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Type 2 Diabetes Pregnancy Meal Plan

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan: List Of Foods To Eat And Avoid

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan: List Of Foods To Eat And Avoid

Currently, there are nine drug classes of oral diabetes medications approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Sulfonylureas, for example, glimepiride (Amaryl) and glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL) Meglitinides, for example, nateglinide (Starlix) and repaglinide (Prandin) Thiazolidinediones, for example, pioglitazone (Actos) DPP-4 inhibitors, for example, sitagliptin (Januvia) and linagliptin (Tradjenta) What types of foods are recommended for a type 2 diabetes meal plan? A diabetes meal plan can follow a number of different patterns and have a variable ratio of fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. The carbohydrates consumed should be low glycemic load and come primarily from vegetables. The fat and proteins consumed should primarily come from plant sources. What type of carbohydrates are recommended for a type 2 diabetic diet plan? Carbohydrates (carbs) are the primary food that raises blood sugar. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure the impact of a carbohydrate on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. The main factors that determine a food's (or meal's) glycemic load are the amount of fiber, fat, and protein it contains. The difference between glycemic index and glycemic load is that glycemic index is a standardized measurement and glycemic load accounts for a real-life portion size. For example, the glycemic index of a bowl of peas is 68 (per 100 grams) but its glycemic load is just 16 (lower the better). If you just referred to the glycemic index, you'd think peas were a bad choice, but in reality, you wouldn't eat 100 grams of peas. With a normal portion size, peas have a healthy glycemic load as well as being an excellent source of pro Continue reading >>

I've Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes – What Can I Eat?

I've Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes – What Can I Eat?

From the moment you are diagnosed with gestational diabetes you are likely to be faced with what seems like an endless list of new tasks: more clinic appointments, more blood tests, taking medications, being more active and eating a healthy, balanced diet. No wonder it can all seem so daunting and overwhelming. One of your first questions is likely to be, “what can I eat?” But, with so much to take in, you could still come away from appointments feeling unsure about the answer. And then, there are lots of myths about diabetes and food that you will need to navigate, too. If you’ve just been diagnosed and aren’t sure about what you can and can’t eat, here’s what you need to know. This may come as a surprise, but you don’t have to go on a special diet when have gestational diabetes. Depending on your current diet, you may have to eat less of some foods and more of others. In the past, people were sent away after their diagnosis with a list of foods they weren't allowed to eat, or often told to simply cut out sugar. Nowadays, you may need to make some changes to your diet, but it’s not a case of cutting things out. Rather, you’ll need to follow the same healthy, balanced diet that’s recommended to everyone. The main aim for managing gestational diabetes is ensuring that your blood glucose levels are under control, so your healthcare team will discuss targets that are right for you. Achieving the targets will increase your chances of having a healthy pregnancy and your food choices play a vital role in this. It is important to enjoy your meals while making changes to your food choices that are realistic and achievable. This will help control your blood glucose levels, and help prevent excessive weight gain during your pregnancy. All carbohydrates will ha Continue reading >>

What Type Of Pregnancy Diet Should I Follow If I Have Gestational Diabetes?

What Type Of Pregnancy Diet Should I Follow If I Have Gestational Diabetes?

Good nutrition is especially important during pregnancy if you've developed gestational diabetes. Diabetes develops when your body can't efficiently produce or use insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas that allows cells to turn sugar in your blood (glucose) into usable fuel. When large amounts of glucose accumulate in your blood, it means that your cells aren't getting the fuel they need. High blood sugar can be harmful for you and your developing baby, so it's important to try to control it. One way to keep your blood sugar levels under control is to follow a specific meal plan. I strongly recommend seeing a registered dietitian who can create a diet particularly suited to you, based on your weight, height, physical activity, and the needs of your growing baby, as well as your level of glucose intolerance. She'll also take into account your personal food preferences. (Note: If dietary changes aren't sufficient to keep your blood sugar in a healthy range, you'll need to take insulin as well. If your practitioner prescribes insulin injections, you'll need to meet again with your dietitian to reassess your diet.) A dietitian starts by determining how many calories you need each day. Then she teaches you how to determine portion sizes and how to balance your meals with just the right amounts of protein, carbohydrates, and fat. She also assesses your current eating habits to make sure you're getting enough vitamins and minerals. Here are some general dietary guidelines: Eat a variety of foods, distributing calories and carbohydrates evenly throughout the day. Make sure both your meals and your snacks are balanced. The American Diabetes Association recommends that you eat three small-to-moderate-size meals and two to four snacks every day, including an after-dinner snack. Continue reading >>

