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Type 2 Diabetes Test At Home

Blood Glucose Testing For Type 2 Diabetes

Blood Glucose Testing For Type 2 Diabetes

Tweet In the UK, the National Health Service (NHS) does not permit people with type 2 diabetes who are not treated with insulin access to diabetes test strips on prescription unless doctors state a legitimate reason or benefit for a particular patient. The reasons for this approach may be due to the cost to the NHS of providing test strips and the fact that there are no available resources to offer education on blood glucose testing to individuals with type 2 diabetes. However, there is now a bank of evidence that structured Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG) can have positive effects on people with non-insulin dependent type 2 diabetes, including helping them to better understand their condition, reduce their HbA1c levels, and improve their diabetes control. Support is vital Blood glucose meters are available to buy from pharmacies both online and on the high street. But research suggests that SMBG is only of significant benefit to a person's diabetes management or overall health if they are supported with guidance on how to test, when to test and what to do with their results. Research has concluded that should an individual test under the right circumstances with support and expert guidance, they can significantly improve their health. How and when to test? In order to get the maximum benefit of testing blood glucose, studies have shown that it needs to be done in a structured, systematic way, one which provides information which can be useful in monitoring a person's diabetes and also in providing specific feedback. SMBG should not be conducted at random or too frequently - tests require fingers to be pricked to draw some blood and lots of tests within a short space of time cannot only make fingers quite sore but the information could be overwhelming so health Continue reading >>

Are There Any Home Tests For Diabetes?

Are There Any Home Tests For Diabetes?

Are There Any Home Testing Kits For Diabetes? Yes, there are home tests for diabetes (which also work for testing for prediabetes). If you suspect you or a loved one is showing signs of diabetes then you may wish to test at home before contacting your doctor. There are two main types of home tests which are available without prescription through pharmacies, online pharmacies and stores like Walmart. These are urine test strips and home A1C Kits. However, it should be noted, neither kit is FDA approved for self-diagnosis, but rather for ongoing blood sugar monitoring. If you are worried about diabetes, contact your doctor for appropriate testing. 1. Urine Test Strips: Testing Blood Glucose Levels Urine tests are not invasive, meaning no blood sample is needed. Most kits contain 1 to 3 specially coated strips which, when inserted into a urine sample, turn a particular color according to the level of blood sugar detected. Usually you are instructed to wait for 2 hours after your last meal before testing to ensure the results are not artificially high. Some tests are even sensitive enough to indicate prediabetes - an elevated level of blood sugar which isn't quite high enough (yet) to be considered full-blown diabetes (see diabetes diagnosis). The results are available in 60 to 90 seconds. Most kits cost under $10 or £8. • Choice DM In-Home High Sugar Level Test Kit, Early Detection. • Testmedica Diabetes Home Scan. • Suresign Diabetes Urine Screening Test Kit. • Boots Diabetes Home Test (Europe only). Points To Consider If you test positive, you should call your doctor immediately for more clinical tests. While home tests if you follow the instructions are generally accurate, they can occasionally produce false-negative or false-positive results (exercise, your me Continue reading >>

Getting Tested

Getting Tested

You’ll need to get your blood sugar tested to find out for sure if you have prediabetes or type 1, type 2, or gestational diabetes. Testing is simple, and results are usually available quickly. Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes, and Prediabetes Your doctor will have you take one or more of the following blood tests to confirm the diagnosis: A1C Test This measures your average blood sugar level over the past 2 or 3 months. An A1C below 5.7% is normal, between 5.7 and 6.4% indicates you have prediabetes, and 6.5% or higher indicates you have diabetes. Fasting Blood Sugar Test This measures your blood sugar after an overnight fast (not eating). A fasting blood sugar level of 99 mg/dL or lower is normal, 100 to 125 mg/dL indicates you have prediabetes, and 126 mg/dL or higher indicates you have diabetes. Glucose Tolerance Test This measures your blood sugar before and after you drink a liquid that contains glucose. You’ll fast (not eat) overnight before the test and have your blood drawn to determine your fasting blood sugar level. Then you’ll drink the liquid and have your blood sugar level checked 1 hour, 2 hours, and possibly 3 hours afterward. At 2 hours, a blood sugar level of 140 mg/dL or lower is considered normal, 140 to 199 mg/dL indicates you have prediabetes, and 200 mg/dL or higher indicates you have diabetes. Random Blood Sugar Test This measures your blood sugar at the time you’re tested. You can take this test at any time and don’t need to fast (not eat) first. A blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL or higher indicates you have diabetes. Result* A1C Test Fasting Blood Sugar Test Glucose Tolerance Test Random Blood Sugar Test Normal Below 5.7% 99 mg/dL or below 140 mg/dL or below Prediabetes 5.7 – 6.4% 100 – 125 mg/dL 140 – 199 mg/dL Diabetes 6.5% or Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Test Measures And Results To Be Sure!

