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Type 2 Diabetes Treatments

Update On The Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Update On The Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: LIFESTYLE CHANGES Dietary intake and physical exercise are the two main determinants of the energy balance[10], and they are considered as a basic base in the treatment of patients with diabetes. Adequate rest is also very important for maintaining energy levels and well-being, and all patients should be advised to sleep approximately 7 h per night[9]. Evidence supports an association of 6 to 9 h of sleep per night with a reduction in cardiometabolic risk factors[11], whereas sleep deprivation aggravates insulin resistance, hypertension, hyperglycaemia, and dyslipidaemia[12]. On the other hand, a screening of patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnoea should be performed, and refer them to a sleep specialist for evaluation and treatment[9]. Although the pharmacological options are each time more extensive and they offer more therapeutics possibilities, especially in the T2DM, the interventions in the life style are essentials in the approach of these patients and they are needed to get the therapeutics goals[13]. Diet When nutritional intervention is contemplated, the co-morbidities that can coexist in a diabetic patient also have to be considered. The recommendations on dietary aspects can contribute to achieve the desired blood glucose, blood pressure, lipid profile and weight[10,14], as well as improve sleep apnoea, depression and quality of life related to health; in addition, it has been observed that the incidence of urinary incontinence in women is reduced[15-18]. Numerous randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the metabolic benefits of nutritional recommendations in reducing HbA1c; being variables the results got depending mainly on the length of the disease[19,20]. Energetic contribution: Total caloric intake diet will depend on several fac Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms

A A A Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is a chronic medical condition that results from an inability of the body to properly use insulin. Type 2 diabetes is different from type 1 diabetes, in which the body is unable to produce sufficient levels of insulin. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes include A fasting blood sugar level of 126 mg/dl or greater on two different days establishes the diagnosis of diabetes. A number of both oral and injectable medications have been developed fo A hemoglobin A1c (HBA1c) level of 6.5% or greater indicates diabetes. Managing type 2 diabetes includes following a healthy eating plan and exercise, as well as medications in many cases. r the treatment of type 2 diabetes. A healthy eating plan and regular physical activity are important components of a type 2 diabetes treatment plan. There is no one recommended "diabetes diet" for all people with type 2 diabetes. Regular physical activity and modest weight loss can help reduce or prevent type 2 diabetes. Common complications of diabetes include cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, eye problems, and nerve damage. A A A Type 2 Diabetes (cont.) Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes mellitus. In type 2 diabetes, there is an elevated level of sugar (glucose) in the bloodstream due to the body's inability to properly respond to insulin. Insulin is a hormone that allows the body to utilize glucose for energy. Insulin is produced by specialized cells in the pancreas. An elevated level of blood glucose is known as hyperglycemia. The excessive levels of glucose in the blood spill over into the urine, leading to the presence of glucose in the urine (glucosuria). Type 2 diabetes is an enormous public health problem. It is estimated that about 29.1 million Americans (9.1% of all Americans) have Continue reading >>

This New Treatment Could Provide Weeks Of Glucose Control For Type 2 Diabetes Patients

This New Treatment Could Provide Weeks Of Glucose Control For Type 2 Diabetes Patients

To control their blood sugar levels, people with type 2 diabetes constantly need to rely on medication, but it's a tricky condition to manage, especially if you need daily insulin shots. Researchers have been working on a new method for delivering diabetes drugs to make them last longer in the body. Now a recent study using both mice and monkeys has shown potential for treatments that would only require a couple of injections a month. Some of the latest-generation type 2 diabetes drugs contain a molecule called GLP1 (glucagon-like peptide-1), which stimulates insulin production in the body only when it needs more glucose. That sounds ideal, but unfortunately, GLP1 has a really short half-life - it breaks down in the body quickly, making it an impractical long-term treatment on its own. By combining it with other molecules, it's possible to extend the half-life of GLP1. But that method still only gets us to about 3-7 days. Right now, patients in the US already have some options that can be injected weekly, but scientists are looking for a way to slow down the release of the drug itself. Now a team from Duke University has managed to combine GLP1 with a biopolymer molecule that starts out as a liquid in colder temperatures, but thickens into a gel-like substance in reaction to body heat. This means the solution can be administered with a simple injection, but once it gets into the body, the drug is released very slowly, so it can control blood glucose levels for longer with just one dose. To test how their new solution would work for actual diabetes treatment, the researchers tried the drug in both mice and in rhesus monkeys - two species with well-established diabetes models. They got exciting results in both: in mice, the new GLP1 solution controlled glucose levels for Continue reading >>

How Can Type 2 Diabetes Be Cured?