Diet For Pregnant Woman With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Diet For Pregnant Woman With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

A well-planned, nutritious diet is recommended for all pregnant women, and is of particular importance to women with a medical condition such as type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Although gestational diabetes, usually diagnosed in the second trimester, is the most common form of diabetes in pregnant women, those with pre-existing diabetes are challenged with the need to tightly manage blood sugars during their entire pregnancy to reduce the risk of birth defects and miscarriage. Diet plays an important role in blood sugar management, so women with T2DM would benefit from starting a healthy diet prior to conception. Choose nutritious foods, eat regularly and manage portions to help keep blood sugar levels in an optimal range and provide good nutrition for mom and baby. Video of the Day The best time to start making dietary changes is before becoming pregnant. According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, a healthy pregnancy diet includes a variety of foods, including fruit; vegetables; whole grains such as whole wheat bread, brown rice and whole grain pasta; calcium-rich foods such as milk, yogurt and fortified soy milk; and high protein foods such as chicken, lean meat, nuts and beans. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, in its 2009 position statement on vegetarian diets, says well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate to meet pregnancy nutrition needs. Pregnant women may also be advised to take supplements, such as a folic acid supplement to prevent neural tube defects. Carbohydrates in starches and sugars provide an important source of energy for pregnant women. High carbohydrate food choices include beans, grains, breads, cereals and starchy vegetables like sweet potatoes and corn, as well as fruit, milk, yogurt, desserts and candy. Because the b Continue reading >>

Diabetes Meal Plans: Control Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes Meal Plans: Control Type 2 Diabetes

If you have type 2 diabetes, diabetes meal planning can bring real health benefits and reduce your symptoms. This diet for diabetes is designed to let you to take pleasure in eating while ensuring optimal control of blood glucose, blood pressure and blood lipid levels (cholesterol and triglycerides). It will also help you achieve and maintain a healthy weight. Our Diabetic Meal Plans were the subject of an independent clinical study by McGill University Health Centre in Montreal, which tested the meal plans for 18 months with patients who have type 2 diabetes. If you have gestational diabetes, our Pregnancy Meal Plans can provide you with a gestational diabetes diet. Health: OPTIMISED Continue reading >>

Common Questions About Gdmâ Mealâ Plans

Common Questions About Gdmâ Mealâ Plans

F A C T S H E E T F O R P A T I E N T S A N D F A M I L I E S Which foods are considered carbohydrates? For your meal plan, only a few types of foods are counted as carbs — starches, fruits, dairy, and non-starchy vegetables. The Food Finder chart on page 3 gives examples and portion sizes for these types of foods. Should I aim for a very low carb diet — like the Atkins diet? No. You (and your baby) need carbohydrates to stay healthy. Follow your meal plan to know when and how much carbohydrate to include in your meals and snacks. Do I need to count calories? It depends. Some women with GDM need to count calories, but many others don’t. Your meal plan will list all of the targets you need to aim for — and your healthcare provider can answer any questions. How do I know if my eating plan is working to control my GDM? A healthcare provider will show you how to test your blood glucose several times a day. Your testing results will show how well your GDM is controlled and whether your treatment should be adjusted. You’ll also be checked during your regular prenatal visits. Use the Food Finder meal planner to help you control your GDM, nourish your growing baby, and keep you feeling good. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) Meal Plan Why do I need a GDM meal plan? If you have gestational [je-STEY-shuhn-uhl] diabetes mellitus (GDM), you and your developing baby are likely to have high blood glucose (too much glucose — or “sugarâ€â€” in the blood). This can cause problems for both of you during the pregnancy, during delivery, and in the years to come. Following a meal plan is one of the most important ways to help control your blood glucose and lower health risks. Your healthcare provider will help you decide on a Continue reading >>

