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Type 2 Diabetes Warning Signs And Symptoms

Symptoms

Symptoms

If you have any of the following diabetes symptoms, see your doctor about getting your blood sugar tested: Urinate (pee) a lot, often at night Are very thirsty Lose weight without trying Are very hungry Have blurry vision Have numb or tingling hands or feet Feel very tired Have very dry skin Have sores that heal slowly Have more infections than usual People who have type 1 diabetes may also have nausea, vomiting, or stomach pains. Type 1 diabetes symptoms can develop in just a few weeks or months and can be severe. Type 1 diabetes usually starts when you’re a child, teen, or young adult but can happen at any age. Type 2 diabetes symptoms often develop over several years and can go on for a long time without being noticed (sometimes there aren’t any noticeable symptoms at all). Type 2 diabetes usually starts when you’re an adult, though more and more children, teens, and young adults are developing it. Because symptoms are hard to spot, it’s important to know the risk factors for type 2 diabetes and visit your doctor if you have any of them. Gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) usually shows up in the middle of the pregnancy and typically doesn’t have any symptoms. If you’re pregnant, you should be tested for gestational diabetes between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy so you can make changes if needed to protect your health and your baby’s health. Learn More Continue reading >>

What Are The Early Signs And Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes?

What Are The Early Signs And Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes?

What is type 2 diabetes (T2D)? Type 2 diabetes is a chronic medical condition which occurs when the body becomes resistant to insulin or cannot produce enough insulin. Insulin is a natural hormone produced by the beta cells in the pancreas. This hormone works by transporting glucose from the bloodstream to the cells of the body. Glucose is a form of sugar, which is a main source of energy for the body. When you eat carbohydrate-rich foods, glucose is absorbed into the bloodstream. When blood sugar levels rise, the body will stimulate the pancreas to release insulin which helps absorbe and process glucose into the body’s cells to be used or stored for energy. Without insulin, glucose cannot enter the body cells. If not treated, high blood sugar levels can lead to health problems such as blindness, loss of limbs, kidney or nerve damage. To prevent these long-term health complications, it is important you identify the early signs of T2D. This will help with proper diagnosis and treatment of this medical condition. Many people with T2D may be able to control their blood sugar levels through regular exercise and diet. However, if diet and exercise do not work on their own, oral diabetes medications such as metformin can be prescribed. Early signs of type 2 diabetes The early signs of type 2 diabetes are not always obvious. This explains why more than 8 million people with T2D in the United States go undiagnosed. The early signs of T2D are difficult to diagnose because they develop slowly over time. The following are early signs of type 2 diabetes: Frequent urination Increased hunger Extreme thirst Numbness or nerve pain Wounds that heal slowly Dark skin patches Blurred vision If you suspect that you have early signs of type 2 diabetes, you should talk to your doctor immedi Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Type 1 Diabetes Warning Signs

Type 2 Diabetes And Type 1 Diabetes Warning Signs

It is difficult for adults to identify the symptoms of Type 2 diabetes or Type 1 diabetes. So, when you or your child feel ill and have some of the symptoms listed in this article, call your doctor immediately. Ask your doctor about a glucose blood test. Annual physicals should catch increasing blood glucose levels. Check the following: Excessive Thirst Excessive Urination Weight Loss Yeast infections Dehydration (in spite of good fluid intake) Vomiting Lethargy Confusion Flu-like Symptoms Extreme thirst Bed-wetting Fruity odor to breath If your child exhibits three or more of these symptoms you should probably have them checked for diabetes. If you exhibit 3 or more of these symptoms you should have your doctor check you for diabetes. Type 2 Diabetes Warning Signs Increased thirst Increased hunger (especially after eating) Dry mouth Frequent urination Unexplained weight loss (even though you are eating and feel hungry) Fatigue (weak, tired feeling) Blurred vision Headaches Loss of consciousness (rare) Slow-healing sores or cuts Itching of the skin (usually around the vaginal or groin area) Frequent yeast infections Recent weight gain Velvety dark skin changes of the neck, armpit and groin, called acanthosis nigricans Numbness and tingling of the hands and feet Decreased vision If your child exhibits three or more of these symptoms you should probably have them checked for diabetes. If you exhibit 3 or more of these symptoms you should have your doctor check you for diabetes. Enter your email address in the left column to receive our monthly newsletter, "Diabetes Health Tip and More". (Your address will not be sold or disclosed to any other party and you can unsubscribe at any time.) Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms – Type 1 Diabetes

