diabetestalk.net

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms Leg Pain

Can Diabetes Cause Muscle Cramps?

Can Diabetes Cause Muscle Cramps?

A recent study looked at links between muscle cramp frequency and severity and nerve fiber measures in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Persons with type 1 and 2 diabetes as well as healthy controls were given an evaluation and their large and small nerve fibers were assessed. Details about their muscle cramps were noted. There were 37 control subjects, 51 patients with type 1 diabetes and 69 with type 2 diabetes. Muscle Cramps a Diabetes Complication? The researchers state in their study paper that “Muscle cramps were the most frequent symptom captured by the Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Score (TCNS) in all groups, up to 78% in patients with [type 2 diabetes].” They also explained that in only those with type 1 diabetes, muscle cramp frequency and severity was tied to clinical, large, and small nerve fiber measures. They concluded that muscle cramps are common diabetes and are associated with clinical and both small and large nerve fiber measures in type 1 diabetes, “suggesting that their origin and propagation might extend beyond the motor nerve,” wrote the study authors. For the study, those with type 2 diabetes were older and had more muscle cramps, more severe cramps, and worse clinical and small and large nerve fiber measures when compared with those with type 1 diabetes. They also had worse nerve function, but this could have been due to the patients with type 1 diabetes being younger than those with type 2 in the study. Researchers added that “These findings are in line with previous studies, describing muscle cramps in a large spectrum of polyneuropathies, including sensory and small fiber polyneuropathies (Lopate et al., 2013; Maxwell et al., 2014; Abraham et al., 2016), suggesting that the cause of muscle cramps may extend beyond the motor n Continue reading >>

Calf Pain & Diabetes Connection

Calf Pain & Diabetes Connection

In diabetes, calf or leg pain can be due to diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), to peripheral artery disease (PAD) or to deep vein thrombosis (DVT). All of these conditions can result in pain, cramping, achiness and swelling in the calves and the lower leg, ankle and feet. And all of them can be associated with severe diabetic foot problems including ulcers, infections and weakened bones that can lead to fractures. The pain in the calf can be in the gastrocnemius muscles (often shortened to “the gastrocs”) or to the soleus or plantaris muscles. Diabetes, Oxidative Stress and DPN DPN results from nerve damage, primarily in the feet and legs, but sometimes also in the hands and arms. One of the main causes of DPN, it is believed, is the accumulating toxic effect of high levels of sugar on the nerves and surrounding tissue. The high levels of sugar can be toxic on their own some believe[1], but in addition, high levels of sugar can increase the levels of substances called free radicals. Free radicals are naturally produced in the body as a result of normal reactions. The body also has naturally occurring antioxidants, primarily enzymes such as the selenoproteins (proteins with the trace mineral selenium), sulfur-based proteins such as glutathione, Vitamin C, Vitamin A, beta carotenes and Vitamin E (which humans need to get through the diet) and others. These natural antioxidants can however, be overwhelmed by the high levels of free radical which may be produced by cells bathed in high levels of sugar.[2] This can eventually lead to a condition in the cells called “oxidative stress” and it is this damage—caused by high levels of free radicals which damage the cell’s DNA and the proteins in the cells which can damage nerve cells and result in DPN. Diabetes, Hi Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Print Overview Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that can occur if you have diabetes. High blood sugar (glucose) can injure nerve fibers throughout your body, but diabetic neuropathy most often damages nerves in your legs and feet. Depending on the affected nerves, symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range from pain and numbness in your extremities to problems with your digestive system, urinary tract, blood vessels and heart. For some people, these symptoms are mild; for others, diabetic neuropathy can be painful, disabling and even fatal. Diabetic neuropathy is a common serious complication of diabetes. Yet you can often prevent diabetic neuropathy or slow its progress with tight blood sugar control and a healthy lifestyle. Symptoms There are four main types of diabetic neuropathy. You may have just one type or symptoms of several types. Most develop gradually, and you may not notice problems until considerable damage has occurred. The signs and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy vary, depending on the type of neuropathy and which nerves are affected. Peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Your feet and legs are often affected first, followed by your hands and arms. Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are often worse at night, and may include: Numbness or reduced ability to feel pain or temperature changes A tingling or burning sensation Sharp pains or cramps Increased sensitivity to touch — for some people, even the weight of a bed sheet can be agonizing Muscle weakness Loss of reflexes, especially in the ankle Loss of balance and coordination Serious foot problems, such as ulcers, infections, deformities, and bone and joint pain Autonomic neuropathy The autonomic nervous system controls your hea Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems Treatment And Complications

