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Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms In Women

How Diabetes Affects Women: Symptoms, Risks, And More

How Diabetes Affects Women: Symptoms, Risks, And More

Diabetes describes a group of metabolic diseases in which a person has high blood sugar due to problems processing or producing insulin. Diabetes can affect anyone, regardless of age, race, gender, or lifestyle. Between 1971 and 2000, the death rate for men with diabetes fell, according to a study in Annals of Internal Medicine. This was a major coup, reflecting the many advances in diabetes treatment. However, according to the study, the death rate for women with diabetes showed no signs of improvement. Additionally, the difference in death rates between women who had diabetes and those who didn’t more than doubled. This study of diabetes in men and women presented several possible reasons for the gender differences. Reasons included: Women often receive less aggressive treatment for cardiovascular risk factors and conditions related to diabetes. The complications of diabetes in women are more difficult to diagnose. Women often have different kinds of heart disease than men. Hormones and inflammation act differently in women. The findings emphasize how diabetes affects women and men differently. Although the death rate was higher among women previously, there has been a shift in gender distribution of type two diabetes showing higher rates among men. The most current reported stats (in 2012) found that 13.4 million women and 15.5 million men have been diagnosed with diabetes in the United States alone. According to the global reports from the World Health Organization from 2014, there was an estimated 422 million adults living with diabetes. This is up from 108 million that was reported in 1980. If you’re a woman with diabetes, you’ll experience many of the same symptoms as a man. However, some symptoms are unique to women. Understanding both will help you identi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

Type 1 diabetes tends to start when people are under 25, although it can be diagnosed later in life. With Type 1 diabetes (also called insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes) the body's immune system destroys, or attempts to destroy, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Insulin is the hormone that allows glucose to enter the cells of the body to provide fuel. When glucose can't enter the cells, it builds up in the blood and the body's cells literally starve to death. Everyone with Type 1 diabetes must take daily insulin injections and regularly monitor their blood glucose levels. The cause of Type 1 diabetes is unknown but it is thought to be an autoimmune disease, where the body's immune system destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Not all diabetes in children and teenagers is the kind called Type 1. Type 2 diabetes is being seen increasingly in young people. Where Type 1 diabetes always requires insulin, Type 2 can require insulin but often it can be treated with other medicines such as tablets. This section deals only with young people who have Type 1 diabetes. We have talked to a range of young people who've lived with Type 1 diabetes from those who were very young when they were first diagnosed to those who were diagnosed when they were teenagers. We have also talked to some young people only recently diagnosed. In this section young people talk about the signs and symptoms that prompted them to seek medical help. Signs of diabetes Most people remembered that the first symptoms of diabetes had crept up on them over weeks or even months- most had felt thirsty all the time and said that they started to drink more and more and found that they were unable to quench their thirst. Lots of people described realising something must be wrong wi Continue reading >>

11 Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

11 Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Learning about the symptoms of type 2 diabetes brings you closer to having a better understanding of the condition. Known as “the silent killer” because it doesn’t necessarily cause any obvious symptoms, type 2 diabetes is often diagnosed when a doctor orders blood tests. In some cases, doctors don’t detect diabetes until long-term complications associated with the disease develop, like eye diseases and heart problems. Most symptoms of type 2 diabetes can be easily managed or prevented by checking your blood sugar levels tested regularly. If you think you may have diabetes, seek treatment as soon as possible. The better you manage diabetes over time, the less like you are to develop serious complications. 1. Frequent Need to Urinate Medically known as polyuria, this symptom can be an early sign of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. When blood sugar levels became elevated (above 160-180 mg/dL), glucose starts to leak into the urine. As the amount of glucose in the urine increases, the kidneys start to work harder to eliminate more water in an attempt to dilute the urine. As a result, a diabetic will feel the urge to urinate more often. Continue reading >>