Signs And Symptoms – Type 1 Diabetes

Up to 5 Irish children and teenagers are diagnosed each week with Type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition affecting 1 in 500 children with onset over days or weeks. The condition tends to occur in childhood or early adult life and will require daily insulin therapy. It is caused by the body’s own immune system destroying the insulin-making cells (beta-cells) of the pancreas. Diagnosis A simple finger prick test by a GP can lead to early diagnosis and avoid the risk of developing DKA. Early diagnosis is vital to ensure that Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) does not develop. DKA is a potentially life threatening condition that requires urgent medical attention. In 2014, 1 in 6 children diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes were admitted to hospital with DKA, as a result of late diagnosis. Signs and Symptoms Knowing the symptoms of Type 1 diabetes is vital. Up to five children and teenagers are diagnosed each week with Type 1 diabetes in Ireland with 10% having a late diagnosis resulting in critical illness. The four main symptoms of Type 1 diabetes are easy to remember: Thirst: Excess drinking, unable to quench thirst. Toilet: Frequent urination, particularly at night. Tiredness: Lack of energy, sleeping more than usual. Weight loss: Rapid weight loss over a short period. If these symptoms present themselves, immediate attention is needed. A simple blood glucose (finger prick) test by your GP can check for Type 1 diabetes. Less common symptoms: Lack of concentration Vomiting and abdominal pain Constipation Bedwetting Mood swings Frequent infections Itchy skin infections In children under the age of two, symptoms may not be immediately obvious. If your child is unwell without a definite cause, ask your GP to check for Type 1 diabetes. For more information on Type Continue reading >>

Warning Signs Of Type 1 Diabetes

Warning Signs Of Type 1 Diabetes

Early diagnosis saves lives Recognizing the symptoms of Type 1 diabetes is critical. Although Type 1 develops gradually, as the body’s insulin production decreases, blood glucose levels can become dangerously high once insulin production is outpaced. Symptoms may develop rapidly and can be mistaken for other illnesses such as the flu, even by doctors. A misdiagnosis can have tragic consequences. Many people are familiar with Type 2 diabetes, but there is an under awareness for Type 1. Learn other forms of diabetes. Who gets Type 1? Anyone, at any age, can be diagnosed with Type 1 — it is neither preventable nor curable. While the cause is unknown, studies prove that genes together with an environmental trigger result in the immune system turning on itself and destroying the body’s beta cells. Early Symptoms of Type 1 diabetes weight loss (despite an increased appetite) unquenchable thirst blurry vision decreased energy level frequent urination a fruity smell to the breath in children with no previous issues, wetting the bed in babies and toddlers, heavy diapers More Advanced Symptom stomach pain fatigue or weakness nausea or vomiting rapid, heavy breathing loss of consciousness What to do If you recognize any of the symptoms, contact your doctor immediately. A simple in-office test for sugar in the urine is used for diagnosis. If that test is positive, then a drop of blood from the fingertip will confirm diabetes. Every day, thousands of adults and children around the world are diagnosed, but many go undetected. Early diagnosis cannot prevent Type 1, but it can head off potentially devastating, even fatal, health concerns. Download Warning Signs of Type 1 Diabetes poster HERE. Check out our Educational Posters (in English, Spanish and French)! Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In Children (cont.)

Type 2 Diabetes In Children (cont.)

A A A Symptoms Children often have no symptoms of type 2 diabetes before they are diagnosed, because their blood sugar level has been rising so slowly. As a result, a child may have diabetes for several months or years before being diagnosed. When children do have symptoms, the most common include: Slight increase in the frequency of urination. Your child may have started wetting the bed at night. Slight increase in thirst. Other possible symptoms include: Increased tiredness. Nausea. Blurred vision. Frequent infections and slow-healing wounds or sores. Weight loss. What Happens Type 2 diabetes usually develops in adulthood, but the number of children being diagnosed with the disease is rising. Children with type 2 diabetes are usually diagnosed during the early teen years. During this time, their bodies are growing and developing rapidly, placing a demand on the pancreas to produce additional insulin. The hormones released during puberty can make it harder than usual for the body to use insulin correctly (insulin resistance). Also, children with type 2 diabetes are usually overweight, which also contributes to insulin resistance. If the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to overcome the resistance, diabetes can develop. Diabetes experts believe the disease progresses as it does in adults. The main risk factors for complications from diabetes are the length of time a person has diabetes and the degree of blood sugar control. A child who develops type 2 diabetes may have an increased risk of complications, because he or she will have the disease for a long time. Some complications that children and teens may develop include: Eye disease (diabetic retinopathy) and kidney disease (diabetic nephropathy). High blood pressure or high cholesterol, which increases the risk Continue reading >>

