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Type 2 Diabetes Vaccine 2017

A Vaccine For Type 1 Diabetes Begins Human Trials In 2018

A Vaccine For Type 1 Diabetes Begins Human Trials In 2018

A prototype vaccine, decades in the making, that could prevent type 1 diabetes in children is ready to start clinical trials in 2018. It's not a cure, and it won't eliminate the disease altogether, but the vaccine is expected to provide immunity against a virus that has been found to trigger the body's defences into attacking itself, potentially reducing the number of new diabetes cases each year. Over two decades of research led by the University of Tampere in Finland has already provided solid evidence linking a type of virus called coxsackievirus B1 with an autoimmune reaction that causes the body to destroy cells in its own pancreas. The type 1 form of diabetes – not to be confused with the more prevalent type 2 variety that tends to affect individuals later in life – is a decreased ability to produce the insulin used by the body's cells to absorb glucose out of the blood. This loss of insulin is the result of pancreatic tissue called beta cells being destroyed by the body's own immune system, often within the first few years of life. It's something of a mystery as to why the body identifies beta cells as foreign, though there could be a genetic link producing variations of human leukocyte markers, which act as the cell's 'ID tags'. No doubt it's complex, and there are numerous ways this process can be triggered. One example established by virologist Heikki Hyöty from the University of Tampere is an infection by a type of enterovirus. Enteroviruses are nasty pieces of work; you might be most familiar with polio, but they can also cause hand, foot and mouth disease, meningitis and myocarditis. There has been suspicion of a link between this group of pathogens and diabetes for a number of years, but it took time to nail down the prime suspects. In 2014, Hyöty an Continue reading >>

A Vaccine For Type 1 Diabetes Is Headed For Human Trials In 2018

A Vaccine For Type 1 Diabetes Is Headed For Human Trials In 2018

After 25 years of dedicated research, a potential vaccine for Type 1 Diabetes developed in Finland is headed for human clinical trials. Type 1 Diabetes By the year 2050, it’s anticipated that in the U.S. alone, 5 million people will be diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D). This autoimmune disease, which affects children and adults, is currently unable to be prevented or cured. In order to manage T1D, people with the condition must constantly monitor their blood glucose levels, and manage those levels through insulin injection, activity, and diet in order to avoid life-threatening complications. It has been suggested, for quite some time now, that T1D could be related to viral infection, which has lead some to propose the possibility of creating a vaccine for the disease. In Finland, researchers have been exploring this connection and potential vaccine for approximately 25 years. After such a laborious scientific journey, they believe they’ve found the viral group that can trigger T1D. The hard work seems to have paid off — as the team has created a prototype vaccine which will move into human clinical trials by 2018. The Future of T1D While it’s unlikely that the vaccine would become an immediate cure-all T1D, if the trials prove successful, it will dramatically shift the future of the disease. Up until this point, patients with T1D have been required to vigilantly self-manage. Complications of the disease, which can result when it goes undiagnosed or is ineffectively managed, can range from heart attack to stroke, amputation, kidney failure, and even blindness. The threat of these complications constantly hangs over the heads of those with T1D. Unfortunately, as the team notes, this vaccine would not be a cure for T1D, but if it proves successful in preventing Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Reversal May Be Possible With Tb Vaccine