Diabetes And Foot Problems Treatment And Complications

Diabetes and foot problems facts Two main conditions, peripheral artery disease (PAD) and peripheral neuropathy, are responsible for the increased risk of foot problems in people with diabetes. Symptoms and signs of diabetic foot problems arise due to the decreased sensation from nerve damage as well as the lack of oxygen delivery to the feet caused by vascular disease. Diabetic foot problems also include bunions, corns, calluses, hammertoes, fungal infections, dryness of the skin, and ingrown toenails. These problems are not specific to diabetes, but may occur more commonly due to the nerve and vascular damage caused by diabetes. Treatment depends on the exact type of foot problem. Surgery or even amputation may be required for some cases. Gangrene (dry gangrene) is tissue death due to absence of blood circulation. It can be life threatening if bacterial infection develops (wet gangrene). Many diabetes-related foot problems can be prevented by good control of blood sugar levels combined with appropriate care of the feet. How can diabetes cause foot problems? Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes cause damage to blood vessels and peripheral nerves that can result in problems in the legs and feet. Two main conditions, 1) peripheral artery disease (PAD), and 2) peripheral neuropathy are responsible for the increased risk of foot problems in people with diabetes. Peripheral artery disease (PAD), sometimes referred to as peripheral vascular disease (PVD), means that there is narrowing or occlusion by atherosclerotic plaques of arteries outside of the heart and brain. This is sometimes referred to as "hardening" of the arteries. Diabetes is a known risk factor for developing peripheral artery disease. In addition to pain in the calves during exercise (medically known as intermitte Continue reading >>

3 Things You Can Do To Reduce Diabetic Leg Pain

3 Things You Can Do To Reduce Diabetic Leg Pain

According to the American Diabetes Association nearly 30 million people in the United States have been diagnosed with diabetes. Diabetes is found in two primary forms, type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder usually diagnosed at a young age. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition often related to weight and lifestyle. It is more frequently diagnosed in individuals over the age of 45. Diabetes of both types can be treated and managed. Type 1 diabetes patients are reliant on insulin, which they can take as a pill or an injection. Type 2 diabetes patients may need to take medications, but lifestyle changes can also control the symptoms and effects of the disease. For diabetic leg pain, specifically, exercise, diet, and weight management changes can help with one of the major conditions associated with diabetes, diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Diabetic leg pain caused by diabetic neuropathy Diabetic neuropathy is a nerve disorder caused by diabetes. Over time, people with diabetes can develop nerve damage throughout the body. This nerve damage can happen in any part of the body. It is currently estimated that about 60-70% of people with diabetes experience neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy specifically affects the limbs, especially the legs and feet. The condition is most common in individuals who have experienced difficulty controlling their blood sugar levels. While diabetes, especially with uncontrolled blood sugar, is the most common cause of peripheral neuropathy there are other risk factors. These include: Alcoholism Vitamin deficiencies Infections such as Lyme disease or shingles Autoimmune diseases Repetitive motions The condition can affect several nerves in the limbs including sensory nerves, motor nerves, and autonomic nerves. Sensory nerves Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes With Exercise: 6 Tips For Nerve Pain