Is It Just Aging, Or Are You At Risk For Diabetes?

Is It Just Aging, Or Are You At Risk For Diabetes?

Did you know that nearly one-third of America’s type 2 diabetics don’t even know they have the disease? That may not seem possible but, in fact, many people over 50 years of age just chalk up the warning signs for diabetes to simply getting older. Often, those who go to the emergency room with symptoms of stroke or heart disease will hear for the first time that this chronic condition is the underlying cause for their rush to the ER. This doesn’t have to be you. With just a little vigilance and an ear for what your body is saying, you may very well beat the odds, get a handle on managing diabetes before it progresses too far, and maybe even reverse or stop it altogether. You just need to be aware of the risks and warning signs for diabetes. At least 29 million Americans have received a diagnosis for diabetes This disease that affects at least 29 million Americans is one of the most commonly treated at the National Stem Cell Institute (NSI), a leader in the advanced field of regenerative medicine. So NSI knows a thing or two about the right therapies and nutritional counseling for diabetes. With that in mind, NSI explains how to tell if you’re experiencing the warning signs for diabetes and what to do about them. 11 Major Warning Signs For Diabetes 1. Family History Do you have family members who are diabetic? If so, consider family history a major warning sign that you are at risk of developing diabetes. People who have parents or siblings that are diabetic have a strong genetic tendency to develop diabetes, too. If one of your parents developed the disease before the age of fifty, you have a one in seven possibility of receiving a diagnosis for diabetes. A diagnosis after fifty years of age brings the risk of inheriting the disease down to one in thirteen. Rega Continue reading >>

7 Signs You May Have Type 2 Diabetes

7 Signs You May Have Type 2 Diabetes

Not exercising. Supersize portions. Our love affair with food has taken a drastic turn. The number of Americans with type 2 diabetes—21 million, including adults and children—has risen with the obesity epidemic. Should you or you child get tested? Yes, if you have a family history of the disease and/or any of the following: You're overweight. Even being just 10 to 15 pounds overweight can increase your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. If your child is overweight, make sure his pediatrician tests him, because type 2 diabetes is on the rise in kids. The encouraging news is that losing just 5% to 7% of your body weight can reduce your risk of diabetes, according to research from the Diabetes Prevention Program. Testing usually involves screening your blood for high glucose (sugar) levels. If they're too high, you could have either type 1 or type 2. (See box, right, for explanations of the two types.) Your doctor will most likely be able to sort it out based on your age and symptoms. In some cases, you may also need to see an endocrinologist (specialist). You're constantly running to the bathroom. "If your body doesn't make enough insulin [a hormone that carries glucose into your cells to give them energy]," which can happen with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, "glucose builds up in your bloodstream and comes out in your urine," explains Janet Silverstein, MD, chief of pediatric endocrinology at the University of Florida. Because you're urinating a lot, you'll probably also be very thirsty and drinking more than usual. Your vision is blurry. High blood sugar levels cause glucose to build up in the lens of your eyes, making it harder for you to focus. This could mean that you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. You're losing weight for no apparent reason. This is usually a sig Continue reading >>