Type 1 Diabetes Reversal May Be Possible With Tb Vaccine

Type 1 Diabetes Reversal May Be Possible with TB Vaccine BCG therapy may change current methods to restoring and enhancing immune response This article is part of MPR's coverage of the American Diabetes Association's 77th Scientific Sessions (ADA 2017) , taking place in San Diego, CA. Our staff will report on medical research and technological advances in diabetes and diabetes education, conducted by experts in the field. Check back regularly for more news from ADA 2017 . According to data from a recent Phase 1 trial directed by the Massachusetts General Hospital Immunobiology Laboratory, the vaccine bacillus Calmette-Gurin (BCG) may have the potential to reverse type 1 diabetes. This interim report was presented at the 2017 American Diabetes Association 77th Scientific Session, San Diego, CA, by Denise Faustman, MD, PhD and her teamthe first to document the reversal in mice. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease presenting as an overall loss of pancreatic islets which are responsible for the endocrine activity of the pancreas. Autoreactive T cells are not adequately controlled by regulatory T (Treg) cells, and destroy glucose-sensitive beta cells which produce insulin. The approach to reversing autoimmune irregularity has been theorized and in development in previous studies. "We and other global efforts have known for some time that restoring beneficial Treg cells might halt the abnormal self-reactivity in type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune diseases, but therapies to restore this immune balance have not achieved long-lasting results, stated Dr. Faustman. Similar A1C Reductions, Less Hypoglycemia with Xultophy Compared to Basal-Bolus Tx BCG therapy may change current methods to restoring and enhancing immune response. In international studies, repeat vaccinations Continue reading >>

What If There Was A Cure For Diabetes

What If There Was A Cure For Diabetes

Dreaming of a cure for diabetes: Fact or Fiction? With tears in her eyes but a faint smile, Camp Director Maura Prescott, approached the podium. I would like to say that I am overjoyed that we are closing our Diabetes Camp with the announcement from the CDC that Type 1 Diabetes has now been eradicated, and that the services of our camp are no longer needed. I look forward to continuing to work in the diabetes world, but with the older Type 2 population, helping to fine tune their diabetes control with the Bionic Pancreas and increase their quality of life and time on this earth. I have given my life to working with and improving the lives of those with diabetes, and I will continue to do so. By the end of my life, I hope to see that there is not one single person with diabetes on this planet, and that our children and grandchildren are taught about this debilitating chronic illness in history class. We have come so far since the 1920’s, where we saw the discovery of insulin. We have come to the point of cure. Here, in 2056, we can say that on the horizon, we can see a world without diabetes. I stand before you today in awe at the shear genius of scientists who have worked tirelessly in efforts to make this day come. From the introduction of the vaccine for Type 1 diabetes in 2032, we have seen worldwide eradication similar to that seen many years ago with polio. The camp closes because there are no more children with diabetes to attend it, and is that not what we have all been working for? Honestly, I never expected to be able to say those words in my lifetime. But here we are. Tania Prescott read the scribbled notes from her mother’s speech some 25 years before. She had just read a news article online explaining how there are now only a few people left on the earth Continue reading >>

Scientists Discover A New Way To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Scientists Discover A New Way To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Medication currently being used to treat obesity is also proving to have significant health benefits for patients with type 2 diabetes. A new study published today in Molecular Metabolism explains how this therapeutic benefit for type 2 diabetes is achieved by acting in our brain. Scientists from the University of Aberdeen Rowett Institute, in collaboration with teams from the Universities of Cambridge and Michigan, have discovered that the medication Lorcaserin acts in the brain to improve type 2 diabetes by modifying the activity of neurones that help to regulate blood glucose levels. Lorcaserin is prescribed to help patients lose weight and works by regulating how hungry we feel. However, researchers have discovered that as well as doing this, the drug can also reduce glucose levels in the body and increase the body's cells sensitivity to insulin. When the body fails to produce enough insulin or the body's cells fail to react to insulin this leads to Type 2 diabetes meaning that glucose remains in the blood rather than being used as fuel for energy. Professor Lora Heisler, who is leading the Aberdeen team, explains: "Current medications for type 2 diabetes improve symptoms of this disease by acting in the body. We have discovered that this obesity drug, lorcaserin, acts in the brain to improve type 2 diabetes. "Lorcaserin targets important brain hormones called pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) peptides, which are responsible for regulating appetite. So as well as sending messages telling us we are full and no longer need to eat, leading to weight loss, the POMC hormones also activate a different brain circuit that helps keep our blood glucose in check. "This discovery is important because type 2 diabetes is an incredibly prevalent disease in the modern world and new treat Continue reading >>

