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Type 2 Diabetes Uk

Number Of People With Type 2 Diabetes In The Uk Has Trebled Over The Last 20 Years

Number Of People With Type 2 Diabetes In The Uk Has Trebled Over The Last 20 Years

Number of people with type 2 diabetes in the UK has trebled over the last 20 years The number of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in the UK has trebled over the last two decades according to a new study. Researchers reported that more than 2.8 million people are now diagnosed with type 2 diabetes compared to 700,000 known cases 20 years ago. The study was led by researchers at Cardiff University who compiled figures from GP services in the UK between 1991 and 2014 for the study recently published in Diabetic Medicine . The report also showed a marked increase in life expectancy for people with the condition, which researchers put down as one of the reasons for why there are so many additional people with type 2 diabetes. Better diagnosis and rising levels of obesity were also linked with the increased number of people with the condition. The study found that between 1993 and 2010 the proportion of obese people in the UK rose from 13% to 26% for men and from 16% to 26% for women. Professor Craig Currie, from Cardiff Universitys School of Medicine, said: The number of people with type 2 diabetes in the UK has gone from 700,000 to around 2.8 million over two decades, and it continues to increase. We are also seeing increased life expectancy from the condition which could be due to earlier diagnosis of the condition as well as drugs such as blood pressure tablets and statins for blood cholesterol. The results of the study also revealed that the chances of being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes increased with age, although this increase was lower in people aged 80 years and above. The number of people with type 2 diabetes was also generally higher in men than in women above the age of 40 years. Below the age of 40 it was similar. Around 4.5 million people live with diabe Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diagnoses Have More Than Doubled In 20 Years, Uk Analysis Suggests