Prediabetes Test Measures And Results To Be Sure!

Do you want to be very sure that you’re doing ok on the prediabetes front? Here is a Prediabetes Test method that is used by medical experts who believe you can never be too careful with blood sugar. Step 1 Get yourself a good quality home glucometer. It will help you monitoring the glucose levels regularly. Step 2 Fast overnight. Twelve hours is a must. So if you ate dinner at 7pm, nothing except water till 7am. Take the first reading. This is called your Fasting Blood Glucose or FBG. Note this down. Step 3 Take the next blood sugar reading just before starting lunch Step 4 Eat your typical lunch. Once you’re done with lunch, do not eat anything else for the next 3 hours. After one hour of lunch, test for sugar and note it down. Step 5 Two hours after lunch, test again Step 6 Last test due: 3hrs after lunch Repeat these tests for two days, recording what you ate and what you measured for each test. Now that you know how to test for diabetes at home, read on to find out what these test results mean. What Are We Measuring in Prediabetes Test? The first test (Fasting Blood Sugar or FBG) tells us how much sugar is floating in your blood after you’ve fasted for 12 hours. It should be at its lowest at this point. Remember: The American Diabetes Association classifies anyone with fasting blood sugar between 100-126 mg/DL or the equivalent of HbA1c between 5.7-6.4% as having prediabetes. We, however, know that sugar can do serious damage (cardiac damage, risk of cancer etc.) at far lower levels than this. So doctors keen to protect their patients from even slight prediabetes damage want to see a number less than 86 mg/DL on this test. Maintain a diabetes test results chart at a place you can see daily and fill in the numbers regularly to keep track of your blood sugar le Continue reading >>

How To Tell If You Have Prediabetes

How To Tell If You Have Prediabetes

Kali Nine LLC via Getty Images Dear Savvy Senior, My 62-year-old sister was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and was surprised when the doctor told her that she’s probably had it or prediabetes for many years. My question is what determines prediabetes and how can you know if you have it? —Surprised Senior Dear Surprised, Underlying today’s growing epidemic of type 2 diabetes is a much larger epidemic called prediabetes, which is when the blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. The National Institutes of Health estimates that as many as 79 million Americans today have prediabetes. Left untreated, it almost always turns into type 2 diabetes within 10 years. And, if you have prediabetes, the long-term damage it can cause — especially to your heart and circulatory system — may already be starting. But the good news is that prediabetes doesn’t mean that you’re destined for full-blown diabetes. Prediabetes can actually be reversed, and diabetes prevented, by making some simple lifestyle changes like losing weight, exercising, eating a healthy diet and cutting back on carbohydrates. Or, if you need more help, oral medications may also be an option. Get Checked? Because prediabetes typically causes no outward symptoms, most people that have it don’t realize it. The only way to know for sure is to get a blood test. Everyone age 45 years or older should consider getting tested for prediabetes, especially if you are overweight with a body mass index (BMI) above 25. See cdc.gov/bmi to calculate your BMI. If you are younger than 45 but are overweight, or have high blood pressure, a family history of diabetes, or belong to an ethnic group (Latino, Asian, African or Native American) at high risk for diabetes, you too Continue reading >>

Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring Of Diabetes

Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring Of Diabetes

According to the latest American Heart Association's Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics, about 8 million people 18 years and older in the United States have type 2 diabetes and do not know it. Often type 1 diabetes remains undiagnosed until symptoms become severe and hospitalization is required. Left untreated, diabetes can cause a number of health complications. That's why it's so important to both know what warning signs to look for and to see a health care provider regularly for routine wellness screenings. Symptoms In incidences of prediabetes, there are no symptoms. People may not be aware that they have type 1 or type 2 diabetes because they have no symptoms or because the symptoms are so mild that they go unnoticed for quite some time. However, some individuals do experience warning signs, so it's important to be familiar with them. Prediabetes Type 1 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes No symptoms Increased or extreme thirst Increased thirst Increased appetite Increased appetite Increased fatigue Fatigue Increased or frequent urination Increased urination, especially at night Unusual weight loss Weight loss Blurred vision Blurred vision Fruity odor or breath Sores that do not heal In some cases, no symptoms In some cases, no symptoms If you have any of these symptoms, see your health care provider right away. Diabetes can only be diagnosed by your healthcare provider. Who should be tested for prediabetes and diabetes? The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that you should be tested if you are: If your blood glucose levels are in normal range, testing should be done about every three years. If you have prediabetes, you should be checked for diabetes every one to two years after diagnosis. Tests for Diagnosing Prediabetes and Diabetes There are three ty Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Update: A lot of our readers ask us where can they find the best deals for test strips. We personally recommend Amazon. You can check the list of selections they offer by clicking here. Blood glucose test strips play a crucial role in helping you to monitor your daily blood glucose level and giving your doctor the data to adjust your medication to control your diabetes symptoms. Without the help from these little disposable strips, life with diabetes can become even more chaotic than ever. But what exactly are these thin little plastic slip and why are they so expensive? Are there any alternative method I can use? Where can I get the best deal on these test strips? This article will answer many of your questions and concerns regarding these blood glucose test strips: Table of Contents History on Glucose Test Strips How Does the Test Strips Work Why Are the Strips So Expensive? And Why the Price Discrepancy? Why Must Diabetic Patients Use Glucometer and Test Strip? How Often Should You Administer A Blood Glucose Test? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? How Accurate Are the Test Strips? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? What is a Urine Glucose Test? Can’t I Use This Procedure Instead? Expiration of Test Strips Medicare Plan B Coverage for Glucose Test Strips Where to Get the Best Deal on Test Strips? Ways to Save of Test Strips How to Avoid Counterfeit Blood Glucose Test Strips Can You Reuse Test Strips? Can You Make Your Own Test Strip? 4 Most Affordable Meters How to Pick the Right Glucometer? How to Dispose Used Test Strips, Lancets, and Needles? What to Do with All These Test Strip Containers? Selling Your Glucose Test Strips A Good Idea? Odd Way to Earn Some Money Back Questions? History on Glucose Test Strips The first glucomet Continue reading >>

Diabetes Urine Tests

Diabetes Urine Tests

Urine tests may be done in people with diabetes to evaluate severe hyperglycemia (severe high blood sugar) by looking for ketones in the urine. Ketones are a metabolic product produced when fat is metabolized. Ketones increase when there is insufficient insulin to use glucose for energy. Urine tests are also done to look for the presence of protein in the urine, which is a sign of kidney damage. Urine glucose measurements are less reliable than blood glucose measurements and are not used to diagnose diabetes or evaluate treatment for diabetes. They may be used for screening purposes. Testing for ketones is most common in people with type 1 diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes: What Are The Symptoms? This test detects the presence of ketones, which are byproducts of metabolism that form in the presence of severe hyperglycemia (elevated blood sugar). Ketones are formed from fat that is burned by the body when there is insufficient insulin to allow glucose to be used for fuel. When ketones build up to high levels, ketoacidosis (a serious and life-threatening condition) may occur. Ketone testing can be performed both at home and in the clinical laboratory. Ketones can be detected by dipping a test strip into a sample of urine. A color change on the test strip signals the presence of ketones in the urine. Ketones occur most commonly in people with type 1 diabetes, but uncommonly, people with type 2 diabetes may test positive for ketones. The microalbumin test detects microalbumin, a type of protein, in the urine. Protein is present in the urine when there is damage to the kidneys. Since the damage to blood vessels that occurs as a complication of diabetes can lead to kidney problems, the microalbumin test is done to check for damage to the kidneys over time. Can urine tests be used to Continue reading >>

How And When To Test Your Blood Sugar With Diabetes

How And When To Test Your Blood Sugar With Diabetes

Most people with diabetes need to check their blood sugar (glucose) levels regularly. The results help you and your doctor manage those levels, which helps you avoid diabetes complications. There are several ways to test your blood sugar: From Your Fingertip: You prick your finger with a small, sharp needle (called a lancet) and put a drop of blood on a test strip. Then you put the test strip into a meter that shows your blood sugar level. You get results in less than 15 seconds and can store this information for future use. Some meters can tell you your average blood sugar level over a period of time and show you charts and graphs of your past test results. You can get blood sugar meters and strips at your local pharmacy. Meters That Test Other Sites: Newer meters let you test sites other than your fingertip, such as your upper arm, forearm, base of the thumb, and thigh. You may get different results than from your fingertip. Blood sugar levels in the fingertips show changes more quickly than those in other testing sites. This is especially true when your blood sugar is rapidly changing, like after a meal or after exercise. If you are checking your sugar when you have symptoms of hypoglycemia, you should use your fingertip if possible, because these readings will be more accurate. Continuous Glucose Monitoring System: These devices, also called interstitial glucose measuring devices, are combined with insulin pumps. They are similar to finger-stick glucose results and can show patterns and trends in your results over time. You may need to check your blood sugar several times a day, such as before meals or exercise, at bedtime, before driving, and when you think your blood sugar levels are low. Everyone is different, so ask your doctor when and how often you should chec Continue reading >>