Top 10 Foods For Diabetes And Pregnancy

Top 10 Foods For Diabetes And Pregnancy

Guest post by Regina M. Shirley RD, LDN of Serving Up Diabetes There are a lot of food lists out there: Top 10 Superfoods for Health, Top 10 Foods to fight Cancer, and many more. As someone with diabetes, there are also a lot of lists we can abide by: the low glycemic index list of foods, foods under 100 calories, low-carb foods, etc. Go ask any dietitian, and we will tell you to eat a balanced diet that contains a food item from each food group at most every meal, with healthy snacks in between. This is a general guideline, and most Americans don’t have enough hours in the day to incorporate all the right food groups into their daily eating plan. I used to be one of those, call me a bit of a hypocrite, but as much as I tell people that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, I was just a coffee girl in the morning, maybe with an English muffin thrown in there or a healthy nut bar. While planning for my pregnancy, I decided I needed to revamp my diet a bit to make sure that I would give my baby the best chance at developing strong organs in the first trimester. I did a lot of reading, and implemented what I already knew as well, and created my own “Top 10” list for baby and me. Here is a list of foods that I have incorporated in my diet that pack the most vitamins and nutrients (folic acid, iron and calcium are of most importance), and are even low on the glycemic index list (helpful for the blood sugars) so are also idea for people with diabetes in general. Eggs – 1-2 eggs per day in the form of hard boiled, scrambled, or in an egg and cheese whole-grain sandwich that I made myself. I buy the cage-free farm fresh eggs from my local farm. Many people think that whole eggs are bad for you because of the cholesterol in the yolk, and that egg whites are al Continue reading >>

Basic Meal Planning

Basic Meal Planning

Diabetes is a condition in which your body cannot properly use and store food for energy. The fuel that your body needs is called glucose, a form of sugar. Glucose comes from foods such as fruit, milk, some vegetables, starchy foods and sugar. To control your blood glucose (sugar), you will need to eat healthy foods, be active and you may need to take pills and/or insulin. In the following table, you will find some tips to help you until you see a registered dietitian. Tips for Healthy Eating, Diabetes Prevention and Management Tips Reasons Eat three meals per day at regular times and space meals no more than six hours apart. You may benefit from a healthy snack. Eating at regular times helps your body control blood glucose (sugar) levels. Limit sugars and sweets such as sugar, regular pop, desserts, candies, jam and honey. The more sugar you eat, the higher your blood glucose will be. Artificial sweeteners can be useful. Limit the amount of high-fat food you eat such as fried foods, chips and pastries. High-fat foods may cause you to gain weight. A healthy weight helps with blood glucose (sugar) control and is healthier for your heart. Eat more high-fibre foods such as whole grain breads and cereals, lentils, dried beans and peas, brown rice, vegetables and fruits. Foods high in fibre may help you feel full and may lower blood glucose (sugar) and cholesterol levels. If you are thirsty, drink water. Drinking regular pop and fruit juice will raise your blood glucose (sugar). Add physical activity to your life. Regular physical activity will improve your blood glucose (sugar) control. Plan for healthy eating Using a standard dinner plate, follow the Plate Method in the image below to control your portion sizes. Alcohol can affect blood glucose (sugar) levels and cause you Continue reading >>

Have Diabetes? 7 Tips For A Healthy Pregnancy

Have Diabetes? 7 Tips For A Healthy Pregnancy

Dealing with disease and pregnancy Pregnancy is full of challenges—and even more so if you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. So how do you handle a demanding disease and pregnancy? It may not be as hard as you think, says Cheryl Alkon, author of Balancing Pregnancy With Pre-Existing Diabetes. But you do need a plan. Before starting a family, check out these 7 tips that can help you ace diabetes management and have a healthy pregnancy. Get your blood sugar under control If you're thinking about getting pregnant, you need to kick bad habits (like smoking), lose weight (if you're overweight), and take prenatal vitamins. You can add one more item to the list if you have diabetes: Get your blood sugar under control. If your blood sugar levels are too high or too low, you may have a tough time getting pregnant. "In that case, your body may recognize that it's not a hospitable place for a pregnancy," says Alkon. Women with type 2 diabetes are particularly at risk for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which can also make it difficult to get pregnant. Medications that stimulate ovulation, such as Clomid and Serophene, can help. Assemble a diabetes team Pregnant women with diabetes could have up to three times as many appointments as women at a lower risk of complications. Find a high-risk obstetrician to monitor your pregnancy and check whether your endocrinologist is willing to work with your ob-gyn. "You want doctors who really know what diabetes is all about," says Alkon. The constant monitoring, ultrasounds, and additional blood sugar tests add up. So "make sure you know the ins and outs of your insurance plan," she adds. Consider going off oral medications Most doctors suggest that pregnant women with type 2 diabetes discontinue oral medications, says Alkon. This is because Continue reading >>