Diabetes Diagnoses Have More Than Doubled In 20 Years, Uk Analysis Suggests

Diabetes diagnoses have more than doubled in 20 years, UK analysis suggests Diagnoses of all diabetes types have shot up since 1998, says Diabetes UK as it calls for greater efforts to lower risk of type 2 Last modified on Mon 26 Feb 2018 19.50EST Diagnosis of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes has increased, but the rise has been greater for type 2, which some experts link to higher obesity rates.Photograph: Alfsky/Getty Images The number of adults and older teens with diabetes in the UK has more than doubled over the past 20 years, with 3.7 million people aged 17 or older now known to be living with the disease, campaigners say. A new analysis, compiled by the charity Diabetes UK, appears to show that the number of diagnoses has shot up since 1998, at which point it is estimated 1.8 million over 16s were diagnosed with diabetes. 'The hardest thing is waking up and part of your body has gone' The analysis does not break down figures into the two main forms of diabetes, type 1 and type 2. But Nikki Joule, policy manager at Diabetes UK, said that other research had shown diagnoses of both have increased, but the rise has been greater for type 2. [The] rise in obesity has driven that largely over recent years, she said. While both types of diabetes are linked to genetics, type 1 diabetes is not associated with weight but is an autoimmune condition where insulin is not produced. It normally begins in childhood and accounts for about 10% of diabetes cases. Type 2 diabetes where little insulin is produced, or insulin does not trigger an uptake of glucose by the bodys cells is linked to obesity , and typically starts later in life, with about 60% of cases thought to be preventable . Both types bring with them the risk of complications such as blindness, stroke, cardiovascular d Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes occurs mostly in people aged over 40 years. However, an increasing number of younger people, even children, are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The first-line treatment is diet, weight control and physical activity. If the blood sugar (glucose) level remains high despite these measures then tablets to reduce the blood glucose level are usually advised. Insulin injections are needed in some cases. Other treatments include reducing blood pressure if it is high, lowering high cholesterol levels and also using other measures to reduce the risk of complications. Although diabetes cannot be cured, it can be treated successfully. If a high blood sugar level is brought down to a normal level, your symptoms will ease. You still have some risk of complications in the long term if your blood glucose level remains even mildly high - even if you have no symptoms in the short term. However, studies have shown that people who have better glucose control have fewer complications (such as heart disease or eye problems) compared with those people who have poorer control of their glucose level. Therefore, the main aims of treatment are: To keep your blood glucose level as near normal as possible. To reduce any other risk factors that may increase your risk of developing complications. In particular, to lower your blood pressure if it is high and to keep your blood lipids (cholesterol) low. To detect any complications as early as possible. Treatment can prevent or delay some complications from becoming worse. Type 2 diabetes is usually initially treated by following a healthy diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and having regular physical activity. If lifestyle advice does not control your blood sugar (glucose) levels then medicines are used to help lower your Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Symptoms The symptoms of diabetes include feeling very thirsty, passing more urine than usual, and feeling tired all the time. The symptoms occur because some or all of the glucose stays in your blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to get rid of the excess glucose in your urine. The main symptoms, which are common to both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, are: urinating more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired unexplained weight loss cuts or wounds that heal slowly blurred vision – caused by the lens of the eye becoming dry The signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes are usually obvious and develop very quickly, often over a few weeks. These signs and symptoms aren't always as obvious, however, and it's often diagnosed during a routine check-up. This is because they are often mild and develop gradually over a number of years. This means you may have type 2 diabetes for many years without realising it. See your GP as soon as possible if you think you may have diabetes. Early diagnosis and treatment for type 2 diabetes is very important as it may reduce your risk of developing complications later on. Hyperglycaemia Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach, can't produce enough insulin to control your blood glucose level, or when the cells in your body don't respond properly to the insulin that is produced. This means your blood glucose levels may become very high, and is known as hyperglycaemia. Hyperglycaemia can occur for several reasons, including: eating too much being unwell ineffective diabetes medication, or not taking enough Hyperglycaemia causes the main symptoms of diabetes, which include extreme thirst and frequent urination. Next review due: 27/06/2018 Type 2 diabetes occurs when t Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Overview Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. The hormone insulin – produced by the pancreas – is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 – where the pancreas doesn't produce any insulin type 2 – where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body's cells don't react to insulin These pages are about type 2 diabetes. Read more about type 1 diabetes. Another type of diabetes, known as gestational diabetes, occurs in some pregnant women and tends to disappear after birth. Symptoms of diabetes The symptoms of diabetes occur because the lack of insulin means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to reduce blood glucose levels by getting rid of the excess glucose in your urine. Typical symptoms include: feeling very thirsty passing urine more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk See your GP if you think you may have diabetes. It's very important for it to be diagnosed as soon as possible as it will get progressively worse if left untreated. Causes of type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to function properly, or the body's cells don't react to insulin. This means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity and tends to be diagnosed in older people. It's far more common than type 1 diabetes. Treating type 2 diabetes As type 2 diabetes usually gets worse, you may eventually need medication – usually tablets – to keep your blood glucose at normal levels. Complications of type 2 diabetes Diabetes can cause serious long-term heal Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication. Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40. However, type 2 diabetes is now becoming more common in young adults, teens and children and accounts for roughly 90% of all diabetes cases worldwide. How serious is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is a serious medical condition that often requires the use of anti-diabetic medication, or insulin to keep blood sugar levels under control. However, the development of type 2 diabetes and its side effects (complications) can be prevented if detected and treated at an early stage. In recent years, it has become apparent that many people with type 2 diabetes are able to reverse diabetes through methods including low-carb diets, very-low-calorie diets and exercise. For guidance on healthy eating to improve blood glucose levels and weight and to fight back against ins Continue reading >>

Diabetes Cases In The Uk Reach 3.7 Million With Another 12.3 Million At Risk

Diabetes Cases In The Uk Reach 3.7 Million With Another 12.3 Million At Risk

Diabetes cases in the UK reach 3.7 million with another 12.3 million at risk Ninety percent of cases are Type 2 diabetes, which is linked to lifestyle factors such as obesity. Image: The charity says it has become the Diabetes UK says the number of people living with the disease has doubled in the last 20 years. The charity says it has become the "fastest growing health crisis of our time". The number of people diagnosed with the condition across the UK has reached almost 3.7 million - an increase of 1.9 million since 1998. A further 12.3 million people are at an increased risk of Type 2 diabetes, according to the charity's analysis. Meanwhile, the number of people diagnosed with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes has increased by almost 100,000 since last year - from 3,590,501 to 3,689,509. The charity found Bradford has the UK's highest prevalence of diabetes, with one in 10 people (10.4%) in the West Yorkshire city being diagnosed with the condition. The lowest is in Richmond, west London, where just 3.6% of people are living with a diagnosis. Diabetes UK also estimates that there are nearly one million diabetic people who don't know it. Almost nine in ten cases of diabetes are Type 2, which is linked to lifestyle factors such as obesity. "Diabetes is the fastest growing health crisis of our time; and the fact that diagnoses have doubled in just 20 years should give all of us serious pause for thought," says Diabetes UK chief executive Chris Askew. Continue reading >>

