continue reading >>

Preventing Alzheimer’s Disease Is Easier Than You Think

Preventing Alzheimer’s Disease Is Easier Than You Think

Do you have insulin resistance? If you don’t know, you’re not alone. This is perhaps the single most important question any of us can ask about our physical and mental health—yet most patients, and even many doctors, don’t know how to answer it. Here in the U.S., insulin resistance has reached epidemic proportions: more than half of us are now insulin resistant. Insulin resistance is a hormonal condition that sets the stage throughout the body for inflammation and overgrowth, disrupts normal cholesterol and fat metabolism, and gradually destroys our ability to process carbohydrates. Insulin resistance puts us at high risk for many undesirable diseases, including obesity, heart disease, cancer, and type 2 diabetes. Scarier still, researchers now understand that insulin resistance is the driving force behind most cases of garden-variety Alzheimer’s Disease. What is insulin resistance? Insulin is a powerful metabolic hormone that orchestrates how cells access and process vital nutrients, including sugar (glucose). In the body, one of insulin’s responsibilities is to unlock muscle and fat cells so they can absorb glucose from the bloodstream. When you eat something sweet or starchy that causes your blood sugar to spike, the pancreas releases insulin to usher the excess glucose out of the bloodstream and into cells. If blood sugar and insulin spike too high too often, cells will try to protect themselves from overexposure to insulin’s powerful effects by toning down their response to insulin—they become “insulin resistant.” In an effort to overcome this resistance, the pancreas releases even more insulin into the blood to try to keep glucose moving into cells. The more insulin levels rise, the more insulin resistant cells become. Over time, this vicious c Continue reading >>

Type 3 Diabetes

Type 3 Diabetes

Most people have heard of type 1 and 2 diabetes – but type 3 has skated below the radar. Tara Thorne explains why it's on the rise. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 85 percent of all diabetes in Australia. And it’s increasing. However, type 3 diabetes - a form that involves the brain and is similar to type 2, the overarching mechanism being insulin resistance - is not widely known outside the medical community. Research now shows there’s a connection between impaired insulin signalling and Alzheimer’s disease or - what’s now being called - type 3 diabetes. To understand type 3 diabetes, it’s important to first understand insulin resistance. Insulin is released when we consume sugar or carbohydrates (the worst being simple carbohydrates like white bread or white pasta). Insulin’s role is to usher glucose from these carbohydrates into our cells, where it can be used for energy. Essentially, insulin is the key that unlocks the door to the cell in order for glucose to enter. But if there’s too much glucose the cells fill up, and the glucose is stored as glycogen and then as fat. At a certain point - due to an oversupply of glucose - our cells start to ignore insulin’s screams. In response to this more insulin is produced, screaming louder at our cells - but our cells are no longer listening because insulin resistance has begun. Brain drain Here’s how this affects the brain. Insulin encourages brain neurons to take up glucose (the brain's main fuel source). But when brain cells have insulin resistance they’re not accepting glucose. This means they’re not being “fed”, which leads to the death of neurons resulting in memory loss, poor motor function, confusion – all symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. We now know that people with type 2 diabetes are tw Continue reading >>

Paleo Vs. Alzheimer’s & Type 3 Diabetes

Paleo Vs. Alzheimer’s & Type 3 Diabetes

Dave loved his job as a financial analyst. He was 66 years old when he left work one day and couldn’t figure out how to get home. In the following months, his work performance declined to the point where he was asked to retire. He became more confused, felt chronically fatigued, and even the simplest tasks became very complicated. Eventually, his eyesight declined, his speech became unintelligible, and he stopped recognizing those nearest and dearest to him. Dave’s daughter had to quit her job to take care of him and now they live together in the unforgiving world of Alzheimer’s. What is Alzheimer’s? Sixty to eighty percent of dementia cases are Alzheimer’s, a disease characterized by the emergence of beta-amyloid plaques and tangles called Tau in the hippocampus region of the brain that controls memory. Beta-amyloid builds up between nerve cells and inhibits signaling while Tau forms inside cells and disrupts transport systems for nutrients and other essential compounds. As beta-amyloid and Tau spread to other neural regions, affected cells die and cognition and biological functions worsen. Originally, it was thought that beta-amyloid or Tau drove the disease. Newer theories focus on genetic and epigenetic drivers as well as inflammatory processes, metabolic dysfunctions and even infections as mechanisms. Although nobody knows the actual cause(s), Alzheimer’s is increasingly thought to be the result of a combination of genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors. (1) The Reach of Alzheimer’s Alzheimer’s affects 5.4 million Americans with 5.2 million of those people age 65 and older. Globally, almost 47 million people have the disease with that number projected to nearly triple to 132 million by 2050. A small percentage (less than 5%) develop Alzheimer Continue reading >>

Treating ‘type 3 Diabetes’ Of The Brain With Insulin And Drugs–have Researchers Gone Completely Crazy?

Treating ‘type 3 Diabetes’ Of The Brain With Insulin And Drugs–have Researchers Gone Completely Crazy?