Pregnancy If You Have Diabetes

Pregnancy If You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes and plan to have a baby, you should try to get your blood glucose levels close to your target range before you get pregnant. Staying in your target range during pregnancy, which may be different than when you aren’t pregnant, is also important. High blood glucose, also called blood sugar, can harm your baby during the first weeks of pregnancy, even before you know you are pregnant. If you have diabetes and are already pregnant, see your doctor as soon as possible to make a plan to manage your diabetes. Working with your health care team and following your diabetes management plan can help you have a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby. If you develop diabetes for the first time while you are pregnant, you have gestational diabetes. How can diabetes affect my baby? A baby’s organs, such as the brain, heart, kidneys, and lungs, start forming during the first 8 weeks of pregnancy. High blood glucose levels can be harmful during this early stage and can increase the chance that your baby will have birth defects, such as heart defects or defects of the brain or spine. High blood glucose levels during pregnancy can also increase the chance that your baby will be born too early, weigh too much, or have breathing problems or low blood glucose right after birth. High blood glucose also can increase the chance that you will have a miscarriage or a stillborn baby.1 Stillborn means the baby dies in the womb during the second half of pregnancy. How can my diabetes affect me during pregnancy? Hormonal and other changes in your body during pregnancy affect your blood glucose levels, so you might need to change how you manage your diabetes. Even if you’ve had diabetes for years, you may need to change your meal plan, physical activity routine, and medicines. Continue reading >>

Diet And Exercise With Type 1/2 Diabetes

Diet And Exercise With Type 1/2 Diabetes

While keeping your blood glucose levels within safe limits is a hugely important part of managing your diabetes, the guidance to staying healthy in pregnancy is similar to that for staying healthy at any other time of life with diabetes. Your diet in pregnancy with type 1 or 2 diabetes When you are pregnant you may find that you need to make changes to your diet to help curb spikes and dips in your blood glucose levels. Try to aim for a varied diet that includes a combination of: carbohydrates such as breads, rice, pasta, grains and potatoes. Choose wholegrain varieties where possible fruit and vegetables pulses, such as baked beans, butter beans or lentils dairy products such as milk, hard cheese and yogurt lean meats and fish. The amount of carbohydrates you eat has the biggest impact on your blood glucose levels after eating. Ask to be referred to a dietitian if you have not seen one already. Pregnancy is not a time to be on a calorie controlled diet so speaking to a dietitian will help you to make small changes to your diet that are safe for you and your baby. 'I did have cravings while I was pregnant – I did really want some chocolate and so I would buy myself just really dark chocolate so I could have just something.' Maria, mum of one No need to 'eat for two' It is all too easy to over-eat during pregnancy, but the phrase ‘eating for two’ is a myth. In fact, your baby will grow well for the first two trimesters of pregnancy without you eating any extra calories at all. During the last trimester of your pregnancy you may need up to 200 extra calories per day – the equivalent of a small snack. Find general guidance on safe exercising in pregnancy here. Supplements You must take 5mg of folic acid, which you should receive on prescription, from when you start Continue reading >>

Have A Safe Pregnancy With Type 2 Diabetes

Have A Safe Pregnancy With Type 2 Diabetes

It used to be that women with type 2 diabetes were discouraged from becoming pregnant. These days, with careful pregnancy planning and monitoring of blood glucose levels, you can have a safe pregnancy and a healthy baby. Diabetes and Pregnancy: Your Prenatal Care Team If you have type 2 diabetes and you want to become pregnant, the first step would ideally be to speak with both your endocrinologist and your obstetrician. They can help you be at your healthiest to conceive. Both before you become pregnant and during your pregnancy (and beyond), it will be important for you to keep your blood sugar levels under control and to follow all the other guidelines to minimize all health risks to you and your baby. Fortunately, different diabetes practitioners can work with you on all the aspects of pregnancy, including exercise and nutrition. Your medical team might include: Your obstetrician. The ob-gyn you choose should care for patients with type 2 diabetes or have experience with high-risk pregnancies. Your dietitian. This professional can outline a pre-pregnancy and pregnancy diet that will keep blood glucose under control. Your diabetes educator. This specialist can help you learn about your body’s changing needs throughout your pregnancy. Your future pediatrician. Your baby’s doctor should have experience treating infants of mothers with diabetes. Diabetes and Pregnancy: Control Blood Glucose First While every woman is urged to get her body into baby-ready shape before conceiving, this is especially important if you have diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association, your blood glucose levels should be in the suggested range for three to six months before you try to conceive and, of course, during your entire pregnancy. This may involve more doctor visits, Continue reading >>