Managing Diabetes With Exercise: 6 Tips For Nerve Pain

What kind of exercise is safe -- and fun -- if you have nerve damage from diabetes, called diabetic neuropathy? And how can you stay motivated after that first flush of inspiration fades? "It depends on where you're starting," says Dace L. Trence, MD, an endocrinologist and director of the Diabetes Care Center at the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle. "For the person who has been doing nothing, you would certainly want to start doing something that's comfortable and enjoyable and can be maintained." If you have diabetic nerve pain in your feet, legs, arms, or hands, consider this: research published in The Journal of Diabetes Complications in 2006 showed significant benefits of exercise in controlling peripheral neuropathy. The study showed that for people who took a brisk, one-hour walk on a treadmill four times a week, exercise slowed how quickly their nerve damage worsened. There's no quick fix here, though; the study lasted four years. Let's face it: when it comes to managing a lifelong condition like diabetes, it makes sense to think long-term. It's all about lifestyle changes to protect yourself from diabetic nerve damage. Becoming more active can help you control blood sugar levels, feel good, and lighten the load on painful feet and legs, especially if you're overweight. These tips can help you start and stick with an exercise plan for more than the first few days. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Leg Pain And Peripheral Arterial Disease

Diabetic Leg Pain And Peripheral Arterial Disease

Cramping, pain, or tiredness in the legs when walking or climbing stairs — these may not sound like symptoms of a serious condition. In fact, many people believe that they are normal signs of aging. But they can be signs of peripheral arterial disease, a severe condition that can lead to gangrene and amputation if left untreated. So if you have these symptoms, be sure to tell your doctor. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a condition in which arteries leading to the legs and feet (or in some cases the arms) become clogged with fatty deposits called plaque, resulting in reduced or blocked blood flow to these areas. It affects between 8 million and 12 million Americans, and people with diabetes are more likely to develop PAD than the general population. PAD is also known as peripheral vascular disease (PVD), leg atherosclerosis, or simply poor circulation. PAD and diabetes Anyone can develop PAD, but people with diabetes, especially those with Type 2 diabetes, have a higher risk of developing it because of a series of bodily changes associated with diabetes, including insulin resistance, a higher level of blood fats, and an increase in blood pressure. All of these contribute to arteries becoming clogged with fatty deposits, leading to the hardening and narrowing of these blood vessels. Having diabetes also increases the risk of developing neuropathy, or nerve damage, as a result of high blood glucose. Neuropathy can cause decreased sensation in the feet and legs, which can cause a person not to notice small injuries to the foot, such as blisters or cuts. If a person continues to walk on an injury, it is likely to enlarge and get infected. The combination of PAD and neuropathy is particularly dangerous because when blood flow to the feet is reduced, the body has a har Continue reading >>

Muscle Cramps

Muscle Cramps

Tweet Muscle cramps happen when a skeletal muscle involuntarily contracts and they can range from being uncomfortable to very painful. They are most common from the waist down, and usually occur in the calf, feet and both front and back of the thighs. They can also affect the arms. While they can be problematic at any time of the day, muscle cramps often wake people up in the middle of the night. Muscle cramping is relatively common in people with diabetes mellitus, although research from Hans Kotzberg et al suggests they do not appear to be more prevalent in people with type 1 diabetes. Relationship to diabetes People with diabetes can experience mild to severely painful muscle cramps, which can be due to a number of reasons. High or low blood glucose levels Glucose is required for muscles to properly contract and relax, as is a balanced exchange of electrolytes, such as calcium, magnesium and potassium. When imbalances happen, through either high or low blood sugar, cramps can occur. During low glucose levels, this results in muscles becoming starved for glucose. However, when blood sugar levels are high, excess glucose is excreted along with water and other salts which results in a reduced amount of electrolytes. Nerve damage People with peripheral vascular disease or diabetic neuropathy may suffer from muscle cramps, with poor circulation and nerve damage likely to instigate spasms. Medication Side effects from certain medications used to treat diabetes can result in muscle cramps. These include insulin, lipid (cholesterol) lowering agents, antihypertensives (blood pressure medications), oral contraceptives or beta-agonists. Treating muscle cramps Muscle cramps are often infrequent in people with or without diabetes, and massaging the affecting muscle while stretchi Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