This Is The First Sign Of Type-2 Diabetes – Never Ignore This Subtle Symptom

This Is The First Sign Of Type-2 Diabetes – Never Ignore This Subtle Symptom

In recent years, type 2 diabetes has grown at an alarming rate and has become one of the world's most common long-term health conditions. Approximately 415 million or one in 11 people in the world have diabetes, a number which continues to rise. It is estimated there are 3.5 million people living with diabetes in the UK – with over 549,000 living undiagnosed. In honour of Diabetes Awareness Week, the Daily Star Online spoke to Emma Elvin, Clinical Advisor at Diabetes UK about the earliest signs of type 2 diabetes – and how to reverse it. “The symptoms of diabetes include passing urine more often, especially at night, being really thirsty, feeling more tired than usual, unplanned weight loss, genital itching or thrush, cuts and wounds taking longer to heal and blurred vision,” Emma revealed. She added that some people with type 2 diabetes go undiagnosed for years as the condition can take up to a decade to develop. Those more likely to suffer from diabetes are those who are obese or overweight – a large portion of the adult UK population. Emma added: “Research shows that people from South Asian, African-Caribbean or black African descent are two to four times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those from Caucasian backgrounds. “Age is also a significant risk factor and so is family history (you’re two to six times more likely to get type 2 diabetes if you have a first degree family member with the condition). “The latest research also suggests that women with history of gestational diabetes have a seven-fold increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes.” Three in five cases of type-2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed by maintaining a healthy weight and being active, the expert revealed. So can it really be reversed? While there isn’t suf Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic (long-term) condition that occurs when your body doesn’t make enough insulin, or when your body has trouble using the insulin that it does make. About 1 in 400 young people have this condition. What is insulin? Why is it important? Insulin is a hormone made by a gland called the pancreas. The pancreas is located behind the stomach. Whenever you eat food, your body digests the food (breaks it down) into smaller parts: vitamins, minerals, sugar (called “glucose”), fat, and protein. Your body then uses glucose for energy. Glucose is the body’s major source of energy. Insulin is the hormone that helps glucose enter the cells of your body so it can be used as energy. If your body doesn’t make enough insulin, or if your body has difficulty using the insulin that it makes, the glucose from your food does not get changed into energy. Instead, the glucose stays in your blood, causing your blood glucose (also called “blood sugar”) to rise. Why is high blood sugar a problem? High blood sugar is a problem because it can cause serious damage to the body. Some of the most serious, long term problems are loss of vision, kidney problems, heart problems, damage to circulation and stroke. This kind of damage happens slowly over many years and can be delayed or prevented if you take good care of your diabetes. There are also short-term problems that come from high blood sugar. Some common short term-problems (caused from high blood sugar) are: Being thirsty Having to urinate (pee) more often Feeling irritable or exhausted Weight loss If your blood sugar gets too high due to not having enough insulin, you can experience a very serious condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. Signs of ketoacidosis are: Rapid deep breathing Stomach pain or chest pain and/or Continue reading >>

Elder Diabetes Patients — Know The Signs And Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes In This Population To Improve Care

Elder Diabetes Patients — Know The Signs And Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes In This Population To Improve Care

By Jill Weisenberger, MS, RD, CDE Today’s Dietitian Vol. 15 No. 3 P. 20 Jean, 78, has been experiencing urinary incontinence and showing signs of confusion. Her physician also notices she’s slightly dehydrated. When he suggests screening Jean for type 2 diabetes, she thinks this is a waste of time. After all, she isn’t experiencing frequent urination or excessive thirst, which she knows are telltale symptoms of the disease. But the truth is Jean’s symptoms are typical in elder patients newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Elder patients often present with different signs and symptoms of diabetes, so it’s important for RDs to know what these are so they can help this patient population stabilize blood glucose levels with proper nutrition or refer them to a physician who specializes in geriatric diabetes care. Different Signs and Symptoms More than one-quarter of the US population aged 65 and older has diabetes,1 including type 1 and 2, and approximately one-half of older adults have prediabetes. In this population, age-related insulin resistance and impaired pancreatic islet function increase the risk of developing the disease. Because of these age-related physiological changes, elder patients may not present with classic symptoms of hyperglycemia. The renal threshold for glucose increases with age, and older people often have impaired thirst mechanisms. Thus, polyuria and polydipsia may be absent. Common presenting symptoms are dehydration, dry eyes, dry mouth, confusion, incontinence, and diabetes complications, such as neuropathy or nephropathy.2 Hypertension and dyslipidemia frequently coexist with diabetes, but in elder diabetes patients so do dementia, depression, and functional decline.3 In general, individuals with type 2 diabetes have twice the risk o Continue reading >>

Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

Almost a third of people who have diabetes do not know it. That number comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Additionally, most people with prediabetes — a condition that puts people at increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes — don’t know they have it. So my diabetes story, which began in ignorance, was not so unusual. I had prediabetes for a long time before the complications caused by high blood sugar led to a stroke. This is the reason I made a list of warning signs for Type 2 diabetes. Perhaps you or someone you love will see how important it is to get a simple blood sugar test. If this sneaky condition is caught early, you can avoid serious complications. The symptoms of Type 2 are well known but are easy to miss. Two of them are increased thirst and frequent urination. The word “diabetes” comes from the Greek word for “siphon.” If the beta cells in your pancreas are working, insulin is pumping into your blood to help your body digest carbohydrates like sugar and bread and noodles. But in Type 2 diabetes (or prediabetes) your cells are resistant to insulin, which leaves much of that glucose, or simple sugar, in the bloodstream. When blood glucose levels are above 250 mg/dl, the ability of the kidneys to reabsorb fluids is blocked, leading to the release of large amounts of liquid (and sugar) into the bladder. (A urine test would show high sugar content. This is why for thousands of years, diabetes was called the “sweet urine disease.”) This process uses lots of water, leading to increased thirst. Another sign of prediabetes or Type 2 diabetes is fatigue. Since your muscle cells are resisting insulin, they are not getting fed the glucose from your blood supply. It makes you tired. The problem with using fatigue as a warnin Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

What is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes (also called diabetes mellitus type 2) is the most common form of diabetes. Insulin is not required for survival in type 2 diabetes. That is why they used to call it non-insulin dependent diabetes. Insulin resistance is the main problem in type 2 diabetes. It means that your body can’t use insulin effectively. You still make insulin but it is less effective. So, you need more insulin to do the same job. Without effective use of insulin, you blood sugar levels go up. That is what happens in type 2 diabetes. (They don’t call it non-insulin dependent diabetes anymore to avoid the perception that insulin has nothing to with type 2 diabetes.) Many type 2 diabetes patients need insulin to effectively treat high blood sugars because their bodies do not make enough insulin to overcome the insulin resistance. Type 2 Diabetes symptoms Type 2 diabetes symptoms develop very slowly. You may already have diabetes, but may not even have the first signs of diabetes for many years. Here is the list of 10 classic diabetes symptoms: Frequent urination Excessive hunger Excessive thirst (dry mouth) Unusual weight loss Extreme fatigue and irritability Frequent infections Blurred vision Cuts/bruises are slow to heal Tingling numbness in the hands or feet Recurring skin, gum or bladder infection If someone asks you, “What are the symptoms of diabetes?”, this list makes it easy to answer the question. However, the list of 10 diabetes symptoms does not help people figure out if they have diabetes. Many patients with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms for many years. When they finally have classic diabetes symptoms, they already have complications of diabetes. Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes symptoms Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes leads to many complicati Continue reading >>

Early Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Easy To Miss

Early Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Easy To Miss

Type 2 diabetes is a sneaky devil. Early on, the warning signs can be hard to spot and people sometimes chalk them up to stress or fatigue, and shrug them off. But screening tests and understanding your risk can help people spot diabetes sooner and get the treatment they need, say experts. "The main thing about early diabetes is that you can have abnormal blood sugar for quite some time and be fairly asymptomatic," Dr. Susan Spratt, an endocrinologist and assistant professor of medicine at Duke University School of Medicine, told CBS News. More than 29 million Americans have diabetes - that's nearly 1 out of 10 U.S. adults - and according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than a quarter of them are undiagnosed. Millions of others are considered at high risk for developing diabetes. Spratt said some people with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes may experience dry mouth, excessive thirst, and they may urinate more frequently. Blurry vision can occur, too. Cuts and bruises may be slow to heal and you may feel tingling, pain, or numbness in your hands and feet, according to the American Diabetes Association. Feeling hungry, even after eating, and experiencing extreme fatigue are symptoms, as well. What's happening in the body when type 2 diabetes is lurking? The condition develops when the body becomes resistant to insulin or when the pancreas stops producing enough insulin. It's not clear why this happens, but genetics and factors such as weight and a sedentary lifestyle can play into the equation, Mayo Clinic experts say. The body needs insulin to survive - it's secreted into the bloodstream via the pancreas. When insulin circulates, it enables sugar to enter cells and lowers the amount of sugar in the bloodstream. With type 2 diabetes, instead of insulin Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Comorbid Symptoms Of Depression And Anxiety: Longitudinal Associations With Mortality Risk

Type 2 Diabetes And Comorbid Symptoms Of Depression And Anxiety: Longitudinal Associations With Mortality Risk