Basic Meal Planning

Basic Meal Planning

Meal plan You need to eat and drink at least 12 carbohydrate choices each day. Most women need 14 carbohydrate choices each day to maintain the desired weight gain of one-half pound each week. If you follow a vegetarian diet, you need 15 to 16 carbohydrate choices each day to get enough nutrients. At breakfast, include: 2 to 3 carbohydrate choices (30 to 45 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely At lunch, include: 3 to 4 carbohydrate choices (45 to 60 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely At dinner, include: 3 to 4 carbohydrate choices (45 to 60 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For a morning snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For an afternoon snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For an evening snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely Breakfast tips Blood glucose is hard to control in the morning when the hormones that boost your blood glucose levels are released. To help, follow these breakfast tips: Eat a small breakfast. Eat whole-grain bread products. Eat a food that has protein. Do not eat cereal or fruit. Do not drink fruit juice at breakfast or any other time of the day. Fruit juice raises your blood glucose very quickly. Completing a meal plan Vegetables Most vegetables do not raise blood glucose. Vegetables supply many nutrients for both you and your baby. Try to eat at least four servi Continue reading >>

Meal Planning For Pregnant Women With Diabetes

Meal Planning For Pregnant Women With Diabetes

Your meal plan for diabetes needs to be modified when you are pregnant. The total calories you need are based on your prepregnancy weight, age, activity level, and whether you are carrying more than one baby. Dieting to lose weight during pregnancy is not recommended, because you may not receive enough nourishment for you and your baby, and it may increase your risk for premature delivery. Follow these guidelines for your meal plan during pregnancy. Carbohydrate Inadequate carbohydrate intake can result in low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) for women taking insulin and in ketone production for women who have gestational diabetes. Excessive carbohydrate intake can result in elevated blood sugar levels. Make sure your meal plan contains: Complex carbohydrate, especially foods high in fiber, such as oatmeal, brown rice, bran cereal, whole wheat bread, whole wheat pasta, and beans. Fresh fruits. Milk. Fresh or frozen vegetables. Limit these carbohydrate foods in your diet: Refined sugar and foods with a high content of refined sugars (sweets) Refined starches, such as highly processed breakfast cereals, instant potatoes, instant rice, or instant noodles Fruit juice Protein If your kidney function is impaired, your protein allowance may be lowered. Fat Monounsaturated fats and omega-3 fats, rather than saturated fats, should continue to be the primary source of fat in your diet. Fiber Get enough fiber each day. Fiber can help stabilize your blood sugar levels and relieve constipation, which is common during pregnancy. Most people get far more sodium than they need. Talk to your doctor about how much sodium you should eat. Vitamins and minerals Take a prenatal vitamin with folic acid and iron to meet your body's increased need for these micronutrients. Folic acid is needed for th Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Diet For Gestational Diabetes?

What Is The Best Diet For Gestational Diabetes?

Gestational diabetes can cause a range of complications during pregnancy. Fortunately, a woman can help reduce complications by following a healthful diet. What foods should women eat and what foods should they avoid if they have gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes occurs if a woman's body cannot produce enough insulin, during her pregnancy. This deficiency leads to high blood sugar. High blood sugar levels may cause problems for the woman and her baby if not managed properly. This article explains what type of diet a woman should follow during pregnancy if she has gestational diabetes. It also considers other treatment options for gestational diabetes and what complications may occur if the condition is not properly managed. Contents of this article: Understanding gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that can develop during pregnancy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), between 2 and 10 percent of pregnancies are affected by gestational diabetes each year in the United States. This type of diabetes occurs when a woman's body cannot make enough of the hormone insulin. Insulin is made by the pancreas and helps the body's cells to use sugar from the blood as energy. When a woman is pregnant, her body will produce more hormones, and she may put on weight. Both of these changes may mean that her body's cells may not use insulin as well as they used to. This is called insulin resistance. Becoming resistant to insulin means that the body needs more of it in order to use up the sugar in the blood. Sometimes a woman's body cannot produce enough insulin to keep up. This leads to a sugar buildup in the blood, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Symptoms of gestational diabetes may include: being unusually thirsty Continue reading >>

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