Am I Diabetic? How To Test Your Blood Sugar To Find Out

Am I Diabetic? How To Test Your Blood Sugar To Find Out

If you have not been diagnosed with diabetes but suspect you might have something wrong with your blood sugar, there is a simple way to find out. What you need to do is to test your blood sugar after you have eaten a meal that contains about sixty grams of carbohydrates. You can ask your doctor to test your blood sugar in the office if you have an appointment that takes place an hour or two after you've eaten or, if this isn't an option, you can use an inexpensive blood sugar meter to test your post-meal blood sugar yourself at home. You do not need a prescription to buy the meter or strips. One advantage of testing yourself at home is that with self-testing you do not run the risk of having a "diabetes" diagnosis written into your medical records which might make it impossible for you to buy health or life insurance. To run a post-meal blood sugar test do following: Borrow a family member's meter or buy an inexpensive meter and strips at the drug store or Walmart. The Walmart Relion meter store brand meters sold at pharamcies like CVS, Walgreens, etc are usually the least expensive. Some meters come with 10 free strips. Check to see if the meter you have bought includes strips. If it doesn't, buy the smallest package size available. Strips do not keep for very long once opened, so don't buy more than you need for a couple tests. Familiarize yourself with the instructions that came with your meter so that you know how to run a blood test. Practice a few times before you run your official test. Each meter is different. Be sure you understand how yours works. The first thing in the morning after you wake up but before you have eaten anything, test your blood sugar. Write down the result. This is your "fasting blood sugar." Now eat something containing at 60 - 70 grams of Continue reading >>

Home Test To Check If You Have Diabetes

Home Test To Check If You Have Diabetes

Testing blood sugar at home can be an effective way to treat and monitor your diabetes. Diabetes is one of the top 10 causes of death in North America. About 29.1 million people in the U.S. have diabetes – 8.1 million cases are undiagnosed. Suspecting that you or a loved one might have diabetes can be scary. It is a condition that causes sweeping changes to a person’s lifestyle. In most cases, because the early signs of diabetes are not known, being diagnosed comes as a shock. However, there are affordable tests that can be done at home to help diagnose diabetes in its early stages. But before you embark on home testing, it’s important to recognize the symptoms that can help you determine if home testing is necessary. Major symptoms of type 2 diabetes include: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Excessive hunger Fatigue Blurry vision Sores and cuts that won’t heal What are diabetic home tests? Although going in to see your doctor will give you accurate blood sugar readings, it can be a hassle making an appointment, waiting to see your doctor and traveling to and from the office. Instead you can do at home testing, which can help you better monitor and control your diabetes. There are different types of at-home tests you can complete daily to properly monitor your blood sugar levels. You can do a blood test, urine test or use an A1C kit. Those who would benefit from diabetic home testing are those with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, prediabetes and individuals who are showing signs of diabetes. By keeping track of blood sugar levels you can gauge how your current treatment and lifestyle habits are affecting your condition. A normal blood sugar reading, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is between 70 and 140 mg/dL. Low blood sug Continue reading >>

Home Blood Glucose Test: How To Test For Diabetes At Home

Home Blood Glucose Test: How To Test For Diabetes At Home

Home blood glucose testing is a safe and affordable way to detect diabetes before it becomes a health issue. Diabetes, especially in the early stages, does not always cause symptoms. Almost half of people with the disease don't know they have it. For people already diagnosed with diabetes, a simple diabetes home test is vital in the management of blood sugar levels. It could even be lifesaving. How to test for diabetes at home Home blood glucose monitoring is designed to offer a picture of how the body is processing glucose. A doctor might recommend testing at three different times, and often over the course of several days: Morning fasting reading: This provides information about blood glucose levels before eating or drinking anything. Morning blood glucose readings give a baseline number that offers clues about how the body processes glucose during the day. Before a meal: Blood glucose before a meal tends to be low, so high blood glucose readings suggest difficulties managing blood sugar. After a meal: Post meal testing gives a good idea about how your body reacts to food, and if sugar is able to efficiently get into the cells for use. Blood glucose readings after a meal can help diagnose gestational diabetes, which happens during pregnancy. Most doctors recommend testing about 2 hours after a meal. For the most accurate testing, people should log the food they eat, and notice trends in their blood glucose readings. Whether you consume a high or low carbohydrate meal, if your blood sugar reading is higher than normal afterwards, this suggests the body is having difficulty managing meals and lowering blood glucose. After consulting a doctor about the right testing schedule and frequency, people should take the following steps: Read the manual for the blood glucose moni Continue reading >>