Vaccine Information For Adults

Vaccine Information For Adults

Each year thousands of adults in the United States get sick from diseases that could be prevented by vaccines — some people are hospitalized, and some even die. People with diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) are at higher risk for serious problems from certain vaccine-preventable diseases. Getting vaccinated is an important step in staying healthy. If you have diabetes, talk with your doctor about getting your vaccinations up-to-date. Why Vaccines are Important for You Diabetes, even if well managed, can make it harder for your immune system to fight infections, so you may be at risk for more serious complications from an illness compared to people without diabetes. Some illnesses, like influenza, can raise your blood glucose to dangerously high levels. People with diabetes have higher rates of hepatitis B than the rest of the population. Outbreaks of hepatitis B associated with blood glucose monitoring procedures have happened among people with diabetes. People with diabetes are at increased risk for death from pneumonia (lung infection), bacteremia (blood infection) and meningitis (infection of the lining of the brain and spinal cord). Immunization provides the best protection against vaccine-preventable diseases. Vaccines are one of the safest ways for you to protect your health, even if you are taking prescription medications. Vaccine side effects are usually mild and go away on their own. Severe side effects are very rare. Vaccines You Need There may be other vaccines recommended for you based on your lifestyle, travel habits, and other factors. Take the Adult Vaccine Quiz and talk with your healthcare professional about which vaccines are right for you. Getting Vaccinated You regularly see your provider for diabetes care, and that is a great place to start! If yo Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Reversed In Just Four Months, Trial Shows

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Reversed In Just Four Months, Trial Shows

Type 2 diabetes can be reversed in just four months, trial shows Lifestyle changes coupled with drugs reversed diabetes in 40 per cent of patients in just four monthsCredit:Alamy Type 2 diabetes can be reversed in just four months by cutting calories, exercising and keeping glucose under control, a trial has shown. Although the condition is considered to be chronic, requiring a lifetime of medication , Canadian researchers proved it was possible to restore insulin production for 40 per cent of patients. The treatment plan involved creating a personalised exercise regime for each trial participant and reducing their calories by between 500 and 750 a day. The participants also met regularly with a nurse and dietician to track progress and continued to take medication and insulin to manage their blood sugar levels. After just four months, 40 per cent of patients were able to stop taking their medication because their bodies had begun to produce adequate amounts of insulin again. Encouraging exercise and cutting calories allowed the pancreas to rest, scientists believeCredit:Getty The researchers at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, said the programme worked because it gavethe insulin-producing pancreas a rest. "The research might shift the paradigm of treating diabetes from simply controlling glucose to an approach where we induce remission and then monitor patients for any signs of relapse," said the study's first author, Dr Natalia McInnes, of McMaster. "The idea of reversing the disease is very appealing to individuals with diabetes. It motivates them to make significant lifestyle changes. This likely gives the pancreas a rest and decreases fat stores in the body, which in turn improves insulin production and effectiveness." The number of people in the UK with ty Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Vaccine To Be Tested In 2018

Type 1 Diabetes Vaccine To Be Tested In 2018

Type 1 diabetes vaccine to be tested in 2018 Type 1 diabetes vaccine to be tested in 2018 Researchers urge celiac disease screenings for children with type 1 diabetes 05 July 2017 Scientists behind a prototype vaccine to prevent children from getting type 1 diabetes are looking to test it on humans next year, it has been announced. For 20 years, a team of researchers from Finland's University of Tampere have been working on a drug which aims to protect the body against a virus which triggers type 1 diabetes . Now, following successful tests on mice, they are planning to start clinical trials in 2018, although no results of significance are expected for eight years. The treatment would not cure type 1 diabetes , but potentially stop it from developing in children who get a certain virus. Researchers from across the world have so far failed to understand why insulin-producing beta cells are firstly identified and then destroyed, which characterises the development of the condition. However, genetics could hold the key in creating different types of 'ID tags' known as human leukocyte markers, which flag up the beta cells. Professor Heikki Hyty, from the university's School of Medicine, has developed a theory behind one of the ways this process is started, involving an infection by a type of enterovirus. This group of viruses can also cause polio, hepatitis and meningitis as well as hand, foot and mouth disease. The Finnish team has already established a link between a strand of enterovirus known as coxsackievirus B1 and the reaction that sparks the body into attacking beta cells. In 2014, Professor Hyty found that six strands of the B group of coxsackieviruses were linked to type 1 diabetes in children . Also, data from American suggests that, in 2007, a quarter of the 44 Continue reading >>

