diabetestalk.net

Type 2 Diabetes Vaccine

Why People With Type 2 Diabetes Should Get The Flu Vaccine

Why People With Type 2 Diabetes Should Get The Flu Vaccine

Flu vaccine cuts hospitalization risk for people with Type 2 diabetes. Have Type 2 diabetes? Then you should probably get a flu shot each year. Those with diabetes who received a vaccination for the flu were less likely to wind up in the hospital due to cardiovascular or respiratory problems, according to a Reuters report. For the study, UK researchers examined medical data from 125,000 people with Type 2 diabetes for a period of seven years. They found that those who received the flu vaccination had a 30 percent lower rate of hospital admission for strokes, a 22 percent lower hospitalization rate for heart failure, and a 15 percent lower hospitalization rate for pneumonia. People with chronic conditions like diabetes are at a higher risk of suffering from common flu complications, like pneumonia, bronchitis, heart attack, and stroke. Overall, those who received the vaccination had a 24 percent lower risk of death from all causes during the study period, but researchers caution that they can’t pin that lower risk solely on flu vaccinations. For example, it’s possible those who are proactive enough to get a flu shot are also proactive about their health overall, which would certainly affect their risk of death. Researchers also weren’t able to determine in the medical records how many of those studied had undiagnosed diabetes; this would also greatly influence the risk of hospitalization or death. The American Diabetes Association estimates that roughly 28 percent of those with Type 2 diabetes in 2012 do not know they have the condition. sponsor There is not one “flu”. Each year, variations of influenza circulate around the world. Getting the flu vaccine does not guarantee that you will not get the flu, but it does cut your risk of getting the flu during flu se Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Reversed In Just Four Months, Trial Shows

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Reversed In Just Four Months, Trial Shows

Type 2 diabetes can be reversed in just four months, trial shows Lifestyle changes coupled with drugs reversed diabetes in 40 per cent of patients in just four monthsCredit:Alamy Type 2 diabetes can be reversed in just four months by cutting calories, exercising and keeping glucose under control, a trial has shown. Although the condition is considered to be chronic, requiring a lifetime of medication , Canadian researchers proved it was possible to restore insulin production for 40 per cent of patients. The treatment plan involved creating a personalised exercise regime for each trial participant and reducing their calories by between 500 and 750 a day. The participants also met regularly with a nurse and dietician to track progress and continued to take medication and insulin to manage their blood sugar levels. After just four months, 40 per cent of patients were able to stop taking their medication because their bodies had begun to produce adequate amounts of insulin again. Encouraging exercise and cutting calories allowed the pancreas to rest, scientists believeCredit:Getty The researchers at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, said the programme worked because it gavethe insulin-producing pancreas a rest. "The research might shift the paradigm of treating diabetes from simply controlling glucose to an approach where we induce remission and then monitor patients for any signs of relapse," said the study's first author, Dr Natalia McInnes, of McMaster. "The idea of reversing the disease is very appealing to individuals with diabetes. It motivates them to make significant lifestyle changes. This likely gives the pancreas a rest and decreases fat stores in the body, which in turn improves insulin production and effectiveness." The number of people in the UK with ty Continue reading >>

Epidemic Of Type 2 Diabetes Linked To Vaccine Inflammation

Epidemic Of Type 2 Diabetes Linked To Vaccine Inflammation

Home / Resources / Articles / Epidemic Of Type 2 Diabetes Linked To Vaccine Inflammation Epidemic Of Type 2 Diabetes Linked To Vaccine Inflammation Newly published data by Dr. J. Barthelow Classen in The Open Endocrinology Journal shows a 50% reduction of type 2 diabetes occurred in Japanese children following the discontinuation of a single vaccine to prevent tuberculosis. This decline occurred at a time when there is a global epidemic of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome, which includes obesity, altered blood cholesterol levels, high blood pressure, and increased blood glucose resulting from insulin resistance. Classen proposes a new explanation for the epidemic of both insulin dependent diabetes (type 1 diabetes), which has previously been shown to be caused by vaccines and non insulin dependent diabetes (type 2 diabetes). Upon receipt of vaccines or other strong immune stimulants some individuals develop a hyperactive immune system leading to autoimmune destruction of insulin secreting cells. Other individuals produce increased cortisol, an immune suppressing hormone, to suppress the vaccine induced inflammation. The increased cortisol leads to type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Japanese children have increased cortisol secretion following immunization compared to White children and this explains why Japanese have a relative high rate of type 2 diabetes but low rate of insulin dependent diabetes compared to Whites. The lower cortisol response attributed to type 1 diabetes and the higher cortisol response attributed to type 2 diabetes explains why type 1 diabetics are generally leaner than type 2 diabetics since elevated cortisol causes weight gain. "The current data shows that vaccines are much more dangerous than the public is lead to believe and adequat Continue reading >>