OBJECTIVE Depression is strongly linked to increased mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Despite high rates of co-occurring anxiety and depression, the risk of death associated with comorbid anxiety in individuals with type 2 diabetes is poorly understood. This study documented the excess mortality risk associated with symptoms of depression and/or anxiety comorbid with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Using data for 64,177 Norwegian adults from the second wave of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT2), with linkage to the Norwegian Causes of Death Registry, we assessed all-cause mortality from survey participation in 1995 through to 2013. We used Cox proportional hazards models to examine mortality risk over 18 years associated with type 2 diabetes status and the presence of comorbid affective symptoms at baseline. RESULTS Three clear patterns emerged from our findings. First, mortality risk in individuals with diabetes increased in the presence of depression or anxiety, or both. Second, mortality risk was lowest for symptoms of anxiety, higher for comorbid depression-anxiety, and highest for depression. Lastly, excess mortality risk associated with depression and anxiety was observed in men with diabetes but not in women. The highest risk of death was observed in men with diabetes and symptoms of depression only (hazard ratio 3.47, 95% CI 1.96, 6.14). CONCLUSIONS This study provides evidence that symptoms of anxiety affect mortality risk in individuals with type 2 diabetes independently of symptoms of depression, in addition to attenuating the relationship between depressive symptoms and mortality in these individuals. Depression and type 2 diabetes are two leading global causes of morbidity and mortality, with type 2 diabetes currently affect Continue reading >>

Tell-tale Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms In Women

Tell-tale Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms In Women

Diabetes is often called “the silent killer” because its symptoms can be difficult to spot. This is a problem considering type 2 diabetes affects 29.1 million people in the United States. People who have type 2 diabetes are not able to use the hormone insulin properly. Your body needs to get glucose from your blood into your cells. When you don’t have enough insulin (or it doesn’t function as it should) glucose gathers in the blood instead of being used by the cells. According to a study in Annals of Internal Medicine, the diabetes death rate for men fell between 1971 and 2000. Unfortunately, the diabetes death rate for women showed no improvement. There were several reasons for this gap: Women frequently have different types of heart disease than men Women often receive less aggressive treatment for conditions related to diabetes Women’s hormones and inflammation respond differently than men’s Complications of diabetes in women are more difficult to diagnose Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms that You’re Overlooking Type 2 diabetes symptoms are sometimes easy to miss. Many seem like commonplace occurrences or small inconveniences. But if you are experiencing the following symptoms, it may be time to get tested for type 2 diabetes. Frequent Urination Type 2 diabetes leads to excess glucose in the blood, so the kidneys react by flushing it into the urine. Of course, this creates the need to relieve yourself more often. Many women even need to go numerous times per night. If you find yourself urinating more frequently than you used to (and producing more urine when you go) you may want to talk with your doctor about whether you have type 2 diabetes. Increased Thirst Frequent urination means that your body will need more fluids to replenish itself. Increased thirst is Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms And Warning Signs In Women

Diabetes Symptoms And Warning Signs In Women

Diabetes can happen at any age, though type 2 diabetes is more common in those over 45 years of age. Many of the risks for diabetes are the same between men and women, but there are some differences. The risk of developing diabetes is higher for people who: Are overweight or obese Are do not lead active lives Have high levels of fats called triglycerides, low levels of "good" cholesterol, or both Are a member of a high-risk race or ethnicity Have a history of high blood sugar Have a first-degree relative with diabetes Have conditions that are associated with the body not using insulin effectively (insulin resistance) Contents of this article: Women and diabetes One condition that is unique to women and linked to the body not using insulin effectively (insulin resistance) is polycystic ovarian syndrome. In this condition, the ovaries become enlarged and are unable to release eggs properly. Other unique risk factors include a history of gestational diabetes or having given birth to a baby weighing over 9 pounds. According to the National Institutes of Heath (NIH), close to one-third of women with diabetes do not know they have the disease. It is recommended that screening for adults of both genders be done in those over the age of 45 who are overweight or obese and who have one of the risk factors listed above. On the other hand, men are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than women. The exact reasons why are unclear, however. One possible reason could be that men tend to carry their weight in the belly area more often than women, which can increase insulin resistance. Men are also more likely than women to develop heart disease as a result of their diabetes. The risks become relatively similar between the sexes once women reach menopause. Complications of diabetes fo Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes occurs mostly in people aged over 40 years. However, an increasing number of younger people, even children, are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The first-line treatment is diet, weight control and physical activity. If the blood sugar (glucose) level remains high despite these measures then tablets to reduce the blood glucose level are usually advised. Insulin injections are needed in some cases. Other treatments include reducing blood pressure if it is high, lowering high cholesterol levels and also using other measures to reduce the risk of complications. Although diabetes cannot be cured, it can be treated successfully. If a high blood sugar level is brought down to a normal level, your symptoms will ease. You still have some risk of complications in the long term if your blood glucose level remains even mildly high - even if you have no symptoms in the short term. However, studies have shown that people who have better glucose control have fewer complications (such as heart disease or eye problems) compared with those people who have poorer control of their glucose level. Therefore, the main aims of treatment are: To keep your blood glucose level as near normal as possible. To reduce any other risk factors that may increase your risk of developing complications. In particular, to lower your blood pressure if it is high and to keep your blood lipids (cholesterol) low. To detect any complications as early as possible. Treatment can prevent or delay some complications from becoming worse. Type 2 diabetes is usually initially treated by following a healthy diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and having regular physical activity. If lifestyle advice does not control your blood sugar (glucose) levels then medicines are used to help lower your Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms And Signs, Causes