9 Diabetes Breakthroughs You Need To Know About

9 Diabetes Breakthroughs You Need To Know About

Diabetes is not just one condition - but whether your body is struggling with blood sugar levels due to type 1, or type 2, or even only during pregnancy, it's a serious condition that requires daily care and still doesn't have a cure. But scientists have been working hard to find cures, new treatments, and better management techniques for the millions of people worldwide dealing with diabetes. Here are some of the latest developments you need to know about. 1. Brand new beta cells. Type 1 diabetes develops when a person's immune system wipes out insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. But it turns out that another type of immature beta cell has been hiding in our pancreases all along, and scientists think it might be possible to use these 'virgin beta cells' to restore the functionality of the pancreas. 2. A preventative vaccine. Finnish researchers are about to embark on the first-ever clinical trial for a type 1 diabetes prevention vaccine. While it's not a cure for those who already have the condition, a successful vaccine could potentially prevent thousands of cases each year, as the vaccine targets a virus linked with the development of an autoimmune reaction in the pancreas. 3. A unique transplant. One woman with severe type 1 diabetes has spent a year without insulin injections thanks to an experimental transplant. Doctors implanted insulin-producing cells into a fatty membrane in the stomach cavity, and the success of the operation is paving the way towards more people receiving artificial pancreases. 4. New pancreas tissue. Earlier this year scientists announced that they reversed type 1 diabetes in mice by giving them a transplant of pancreatic tissue. The tissue was grown using stem cells from non-diabetic mice, and the success of this method suggests i Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Vaccine Moving To Human Trials In Finland

Type 1 Diabetes Vaccine Moving To Human Trials In Finland

It has long been hypothesized that viral infections play a significant role in the development of type 1 diabetes. Researchers in Finland have been investigating this connection for over 25 years and now believe they have targeted the particular virus group that can trigger the disease. After developing a prototype vaccine the team is now moving to human clinical trials in 2018. Though not as common as type 2 diabetes, type 1 diabetes it still affects millions of people worldwide. The disease generally begins in childhood and an estimated 80,000 new cases are diagnosed worldwide every year. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the immune system destroys insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Recent research suggests that enteroviruses could play a strong role in the onset of type 1 diabetes, with several studies showing that the presence of an enteroviral infection significantly increases the chance of a person developing the disease. The causal relationship between an enteroviral infection and type 1 diabetes is still unknown, but one study suggests it could act as "a critical trigger to push an already dysfunctional metabolic equilibrium over the brink." A research group at the University of Tampere initially looked at the more than 100 different enterovirus types found in humans. After pinpointing six specific viral strains that could be associated with type 1 diabetes they ultimately identified the one type that held the biggest risk. A prototype vaccine was then produced and successfully tested on animals. "Already now it is known that the vaccine is effective and safe on mice," says Heikki Hyöty, Professor of Virology and lead on the research. "The developing process has now taken a significant leap forward as the next phase is to study the vaccine in humans." Thre Continue reading >>