What Vaccines Are Known To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

What Vaccines Are Known To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

Have a question aboutDiabetes Type 2? Ask a doctor now Diamyd Medical is a Swedish company that is testing a diabetic vaccine on humans. They are trying to see whether or not that they can stop or slow down diabetes from development in the human body. Unfortunately, the vaccine was in phase 3 and was unable to stop the t cells from killing the beta cells. Now the Swedish company is trying to continue with research and deciding whether or not they will still try to develop the treatment. The University of Calgary successfully developed a vaccine that has worked in mice. The vaccine uses nanoparticles with antigens to stimulate the bodys T cells. This prevents the T cells from killing the beta cells. This breakthrough came out in April 2010 and was exciting news in the development of vaccines for diabetes. This was a collaboration between two colleges: Kings College London and Bristol University. They were awarded a 10-million grant in early 2010. The grant was awarded for research for a vaccine against the anti-immune effects of diabetes. These two colleges have been working together for years, and both are trying to find a solution to the problem. Most people who have diabetes have type 2 diabetes. This is because of lack or exercise and bad eating choices. It is often believed that obesity is the direct reason on why diabetes happens. Now there is new research that suggests the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus(staph) might also be the cause. It is a bacteria living on the surface of the skin. Of course the cause of diabetes is still unknown, but some believe that this bacteria is a likely cause. There is still a lot of lab work to be done, but, as the progress moves on, hopefully there will be a vaccine some day. Even though a diabetes patient takes all recommended prec Continue reading >>

Diabetes Update: Discovery Of Type-4 Diabetes & A New Vaccine For Type-1 | Let's Care - The Official Blog Of Care Hospitals

Diabetes Update: Discovery Of Type-4 Diabetes & A New Vaccine For Type-1 | Let's Care - The Official Blog Of Care Hospitals

Diabetes Update: Discovery of Type-4 Diabetes & a New Vaccine for Type-1 In two separate news items over the last week, two major updates have been released that can revolutionize the world of diabetes. Firstly, researchers at AIIMS, New Delhi have discovered a new type of diabetes and named it the type-4 diabetes. Secondly, at its 75th Scientific Sessions, the American Diabetes Association announced that it would be testing the Bacillus Calmette-Geurin (a vaccination used to treat tuberculosis) to treat type-1 diabetes as it has shown promise in reversing diabetes. Lets discuss these updates one by one. While a majority of us are struggling to understand type-1 and type-2 diabetes , the study by scientists from AIIMS (All India Institute of Medical Sciences) talks about type-4 diabetes, which affects the brain and eye tissues. According to the doctors who conducted this study, this diabetes is quite different from the others that occur due to high levels of glucose in the blood. The type-4 diabetes affects the brain and eye tissues and this discovery can open new avenues of therapy for glaucoma and neurodegenerative diseases. Dr Muneeb Faiq, a clinical researcher studying glaucoma and neurodegeneration and Dr Tanuj Dada, a professor of ophthalmology at AIIMS, New Delhi conducted this study together. While type-1 and type-2 diabetes occur due to increased levels of glucose in the blood and type-3 diabetes occurs due to certain insulin resistance that causes symptoms similar to Alzheimers disease , type-4 diabetes can be linked to glaucoma and neurodegenerative diseases. Glaucoma, a dangerous eye disorder that can cause permanent blindness, currently affects 65 million people worldwide. Often nicknamed the sneak thief of sight , this disorder can damage the optic nerve Continue reading >>

Vaccine Information For Adults

Vaccine Information For Adults

Each year thousands of adults in the United States get sick from diseases that could be prevented by vaccines — some people are hospitalized, and some even die. People with diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) are at higher risk for serious problems from certain vaccine-preventable diseases. Getting vaccinated is an important step in staying healthy. If you have diabetes, talk with your doctor about getting your vaccinations up-to-date. Why Vaccines are Important for You Diabetes, even if well managed, can make it harder for your immune system to fight infections, so you may be at risk for more serious complications from an illness compared to people without diabetes. Some illnesses, like influenza, can raise your blood glucose to dangerously high levels. People with diabetes have higher rates of hepatitis B than the rest of the population. Outbreaks of hepatitis B associated with blood glucose monitoring procedures have happened among people with diabetes. People with diabetes are at increased risk for death from pneumonia (lung infection), bacteremia (blood infection) and meningitis (infection of the lining of the brain and spinal cord). Immunization provides the best protection against vaccine-preventable diseases. Vaccines are one of the safest ways for you to protect your health, even if you are taking prescription medications. Vaccine side effects are usually mild and go away on their own. Severe side effects are very rare. Vaccines You Need There may be other vaccines recommended for you based on your lifestyle, travel habits, and other factors. Take the Adult Vaccine Quiz and talk with your healthcare professional about which vaccines are right for you. Getting Vaccinated You regularly see your provider for diabetes care, and that is a great place to start! If yo Continue reading >>