Mixed Reviews For New Type 2 Diet Guidelines

Mixed Reviews For New Type 2 Diet Guidelines

Mixed reviews for new type 2 diet guidelines Diabetes UKs new dietary guidelines for type 2 diabetes have reignited the low fat, high fat debate. The guidelines were presented at the Diabetes UK Professional Conference 2018 held in London last week. They suggested that one size of diet does not fit all and stated that dietary advice needs to be tailored. The evidence-based guidelines reflect recent research advances and provide nutrition recommendations to better enable healthcare professionals in supporting adults with diabetes, and those at risk of type 2 diabetes, Diabetes UK said. The charity said: For the first time the guidelines which were last updated in 2011 outline how people with type 2 diabetes might be able to achieve remission. This guidance has been added after the first year results of the Diabetes UK-funded study called DiRECT, suggested that type 2 diabetes remission can occur with significant weight loss. The guidelines outline consistently strong evidence that suggests eating certain foods can help reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, can manage blood glucose levels in people with type 2 diabetes, and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in people with diabetes. These suggested foods include vegetables, fruits, wholegrains, fish, nuts and pulses. Eating less red and processed meat, refined carbohydrates and sugar sweetened beverages, is also recommended. The charity said that these recommended foods are usually associated with the Mediterranean-style diet, but can be adapted to take into account cultural and personal preferences. Previous recommendations had relied on more nutrients, but this food-based approach provides people at risk and with diabetes more flexibility, Diabetes UK added. But, while Jack Woodfield, deputy editor of Diabetes.co. Continue reading >>

3.8 Million People In England Now Have Diabetes

3.8 Million People In England Now Have Diabetes

The new Diabetes Prevalence Model, produced by the Public Health England (PHE) National Cardiovascular Intelligence Network (NCVIN) and launched today at the PHE Conference at Warwick University, estimates the total number of adults with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in England. Whilst 3.8 million people are estimated to have both types of diabetes, approximately 90% of diabetes cases are Type 2; this is largely preventable or manageable by lifestyle changes and also provides additional benefits for health and wellbeing. The likelihood of developing Type 2 diabetes is increased by being overweight (although family history, ethnicity and age can also increase risk). The figures reiterate that diabetes is an increasing burden of ill health, underlining the need for urgent action to lessen the impact on individuals, as well as the health and social care system supporting them. The model suggests that 1 in 4 people with diabetes, an estimated 940,000, are unaware of their condition. The disease can lead to serious complications including foot amputation and kidney disease, and is associated with an increased risk of stroke and heart attack. John Newton, Chief Knowledge Officer at PHE, said: The number of people with diabetes has been steadily increasing and tackling it is fundamental to the sustainable future of the NHS. Diabetes can be an extremely serious disease for those that have it and treating it and its complications costs the NHS almost £10 billion a year. Developing Type 2 diabetes is not an inevitable part of aging, we have an opportunity through public health to reverse this trend and safeguard the health of the nation and the future of the NHS. The proportion of people who have diabetes increases with age: 9% of people aged 45 to 54 have diabetes, but for ov Continue reading >>

Rising Incidence Of Type 2 Diabetes In Children In The U.k.

Rising Incidence Of Type 2 Diabetes In Children In The U.k.