After several years of studying and observing people involved in the world of diet, nutrition, and health, I’ve come to one grim conclusion–the more we learn about what truly makes us sick and unhealthy, the less willing we are to apply those lessons to the very people who would stand to benefit from them the most. The latest example of this all-too-common occurrence comes to us today courtesy of a Reuters new story about a new study that identifies a relatively new form of diabetes of the brain known as “Type 3 diabetes.” I first blogged about this term in September 2007 when I interviewed low-carb neurosurgeon Dr. Larry McCleary about his book called The Brain Trust Program. But as you will quickly see, the conclusion of the researchers in this study is FAR different from what Dr. McCleary would ever advocate (I’ll be featuring an engaging interview with him on February 19, 2009 at my podcast show). According to the study published in the February 2009 of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, lead researcher Dr. William L. Klein, Professor of Neurobiology & Physiology and of Neurology at the Evanston, IL-based Northwestern University, and his team concluded that insulin protects the brain from toxic proteins that lead to Alzheimer’s disease which they acknowledge is indeed this “Type 3 diabetes” of the brain. They added that treating the neurologically-diseased and Alzheimer’s patients with insulin and a diabetic prescription medication called Avandia can improve brain function and should be used as a routine treatment option for people suffering from these conditions. Whoa whoa whoa, wait just a minute! Why would we want to be pumping insulin and diabetes drugs into people who dealing with a terrible disease like Alzheimer’s when pr Continue reading >>

Paleo And Alzheimer’s: All About “type 3 Diabetes”

Paleo And Alzheimer’s: All About “type 3 Diabetes”

You might have heard Alzheimer’s disease described as “Type 3 Diabetes,” implying that it’s another “disease of civilization,” a consequence of the modern diet and lifestyle more than anything else. The “Diabetes” label in particular makes it seem like Alzheimer’s is all about the carbs. But it’s actually more complicated than that (isn’t it always?). Alzheimer’s Disease probably does have something to do with dietary carbs, but it’s much more complicated than “insulin wrecks your brain.” And it also has connections to other parts of the modern diet, especially overload of Omega-6 fats. So here’s a look at Alzheimer’s from a Paleo perspective, focusing on the potential role of diet in long-term prevention and therapy. This post is not an explanation of how to “cure” Alzheimer’s Disease, or even what causes it, and if you meet anyone trying to tell you either of those things, they’re probably lying. It’s just a look at some possible connections between diet and Alzheimer’s What Is Alzheimer’s Disease? Alzheimer’s Disease is a progressive, age-related brain disease that starts off by causing forgetfulness and confusion and progresses to more serious problems like mood, language, and behavioral issues. A few people get it earlier, but it’s primarily found in people in their 60s and up. Alzheimer’s isn’t just an extension of normal age-related forgetfulness, though. In Alzheimer’s Disease, neurons in the brain actually die – this doesn’t happen in normal aging, even though most people’s brains do shrink a little bit with age. In most cases of Alzheimer’s, nobody’s really sure what causes it – we can identify hallmark signs of the disease (amyloid-beta plaques and tangled proteins) and certain genes that m Continue reading >>

Faq On Type 4 Diabetes

Faq On Type 4 Diabetes

What is type 4 diabetes? Salk scientists use this to describe age-related insulin resistance that occurs in lean, elderly people. While type 1 diabetes is a result of the immune system destroying insulin-producing cells and type 2 diabetes is caused by diet and obesity, type 4 diabetes is associated with older age, rather than weight gain. Type 3 diabetes is suggested for a type of insulin resistance that results in symptoms mimicking Alzheimer’s disease. What do we know about type 4 diabetes? The Salk Institute labs of Ronald Evans and Ye Zheng discovered that diabetes in aged, lean mice has a different cellular cause than Type 2 diabetes, which results from weight gain. The mice with type 4 diabetes had abnormally high levels of immune cells called T regulatory cells (Tregs) inside their fat tissue. Mice with type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, had abnormally low levels of Tregs within the tissue, despite having more fat tissue. Therapeutic intervention that blocks Treg cells from accumulating in the fat reverses age-associated type 4 diabetes. However, this kind of therapy does not prevent type 2 diabetes insulin resistance. The researchers now want to see if the same process will help humans with this type of diabetes. How can I sign up for a clinical trial on this work? The Salk Institute does not conduct human trials, but we do partner with a variety of research institutes and hospitals to test research. To find information on the current trial related to this work, visit: www.clinicaltrials.gov How can I donate to this work? To donate to the Salk Institute, please visit: To learn more about this research, please visit: Continue reading >>

What’s The Difference Between Type 1, Type 2, Type 3 And Gestational Diabetes?

What’s The Difference Between Type 1, Type 2, Type 3 And Gestational Diabetes?

One in every 12 people have diabetes and every seven seconds someone in the world dies from the disease. These are some pretty shocking facts, so to kick off National Diabetes Week we thought we’d raise a bit of awareness: What are the different types of diabetes? Which are preventable and manageable through diet? And can you reduce your risk? Before reading on, please know that diabetes is a serious condition and we recommend you work closely with a doctor, diabetes educator and other health professionals to ensure you are getting proper, tailored treatment for your condition. Pre-diabetes Pre-diabetes is also known as insulin resistance, which can progress into full-blown diabetes. To explain in the simplest way we can: When we eat food that is rapidly converted to glucose, as in the case of processed foods and sugar, our bodies make a lot of insulin in order to carry the glucose into our cells to be used for energy. If we continue to eat a lot of these foods, the body releases more and more insulin. You can understand that after a while the body gets exhausted by this constant production of insulin. Soon the pancreas (the organ responsible for producing insulin) gets tired and our cells become unresponsive to the hormone (i.e. insulin resistance). This is metabolic chaos for the body and quickly leads to type 2 diabetes if left untreated. Treatment options: This is a preventable one. Phew! Diabetes UK says that lifestyle factors like quitting sugar, maintaining a healthy body weight and eating a nutrient-dense, whole food diet can help stop the progression of pre-diabetes to Type 2 diabetes. But more about that later… Type 1 diabetes This is an autoimmune disease, meaning the body destroys its own insulin-making cells. The body can’t turn sugar into energy on i Continue reading >>

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