9 Diabetes Breakthroughs You Need To Know About

9 Diabetes Breakthroughs You Need To Know About

Diabetes is not just one condition - but whether your body is struggling with blood sugar levels due to type 1, or type 2, or even only during pregnancy, it's a serious condition that requires daily care and still doesn't have a cure. But scientists have been working hard to find cures, new treatments, and better management techniques for the millions of people worldwide dealing with diabetes. Here are some of the latest developments you need to know about. 1. Brand new beta cells. Type 1 diabetes develops when a person's immune system wipes out insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. But it turns out that another type of immature beta cell has been hiding in our pancreases all along, and scientists think it might be possible to use these 'virgin beta cells' to restore the functionality of the pancreas. 2. A preventative vaccine. Finnish researchers are about to embark on the first-ever clinical trial for a type 1 diabetes prevention vaccine. While it's not a cure for those who already have the condition, a successful vaccine could potentially prevent thousands of cases each year, as the vaccine targets a virus linked with the development of an autoimmune reaction in the pancreas. 3. A unique transplant. One woman with severe type 1 diabetes has spent a year without insulin injections thanks to an experimental transplant. Doctors implanted insulin-producing cells into a fatty membrane in the stomach cavity, and the success of the operation is paving the way towards more people receiving artificial pancreases. 4. New pancreas tissue. Earlier this year scientists announced that they reversed type 1 diabetes in mice by giving them a transplant of pancreatic tissue. The tissue was grown using stem cells from non-diabetic mice, and the success of this method suggests i Continue reading >>

Is There A Diabetes Cure?

Is There A Diabetes Cure?

With all the research on diabetes and advances in diabetes treatments, it's tempting to think someone has surely found a diabetes cure by now. But the reality is that there is no cure for diabetes -- neither type 1 diabetes nor type 2 diabetes. (Although lifestyle changes can achieve remission in type 2 diabetes in some cases.) However, there are treatments, including simple things you can do daily, that make a big difference. No. Natural therapies such as deep abdominal breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, guided imagery, and biofeedback can help relieve stress. And emotional stress affects your blood sugar levels. So learning to relax is important in managing your diabetes. Supplements don't cure diabetes, either. Some natural supplements may interact dangerously with your diabetes medication. Others have been shown to help improve your diabetes, but always check with your doctor before taking any supplement. Be skeptical about claims of a diabetes cure. A genuine cure will have been tested repeatedly in clinical trials with clear success. Even though there's no diabetes cure, diabetes can be treated and controlled, and some people may go into remission. To manage diabetes effectively, you need to do the following: Manage your blood sugar levels. Know what to do to help keep them as near to normal as possible every day: Check your glucose levels frequently. Take your diabetes medicine regularly. And balance your food intake with medication, exercise, stress management, and good sleep habits. Plan what you eat at each meal. Stick to your diabetes eating plan as often as possible. Bring healthy snacks with you. You’ll be less likely to snack on empty calories. Exercise regularly. Exercise helps you keep you fit, burns calories, and helps normalize your blood gluc Continue reading >>

Fact Check: Diabetes Vaccine Announced?

Fact Check: Diabetes Vaccine Announced?