Bcg Vaccine Could Restore Proper Immune Response In Type 1 Diabetes

Bcg Vaccine Could Restore Proper Immune Response In Type 1 Diabetes

The results of a new clinical trial testing a type 1 diabetes vaccine have been presented at the 75th Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association. The genetic vaccine bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been shown to reverse advanced type 1 diabetes in mice, and could help to restore proper immune response to insulin-producing beta cells. The findings of this FDA-approved clinical trial were presented by principal investigator Dr Denise Faustman, PhD, director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Immunobiology Laboratory. The BCG vaccine is based on a harmless strain of bacteria related to one that causes tuberculosis. It is also approved by the FDA for treatment of bladder cancer. Faustman explained the BCG could induce a permanent gene expression that restores regulatory T cells (Tregs), helping to prevent the immune system attack which characterises type 1 diabetes. "BCG is interesting because it brings into play so many areas of immunology that we as a community have been looking at for decades, including Tregs and the hygiene hypothesis," said Faustman. "Repeat BCG vaccination appears to permanently turn on signature Treg genes, and the vaccine's beneficial effect on host immune response recapitulates decades of human co-evolution with myocbacteria, a relationship that has been lost with modern eating and living habits." Researchers worldwide have been examining the benefits of Tregs, but Faustman said that existing therapies have struggled to achieve long-term results. However, with BCG able to restore Tregs, this provides a clearer picture as to how vaccination works to reset the immune system within type 1 diabetes. Faustman's team was the first to document type 1 diabetes reversal in mice and in a subsequent phase I trial demonstrated successful hu Continue reading >>

Vaccine Against Diabetes Has Been Announced, World Celebrating

Vaccine Against Diabetes Has Been Announced, World Celebrating

Vaccine against Diabetes has been announced, world celebrating The Vaccine Against Diabetes Has Been Officially Announced And The Entire World Is Celebrating In the United States alone, 1.25 million individuals suffer from type 1 diabetes. A vaccine used over 100 years ago for tuberculosis (bacillus Calmette-Guerin) has actually shown pledge in reversing this illness. This vaccine is now typically utilized for treating bladder cancer and is considered to be safe. The Vaccine Versus Diabetes Has Been Formally Revealed And The Entire World Is Celebrating The News!An announcement made yesterday at the 75th Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association said that the FDA will evaluate the vaccine on 150 people who are in an innovative stage of type one diabetes. The body of an individual with type 1 diabetes does not produce insulin due to the immune system damaging the cells that develop insulin. T cells are produced, and these cells produce issues in the pancreatic islets, where insulin is produced. The vaccine works by removing these T cells. Clients with diabetes injected with the vaccine saw a boost in the levels of a compound called tumor necrosis factor. The increased level of TNF in the system ruins the T cells that are impeding the production of insulin. In a previous trial, patients were injected with the tuberculosis vaccine twice within a four-week amount of time. The results revealed that the harmful T cells were gone, and some people even started to produce insulin by themselves. Dr. Denise Faustman, director of the Massachusetts General Healthcare facility Immunobiology Laboratory in Boston, is extremely excited about the outcomes the BCG vaccine has been revealing. In the phase I (preliminary) trial we demonstrated a statistically considerable act Continue reading >>

Fact Check: Finnish Researchers Set To Start Type 1 Diabetes Vaccine Trials?

Fact Check: Finnish Researchers Set To Start Type 1 Diabetes Vaccine Trials?

Finnish Researchers Set to Start Type 1 Diabetes Vaccine Trials? Scientists at Finnish universities are targeting a strand of viruses linked to Type 1 diabetes, and human trials for a vaccine will begin in 2018. In July 2017, it was announced that Finnish researchers would begin human trials of a Type 1 diabetes vaccine in 2018. On 19 July 2017, the Finnish news web site Yle reported that a group of Finnish researchers had developed a vaccine for Type 1 diabetes, and that human trials were set to begin in 2018: A vaccine for type 1 diabetes developed by Finnish researchers will be tested on mainly Finnish human subjects in late 2018, researchers announced on Tuesday.The scientists first found that the prototype works effectively and safely on mice, and now saythat the vaccine could be in mainstream use within eight years if the coming rounds of tests prove successful. One skeptical reader asked us to check out the story. Yle is Finlands public broadcasting corporation (akin to NPR or the BBC). T he names of the lead researchers and their universities are real, the announcement of vaccine trials is real, and the story is true. On 18 July 2017, the University of Tampere in Finland announced that Professor of Virology Heikki Hyty and his team of researchers had identified a particular strand of enteroviruses (viruses transmitted through the intestines) linked to Type 1 diabetes, and developed a vaccine against them. Already now it is known that the vaccine is effective and safe on mice, Hyty said. The developing process has now taken a significant leap forward as the next phase is to study the vaccine in humans. In the first clinical phase, the vaccine will be studied in a small group of adults to ensure the safety of the vaccine. In the second phase, the vaccine will be Continue reading >>