How Can Type 2 Diabetes Be Cured?

Curing Insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes is easy. In fact, it is so easy to correct that I cannot understand why it is a problem. I guess it is easier to take a pill than put in the effort needed to cure yourself. For the past three years, I have been preaching the cure, hoping someone would hear. To cure yourself of type 2 diabetes, all you have to do is give up flour and sugar. Read all labels and if flour and/or sugar is listed, don’t use it. I am making an assumption that you have not allowed your diabetes to go on so long that it has destroyed some of your vital tissue. If it has gone that far, it may be too late and you will have to take medication for the rest of your life. Three months after I gave up flour and sugar, I lost weight, I no longer had to take high blood pressure medication, my triglycerides went from 330 to optimal, my cholesterol became optimal, my A1C went to 5.7, I no longer had type 2 diabetes and I was no longer insulin resistant. It has been three years and my health continues to improve. During these three years, I continued to improve my diet. Currently, I try to maintain 70% of my food intake is from vegetables and fruit. 15% of my diet is from protein, and 15% from fat. I no longer use liquid oils, I use saturated fat. Mostly from coconut oil and bacon grease. I avoid all man-made or man-altered carbohydrates. Exercise is also important. I am retired, so, I do not have a problem with getting an hour of exercise each day. I do Calisthenics and some jogging. Three years ago, I was having problems with arthritis. Each day, just sitting was a problem. To avoid knee pain when sitting at the kitchen table, I would position my butt over the chair and let my body fall into the chair. It also hurt my knees to get into the car and then it hu Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

font size A A A 1 2 3 4 5 Next What is Type 2 Diabetes? The most common form of diabetes is type 2 diabetes, formerly called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus or "adult onset" diabetes, so-called because it typically develops in adults over age 35, though it can develop at any age. Type 2 diabetes is diagnosed more often in people who are overweight or obese, and who are not physically active. Type 2 diabetes is an illness in which the body does not process ingested sugars (glucose) properly. In type 2, the body usually produces some insulin, but not enough to allow the glucose into the cells for the body to use as energy. In addition, there can be insulin resistance, where it becomes difficult for the body to use the insulin produced. Type 2 diabetes is seen both in men and in women, though men have a slightly higher incidence of developing the disease. It can also be diagnosed in children, even though typically it is seen in adults. What Causes Type 2 Diabetes? Several factors can cause type 2 diabetes, such as insulin resistance, heredity, being obese or overweight, lack of physical activity, abnormal glucose production by the liver, metabolic syndrome, problems with cell signaling, and beta cell dysfunction. Insulin resistance is a condition where the body still produces insulin but is unable to use it properly. It is more commonly seen in people who are overweight or obese, and lead a sedentary lifestyle. This leads to a buildup of glucose (sugar) in the blood, which can result in prediabetes or diabetes. Certain genes that affect insulin production rather than insulin resistance are a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. Family history of diabetes is a risk factor, and people of certain races or ethnicities are at higher risk, including African Americ Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment Pipeline Looks Promising

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment Pipeline Looks Promising