On 18 September 2016, the English-language clickbait web site called Time for You shared an article reporting that The vaccine against diabetes promises to be the solution for the advance of the illness and even reverses its effects. The story cited work of two supposed Mexican scientists, Salvador Chacn Ramrez, president of the Live Your Diabetes Foundation, and Lucila Zrate Ortega, of the Mexican Association for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Autoimmune Diseases, along with Doctor Jorge Gonzlez Ramrez, using a therapy called auto-chemotherapy. According to the Time for You article (which appeared to rely on a bad auto-translation), the procedure for immunizing against diabetes works as follows: About 5 cm of blood were extracted from each patient and then they were injected with 55 milliliters of blood solution. It is refrigerated at five degrees centigrade. When the temperature changes to 37 grades, since it goes out of the body to a new temperature, a shock happens takes place and what was a problem turns into the solution inside the bottle, in such a way that the genetic and metabolic flaw is corrected or inmunometabolised in the vaccine. The vaccine lasts for 60 days and the treatment is about one year. This vaccine is much more than a medicine; it is a medical practice that has turned into an alternative, a possible solution to stop the complications that are chronically degenerative: embolism, loss of ear; amputation, renal insufficiency and blindness, etc. The article referred to events in Mexico that transpired in November 2015. According to the Spanish-language daily newspaper, La Jornada , the organization Live Your Diabetes held a press conference announcing their alleged discovery on 25 November 2015, but they were shut down by the Mexican government with Continue reading >>

Scientists Find Cure For Type 2 Diabetes In Rodents, Don’t Know How It Works

Scientists Find Cure For Type 2 Diabetes In Rodents, Don’t Know How It Works

The cure for type 2 diabetes may be all in your head, a new study in rats and mice suggests. With a single shot to the brain, researchers can rid rodents of all symptoms of the disease for months. The injection, a relatively low dose of a tissue growth factor protein called fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1), appears to reset powerful neural networks that can control the amount of sugar in the blood. So far, it’s not completely clear how exactly FGF1 does that, researchers report in Nature Medicine. Early experiments found that FGF1 didn’t appear to lower blood sugar levels in some of the most obvious ways, such as curbing the rodents’ appetite and spurring sustained weight loss. Nevertheless, because FGF1 is naturally present in human brains, as well as those of rodents, researchers are hopeful that the lucky shot may translate into a useful treatment. If nothing else, the FGF1 finding “unmasks the brain’s inherent capacity to induce sustained diabetes remission,” the authors conclude. But because scientists already have the protocols and know-how to safely deliver FGF1 to human noggins via intranasal routes, moving toward clinical trials seems like a no brainer, they argue. The authors, led by researchers at the University of Washington, gave FGF1 a crack in animal brain experiments after other studies had seen encouraging results with FGF1’s cousins. Those related growth factors can activate some of the same brain signals as FGF1 and lowered blood sugar levels after brain injections in animals. Yet FGF1 may be a more powerful player in the brain, the authors reasoned, because it can trigger an even greater number of brain cell signals. And earlier experiments found that large systemic doses of FGF1 can lower blood sugar levels in mice. Researchers inject Continue reading >>

Towards A Game-changing Type 1 Diabetes Vaccine

Towards A Game-changing Type 1 Diabetes Vaccine

Home / Conditions / Type 1 Diabetes / Towards a Game-Changing Type 1 Diabetes Vaccine Towards a Game-Changing Type 1 Diabetes Vaccine Dr. Denise Faustman, M.D, Ph.D. Exclusive Interview from theDiabetes Symposium Seminar 2016 in Boston, featuring Steve Freed, Publisher, Diabetes in Control. In part 3 of this exclusive interview, Dr. Faustman discusses how a cure based on the inexpensive BCG vaccine could permanently change type 1 treatment, and whether results could also apply to type 2. Steve Freed: So, I know in the past youve been researching trying to find the T-cells that cause the autoimmune disease specifically for diabetes. Then if you could just keep the bucket half full. Steve Freed: Where does that stand in all this? Dr. Faustman: So, one of the surprising things about the phase 1 clinical trial data was after we gave each dose of BCG, the blood was filled with dead autoreactive T-cells. These are people that are 15-20 years out from disease. So what that taught us was one, BCG was killing autoreactive cells, but it also taught us that people with long-standing type 1 diabetes have huge reservoirs of autoreactive T-cells. Thats probably because the pancreas is continually regenerating and getting bumped off by these bad T-cells. We have quite a large repertoire, numbers wise, of autoreactive T-cells even with long standing disease that need to be eliminated. So the dosing of BCG will become very important to get that balance and get rid of the majority of those cells. Steve Freed: So, what about the time frame? When do you expect to have phase 2 completed? Obviously you cant talk about phase 3. Dr. Faustman: So, there will be two sets of clinical trial data coming. The next set of data that youll hear about, probably in the next year or so is that we went ba Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis To diagnose type 2 diabetes, you'll be given a: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates you have diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Normal levels are below 5.7 percent. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — that can make the A1C test inaccurate, your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test. For this test, you fast overnight, and the fasting blood sugar level is measured. Then you drink a sugary liquid, and blood s Continue reading >>