Diabetes Warning Signs

Diabetes Warning Signs

Diabetes Warning Signs Because type 2 diabetes can lead to some serious health complications, it's important to be aware of any diabetes warning signs and get tested for diabetes, if you have these symptoms. Treating diabetes early, when treatment is most effective, can help prevent these diabetes complications. We'll explain the various diabetes warning signs and also warning signs of specific diabetes problems. Discover why it's important to listen to your body and alert your doctor if you notice any new signs or problems. Warning Signs of Diabetes Sometimes type 2 diabetes can develop without any warnings signs. In fact, about a third of all people who have type 2 diabetes don't know they have it. That's why it's important to talk to your doctor about your risk for diabetes and determined if you should be tested. Common warnings signs of diabetes include: Increased thirst Increased hunger (especially after eating) Unexplained weight loss (even though you are eating and feel hungry) Fatigue (weak, tired feeling) Blurred vision Diabetic coma (loss of consciousness) If you have any of the above mentioned warnings signs of diabetes, give your doctor a call and schedule a diabetes test. With the right diabetes diet, regular exercise, and medications, if needed, you can manage type 2 diabetes and live an active, productive life. If you have symptoms of the following diabetes complications, it's important to seek immediate medical attention. Each brief discussion links to more in-depth information. Hypoglycemia and Diabetes As you'll learn in this health topic, hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, occurs when the level of sugar or glucose in the blood drops too low to fuel the body. Hypoglycemia is not a disease but a condition that results from a variety of causes. Hypoglycem Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes occurs mostly in people aged over 40 years. However, an increasing number of younger people, even children, are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The first-line treatment is diet, weight control and physical activity. If the blood sugar (glucose) level remains high despite these measures then tablets to reduce the blood glucose level are usually advised. Insulin injections are needed in some cases. Other treatments include reducing blood pressure if it is high, lowering high cholesterol levels and also using other measures to reduce the risk of complications. Although diabetes cannot be cured, it can be treated successfully. If a high blood sugar level is brought down to a normal level, your symptoms will ease. You still have some risk of complications in the long term if your blood glucose level remains even mildly high - even if you have no symptoms in the short term. However, studies have shown that people who have better glucose control have fewer complications (such as heart disease or eye problems) compared with those people who have poorer control of their glucose level. Therefore, the main aims of treatment are: To keep your blood glucose level as near normal as possible. To reduce any other risk factors that may increase your risk of developing complications. In particular, to lower your blood pressure if it is high and to keep your blood lipids (cholesterol) low. To detect any complications as early as possible. Treatment can prevent or delay some complications from becoming worse. Type 2 diabetes is usually initially treated by following a healthy diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and having regular physical activity. If lifestyle advice does not control your blood sugar (glucose) levels then medicines are used to help lower your Continue reading >>

5 Strange Symptoms That Could Be Early Signs Of Diabetes

5 Strange Symptoms That Could Be Early Signs Of Diabetes

Besides the well-known symptoms—like constant thirst and a frequent need to pee—here are a few other subtle signals that something may be wrong. Many people who develop type 2 diabetes have no idea they’re sick until a blood test shows abnormal blood sugar levels, or until their disease progresses and serious complications start to occur. “For the most part, diabetes is silent and insidious,” says Ronald Tamler, MD, director of the Mount Sinai Clinical Diabetes Institute. “Most of the time people have no symptoms early on.” In some cases, though, there are sneaky signs. Some early diabetes symptoms are well-known: constant thirst, excessive urination, or sudden weight gain or loss, for example. Others, like the ones below, are more easily missed—by medical professionals and patients alike. If you’re experiencing any of these, be sure to bring them up with your doctor. Inflamed or infected gums Periodontitis—also known as gum disease—may be an early sign of type 2 diabetes, according to new research published in the journal BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care. The study found that people with gum disease, especially those with severe cases, had higher rates of diabetes (both diagnosed and undiagnosed) and pre-diabetes than those without. The connection between gum disease and diabetes isn’t new, says Dr. Tamler, and it appears to go both ways: Having either condition seems to increase the risk of developing the other. “Inflammation caused by gum disease eggs on the same factors that are responsible for high blood sugar that cause diabetes,” he says. Skin discoloration “Long before you actually get diabetes, you may notice a dark discoloration on the back of your neck,” says Dr. Tamler. This is called acanthosis nigricans, and it’s usually Continue reading >>

Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

Almost a third of people who have diabetes do not know it. That number comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Additionally, most people with prediabetes — a condition that puts people at increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes — don’t know they have it. So my diabetes story, which began in ignorance, was not so unusual. I had prediabetes for a long time before the complications caused by high blood sugar led to a stroke. This is the reason I made a list of warning signs for Type 2 diabetes. Perhaps you or someone you love will see how important it is to get a simple blood sugar test. If this sneaky condition is caught early, you can avoid serious complications. The symptoms of Type 2 are well known but are easy to miss. Two of them are increased thirst and frequent urination. The word “diabetes” comes from the Greek word for “siphon.” If the beta cells in your pancreas are working, insulin is pumping into your blood to help your body digest carbohydrates like sugar and bread and noodles. But in Type 2 diabetes (or prediabetes) your cells are resistant to insulin, which leaves much of that glucose, or simple sugar, in the bloodstream. When blood glucose levels are above 250 mg/dl, the ability of the kidneys to reabsorb fluids is blocked, leading to the release of large amounts of liquid (and sugar) into the bladder. (A urine test would show high sugar content. This is why for thousands of years, diabetes was called the “sweet urine disease.”) This process uses lots of water, leading to increased thirst. Another sign of prediabetes or Type 2 diabetes is fatigue. Since your muscle cells are resisting insulin, they are not getting fed the glucose from your blood supply. It makes you tired. The problem with using fatigue as a warnin Continue reading >>

Most Common Early Symptoms Of Diabetes Type 2

Most Common Early Symptoms Of Diabetes Type 2

There are various types of diabetes, but the vast majority of people, in fact, more than 90 percent suffer from type 2 diabetes(“WHO | Diabetes,” n.d.). Type 2 diabetes is rising, and has become an epidemic of the 21st century(Jaacks, Siegel, Gujral, & Narayan, 2016), in fact in many countries almost one-tenth of the population have become diabetic(“IDF diabetes atlas – Home,” n.d.). It is a disease of faulty lifestyle. Thus the key to prevention of this disease lies in its early diagnosis and lifestyle correction. Almost one-third of people suffering from diabetes remain undiagnosed even in advanced western societies(“One-Third of Adults with Diabetes Still Don’t Know They Have It,” 2015), this percentage is much higher in developing nations(“IDF diabetes atlas – Home,” n.d.). The vast majority of people suffering from diabetes are diagnosed just by chance when they come to a physician with some other symptom or health disease condition. Because diabetes is often diagnosed at the phase when complications have arisen(American Diabetes Association, 2004), thus in a significant number of cases, the precious chance of early diabetes diagnosis and prevention is lost. Hence everyone got to know the beginning of the signs, which may be quite vague, but indicate the initial stages of diabetes. First and foremost, 3 important early signs of diabetes are so called 3Ps (polyphagia, polyuria, and polydipsia), simply put the person suffering from diabetes, eats more, drinks more and pees more. Added to it are various other equally important signs to look for(“Symptoms & Causes of Diabetes | NIDDK,” n.d.). Polyphagia- desire to eat more In the early stages of diabetes, when your body is unable to control the glucose levels properly, or unable to either rele Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine. Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable. Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus. Slow-healing sores o Continue reading >>

Early Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Women

Early Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Women

Diabetes often strikes women differently due to a number of reasons, primary among them being the hormonal variations between men and women. Inflammation also acts differently in women. Considering that type 2 diabetes is a disease of chronic low-grade inflammation, it follows that warning signs, as well as disease progression in women, are different significantly, if not vastly. Diabetes is one of the biggest lifestyle diseases we see today. In just 25 years, the global incidence of diabetes has doubled, according to the World Health Organization. More than 15 million women are living with type 2 diabetes in the United States alone and another 40 million are prediabetic, according to CDC (Center for Disease Control) statistics of 2017. Symptoms of Diabetes in Women While many signs and symptoms of diabetes are common in men and women, women experience certain unique symptoms. These are: Vaginal and Oral Infections Overgrowth of a yeast called Candida albicans causes vaginal and oral yeast infections, called “thrush.” High levels of glucose in the blood are favorable for the growth of this yeast. Vaginal infections are accompanied by symptoms like soreness, itching, vaginal discharge and pain during sex. When the infection is oral, a cottage cheese-like coating is seen on the tongue and the inside of the mouth. Urinary Tract Infections The risk of UTIs is higher in women with diabetes. UTIs occur when bacteria gain access to the urinary tract, where they colonize and cause infection. Signs and symptoms include painful urination, burning sensation while urination, fever and cloudy (sometimes bloody) urine. High blood glucose levels, poor circulation and the inability of immune cells to effectively fight bacteria are all causes of UTIs. Poor Sexual Health High levels Continue reading >>

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