Abstract OBJECTIVE—To estimate the incidence of type 2 diabetes in children <17 years of age and to investigate the relationship of diabetes with increasing childhood obesity in the U.K. and the Republic of Ireland (ROI). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Active monthly reporting of cases by consultant pediatricians occurred through the framework of the British Pediatric Surveillance Unit, with additional reports from specialist diabetes nurses. All children <17 years of age and diagnosed by their clinician as having non–type 1 diabetes from 1 October 2004 to 31 October 2005 were included. RESULTS—A total of 168 confirmed cases of non–type 1 diabetes were reported, resulting in a national incidence (excluding the ROI) of 1.3 · 100,000−1 · year−1. Of these, 40% were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes giving a minimum incidence of 0.53 · 100,000−1 · year−1. Children of ethnic minorities were greatly overrepresented, with those of black and South-Asian origin (England data only) having an incidence of 3.9 and 1.25 · 100,000−1 · year−1, respectively, compared with 0.35 · 100,000−1 · year−1 in those defined as white. Of those diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, 95% were overweight and 83% obese according to International Obesity Task Force guidelines. Eighty-four percent had a family history of type 2 diabetes. CONCLUSIONS—Type 2 diabetes is still less common than type 1 diabetes in U.K. children. However, compared with previous prevalence data, the frequency of type 2 diabetes appears to be increasing. Incidence among ethnic minorities is far higher than in whites, as previously described in the U.S. Increased adiposity and family history of type 2 diabetes were strongly associated with the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in U.K. children. The growing pre Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Uk: Supplements Containing This Enzyme Could Help Manage Symptoms | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Type 2 Diabetes Uk: Supplements Containing This Enzyme Could Help Manage Symptoms | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Type 2 diabetes: Supplements with the co-enzyme Ubiquinone Q10 could help manage symptoms Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. People should be aware signs and symptoms of diabetes are not always obvious and the condition is often diagnosed during GP check ups. Type 2 diabetes's the fastest growing health crisis in the UK Dr David Mantle, author of the study in The British Journal of Diabetes, said: The body of evidence pointing to the potentially beneficial effects of Ubiquinone Q10 supplements for Type 2 diabetes sufferers is substantial. As the article outlines, controlled clinical trials have shown significant benefits in blood sugar control and vascular function for Type 2 diabetics who have taken Ubiquinone Q10 on a regular basis. Ubiquinone Q10 is also generally well tolerated with no serious adverse effects reported in long-term use and its safety has also been documented in over 200 randomised controlled trials in a wide range of disorders. Taken together, these results are certainly something worth considering by Type 2 diabetes sufferers and healthcare professionals involved in treating and managing the condition. Type 2 diabetes: The co-enzyme Ubiquinone Q10 is a vitamin-like substance Dr Mantle, who is also a medical adviser at Pharma Nord UK, said for Q10 supplementation to be effective, it needs to be absorbed by the body what is known as bioavailability. For this he recommends Pharma Nords Bio-Quinone Q10. The NHS recommends that if youre diagnosed with type 2 diabetes you should eat healthily, take regular exercise and carry out regular blood test to ensure your blood glucose levels stay balanced. As type 2 Continue reading >>

Bradford Revealed As Having The Highest Diabetes Prevalence In The Uk

Bradford Revealed As Having The Highest Diabetes Prevalence In The Uk

Bradford revealed as having the highest diabetes prevalence in the UK Diabetes UK chief executive Chris Askew said the figures should be a wake up call for the country. (Photo: Philippa Edge) One in 15 people in the UK are thought to be living with diabetes as the number of people with the condition has doubled in the last 20 years, shocking new figures reveal. Diabetes UK said the condition is the fastest growing health crisis of our time as it found that the number of people diagnosed with the condition has reached almost 3.7 million an increase of 1.9 million since 1998. Meanwhile, a further 12.3 million people are at an increased risk of Type 2 diabetes, according to the charitys analysis. The number of people diagnosed with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes has increased by almost 100,000 since last year from 3,590,501 to 3,689,509. Bradford has the UKs highest prevalence of diabetes, with more than one in 10 people (10.4 per cent) in the West Yorkshire city diagnosed with the condition. The lowest prevalence is in Richmond, west London, where just 3.6 per cent of people are living with a diagnosis, the charity found. The national average is 6.6 per cent. Diabetes is the fastest growing health crisis of our time; and the fact that diagnoses have doubled in just 20 years should give all of us serious pause for thought. Chris Askew, Chief Executive, Diabetes UK The true figure is likely to be worse: Diabetes UK estimates that there are nearly one million people who have the condition but are not aware of it. Almost nine in ten people diagnosed with diabetes have Type 2 diabetes, which has been linked to lifestyle factors such as obesity. Diabetes is the fastest growing health crisis of our time; and the fact that diagnoses have doubled in just 20 years should give all of us Continue reading >>