What If There Was A Cure For Diabetes

What If There Was A Cure For Diabetes

Dreaming of a cure for diabetes: Fact or Fiction? With tears in her eyes but a faint smile, Camp Director Maura Prescott, approached the podium. I would like to say that I am overjoyed that we are closing our Diabetes Camp with the announcement from the CDC that Type 1 Diabetes has now been eradicated, and that the services of our camp are no longer needed. I look forward to continuing to work in the diabetes world, but with the older Type 2 population, helping to fine tune their diabetes control with the Bionic Pancreas and increase their quality of life and time on this earth. I have given my life to working with and improving the lives of those with diabetes, and I will continue to do so. By the end of my life, I hope to see that there is not one single person with diabetes on this planet, and that our children and grandchildren are taught about this debilitating chronic illness in history class. We have come so far since the 1920’s, where we saw the discovery of insulin. We have come to the point of cure. Here, in 2056, we can say that on the horizon, we can see a world without diabetes. I stand before you today in awe at the shear genius of scientists who have worked tirelessly in efforts to make this day come. From the introduction of the vaccine for Type 1 diabetes in 2032, we have seen worldwide eradication similar to that seen many years ago with polio. The camp closes because there are no more children with diabetes to attend it, and is that not what we have all been working for? Honestly, I never expected to be able to say those words in my lifetime. But here we are. Tania Prescott read the scribbled notes from her mother’s speech some 25 years before. She had just read a news article online explaining how there are now only a few people left on the earth Continue reading >>

Diabetes Vaccines

Diabetes Vaccines

Diabetes vaccines are still in the research phase Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease which, when triggered, causes the bodys own killer T cells to kill off the pancreass insulin producing beta cells. Diabetes vaccines attempt to stop the T cells from attacking the body's own cells. Studies have been able to treat diabetes in mice , but a working vaccine in humans has yet to receive pharmaceutical approval. Diamyd Medical is a Swedish company that is undertaking a trial in humans to see if their antigen vaccine can slow down or even halt type 1 diabetes at an early stage of its development. Phase III of the trial has been split into two regions, Europe and the USA, with 320 participants taking part in each. Should the European trial prove successful, Diamyd Medical could apply as early as by the end of 2011, to market the vaccine in Europe. The company is considering how to proceed with research and development of the treatment. The University of Calgary is one of the universities that have successfully developed a vaccine that works in mice . The vaccine is novel in that it uses tiny nanoparticles armed with antigens to stimulate the bodys regulatory T cells which help to police the killer T cells. Essentially, this prevents the response of the killer cells from getting out of control and killing the bodys precious beta cells. News of the breakthrough appeared in April 2010 and the license to develop the vaccine is held by Parvus Therapeutics, part of the University of Calgary. A collaboration between Kings College London and Bristol University was awarded a 10 million Euro grant early in 2010 to continue their research to find a potential vaccine against the anti-immune effects of type 1 diabetes. The two universities have been working together for a number of y Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Begins With Bacterial Infection, Suggesting Room For A Vaccine

Type 2 Diabetes Begins With Bacterial Infection, Suggesting Room For A Vaccine

Scientists working in rabbit models have recreated the hallmark symptoms of type 2 diabetes using a common strain of bacteria found on the skin’s surface, a new study reports. The findings could pave the way for anti-bacterial treatments and vaccination against microbial invaders. Between 90 to 95 percent of diabetes cases are type 2 diabetes, an insulin deficiency that develops through lack of exercise and poor diet. This has led to the widespread belief that obesity poses direct risks to developing the disease; however, the new research suggests an alternate route to diagnosis, namely, the Staphylococcus aureus (staph) bacteria living on the surface of the skin. “At any given time, 30 percent of folks are colonized in the [nostrils] and other mucosal surfaces with S. aureus, with nearly all of us occasionally colonized,” Dr. Patrick Schlievert, the study’s senior author and professor of microbiology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, told Medical Daily in an email. As people gain weight, their skin effectively becomes “wetter” due to increased sweating and greater skin folds, making an ideal home for bacteria to colonize and enter the body. “We find that the colonization rate goes up to 100 percent.” Schlievert and his colleagues recently wanted to learn more about what happens when staph bacteria colonies grow to extraordinary numbers. Prior studies had shown a “superantigen” effect. When the bacteria reach a certain threshold, they initiate a defense mechanism against the body’s immune system, targeting key cells involved with immune-related functions, called T-cells. In their latest study, the investigators exposed a group of rabbits to the staph superantigen. Once in the body, the bacteria created a domino effect of physiologic re Continue reading >>

More in diabetes