The creation of novel investigational drugs that target a protein receptor found in fat tissue could pave the way for better treatments for type 2 diabetes. For the first time, a pair of studies published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry and BBA-General Subjects were able to demonstrate how new potential anti-diabetic drugs interact with their target on a molecular level. The function of these potential drugs differs from the commonly prescribed Metformin, which acts on the liver to reduce glucose production. Instead, they target the protein receptor PPARgamma to either fully or partially activate it to lower blood sugar by increasing insulin sensitivity and altering fat and sugar metabolism. “Type 2 diabetes is characterized by resistance to insulin with subsequent high blood sugar, which leads to serious disease,” said lead investigator Dr John Bruning. “It is usually associated with poor lifestyle factors such as diet and lack of exercise. “People with severe diabetes need to take insulin but having to inject this can be problematic, and it’s difficult to get insulin levels just right. It’s highly desirable for people to come off insulin injections and instead use oral therapeutics.” The need to develop safer and more efficacious drugs to treat type 2 diabetes is increasing in importance as the prevalence of the disease continues to rise. “[The] prevalence of type 2 diabetes in Australia alone as more than tripled since 1990, with an estimated cost of $6 billion a year,” Dr Bruning said. The first study was a collaboration with The Scripps Research Institute in Florida, and described an honors research project led by Rebecca Frkic. In the project, 14 different versions of a drug that partially activated PPARgamma were produced with a goal of ac Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a disease that affects how your body processes blood sugar (glucose). If you have type 2 diabetes, this means your body doesn’t make enough insulin, or it can’t use the insulin it has. Our bodies use glucose—or sugar—for energy. Insulin allows the cells in our body to process glucose. If your body doesn’t have enough insulin, glucose can collect in your blood. This causes high blood sugar. There’s no cure for type 2 diabetes. People with this disease will need to manage it with medication, diet, and exercise for the rest of their life. The reason doctors call diabetes a “chronic” disease is because it is a long-term health problem that can’t be cured or prevented with medication. Type 2 diabetes is also called adult onset diabetes. It’s also the most common kind of diabetes. Doctors and researchers don’t know exactly causes type 2 diabetes. Some families have higher rates of the disease. But lifestyle factors like poor diet, obesity, and not exercising enough increase your chances of developing the disease. Some medications also may increase your chances of getting it. Risk Factors For Type 2 Diabetes A risk factor is anything that increases your chances of getting a certain kind of disease. There are many risk factors for type 2 diabetes. This means that if you have or do any of these things, you have a higher chance of getting type 2 diabetes. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include the following: Having a history of diabetes in your family Being overweight Age. People who are older than 45 have a higher chance of developing diabetes. Not getting enough exercise Being pregnant Race and ethnicity. Hispanic Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, and American Indians have higher chances of developing type 2 diabetes than Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease that can lead to many other health conditions when it’s not managed properly, including kidney disease, blindness, leg and food amputations, nerve damage, and even death. (1) Type 2 diabetes is a completely preventable and reversible condition, and with diet and lifestyle changes, you can greatly reduce your chances of getting the disease or reverse the condition if you’ve already been diagnosed. If you are one of the millions of Americans struggling with diabetes symptoms, begin the steps to reverse diabetes naturally today. With my diabetic diet plan, suggested supplements and increased physical activity, you can quickly regain your health and reverse diabetes the natural way. The Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2) The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estimated that almost 34 million U.S. adults were prediabetic in 2015. People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. Without proper int Continue reading >>

The Top Diabetes Treatment Options For Better Blood Sugar Control

The Top Diabetes Treatment Options For Better Blood Sugar Control

There are some health conditions that can be managed by simply taking a pill — but type 2 diabetes isn’t one of them. Diabetes is a complex condition that often requires lifestyle changes and sometimes additional treatment that can help keep your blood sugar level under control. For some people, making healthful lifestyle changes can be enough to gain control over their blood sugar level. For others, taking medication may also be necessary. There are many drug options available, and the initial approach might need to be tweaked as treatment progresses. How Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Treated Through Diet and Lifestyle Changes The first approach to managing diabetes usually means practicing healthier lifestyle habits. This is often centered on eating a better diet, getting exercise, and losing weight if necessary. If your doctor says that you need to make these changes, it’s smart to tailor them to your personal preferences so that you'll be more likely to stick with them. “First, I ask people about their exercise patterns and about what they like to eat, and try to get an idea about what might be improved,” says endocrinologist William Sivitz, MD, a professor of internal medicine at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in Iowa City. Dr. Sivitz emphasizes the importance of being active, eating a healthy diet, and having a good understanding of the role that carbohydrates play. He recommends eating healthy carbs, such as nonstarchy vegetables, fruits, legumes, whole grains, and nonfat dairy products. A certified diabetes educator or a registered dietitian can help personalize your diet and teach you strategies to control your blood sugar. Depending on your desired blood sugar range and weight loss goals, recommendations for foods, carbohydrate intake, an Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms, Signs, Diet, And Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms, Signs, Diet, And Treatment