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms And Signs, Causes

Diabetes mellitus describes a collection of disorders that influence exactly how your whole body makes use of blood sugar (glucose). Glucose is extremely important to your overall health mainly because it is a significant way to obtain energy for the body cells which make up your tissues and muscles. It is additionally your brain’s major foundation of energy. If you have diabetes, whatever type, this means you have an excessive amount of glucose in your blood, even though the causes vary. A lot of glucose can result in severe health issues. Long term diabetes disorders consist of type 1 diabetes as well as type 2 diabetes. Possibly reversible diabetes disorders consist of prediabetes — whenever your blood glucose levels are greater than regular, although not sufficient to be categorized as diabetes or gestational diabetes, which happens in pregnancy however might fix after the baby is delivered. Many people with the disease have type 2. There are approximately 27 million individuals in the U .S. having it. Another 86 million have prediabetes: Their blood sugar level is not conventional, although not critical enough to be diabetes so far. The Causes of Type 2 Diabetes Your pancreas tends to make a hormone generally known as insulin. It is exactly what allows your body cells transform glucose from the meals you consume into energy. Individuals with type 2 diabetes generate insulin, however their body cells don’t utilize it along with they need to. Physicians name this insulin durability. Initially, the pancreas tends to make a lot more insulin to try to look for glucose into the body cells. However ultimately it can’t maintain, along with the glucose increases in your blood rather. Generally blends of things result in type 2 diabetes, which includes: Genes: – Re Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms In Women | Prevention

Diabetes Symptoms In Women | Prevention

1 Youve been getting UTIs more regularly. If youve always been prone to UTIs or other vaginal infections, dont freak. But if youve noticed an uptick, that may be a sign of underlying diabetes, says Daniel Hsia , MD, an assistant research professor at PBRC. High blood sugar levels create an environment that makes these infections more likely, Hsia explains. In particular, watch out for yeast infections, he says. Yeast feeds on sugar, so they tend to thrive when blood-sugar levels are elevated. (Psst! These 9 highly effective solutions for a vaginal yeast infection can help.) People with diabetes often describe being very thirsty, Silver says. When your blood sugar levels are high, the amount of sodium in your blood tends to drop. Sodium helps your body hold onto water, so a drop in blood sodium can increase thirst, research shows . Drinking water will resolve the issue temporarily. But if you feel like youre much thirstier than you used to be (even though youre drinking the same amount of water) thats a warning sign. Blood glucose can get into the lens of the eye and distort vision, Silver says. People have blurry vision and think they need glassesor neednewglassesbut when their blood sugar goes down, the blurry vision goes away. Carbohydrate-loaded foods like fruit and bread tend to elevate blood sugar among diabetics. If you notice your vision gets funky after eating those foods, thats another red flag. This one goes hand in hand with feeling dehydrated, Silver says. As elevated blood sugar causes a drop in blood sodium, your body will struggle to stay hydrated even if youre drinking tons of H20. Rather than retain that water, you end up peeing much of it out, she explains. Dehydration can lead to muddled thinking or confusion, Silver says. So that alone could explain Continue reading >>

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