The symptoms of diabetic neuropathy depend on what type of neuropathy you have. Symptoms are dependent on which nerves have been damaged. In general, diabetic neuropathy symptoms develop gradually; they may seem like minor and infrequent pains or problems at first, but as the nerves become more damaged, symptoms may grow. Don’t overlook mild symptoms. They can indicate the beginning of neuropathy. Talk to your doctor about anything you notice—such as any pain, numbness, weakness, or tingling—even if it seems insignificant. Your pain may mean the control of your diabetes could be improved, which will can help slow down the progression of your neuropathy. Pain and numbness are also important warning signs to take very good care of your feet, so you can avoid wounds and infections that can be difficult to heal and even raise risk for amputation. 1 Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms Peripheral neuropathy affects nerves leading to your extremities—the feet, legs, hands, and arms. The nerves leading to your feet are the longest in your body, so they are the most often affected nerves (simply because there’s more of them to be damaged). Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy symptoms include: Pain Burning, stabbing or electric-shock sensations Numbness (loss of feeling) Tingling Muscle weakness Poor coordination Muscle cramping and/or twitching Insensitivity to pain and/or temperature Extreme sensitivity to even the lightest touch Symptoms get worse at night. 2, 3 Autonomic Neuropathy Symptoms The autonomic nervous system is in charge of the "involuntary" functions of your body. It keeps your heart pumping and makes sure you digest your food right—without you needing to think about it. Autonomic neuropathy symptoms i Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Cause Fatigue, Body Ache?

Can Diabetes Cause Fatigue, Body Ache?

May 18, 2011 at 07:47 | Report abuse | Reply Heather, I have had tremendous success dealing with my sleep-related fatigue problems (non-restorative sleep) and significantly reduced my fibromyalgia by taking a low dose (30mg to 40mg) of desipramine just before bedtime. Desipramine is a low dose antidepressant and been in use for years. I have been using it for the last 18 years with great success. Your symptoms sound exactly like mine just before I started this treatment. Just a suggestion. It is important to note that at its early stages, diabetes does not cause many symptoms and may pass unnoticed. But the disease develops silently, causing damage to eyesight, kidneys and the cardiovascular system. PS – men can also have fibromyalgia. It is either underdiagnosed (possibly) or may be more common in women. I know a few men who have been diagnosed. Not enough is known about it to make the assumption that it doesn't occur more often (than diagnosed) in men. May 18, 2011 at 07:51 | Report abuse | Reply I am in the Marine Corps and need to run atleast 3 milesbut can't run 1/2 mile anymore. I am on a Beta blocker for chest pain and atrial tach. I lift weights and I try to run but have a shortness of breath while attempting to run, yard work, and walking up one flight of stairs. Cardiologist says all is good with my heart no obstructions. What else could be causing my shortness of breath. May 18, 2011 at 08:05 | Report abuse | Reply Have you been to a cardiologist who ran a stress-test scan on your heart? That particular test lets the examiner look at your hear function under duress. Your problem may be respiratory-related, maybe you should see a pneumologist, as compromized lung function may tax your heart and give you chest pain. Also, you might want to lay off the weight Continue reading >>

Leg Cramps And Diabetes: 5 Signs Of Complications For Diabetics

Leg Cramps And Diabetes: 5 Signs Of Complications For Diabetics

Diabetes is a disease that can lead to a variety of complications because of the detrimental impact high blood sugar has on the body. Leg cramps can occur because elevated blood sugar causes excessive urination and subsequent dehydration. Limb pain is another common complication of the disease and signals a serious condition that, without treatment, can become debilitating. Leg cramps are not just a sign of dehydration. In combination with pain in the arms and legs, they are a sign of diabetic neuropathy, which is damage to nerves as the result of high blood sugar levels. These nerves are very sensitive to everything from changes in temperature, to vibrations, and even a light touch. Sometimes the nerves are so damaged that "They might send signals of pain when there is nothing causing pain, or they might not send a pain signal even if something is harming you," reports Healthline. Urgent: Assess Your Heart Attack Risk in Minutes. Click Here. Dr. Laurence Kinsella, professor of neurology at Saint Louis University says, "Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a so-called minor complication of diabetes, but not to the people who live with the pain it creates," reports WebMD. Here are five signs that may indicate a peripheral neuropathy complication of diabetes: 1. Numbness or tingling in the feet and lower legs: These symptoms can feel like the limb as fallen "asleep." On the other hand, they can feel like a "buzzing or shocking sensation," according to Healthline. 2. Impaired sense of touch: The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke addresses sensory nerve damage. "Since this is felt most in the hands and feet, people may feel as if they are wearing gloves and stockings even when they are not. This damage to larger sensory fibers may contribute to the loss o Continue reading >>