Diabetes Test Panel

Diabetes Test Panel

Direct-to-consumer lab testing; No doctor referral or insurance necessary 2,000+ conveniently located CLIA-certified U.S. labs Comprehensive and easy-to-use website About Our Diabetes Test Panel The diabetes test panel includes multiple tests relevant to diagnosing and monitoring diabetes. Diabetes is a group of diseases that result in blood sugar (glucose) levels that are too high. Type 1 Diabetes is characterized by the body failing to produce insulin. Type 2 Diabetes is characterized by failing to produce enough insulin for proper function or by the body not reacting to insulin. Approximately 90 percent of diabetes cases are Type 2. Gestational diabetes affects pregnant women. It occurs when their bodies have very high glucose levels and not enough insulin to transport it into cells. Often women with gestational diabetes have no symptoms, so testing is important if you are considered an at-risk patient. Our Diabetes Panel includes the following: Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) / Glycohemoglobin - The Hemoglobin A1c (glycohemoglobin or glycated hemoglobin) test evaluates the average amount of glucose in the blood over the past 8-12 weeks. Random Microalbumin, Urine Test - Healthy kidneys filter waste and toxins from the blood and hang on to the healthy components, including proteins such as albumin. Kidney damage can cause proteins to leak through the kidneys and exit the body via urine. Albumin is one of the first proteins to leak when the kidneys become damaged. Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP); 14 health tests that measure blood sugar (glucose) levels, electrolyte and fluid balance, kidney function, and liver function. Albumin - Albumin is a protein made by the liver. Measuring levels of albumin is helpful in diagnosing liver disease. An albumin test measures how well yo Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Pre-diabetes

Diabetes & Pre-diabetes

Diabetes is disease where the body is unable to produce enough (or any) insulin, does not properly use the insulin that is produced, or a combination of the two. When this occurs, the body becomes unable to process sugar from the blood into the cells, which leads to high blood sugar levels. High blood sugar can lead to serious health problems, including heart disease, stroke and kidney failure. A simple blood test – called the A1C test – can show whether you have type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, pre-diabetes, or are at risk for developing the disease in the future. The most common types of diabetes include: Type 1 Diabetes When you have type 1 diabetes, your body makes little to no insulin whatsoever. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease; the cause is not fully understood, but it likely relates to genetics as well as environmental triggers. Type 1 diabetes – formerly known as juvenile diabetes - is usually diagnosed in childhood or adolescence, but can surface at any age. It’s critical for people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes to take insulin every day. Type 2 Diabetes When you have type 2 diabetes, your body does not make or use insulin as efficiently as it should. This condition is the most common type of diabetes and is most prevalent among middle-aged and older adults. Type 2 diabetes can be caused by a number of factors including obesity, poor diet and family history. Gestational Diabetes Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. While most cases of gestational diabetes disappear after giving birth, having gestational diabetes during pregnancy may increase your chances of getting type 2 diabetes in the future. Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Testing Offers Little Value To Some Type 2 Diabetes Patients: Study

Blood Glucose Testing Offers Little Value To Some Type 2 Diabetes Patients: Study

When Margaret DeNobrega was first diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, she meticulously monitored her eating habits and blood sugar levels. The 68-year-old would write down what she ate for breakfast, lunch and dinner, pricking her finger to test her glucose levels before and after each meal. "I used to test before my meals, so I would know what my blood sugar was at, and then I would test two hours after," she says. "I did that for quite a while. "I guess maybe I did … obsess a little about it because I didn't want to go on medication." It's a daily ritual for many with Type 2 diabetes, aimed at helping them keep their blood sugar levels in check. But according to a new U.S. study, that common finger-prick test may have little impact on managing the chronic condition. Type 2 diabetes is one of the fastest-growing diseases in Canada, with about 60,000 new cases diagnosed each year. Complications associated with the disease — including kidney disease, heart disease, blindness and stroke — can range from serious to life-threatening, making proper management of blood sugar levels important. Insulin-dependent patients will frequently test their blood sugar before delivering a shot of the hormone. But the majority of Type 2 patients aren't treated with insulin, and can instead regulate their glucose levels through diet, exercise and sometimes medication. Rejecting routine testing In a paper published this week in JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers found that self-monitoring of blood sugar for non-insulin Type 2 patients offers virtually no benefit. "From the study, what we find is that glucose monitoring should not be routine," Dr. Katrina Donahue, one of the study's authors, told CBC News. To conduct the study, the researchers tested 450 adult patients with Type 2 diabete Continue reading >>

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