Human Study Re-ignites Debate Over Controversial Diabetes

Human Study Re-ignites Debate Over Controversial Diabetes "cure"

* TB vaccine seen attacking disease-caused autoimmunity * Long-term type 1 diabetes patients produce insulin again * Effect lasts for a week, further trials to boost dosing NEW YORK, Aug 8 (Reuters) - A controversial experimental cure for type 1 diabetes, using a tuberculosis vaccine invented a century ago, appears to temporarily vanquish the disease, according to a study in a handful of patients led by a scientist long criticized by her peers. There is no guarantee the results from this early-stage trial, published on Wednesday in the journal PLoS One, will stand up in larger studies, which are now under way. Other diabetes researchers criticized it for going beyond the evidence in its claims about what caused the observed effects. If the findings do hold up, however, they would mean that the generic bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine, in use since 1921, can regenerate insulin-secreting cells in the pancreas, whose loss causes the disease. "We think we're seeing early evidence of effectiveness," said immunology researcher Denise Faustman of Massachusetts General Hospital, who led the trial. "This simple, inexpensive vaccine attacks the autoimmunity underlying type 1 diabetes." That autoimmunity, in which the immune system turns on the body's own cells rather than invaders, destroys insulin-producing "islet" cells in the pancreas. As a result, patients have to regularly inject themselves with insulin to control their blood sugar, or glucose. Also known as juvenile diabetes, the disease affects as many as 3 million Americans, estimates JDRF (formerly the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation). Another 30,000 people in the United States, half of them adults, are diagnosed every year with the disease, which has long been considered incurable. "We found that even low do Continue reading >>

Fact Check: Diabetes Vaccine Announced?

Fact Check: Diabetes Vaccine Announced?

On 18 September 2016, the English-language clickbait web site called Time for You shared an article reporting that The vaccine against diabetes promises to be the solution for the advance of the illness and even reverses its effects. The story cited work of two supposed Mexican scientists, Salvador Chacn Ramrez, president of the Live Your Diabetes Foundation, and Lucila Zrate Ortega, of the Mexican Association for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Autoimmune Diseases, along with Doctor Jorge Gonzlez Ramrez, using a therapy called auto-chemotherapy. According to the Time for You article (which appeared to rely on a bad auto-translation), the procedure for immunizing against diabetes works as follows: About 5 cm of blood were extracted from each patient and then they were injected with 55 milliliters of blood solution. It is refrigerated at five degrees centigrade. When the temperature changes to 37 grades, since it goes out of the body to a new temperature, a shock happens takes place and what was a problem turns into the solution inside the bottle, in such a way that the genetic and metabolic flaw is corrected or inmunometabolised in the vaccine. The vaccine lasts for 60 days and the treatment is about one year. This vaccine is much more than a medicine; it is a medical practice that has turned into an alternative, a possible solution to stop the complications that are chronically degenerative: embolism, loss of ear; amputation, renal insufficiency and blindness, etc. The article referred to events in Mexico that transpired in November 2015. According to the Spanish-language daily newspaper, La Jornada , the organization Live Your Diabetes held a press conference announcing their alleged discovery on 25 November 2015, but they were shut down by the Mexican government with Continue reading >>

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