Type 2 diabetes is a condition in which cells cannot use blood sugar (glucose) efficiently for energy. This happens when the cells become insensitive to insulin and the blood sugar gradually gets too high. There are two types of diabetes mellitus, type 1 and type 2. In type 2, the pancreas still makes insulin, but the cells cannot use it very efficiently. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas cannot make insulin due to auto-immune destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells. Type 2 can be caused by: Lack of activity (sedentary behavior) Genetics Risk factors include: Being overweight Being sedentary including watching more than 2 hours of TV per day Drinking soda Consuming too much sugar and processed food The signs and symptoms of this type of this type of diabetes are sometimes subtle. The major symptom is often being overweight. Other symptoms and signs include: Urinating a lot Gaining or losing weight unintentionally Dark skin under armpits, chin, or groin Unusual odor to urine Blurry vision Often there are no specific symptoms of the condition and it goes undiagnosed until routine blood tests are ordered. A blood sugar level more than 125 when fasting or more than 200 randomly is a diagnosis for diabetes. Treatment is with diet and lifestyle changes that include eating less sugary foods, and foods that are high in simple carbohydrates (sugar, bread, and pasta.) Sometimes a person will need to take drugs, for example, metformin (Glucophage). People with both types of diabetes need monitor their blood sugar levels often to avoid high (hyperglycemia) and low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia). Complications include heart and kidney disease, neuropathy, sexual and/or urinary problems, foot problems, and eye problems. This health condition can be prevented by following a Continue reading >>

Scientists Discover A New Way To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Scientists Discover A New Way To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Medication currently being used to treat obesity is also proving to have significant health benefits for patients with type 2 diabetes. A new study published today in Molecular Metabolism explains how this therapeutic benefit for type 2 diabetes is achieved by acting in our brain. Scientists from the University of Aberdeen Rowett Institute, in collaboration with teams from the Universities of Cambridge and Michigan, have discovered that the medication Lorcaserin acts in the brain to improve type 2 diabetes by modifying the activity of neurones that help to regulate blood glucose levels. Lorcaserin is prescribed to help patients lose weight and works by regulating how hungry we feel. However, researchers have discovered that as well as doing this, the drug can also reduce glucose levels in the body and increase the body's cells sensitivity to insulin. When the body fails to produce enough insulin or the body's cells fail to react to insulin this leads to Type 2 diabetes meaning that glucose remains in the blood rather than being used as fuel for energy. Professor Lora Heisler, who is leading the Aberdeen team, explains: "Current medications for type 2 diabetes improve symptoms of this disease by acting in the body. We have discovered that this obesity drug, lorcaserin, acts in the brain to improve type 2 diabetes. "Lorcaserin targets important brain hormones called pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) peptides, which are responsible for regulating appetite. So as well as sending messages telling us we are full and no longer need to eat, leading to weight loss, the POMC hormones also activate a different brain circuit that helps keep our blood glucose in check. "This discovery is important because type 2 diabetes is an incredibly prevalent disease in the modern world and new treat Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Treatments

Type 2 Diabetes Treatments

In patients affected by type 2 diabetes, their glucose or blood sugar is too high because either the body is not able to produce enough insulin or the cells ignore the insulin that is produced. Cells in the body use glucose for energy, and the hormone insulin draws the glucose from the blood into the cells. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. At MedStar Good Samaritan Hospital, our diabetes care team provides patients with the proper education and essential type 2 diabetes treatments they need to live healthy, enjoyable lives. The Connection Between Pre-Diabetes and Diabetes In most cases, individuals experience pre-diabetes before developing type 2 diabetes. The blood glucose levels are higher than normal but still not high enough to be classified as diabetes. It is possible that long-term damage, especially to the heart and circulatory system, can occur during pre-diabetes. With early detection and a healthy lifestyle, you can keep your blood glucose levels under control and delay or prevent type 2 diabetes. Learn more about the different forms of diabetes. Common Risk Factors and Symptoms Some diabetes risk factors can be controlled, such as excess body weight, diet, activity level, and high blood pressure. On the other hand, risk factors that cannot be controlled include: age, gender, race and family history. Check out a full list of risk factors. Early symptoms of diabetes can vary, depending on if you have low or high blood sugar. They may include the following: Low Blood Sugar High Blood Sugar Anxiousness/dizziness Blurred vision Fast heartbeat Drowsiness Headache Dry skin Impaired vision Extreme thirst Irritability Frequent urination Shaking Hunger Sweating Weakness/fatigue If you experience any or a combination of these symptoms, consult with y Continue reading >>

Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes can affect all people, regardless of age. Early symptoms of type 2 diabetes may be missed, so those affected may not even know they have the condition. An estimated one out of every three people within the early stages of type 2 diabetes are not aware they have it. Diabetes interferes with the body's ability to metabolize carbohydrates for energy, leading to high levels of blood sugar. These chronically high blood sugar levels increase a person's risk of developing serious health problems. Potential Consequences of High Blood Sugar Nerve problems Vision loss Joint deformities Diabetic coma (life-threatening) Other diabetes complications from high blood pressure are listed further along in this slideshow Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: Thirst Although people with type 2 diabetes may not have specific symptoms, an increase in thirst is one symptom that is characteristic of the condition. The increased thirst can accompany other symptoms like frequent urination, feelings of unusual hunger, dry mouth, and weight gain or loss. Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: Headaches Other symptoms that can occur if high blood sugar levels persist are fatigue, blurred vision, and headaches. Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: Infections Often, type 2 diabetes is only identified after its negative health consequences are apparent. Certain infections and sores that take a long time to heal are a warning sign. Other possible signs include frequent yeast infections or urinary tract infections and itchy skin. Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: Sexual Dysfunction Sexual problems can occur as a result of type 2 diabetes. Since diabetes can damage the blood vessels and nerves in the sex organs, decreased sensation can develop, potentially leading to difficulties with orgasm. Vaginal dryne Continue reading >>

Treatments For Type 2 Diabetes

Treatments For Type 2 Diabetes

Prescription treatment... Visit Site Some forms of Type 2 diabetes treatments are necessary for more than 30 million people in the United States alone, as diabetes is one of the most critical health concerns in the modern history. This condition also affects millions of people across the world, who are unable to properly regulate their blood sugar levels as a result of insulin resistance. This inability to properly use the insulin that the body produces in the pancreas can be very serious because the body is often unable to make enough insulin to regulate glucose. This results in high blood sugar, which can lead to blurred vision, increased thirst, and hunger, weight gain, cognitive confusion, and fatigue. Long-term effects of type 2 diabetes include diabetic retinopathy, kidney disease, and a shortened life span. As this disease affects so many people around the world, there are a wide variety of type 2 diabetes treatments and preventative measures available. They can help in lowering the risk of developing this condition, as well as managing the symptoms if you have been diagnosed. Type 2 Diabetes Treatments Some of the best type 2 diabetes treatments are the medications, insulin injections, and bariatric surgery. These are generally considered more formal and involve a doctor’s advice, while others can easily be administered or practiced at home to improve your quality of life and keep you healthy. Diabetes Medication There are quite a few options when it comes to diabetes medication, a choice many people make, particularly if they don’t require insulin injections every day. Diabetes medications called sulfonylureas can increase the amount of insulin the body produces, countering the diminishing effects of insulin resistance. It is the most popular of the type 2 Continue reading >>

Oral Pharmacologic Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Clinical Practice Guideline Update From The American College Of Physicians Free

Oral Pharmacologic Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Clinical Practice Guideline Update From The American College Of Physicians Free

Abstract Description: The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline to present the evidence and provide clinical recommendations on oral pharmacologic treatment of type 2 diabetes in adults. This guideline serves as an update to the 2012 ACP guideline on the same topic. This guideline is endorsed by the American Academy of Family Physicians. Methods: This guideline is based on a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials and observational studies published through December 2015 on the comparative effectiveness of oral medications for type 2 diabetes. Evaluated interventions included metformin, thiazolidinediones, sulfonylureas, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, and sodium–glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors. Study quality was assessed, data were extracted, and results were summarized qualitatively on the basis of the totality of evidence identified by using several databases. Evaluated outcomes included intermediate outcomes of hemoglobin A1c, weight, systolic blood pressure, and heart rate; all-cause mortality; cardiovascular and cerebrovascular morbidity and mortality; retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy; and harms. This guideline grades the recommendations by using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. Target Audience and Patient Population: The target audience for this guideline includes all clinicians, and the target patient population includes adults with type 2 diabetes. Recommendation 1: ACP recommends that clinicians prescribe metformin to patients with type 2 diabetes when pharmacologic therapy is needed to improve glycemic control. (Grade: strong recommendation; moderate-quality evidence) Recommendation 2: ACP recommends that clinicians consider adding either a Continue reading >>

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