About Type 2 Diabetes

About Type 2 Diabetes

There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form. About 3.3 million people in the UK have been diagnosed with diabetes, and of these, more than 9 out of 10 have type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is more common among older people, but you can develop it at any age. It’s becoming more common in young adults and children. It’s usually associated with being overweight and not very active. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body stops reacting to insulin properly, and you may also not produce enough of insulin. Insulin is a hormone (a chemical made by your body) that controls the amount of glucose in your blood. It helps glucose move from your blood into your body tissues – like your muscle cells – when you need a quick form of energy. If your body is not responding to insulin properly, your blood glucose level can become too high. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes If you have type 2 diabetes, you may not have any obvious symptoms. Your diabetes may be discovered during a routine medical check-up with your GP. If you do have symptoms of type 2 diabetes, you may: pass urine more often than usual be constantly thirsty lose weight for no obvious reason be extremely tired have blurred vision have itchy skin around your genitals or get regular genito-urinary infections, such as thrush If you have any of these symptoms, see your GP. Diagnosis of type 2 diabetes Your GP will ask about your symptoms and examine you. They may ask you to have a blood test for glucose. Other tests can include the following. A fasting blood glucose test. You will need to have this test at a time when you haven’t eaten anything for at least eight hours. Glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1C) test. Your HbA1C level is a measure of how much glucose has been taken Continue reading >>

Five Million People At High Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes, New Figures Estimate

Five Million People At High Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes, New Figures Estimate

Five million people in England have blood sugar levels indicating a high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, according to a new report published today. The Public Health England (PHE) report provides the most up to date estimate of how many people over 16 in England have a high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. It was commissioned by the NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme (NHS DPP) run by NHS England, (PHE) and Diabetes UK, and compiled by PHE’s National Cardiovascular Health Intelligence Network (NCVIN). The NHS DPP will support people in reducing their risk of developing Type 2 diabetes by helping them lose weight, be more active and have a healthier diet. The new estimate further underlines the need to act on Type 2 diabetes, especially as it already results in 22,000 early deaths and costs the NHS £8.8billion every year. An evidence review also published today by PHE shows programmes similar to the NHS DPP can be successful in preventing 26% of people at high risk of Type 2 diabetes from going on to develop the condition. People supported by diabetes prevention programmes lose on average 1.57kg more weight than those not on a programme aiming to significantly reduce diabetes risk. Both reports have shaped what the NHS DPP will offer – at least nine months of information, support, group and one to one sessions on weight loss, physical activity and diet. Practitioners, clinicians, academics and the public are currently being consulted on a proposed outline of the programme. Consultation responses will further inform the programme, with a phased national rollout starting in 2016. For more information visit the PHE website. Continue reading >>

Risk Factors For Renal Dysfunction In Type 2 Diabetes: U.k. Prospective Diabetes Study 74.

Risk Factors For Renal Dysfunction In Type 2 Diabetes: U.k. Prospective Diabetes Study 74.

Risk factors for renal dysfunction in type 2 diabetes: U.K. Prospective Diabetes Study 74. Diabetes Trial Unit, Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. Not all patients with type 2 diabetes develop renal dysfunction. Identifying those at risk is problematic because even microalbuminuria, often used clinically as an indicator of future renal dysfunction, does not always precede worsening renal function. We sought to identify clinical risk factors at diagnosis of type 2 diabetes associated with later development of renal dysfunction. Of 5,102 U.K. Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) participants, prospective analyses were undertaken in those without albuminuria (n = 4,031) or with normal plasma creatinine (n=5,032) at diagnosis. Stepwise proportional hazards multivariate regression was used to assess association of putative baseline risk factors with subsequent development of albuminuria (microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria) or renal impairment (Cockcroft-Gault estimated creatinine clearance <60 ml/min or doubling of plasma creatinine). Over a median of 15 years of follow-up 1,544 (38%) of 4,031 patients developed albuminuria and 1,449 (29%) of 5,032 developed renal impairment. Of 4,006 patients with the requisite data for both outcomes, 1,534 (38%) developed albuminuria and 1,132 (28%) developed renal impairment. Of the latter, 575 (51%) did not have preceding albuminuria. Development of albuminuria or renal impairment was independently associated with increased baseline systolic blood pressure, urinary albumin, plasma creatinine, and Indian-Asian ethnicity. Additional independent risk factors for albuminuria were male sex, increased waist circumference, plasma triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, HbA(1c) (A1C), increased w Continue reading >>

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