Proximal Diabetic Neuropathy

Proximal Diabetic Neuropathy

Proximal diabetic neuropathy, more commonly known as diabetic amyotrophy, is a nerve disorder that results as a complication of diabetes mellitus. It can affect the thighs, hips, buttocks or lower legs. Proximal diabetic neuropathy is a peripheral nerve disease (diabetic neuropathy) characterized by muscle wasting or weakness, pain, or changes in sensation/numbness of the leg.[1] Diabetic neuropathy is an uncommon complication of diabetes. It is a type of lumbosacral plexopathy, or adverse condition affecting the lumbosacral plexus. There are a number of ways that diabetes damages the nerves, all of which seem to be related to increased blood sugar levels over a long period of time. Proximal diabetic neuropathy is one of four types of diabetic neuropathy.[2] Proximal diabetic neuropathy can occur in type 2 and type 1 diabetes mellitus patients however, it is most commonly found in type 2 diabetics.[3] Proximal neuropathy is the second most common type of diabetic neuropathy and can be resolved with time and treatment.[4] Signs & symptoms[edit] Signs and symptoms of proximal diabetic neuropathy depend on the region of the plexus which is affected. The first symptom is usually pain in the buttocks, hips, thighs or legs. This pain most commonly affects one side of the body and can either start gradually or come on suddenly. This is often followed by variable weakness in the proximal muscles of the lower limbs. These symptoms, although often beginning on one side, can also spread to both sides.[1] Weakness in proximal diabetic neuropathy is caused by denervation of the specific muscles innervated by regions of the plexus affected and can thus these muscles may start exhibiting fasciculations. Note that diabetic amyotrophy is a condition caused by diabetes mellitus, but sepa Continue reading >>

What Can I Do For Numb, Painful Feet And Legs?

What Can I Do For Numb, Painful Feet And Legs?

My husband was diagnosed with diabetes almost a year ago. At first he was experiencing numbness in his feet. Over the past few months, he began having pain as well, sometimes as far up his leg as his calf. What can we do to help these symptoms? I have read that vitamin E and even flaxseed oil are good for the circulation. Would those be helpful? Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

Diabetes Leg Pain And Cramps: Treatment Tips

Diabetes Leg Pain And Cramps: Treatment Tips

Diabetes can lead to a variety of complications. Leg pain and cramps often occur as a result of nerve damage called diabetic neuropathy. If diabetes damages nerves in your arms or legs, it’s called diabetic peripheral neuropathy. This condition can be a direct result of long-term high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) in those who have diabetes. Pain, burning, tingling, and numbness are common symptoms. Peripheral neuropathy can also result in serious foot and leg conditions. Catching nerve damage early is important in preventing symptoms. This can help prevent lower leg amputations. You have options for alleviating leg pain and cramps due to diabetic neuropathy. Managing leg pain and cramps may also help prevent the condition from progressing and improve your quality of life. Diabetic neuropathy is most common in the legs and feet. Without treatment and management, it can become debilitating. The most important thing you can do to lower your risk of all complications, including diabetic neuropathy, is to keep your blood sugar level within the target range. If you have neuropathy, controlling blood sugar is still very important. But there are some other steps you can take to help control this condition. One of the first courses of action is pain management through medication. Over-the-counter medications, such as acetaminophen and ibuprofen, may help alleviate mild to moderate pain. Two medications are currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treating diabetic peripheral neuropathy: Other medications and treatment options include the use of opioid medications, such as tramadol and tapentadol, and topical remedies and sprays. Certain dietary supplements may also help ease pain, including leg discomfort associated with diabetes. Some nutrie Continue reading >>

More in diabetes